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 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Main
 Back Cover














Title: Florida dairy news
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00082035/00026
 Material Information
Title: Florida dairy news
Physical Description: 12 v. : illus. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Dairy Industry Association
Publisher: Cody Publications for Florida Dairy Industry Association.
Place of Publication: Kissimmee Fla
Publication Date: November-December 1954
Frequency: bimonthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Dairying -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Cattle   ( lcsh )
Milk   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-12, no. 1; Nov. 1950-Spring, 1962.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00082035
Volume ID: VID00026
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01386090
issn - 0426-5696

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Main
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Back Cover
        Page 37
        Page 38
Full Text





















t,5" jefl


Florida's State 4-H Dairy Judging Team,


1st In Chicago International Dairy Show (see page 21)


10 s (6 r rti u g







"EL ECTROBDRAI
Patent Pending

The

SURGE

Automatic

High-Velocity

Push Button

Pipeline Washer


"The right routine
locked up in a box
that has no key"


ELECTROBRAIN is a fully automatic timing de-
vice designed specifically to handle the cycles of
C. I. P. (Cleaned In Place) washing of milk lines
and milking equipment.
Electrobrain is never hurried -never forgets
- is never careless. The right and accepted rou-
tine is the only one that it knows.


BABSON BROS. CO.
2843 W. 19th St., Chicago 23, III.
ATLANTA HOUSTON KANSAS CITY MINNEAPOLIS SACRAMENTO SEATTLE
I Babson Bros. Co., 2843 W. 19th St., Chicago 23, II., Dept. FDN
I Please send me further details on ELECTROBRAIN. for ful
I have __ cows.
R I am interested in a pipeline system.
I O I have a pipeline now installed. bref
I NAME___ Surge
S(Pleas.e Print) "CleaJ
ADDRESS ._ ____ _
L g m m mm --- - m


Copyright 1954
SSYRACUSE TORONTO

rher information on
CITROURAIP
this blank for a
booklet on the new
system of pipeline
ning in Place."







2 out of 3 cows give up to


20% MORE MILK on LARRO SUREMILK!


Get Up To 2000-Lbs.
More Milk Per Lactation
When Fed As Directed!
General Mills checked over 100 thou-
sand production records and proved
2 out of 3 cows actually undermilk
as much as 20% !
What Is SureMilk?
Larro SUREMILK contains a variety
of proteins, plus energy, minerals
and trace minerals needed for rumen
bacterial activity, so that the cow
may milk her best. Feeding Larro
SUREMILK is one sure way to give
your cows the right amounts of
every known milk-making ingre-
dient needed.
M-S-F Included
Building a balanced ration with
SUREMILK or SUREMILK 32 and
grain gives your cows M-S-F, the
mysterious Milk Stimulating Factor
found in lush grasses. Some of the
best sources of M-S-F are included
in SUREMILK to give milk flow a
"push" for high milk production all
year round.
Mineral Feeding Stopped!
SUREMILK and SUREMILK 32 both
contain Larromin, General Mills'
own trace mineral formula. Regard-
less of soil or roughage conditions,
you feed no extra minerals with
SUREMILK.
The figures show that 2 out of 3 cows
undermilk as much as 20%, so why
take chances? Feed Larro SUREMILK
or SUREMILK 32 and grain as
directed, the Larro rations that in-
creased milk flow up to 20% and
more!


20 CAUSED BY
1s UNDERFEEDING.-
10 I I I
Days 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 Days
in milk
The top graph represents an actual production of a good cow which dropped off in production too
fast because of inadequate feed. The lower graph is what this cow should have produced if she
had milked to her inherited ability. If fed with SUREMILK, the peaks and valleys would smooth out
and she would produce closer to her bred-in ability as shown by the smooth line in the lower
graph. Your good cows may be undermilking, too. Do you know? Better feed SUREMILK.
Lbs.
j55 WHEN SUREMILK
5so GIVES YOU COWS THAT


15
10
Days 30 60 90 120 150 180
in milk
Satisfaction Guarantee
If after feeding Larro SUREMILK or
SUREMILK 32 you are not com-
pletely satisfied, notify your Larro
Dealer or salesman. He'll arrange
to pick up the unused feed and re-
fund its purchase price.


A well-fed cow will produce about
12 tons of manure annually. At
about $2.50 per ton, it's worth $30 a
year. Twenty cows will give you
about $600.00 worth of valuable
manure each year.


NOVEMBER


210 240 270 300 330 360 Days
SM-1-54


General Mills
MINNEAPOLIS 1, MINNESOTA

& DECEMBER, 1954 0 1


MONEY SAVING
DAIRY TIPS
by Steve Carter
isa of General Mills


Increase your returns from the dairy herd by culling un-
y profitable cows. One cow producing 400 Ibs. butterfat per
" year is as profitable as three cows producing 200 lbs.
Raking alfalfa at the right time reduces leaf losses . .
may save you up to 30% of the crop. Leaves contain
70% of the protein and about 90% of the carotene in the
alfalfa so keep the leaves from shattering. Windrow the
cut alfalfa after it wilts; but before it gets too dry.






NOW! A NEW "KITCHEN COMPARISON" SURVEY PROVES


2 out of 3 housewives


prefer Caneo Snap Cap


milk cartons!


In New Orleans survey (August, '54) housewives
were given a 4-day supply of milk in both Canco
Snap Cap cartons and another familiar fibre carton.
More than twice as many preferred Canco Snap Cap.
And-this survey was made in an area where the
Canco carton has only recently been introduced.


HERE0 'S0'HW THE V TED ONEACH
IIMPORTj AN T FEATURE


Canco


Carton X


No preference
or don't know


Easier to open 93% 6% 1%

Easier to store 59% 1% 40%

Better for pouring 56% 39% 5%


Easier to pick up and carry 27% 32% 41%

Better closing 69% 27% 4%

Easier for children 83% 15% 2%

Better protection for milk 33% 27% 40%


I HERE'S HOW THEYVOTED


Canco Snap Cap milk carton


Preferred by
68%


Preferred by
Fibre milk carton "X" 32% j



This scientific new survey was conducted
by an independent outside organization on
an entirely different and improved basis.
All the housewives in the survey were
given a four-day supply of milk of the
same brand-the same amount equally
divided between Canco Snap Cap cartons
and familiar milk carton "X". Then they
were asked which they preferred and why.
Canco Snap Cap carton came out way
ahead. This was after the whole family
had ample opportunity to compare both
types of cartons for ease of opening and
pouring . ease of handling and storing
and other features.
This is proof again that Canco Snap Cap
milk cartons are a positive selling asset
for your brand.
For full information about this survey
and its results, write Fibre Milk Container
Dept., 100 Park Avenue, N. Y. C.


FLIP-it's open!
SNAP-it's closed!


AMERICAN CAN COMPANY
The milk container women really prefer!


2 NOVEMBER & DECEMBER, 1954








EDITORIALS


Is A New Model Needed For 1955?
Every avenue of public information reminds us of the approach of a new
year, new models and a new look in many of those things closely affecting
our business, our homes and our daily living.
Those of us whose investments and interests are in the dairy industry
are more fortunate in the fact that the products of the industry do not need
new models with the changing seasons nor with the coming and going of
the years.
These products were nature's most nearly perfect food from the begin-
ning.
Where, then, in this most essential industry with a product that it is
never out-moded, is there a place and a need for a new model? The answer
is one about which alert leaders of the industry have been speaking, writing
and conferring with increasing conviction and, in some instances, not with-
out alarm.
What is it then the dairy industry needs in the way of a "new model"
for the new year and for the problems which lie ahead?
If we have interpreted correctly what we have heard among our leaders,
what we have read and observed, the "new model" most needed for the
goad of the Florida dairy industry and for those who are a part of the in-
dustry is a new model of "Understanding, trust, ethics, cooperation, fair
play and courage to practice the Golden Rule."
There is considerable opinion, too, that the New Year may have prob-
lems in store which will require more "hanging together" to avoid "hang-
ing separately".

To our Contributors and Advertisers
The success which the Dairy News has enjoyed for the past four years
could not have been possible without the splendid assistance of the many
contributors to our editorial and news copy and the splendid cooperation of
our advertisers.
To these, the editor and the Dairy News Advisory Committee of F.D.A.
wish to express our sincere appreciation.


VOL. 4 NO. 6
NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 1954
BI-MONTHLY


FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS
I| |||E. T. LAY, Editor & Business Manager


Official Publication of
Florida Dairy Association

Florida Guernsey Cattle Club

Florida Jersey Cattle Club
Florida Holstein Cattle Club

Florida Association
of Milk Sanitarians

DIRECTORS
FLORIDA DAIRY ASSOCIATION
E. T. LAY, Executive Director
W. HERMAN BOYD, President, Miami
Producers
GEORGE F. JOHNSON, West Palm Beach
Vice President & Chairman
"Producers Council"
D. WAYNE WEBB, Tampa
JOHN SERGEANT, Lakeland
L. B. HULL, Micanopy
BILL GRAHAM, Miami
JOHN T. ADKINSON, Pensacola
IRA BARROW, New Smyrna Beach
J. H. ADAMS, Jacksonville
J. D. FUQUA, Altha
JOHN MCMULLEN, Clearwater

Distributors
CLIFF D. WAYNE, Miami
Vice President & Chairman
"Distributors Council"
HERMAN BURNETT, Bradenton
J. N. McARTHUR, Miami
H. CODY SKINNER, Jacksonville
JOHN M. HOOD, St. Petersburg
W. J. BARRITT, JR., Tampa
J. F. W. ZIRKLEBACH, Pensacola
JOHN TRIPSON, Vero Beach
GEORGE BOUTWELL, Lake Worth
CLAUDE KELLY, Daytona Beach
Additional Directors
F. W. DECKLAR, President
"Alligator Club," Tampa
WILMER BASSETT, Past-Pres., Monticello

THE FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS is
published bi-monthly by the Florida Dairy
Association, 220 Newnan St., Jackson-
ville, Florida. Subscription price of $1.00
a year. Entered as second class mail at
the Post Office at Jacksonville, Fla.,
under Act of March 3, 1879, as amended.
Business and Editorial office, 220 New-
nan Street, Jacksonville.
NATIONAL EDITORIAL
er Foria Prs A ATION


Member Florida Press Association


NOVEMBER & DECEMBER, 1954 3









1hristmas
GREETINGS AND BEST

WISHES FOR THE

NEW YEAR TO OUR

FRIENDS OF THE

DAIRY INDUSTRY


1954


We congratulate you on your
excellent publication "THE FLORIDA
DAIRY NEWS" which we take pride
in numbering among those we serve.


THE CONVENTION PRESS
PRINTERS & TYPOG(RAPHERS ,~ JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA


4 0 NOVEMBER & DECEMBER, 1954










A TRIBUTE TO


DR. JOHN S. ALLEN

Acting President UniverAity of Floida


CG^A^


By: The Board of Directors
FLORIDA DAIRY ASSOCIATION


F OR A number of years the Florida Dairy Association has demonstrated that it
believes in giving recognition for meritorious service and outstanding leadership,
both among those of the Florida dairy industry and those closely associated with it.
At a recent meeting of the Florida Dairy Association's Board of Directors, a
resolution was adopted awarding the Association's second "Honorary Membership"
to Dr. John S. Allen, Acting President of the University of Florida. The resolution,
which pays high tribute to Dr. Allen on behalf of the Florida dairy industry, is
given herewith in full:
RESOLUTION
"WHEREAS, Dr. John S. Allen, during his years of service as Vice Presi-
dent of the University of Florida and during the past year as Acting President,
has demonstrated a keen and sincere interest in the agricultural life and problems
and development of Florida and particularly of the dairy industry, and
"WHEREAS, Dr. Allen has endeared himself to the members of the Florida
Dairy Association through his personal attention to and participation in the
various events and programs in dairy training and education conducted under
the auspices of the University of Florida and the Association, and
"WHEREAS, In recognition of this friendship and cooperation, as well as
his capable and constructive leadership for many years as Vice President and
during the past year as Acting President of the University of Florida, the Florida
Dairy Association desires to pay tribute to Dr. Allen.
"THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED That the Florida Dairy Association
hereby elects Dr. John S. Allen an 'Honorary Member' thereby extending to him
all rights and privileges of the Association."
WM. HERMAN BOYD, President
E. T. LAY, Secretary
Adopted By the Board of Directors
September 16, 1954


SDR. ALLEN, who is a native of Indi-
ana, received his B.A. degree in 1928 at
Earlham College, his M.A. degree in As-
tronomy in 1929 at the University of
Minnesota and his Ph.D. degree in 1936
at New York University.
His wide experience in educational
work includes teaching and administrative
work at the University of Minnesota and
Colgate University where he was Dean of
Freshmen, extensive service as lecturer
and consultant in Astronomy and Science,
and from 1942 to 1948 he served as Di-
rector of the Division of Higher Educa-
tion of the New York State Department
of Education.
He came to the University of Florida
in 1948 as Vice President in which capac-
ity he served until appointed Acting
President in November, 1953 following
the death of President Miller.
Dr. Allen is author and co-author of a
number of books and has had numerous
articles published on astronomy, higher
education and veterans' education.
His many affiliations include Phi Delta
Kappa, Lambda Chi Alpha, Sigma Xi and
Kiwanis. His latest affiliation, "The
Florida Dairy Association."


Association Honors
Leaders
Since 1947, outstanding leaders of the
Florida dairy industry have been elected
members of the Association's leadership
club, known as "The Order of Bell
Cows," of which A. R. Nielsen of West
Palm Beach was the first member and
who serves as its permanent chairman.
Others named "Bell Cow" members
are: F. D. A. Past Presidents Ernest
Graham, Miami; Theo Datson, Orlando;
John DuPuis, Jr., Miami; Cotton Paul,
Jacksonville; Vernon Graves, Tampa, and
the late Sam Solomon, Sr.
Other dairy members are J. O. Bowen,
past president Florida Dairy Products As-
sociation, and T. G. Lee, past president
Florida Dairymen's Association.
Members not dairymen are Col. B. F.
Castle, Milk Industry Foundation; Dr.
E. L. Fouts, Head of Dairy Department,
University of Florida; C. W. Reaves,
Florida State Extension Dairyman; John
M. Scott, Florida Chief Dairy Supervisor,
and the late Dr. J. Hillis Miller, who was
president of the University of Florida.
Two members of the industry have
been elected lifetime "Honorary Direc-
tors" and one not a member of the in-
dustry, Dr. J. Hillis Miller, the late Presi-
dent of the University of Florida, was
elected "Honorary Member" of the
Association.
"Honorary Junior Membership" was
recently extended to a number of 4-H and
FFA members for outstanding accom-
plishments in the dairy program of their
respective groups in Florida.


NOVEMBER & DECEMBER, 1954 0 5


~Ei~PS~II~ IfCI-arl







Honor State's Dairy Supervisor
On 25th Anniversary of Department
BELOW, LEFT, Mr. John M. Scott is seen cutting the Silver Anniversary Cake
celebrating 25 years operation of the State Dairy Inspection Service and his 25 years
service as Chief Dairy Supervisor.
AT RIGHT, Commissioner of Agriculture Nathan Mayo is seen as he offered a
toast to Mrs. John Al. Scott and praised the 25 years service of Mr. Scott as head of the
Dairy Division of the Dept. of Agriculture.

-I6~Sl~b


Rapid Growth of Dairy Industry Disclosed
In Tribute To State Supervisor John M. Scott
FLORIDA'S Chief Dairy Supervisor for the past 25 years, Mr. John M. Scott, was
appropriately honored at a Silver Anniversary Dinner given him by the members of
his staff the evening of October 7th in Gainesville.
Commissioner of Agriculture Mr. Nathan Mayo, who named Mr. Scott to the
position which he has held for the past 25 years, was the principal speaker of the
occasion and his son, Nat Mayo, General Supervising Inspector of the State Depart-
ment of Agriculture, acted as toast master.
Mrs. Scott, Mrs. Nathan Mayo and Mrs. Nat Mayo were honor guests.


Other guests were Mr. W. H. Boyd of
Miami, President of the Florida Dairy
Association, E. T. Lay, Executive Secre-
tary of the Association, and Mrs. Lay;
Dr. E. L. Fouts, Head of the Department
of Dairy Science, University of Florida,
and Mrs. Fouts; Mr. H. G. Clayton,


Director of Extension Service, Univer-
sity of Florida; Lee Thompson, Chief
Auditor and Jack Shoemaker, Assistant to
Mr. Brooks of Commissioner Mayo's of-
fice, Tallahassee, and F. W. Risher, Dairy
and Poultry Specialist of the State Mar-
keting Bureau, Jacksonville.


Members of Mr. Scott's staff who at-
tended were: Mrs. Ora Stanley, chief of
the office staff and her assistants, Miss
Mary Goodbred, Miss Louise Parker and
Mrs. Marjorie Schisler; Field Supervisors
and Inspectors, Lewis T. Smith and Mrs.
Smith, Jacksonville; Alex Shaw and Mrs.
Shaw, Tallahassee; John D. Robinson and
Mrs. Robinson, Tampa; R. R. Hood and
Mrs. Hood, Pensacola; J. W. Saunders
and Mrs. Saunders, Key West; Lester E.
Ford and Mrs. Ford, Miami; and H. H.
Rothe and Mrs. Rothe, Gainesville.
Reviews Florida Dairy Laws
In explaining the reason for designat-
ing the meeting as celebration of the
"Silver Anniversary" of the Dairy Divis-
ion of the State Department of Agricul-
ture, the master of ceremonies, Mr. Nat
Mayo, related the history of the State's
milk and dairy products laws which were
passed by the State Legislature and be-
came effective October 1, 1929, twenty-
five years ago.
This marked the beginning of the
Dairy Division and its duties of inspect-
ing and supervising the production and
processing of milk and milk products.
Mr. John M. Scott was then intro-
duced as the man appointed under this
law by the Commissioner of Agriculture
in 1929 as Chief Dairy Supervisor to or-
ganize the Department and administer the
provisions of the new law. Mayo dis-
closed that at the time of his appoint-
ment, Mr. Scott had been associated with
the University of Florida for a number
of years as a professor in husbandry. Also
that he was a native of Kansas and a
graduate of Kansas State College.
Outlines Dairy Development
After officiating at the cutting and
serving of the Silver Anniversary Cake
which had been provided by members
of his staff, Mr. Scott reviewed the early
organization of the Dairy Department
and its expansion through the 25 year.;
along with the growth and development
of the dairy industry.
(Continued on Page 16)


IhTe Silver Anniversary Dinner of the Dairy Division, State Dept. of Agric


6 0 NOVEMBER & DECEMBER, 1954

























NEW LOW-COST
FIELD CUTTER
It mows, clips and chops grass, heavy
weeds or light brush-leaves a well-chop-
ped protective mulch. Works down cover
crops and residues of corn, cotton, to-
bacco and vegetables. Aids clean plowing.
Has hydraulic control. Mounts on Case
Eagle Hitch or other 3-point hook-ups.


NEW CASE
BUSH AND BOG HARROW
Has pivot action to disk evenly around
curves. Its big 24-inch blades, spaced 9
inches apart, chop through and mix trash,
light brush or palmettoes. Set nearly
straight, and with dirt boxes loaded, it
cuts deep to renovate old sod.


(:,
exi


*T'4

g.'.


NEW CASE
FERTILIZER SPREADER
Flexible fingers keep feed openings clear
for steady flow even when fertilizer is
damp and lumpy. Full-floating rotors come
out for easy cleaning. Spreader holds 16
bags, spreads 10 feet wide, from 10 to
3,500 pounds per acre. Easily equipped
for row-crop band applications.


NEW LOW-COST
UTILITY HARVESTER
Cuts and loads grass or legumes for green
feeding or silage. It's easy to maneuver-
hydraulic control adjusts cutting height,
lifts for turning, backing or transport. An
over-running clutch lets you speed it up
before entering the crop.


\ '40
N, ..


I; 1i';~~.P~1


SE YOU CAS DELE .. AS FO A DEOSR


BELLE GLADE
Coastal Motors & Equipment
COCOA
Hibbs Tractor Co.
DADE CITY
Moss Tractor Co.
FORT MYERS
Ray Moore Implement Co.
FORT PIERCE
Taylor & Munnell Inc.
HIGH SPRINGS
Thomas Equipment Co.
HOMESTEAD
Dade Tractor Co.


LAKELAND
Pounds Tractor Co.
LIVE OAK
Grantham Chevrolet
MARIANNA
Andreason Tractor & Equip.
MILTON
Gerlach Motor Co.
ORLANDO
Medlock Tractor Co.
PALATKA
Beasley Tractor Co.
POMPANO BEACH
Farm Machinery Sales


SEBRING
Pounds-Zeiss Motor Co.
TAMPA
Thompson Tractor & Equip.
WAUCHULA
Cosey Motor Co.
WEST PALM BEACH
Buckner Tractor & Equip.
WINTER GARDEN
Pounds Motor Co.
WINTER HAVEN
Pounds Tractor Co.


NOVEMBER & DECEMBER, 1954 0 7


NEW




for





Florida


il


~~rrz~-~1 j;S;T~-
s :






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


DAIRY REVIEW


Extension Service Dairy Products Laboratory
Dairy Farm Research Unit Agricultural Experiment Station

ilow To Avoid Watered Milk
Dr. H. H. WILKOWSKE
Associate Dairy Technologist
Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
APPROXIMATELY 13 per cent of milk is composed of butterfat, carbohydrates,
proteins, minerals and vitamins, which together make up our most nearly perfect food.
The butterfat and other solids of milk are combined in such proportion to supply a
well-balanced and nutritious food of unequalled quality. Today,
with our scientific knowledge of nutrition, no one dares to chal-
lenge the fact that milk is second-to-none as an ideal, inexpensive
food product, especially when due credit is given to the total nutri-
tional benefits that are present in the part of milk which is not
water.
Normal whole milk contains approximately 87 per cent water.
The water present in milk serves as a carrier for the solids and fat
portion of milk but does not supply any calories or satisfy other
nutrient requirements.
WILKOWSKE The legal definition
of milk clearly recog-
nizes that milk contains a large percentage important to emphasize that possibly milk
of water. The Florida Law states that may accidentally be adulterated with water
milk must have at least 3.25 per cent which was not done deliberately. It is
butterfat and 8.5 per cent solids-not-fat, possible to detect as little as 3 per cent of
which recognizes that milk may have as added water in milk with a very sensitive
much as 88.25 per cent water. (Some laboratory device known as the cryoscope.
Florida municipalities require up to 4.0 Even less than 3 per cent of added water
per cent butterfat.) Furthermore, the law can be detected if some of the non-adul-
states that nothing may be added to, or terated milk is available to serve as a
taken from, the milk. When milk is sold control sample when conducting the cryo-
the composition must be the same as scopic measurements.
when it came from the cow. Since Jersey The cryoscope measures the freezing
and Guernsey breeds predominate in Flor- point of milk. The normal freezing point
ida, much of the Florida produced milk of milk is relatively constant, so any var-
contains more than 4.0 per cent fat and iation from the normal freezing point in-
in excess of 9 per cent solids-not-fat. dicates that the milk is of abnormal com-
position. Added water will bring about
Strict Regulations an abnormal freezing point. Generally a
Regulatory officials are very strict in re- higher freezing point than normal is in-
quiring that no additional water gain en- terpreted to mean that excessive water is
trance into milk. Such dilution would de- present in the milk.
crease the nutritive value of milk as well
as being contrary to law. If milk becomes Milk from individual cows have been
watered, either intentionally or accident- reported to test as much as 5 per cent
ally, the milk is considered adulterated ac- added water when it was definitely
cording to the law. known that no water was added. Varia-
Everyone would agree that deliberate tions in the freezing point of milk from
Everyaddition of would after to milk should not deliberate individual animals, however, will be min-
addition of water to milk should not be imized when milk from a number of cows
condoned since such actions reflect un- is mied together. Thelk from a numberage freezing cows
favorably upon the entire dairy industry. p oin t of blended milk from a herd geng
Unfortunately, in years past the practice rally will tend to remain more constant
of watering milk was so common that erally will tend to remain more constant
eve n today some consumers think dairy- and more in agreement with the average
even today some consumers think dairy- freezing point of all milk which is used
men deliberately add water to milk. At freezing point of all milk which is used
men deliberately add water to milk. At as the basis of interpretation of the cryo-
the present time very little, if any, inten- a e bass of the o-s c
tional adulteration of milk by additions scopic readings.
of water is taking place. There are several ways in which water
may accidently gain entrance into milk.
Accidental Watering This water, to greater or lesser degrees
Since it is possible to detect small will alter the freezing point of the milk.
amounts of added water in milk, it seems To prevent such accidental adulteration a


great deal of care should be exercised in
the production and processing of the
milk.
Rinsing of Equipment
In recent years one of the greatest
problems has been the matter of rinsing
pipe line milkers with water after milk-
ing to force all the milk out of the pipes.
The lines should be so arranged that all
milk will flow out the lines by gravity
with no need for rinsing after milking. It
is better to lose the small amount of milk
adhering to the pipes than to risk the
danger of watering the milk.
It has been reported that on one dairy
farm a milker failed to cut off the vacuum
while rinsing and sanitizing the teat cups.
Presumably this was in a milking parlor
arrangement. Such carelessness caused a
considerable amount of dilution of milk
until this incorrect cleaning procedure
was discovered.
Rinsing of equipment such as milk
coolers, bulk storage tanks and plant
equipment will result in watered milk.
Such rinsing of equipment just prior to
use will naturally leave small amounts of
water on the equipment which will even-
tually get mixed into the milk. Sanitizing
solutions or rinse water should be very
carefully and thoroughly drained from
all equipment before use. This is par-
ticularly important with respect to low
spots in vats, tanks, troughs or pipe lines
where it remains unnoticed because it can-
not be seen.
The practice of adding a small amount
of water to the farm tank or the tank
truck to follow the milk through the milk
lines will invariably result in entrance of
some water into the milk. This practice
should be avoided to prevent water gain-
ing entrance into the milk.
In the plant it is a common practice to
push the last of the milk through the
high-temperature short-time pasteurizers
with water to flush out all the milk. Some
of the milk-water mixture will get into
the milk unless a great deal of care is
taken to avoid the entry of water into the
milk, even at the risk of losing a small
amount of milk which remains in the
system.
SIt is obvious that the addition of a
little water at each of the various danger
points mentioned above might add up to
give a freezing point equal to a consider-
able percentage of added water. Perhaps
none of the water was added deliberately
to defraud, but nevertheless, might be
present in the milk due to carelessness.
Freezing point trouble can be avoided by
an intelligent approach to the problem.
When all of the above mentioned items
are carefully considered and avoided there
will be very little chance for an unusual
freezing point to occur in the farm or
plant milk supply.


8 NOVEMBER & DECEMBER, 1954






















r I,'- ;-r.wer~ -. .. cwUr. r".. r j -~. Th' 'r ....r." ,.r l.. .. ) A"
This group indicates the splendid attendance at the 17th Annual Conference and Short Course for Dairy Plant Superintendents and assistants at
the University of Florida. The picture was taken on the lawn of the Dairy Science Building where the conference was held.


Over 90 Attend 3-Day Conference
On Dairy Plant Operation at U. of F.

T HE 17TH annual Dairy Plant Superintendents' Conference and Short Course
sponsored jointly by the Department of Dairy Science and the Dairy Plant Op-
erations Committee of the Florida Dairy Association was held at the Dairy Products
Laboratory on the University campus at Gainesville on October 14, 15 and 16, 1954.
More than ninety persons representing the Dairy Industry and Allied Trades
registered for this event. The majority of those in attendance were from Florida, but
many came from Georgia, Alabama, North Carolina and Havana, Cuba.
Old timers of the group observed that it was the best of the Plant Problems


Conference to date.
Many of the industry's foremost leaders
appeared on the program among which
were Mr. Farnum M. Gray of Southern
Dairies, Charlotte, N. C., Mr. Milton
Gelbman of Foremost Dairies, Jackson-
ville, Fla., Dr. Ed. M. Searls of National
Dairies, New York, Mr. Joseph F. Flynn,
Ex Cell 0 Corporation, Detroit, Mr.
Claude B. Wells, Jr., of Stein, Hall and
Co., New York, and Mr. George Tworo-
ger of the Borden Co., Miami.
Members of the Dairy Science Staff,
University of Florida, participating as
speakers on the program were Dr. E. L.
Fouts, Head of the Department, Dr. R.
B. Becker and Prof. Walter Krienke.
Among the important subjects on the pro-
gram were: (a) Problems with HTST
Pasteurization of Ice Cream Mix, (b) Pro-
fits in Ice Cream, (c) Problems in Manu-
facture and Selling Soft Ice Cream,
(d) Effect of Feeding on Composition of
Milk, (e) Interpreting the Results of the
Cryoscope, (f) In-Place-Cleaning, (g)
Synchronizing Plant Operations, (h) Prac-
tical Aspects of Maintaining Paper Fill-
ing Machinery, (i) Insect and Rodent
Control in Dairy Plants.
A clinic on cultured buttermilk was
added to this year's program in place of
the ice cream clinic which has been held
annually for many years in the past. The
overall quality of the twenty samples sub-
mitted for judging and analysis was con-
sidered excellent by a panel of qualified
judges selected from the industry and the
Dairy Science Staff.


Exactly one hundred persons attended
the annual banquet and heard the guest
speaker, Dr. Russell S. Poor, Provost for
the J. Hillis Miller Memorial Health


Center, describe the plans and proposed
functions of this new and important ad-
dition to the University of Florida facili-
ties. Dr. H. H. Wilkowske, the genial
master of ceremonies, introduced the guest
speaker and other honored guests from
the Dairy Industry.
A business meeting of the F.D.A.
Dairy Plant Operations Committee took
place immediately following the adjourn-
ment of the regular session to make pre-
liminary plans for the 18th Annual Con-
ference to be held in the fall, 1955.
More than half of those in attendance
remained after the short course to see an
exciting football game at Florida Field
between the University of Florida and the
University of Kentucky.


DAIRY SCIENCE MARCHES ON 1954
By: DR. R. B. BECKER
Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Part II of a special summary of the proceedings of the 49th annual meeting of American
Dairy Science Association which was held at Pennsylvania State University, June 22-24,
THE 49TH annual meeting of the American Dairy Science Association, at Pennsyl-
vania State University in June, 1954 was attended well. Part one of this summary
which appeared in the July-August issue of Florida Dairy News discussed the key
talk by the Honorable Ezra Taft Benson, Secretary of Agriculture.
The Extension Section program dealt with timely topics. This syn-
opsis deals with the Manufacturing Section program, split into
Stwo sections, and entailing 66 technical papers. There were 12
papers dealing with milk bacteria, 7 with casein, 6 with milk fat,
13 with five kinds of cheese, 5 each with oxidized flavor of milk
-and enzymes. Other fields were dried and condensed milks, de-
tecting adulterations of milk, buffer capacity, action of ultrasonic
waves on milk products, bactericides, heat, etc.
ACTIVITIES of casein
BEC i and other milk pro- their ability to attack a number of carbo-
BECKER teins as affected by hydrates.
bacteria, heat, and certain salts are un- Some chemical bactericides had little
der investigation at California, Illinois, action on numbers of bacteria common in
Missouri, Ohio and the Quartermaster milk and milking equipment. As much
research laboratories, as 5 parts per million of chlorine slowed
Missouri workers studied the types of bacterial growth, while 25 p.p.m. added
lactic acid produced in 561 samples of as hypochlorite greatly inhibited growth.
milk and cream-separating gas and non-
gas-producing types, and investigated (Continued on Page I1)


NOVEMBER & DECEMBER, 1954 9








Florida Dairy Cattle Take Honors

At Memphis 4-H Junior Dairy Show
By: T. W. SPARKS
Assistant State Extension Dairyman
M ANY PEOPLE viewed the splendid Florida 4-H Dairy Cattle Exhibit at the
Mid-South National Junior Dairy Show held recently in Memphis, Tennessee.
According to the judges, they were looking at a fine group of dairy cattle. Of the
sixteen animals exhibited, fourteen were placed in the blue ribbon groups. A Jersey,
senior yearling heifer, "Dandy's Delight," owned by Robin Alvarez, Jacksonville,
Florida, stood at the top of a very strong class of senior yearling heifers.
Florida had the only exhibit of Ayrshire cattle at the fair. Charles Addison,
Haines City, showed a fine junior yearling heifer, "Thunder Mae's Betty Ann" to the
Ayrshire Grand Championship, and the cow, "Beacon Magnet's Simmone", exhibited
by Billy Boyd of Miami, was judged Reserve Garnd Champion Ayrshire.
The Florida exhibit placed second in
the Herdsman Award, being judged first
on two of the five major points. First, on
the cleanest exhibit and first on attractive-
ness of exhibit.
Thirty-three Florida people attended
the show, seventeen of which were 4-H
club members.
Polk and Jackson Counties were repre-
sented in the Dairy Judging Contest.
Both county teams placed in the money.
4-H'ers judging for Jackson County were
Martin Schack, William Schack and
Charles Crutchfield and Earl Crutchfield.
Polk County was represented by Charles
Addison, Ginger Stuart and Caroline
Stuart. "',.
The Florida Jersey Cattle Club and the 'H
Florida Dairy Association helped finance
the trip. The Dade County Agricultural
Department and Mr. M. T. Crutchfield,
Jersey breeder from Marianna, provided
trucks, and breeders furnished other show
equipment.
The cattle were tended by two Assistant
County Agents and two 4-H boys. Agents
were Mr. R. K. Price, Dade County, and
Mr. L. D. Taylor, Jackson County. 4-
H'ers were Charles Addison, Polk, and .. ..I
Earl Crutchfield, Jackson. T. W. Sparks,
Assistant Extension Dairyman, was in
charge of the exhibit.
Parents of 4-H members and others
accompanying the group as leaders were:
Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Sellers, Tallahassee,
Mrs. J. K. Stuart, Bartow, Mr. and Mrs.
A. T. Alvarez, Jacksonville, Mrs. Paul
Simmons, Orangedale, W. W. Glenn,
Jackson County Agent, M. T. Crutchfield, SENIOR YEARLING HEIFER
Marianna and C. W. Reaves, State Ex- Jester Royal's Gushing Bell,
tension Dairyman. Erny Sellers, Tallahassee


FLORIDA PLACINGS
AT MEMPHIS SHOW
JERSEYS-Blue Ribbons
6 YEAR OLD COW
Ena Senation Ann
William Schack, Greenwood
2 YEAR OLD COW
Favor King Dolly Dee
Erny Sellers, Tallahassee
SENIOR YEARLING HEIFER
Dandy's Delight
Robin Alvarez, Jacksonville
SENIOR YEARLING HEIFER
Alpine Basil Beauty
Ted Kretzschmar, Miami


SENIOR YEARLING HEIFER
Children Wonderful Jester Rose
Brenda Dennison, Orlando
SENIOR YEARLING HEIFER
Alpine Treva Xenia Nancy
Earl Crutchfield, Grand Ridge
SENIOR HEIFER CALF
Sybil A. Signal Rosa
Ginger Stuart, Bartow
JUNIOR HEIFER CALF
Alpine Fillpail Elsie
Ernest Fischer, Orlando
JUNIOR HEIFER CALF
Standard Sir Dream Laura
John H. Talton, Jr., Orlando


MILK Made The Difference

MEMPHIS SHOW PICTURES Seen Be-
low are: TOP LEFT, "Thunder Mae's
Betty Ann," Junior Yearling, Grand Cham-
pion Ayrshire. Owner: Charles Addison,
Haines City. RIGHT, "Dandy's Delight,"
First Place Senior Yearling. Owner: Robin
Alvarez, Jacksonville. AT BOTTOM is
Florida's 4-H Exhibit which won second in
Herdsman's Award. Owner of cow on left,
William Schack, Marianna.


n"p.


JUNIOR HEIFER CALF
Sybil Baronet Bellflower
Olin Fischer, Orlando
JERSEYS-Red Ribbons
2 YEAR OLD COW
Patricia Dreaming Beau
Martin Schack, Greenwood
JUNIOR YEARLING HEIFER
Holly Caesar Brocade
Ginger Stuart, Bartow
AYRSHIRES-Blue Ribbons
7 YEAR OLD COW
Beacon Magnet's Simmons
Billy Boyd, Miami
JUNIOR YEARLING HEIFER
Thunder Mae's Betty Ann
Charles Addison, Haines City
SENIOR HEIFER CALF
Maiden Hill Butterhay's Kate
Bill Parent, Oneca


10 NOVEMBER & DECEMBER, 1954






Dairy Science
Marches On 1954
(Continued from Page 9)
The present pasteurization standards of
1430 F. for 30 minutes, and 1610 F. for
15 seconds afforded a wide margin of
safety in thermal death point of eight
strains of Brucella abortus. Montana work-
ers found that high counts of coliform
bacteria could be traced to unsanitary
practices or improperly cleaned equip-
ment between the pasteurizer and the
filler.
Cottage cheese and cultured milk were
made successfully by Wisconsin workers,
using a frozen-dried preparation of lac-
tic starter. This preparation has been car-
ried in storage with only slight loss of ac-
tivity. Fortifying skimmilk with nonfat
dry milk solids increased yields and ease
of handling cottage cheese at Land 0'
Lakes Creameries research laboratory. Of
the reports on Cheddar cheese, use of
ultrasonic waves to accelerate rate of
ripening was among the newer research
methods. Five papers dealt with Swiss,
Mozzarrelle (Italian), and a low fat soft
ripened cheese which has had good con-
sumer acceptance as a soft spreadable
cheese.
Professor F. W. Bennett at the Uni-
versity of Georgia found dipping teat
cup inflations of the milking machine
into a quarternary ammonium compound
more effective in low bacteria counts of
the rinsings, than dipping into hypochlor-
ite solution or tap water. The hypochlor-
ite solution declined in effectiveness as
much as 85 percent during milking of
a herd.
Cleaner solutions having salts that pre-
cipitated in hard water produced the larg-
est amounts of milk stone on dairy equip-
ment.
Several reports dealt with various
phases of the market milk industry. Flor-
ida workers found that feeding Mena-
dione at three levels to dairy cows for 20
to 28 days did not affect normal rate of
milk souring by lactic bacteria. Milk from
cows on certain non-succulent experimen-
tal rations had a reduced susceptibility to
develop oxidized flavor in the laboratory.
Amber bottles protected the flavor of
milk exposed in sunlight better than did
white bottles. The character of the feed
appeared to Cornell workers to relate di-
rectly to the susceptibility of milk to de-
velop oxidized flavor.
Abbott's Dairies tested the enzyme lac-
tase which slowly hydrolyses milk sugar
(lactose) to glucose and galactose. When
processed milk solids not fat were used
up to 13 15 percent in ice cream, the
latter did not become "sandy" (Lactose
crystalization) even on four months' stor-
age.
(Continued on Page 34)


POWDER


Here's why
you'll like B-K best...
Mild to udders, hands
Safe to utensils
Fast acting
Low cost sanitation
Combats mastitis
Leaves no milkstone

For latest information on practical dairy
sanitation, write to:
B-K Dept., Pennsylvania Salt Mfg. Co.
East: 585 Widener Bldg., Phila. 7, Pa.
West: 2168 Shattuck Ave., Berkeley 4, Calif.


34 to36


soon after the end
of the milking period


Using a direct, efficient refriger-
ation system, Mojonnier Bulk
Coolers cool the milk to low tem-
peratures soon after the end of
the milking period. Temperature
rise during the second milking is
held to a very minimum with
Mojonnier Bulk Coolers.
As a result, Mojonnier Bulk
Coolers produce quality bulk milk
at the lowest possible operating
cost.
All stainless steel Mojonnier
Bulk Coolers with round bottom
design insure calibration stability
plus easy cleaning.


Combat Mastitis

with B%

Wipe cows' udders with a B-K solution
before milking. Acts to prevent infec-
tion of healthy cows and contamination
of milk.
At the strength recommended for mas-
titis control, B-K solutions act to kill
mastitis germs. Yet B-K is mild to cows'
udders, easy on hands and utensils.
B-K need not be rinsed from utensils
-leaves no milkstone-imparts no odor
or flavor to milk-does not affect starter
cultures. Use B-K to sanitize utensils
before every milking.
Get B-K Powder from your supplier
today.


mw


Department


Bulletin 290 gladly sent upon request.
Call or write:
MOJONNIER BROS. CO.
4601 W. Ohio St., Chicago 44, Illinois


NOVEMBER & DECEMBER, 1954 11


PRACTICAL DAIRYING ... No. 4


I














re



ABOVE ARE MEMBERS OF THE STATE FFA DAIRY JUDGING TEAM from
the Ocala Chapter who competed in the National FFA Dairy Cattle Judging Contest at
the National Dairy Cattle Congress in October. LEFT TO RIGHT are Al. C. Roche,
chapter leader, Duncan Wright, Carl Magle, Mickey McGee and alternate member
Jimmie Peebles.

Florida Future Farmers Win Honors
In 1954 Dairy Farming Activities
FFA Team Wins Silver Plaque
In National Dairy Judging Contest
B OTH TEAM and individual honors were won by Florida's State 1954 FFA Dairy
Judging Team from the Ocala chapter in the National FFA Dairy Cattle Judging
Contest at Waterloo, Iowa, October 3-5.
In Dairy Cattle Judging, the team won a Silver plaque and individual placings
were as follows: Gold Emblem to Harold McGee, Bronze Emblem to Carl Magle,
and Honorable Mention to Duncan Wright.
In Dairy Products Judging, the team won "Participation" and individual placings
were as follows: Honorable Mention to Duncan Wright and Participation to Carl
Magle and Harold McGee.
The State Department of Agriculture, through Commissioner Nathan Mayo,
provided funds to help defray the expenses of the Team's trip to Waterloo.
Other 1954 FFA Awards winner a Dairy Efficiency Plaque. In
Won In Dairy Farming addition, each district winner receives a
THI: FFA Foundation awards the State $25.00 award from Southern Dairies.
Star Dairy Farmer $100.00 and Southern Harry Fuqua, age 17, in the 12th
Dairies awards him and the top district grade and a member of the Altha FFA


HAVE YOU JOINED

the .


DRINK
3 GLASSES
OF MILK
EVERY DAY


CLUB?

Chapter of Altha High School, who re-
ceived his State Farmer Degree in June,
was the State Star Dairy Farmer Award
Winner for 1954 and received $100.00
from the Future Farmers Foundation and
the Dairy Efficiency Plaque from South-
ern Dairies.
George Ford of the Quincy Chapter
was awarded the Florida Dairy Associa-
tion "Revolving Trophy" for 1954 for
his "Best FFA Dairy Exhibit" at the
Florida State Fair and has received the
coveted "State Star Farmer Award" for
1954. He also received the Southern
Daries "Efficiency Plaque" and $25.00
cash award as "Star FFA Dairy Farmer"
of his district.
Other district "Star Dairy Farmer Win-
ners" in 1954 receiving Southern Dairies'
awards were: Dowlin Black, (Tate) Gon-
zalez; Hillman Goff, (J. F. Williams)
Live Oak; Ronald Hunt, DeLand; Harry
C. Griffin, Bartow; Terry McDavid,
Pompano.


ELSIE AND BEAUREGARD, AMBASSADORS OF GOOD WILL FOR THE "KINGDOM OF COWS" and more particularly
The Borden Dairy, recently paid an important visit to Florida's Capitol at Tallahassee and top State Officials. (1) State Cabinet
Members are seen conferring with the famous pair on the Capitol lawn. LEFT TO RIGHT, are Thos. D. Bailey, Supt. of Public
Instruction; Roy Higgins, representing State Comptroller C. M. Gay; Acting Governor Charley E. Johns; Agricultural Cormmissioner
Nathan Mayo; Attorney General Richard Ervin; State Treasurer Ed Larson and Secretary of State R. A. Gray. (2) Governor-elect
LeRoy Collins and daughter, Darby, receive Elsie and Beauregard at "The Grove," Tallahassee home of the Collins. Curry Bassett,
Borden's Tallahassee Branch Manager, was official host to the bovine visitors.
12 NOVEMBER & DECEMBER, 1954







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NOVEMBER & DECEMBER, 1954 13







Highlights Of Annual Field Day Talks

On Dairy Pastures, Feeds And Forage /,
Succeeding issues of the "Dairy News" will carry Parts 11 and III of this series.
>PRODUCTION OF PASTURE AND FORAGE CROPS-
By DR. J. R. HENDERSON, Extension Agronomist
Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
"The use of pastures and other forage crops for the economical production of
large quantities of high quality roughages is essential to maximum success in the
operation of dairy farms.
"In developing his pasture and forage crops program the individual dairyman
should keep in mind not only his needs for green and dry roughages but also the
possibilities for growing the various pasture and forage crops on his farm. He may
need not only to manage his permanent pastures so as to furnish good grazing and
permit harvesting of hay or silage during the growing seasons of the plants used,
but also to use temporary grazing crops where it is indicated that these can be grown
and will be needed. Regardless of the combination of crops chosen many factors
must be considered, of which the most
important are: varieties; inoculation of was an increase of 434 pounds per cow
legumes; planting rates, dates and meth- over the previous year, while the concen-
ods; liming, fertilization; and water trate fed was reduced by 710 pounds per
control. animal."
"In choosing the crops and varieties to
be grown the following characteristics /( FEEDING FOR MILK PRODUCTION
should be kept in mind: (1) growth WITH CLOVER AND GRASS PASTURE
cycle; (2) growing season; (3) adapta- By: GLENN DATSON
tion to soils and climate; (4) uses to be Datson Dairy Farm, Orlando
made of crop; and (5) yield and quality "Establishment and use of permanent
of the harvested product." Establishment and use of permanent
.~....i-... .~ 1 ........\ .'.- L ^^1. . 11\) ,A ...


INTENSIVE GRASS PROGRAM
By: M. A. SCHACK
Schack Dairy, Greenwood, Fla.
Winner of 1953 "Best Pasture Program" for
Washington Countv in State
Dairy Pasture Contest
"The adoption of an intensive grass-
land farming program on our farm has
improved the quality of forage, increased
milk production, doubled the carrying
capacity of the pasture and reduced the
amount of concentrate and roughages
purchased.
"In 1953, 30 acres of bermuda pasture
were seeded with a mixture of white
clover, black medic, and crimson clover.
Oats and Kenland Red clover were seeded
on 10.5 acres, and rye grass on the re-
maining 18.5 acres. The soil was limed
to a pH of 6.5; 7.3 tons of manure were
scattered per acre; 60 pounds of K,O
were applied in May and again in Septem-
ber, and 3 applications of 33.5 pounds of
nitrogen each were made in January- Feb-
ruary, March-April, and June-July. The
pastures were divided with electric fences
into 6 plots which were grazed rotational-
ly. Animals had access to shade and fresh
water from each area. When all of the
plots were not needed for grazing, the
excess forage was cut for hay.
"Grazing was initiated on January 17
and, in addition to supplying the grazing
requirements of 25 cows, 14 heifers and
13 calves, 17 tons of oat and clover hay,
3.2 tons of rye grass hay, and 8.7 tons of
bermuda grass hay were made during the
year. Milk production (DHIA records)
was 7,392 pounds per cow in 1953, which


tIdaLUr s glasses ) in Lie early 4t s maea
possible a marked reduction in feed cost
and increased the profitableness of my
dairy operation. The highlight of this
grassland program which enabled a re-
duction in feed cost of $17,000 for the
year, was learning how to make maximum
utilization of the pasture and reduce grain
feeding to a minimum. The method em-
ployed to determine the level of grain to
feed was to select 2 or 3 reliable cows
in full milk flow and keep daily weights
of their production. The concentrate al-
lowance was cut until their production
began to drop. After each change in feed
offering one must always let several days
pass (usually 7 to 10) in order to get an
accurate picture of any change in produc-
tion trends. One also must keep close
watch on the pasture to detect any
changes in quality or quantity.
"White clover was added to the pasture
program in 1946 and an irrigation system
was installed in 1949 to insure adequate
soil moisture during the growing season.
"During the best clover season the only
supplemental feed used for the milking
herd is roughage to control bloat. Four
pounds daily per cow of hay, cobs and
shuck or citrus pulp with molasses are
satisfactory for this purpose.
"My present concept of the most prac-
tical pasture improvement program for
this area would be to use a frost-resistant
grass such as coastal bermuda and supple-
ment it with hay. Low cost hay can be
made by fertilizing pangola or coastal
bermuda heavily in October and curing
hay from it in November when the
weather usually is dry."


REDUCING FEED COST ON
MILLET AND CLOVER PASTURE
By: L. B. HULL
Hull Dairy Farm, Gainesville
"Five plantings of millet totaling 40
acres were made at 2-week intervals be-
ginning the first week of March. The
pastures were grazed rotationally, begin-
ning when the plants were about 18
inches tall. One hundred pounds of am-
monium nitrate were applied per acre
when the millet was about 3 inches tall
and again after each of the 3 grazings
made to date. Weeds and stubble were
mowed following each grazing. The pas-
ture has provided continuous grazing
since the first week of April and should
last through the remainder of this month
(September).
"Forty-seven cows on a pasture pre-
dominately carpet grass were placed on
white clover. While on carpet grass the
cows, producing an average of 26.8
pounds of milk daily, were fed 11 pounds
of citrus pulp daily and 1 pound of con-
centrate mixture per 3 pounds of milk
produced. When they were changed to
clover, the concentrate mixture was dis-
continued and only citrus pulp fed.
"Production increased 2 pounds daily
per cow during the first week, but as
clover growth was slowed during the
second week and third week of this trial,
production declined to about its initial
level."


1954 55 officers of Florida County
Agents' Association. L to R, seated: lames
N. WIatson, Jacksonville, president; IR. E.
Norris, Tartares, secretary; Loomis Blitch,
Gainesville, vice-president. Standing: J. I.
Logan, Clearw'ater, past-president of the
National County Agents' Association.

Florida County Agents
On National Committees
Florida county agents have drawn as-
signments on four important committees
of the National Association of County
Agricultural Agents, it is revealed in a
list of committees received by the Florida
Agricultural Extension Service.
E. N. Stephens, Pensacola, is chairman
of the relationships committee. Members
of other groups include J. H. Logan,
Clearwater, association policy; James N.
Watson, Jacksonville, 4-H young men
and women; and Alec White, Tampa,
professional training.


14 NOVEMBER & DECEMBER, 1954







Florida Farm Agents
Receive Service Awards
Two Florida county agents, Emmett D.
McCall of Milton and P. R. McMullen
of St. Augustine, received distinguished
service awards from the National Asso-
ciation of County Agricultural Agents at
the recent annual meeting of the organ-
ization in Salt Lake City.
The two had been chosen previously
for the honor by fellow members of the
Florida County Agents Association. Both
awards are based on more than 10 years
of outstanding accomplishment in their
counties.
Mr. McMullen has been agent in St.
Johns since April 1, 1942, having first
served in Lafayette and Jefferson coun-
ties. He was especially helpful in the
establishment of the livestock auction
market at Monticello and in securing the
second soil conservation project in Flor-
ida for Jefferson County. He has been
active in improving beef cattle, improved
pastures, poultry production, introducing
new vegetable varieties, assisting forestry
improvements, ornamentals and 4-H Club
work. He has served as secretary of
the Livestock Association, Timber Grow-
ers Association, and the Agricultural Sta-
bilization and Conservation Committee,
and as chairman of the agricultural com-
mittee of the Civil Defense Council. He
is a member of various St. Augustine
civic organizations.
Mr. McCall has been agent in Santa
Rosa County since November 1, 1942.
He has been especially instrumental in the
development of dairying in Santa Rosa
and has encouraged more improved pas-
tures, more feed crops, 4-H Club work
and other activities. He has been secretary
and treasurer of the Blackwater Soil Con-
servation District and the livestock asso-
ciation, secretary of the Agricultural Sta-
bilization and Conservation Committee
secretary of the County Farm Bureau and
the County Dairy Association and chair-
man of the exhibit committee of the Fair
Association.

Home Demonstrations Staff
Appointments Announced
Appointment of an assistant economist
in food conservation on the state home
demonstration staff, one home demon-
stration agent and three assistants is an-
nounced by Miss Anna Mae Sikes, state
home demonstration agent.
Miss Lena E. Sturgis has been named
assistant economist in food conservation,
succeeding Miss Alice L. Cromartie, Miss
Barbara J. Daniels has been appointed
home demonstration agent in Franklin
County.
The two assistant home demonstration
agents are Mrs. Margaret C. Smith, Polk
County, and Miss Jo Ann Mills, Lake
County.


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NOVEMBER &


* 15









Mr. Scott stated that the original staff
of his department, in addition to himself,
was an office secretary and two field sup-
ervisors, Lewis T. Smith and Augustus
Forrest. Forrest, who died sometime
later, served only one year and Smith is


still on the staff. Alex Shaw, who suc-
ceeded Forrest, is also still active on the
staff. From time to time the growth of
the industry required additional super-
visors until today, in addition to Smith
and Shaw, the staff of Field Supervisors


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Through the Years
it has been our pleasure
to play host to the

FLORIDA DAIRY INDUSTRY
We take this opportunity to extend to one and all

A ry fi rrry HtnrifIma88

And a Bright and Successful 1954



THE KLOEPPEL HOTELS
ROBERT KLOEPPEL, President
ROBERT KLOEPPEL, JR., V. P. and Gen'l Mgr.



HOTEL MAYFLOWER NEW HOTEL JEFFERSI
Jacksonville Jacksonville

HOTEL GEORGE WASHINGTON
JACKSONVILLE


HOTEL PENNSYLVANIA
West Palm Beach


HOTEL GEORGE WASHINGTON
West Palm Beach


HONOR STATE DAIRY SUPERVISOR
(Continued on Page 6)


!6 NOVEMBER & DECEMBER, 1954


includes H. H. Rothe, John D. Robin-
son, R. R. Hood, Lester E. Ford and J.
W. Saunders.
In referring to the development of the
dairy industry during his twenty-five
years' service as Chief Supervisor, Mr.
Scott stated that "in 1929 there were 780
daires in the State of Florida and at the
present time there are 1265 dairies.
"In 1929 there were 80,000 cows
milked and they produced 20,000,000
gallons of milk. Today there are 196,736
cows being milked and they produce
112,041,600 gallons of milk.
"In 1929 dairymen bought all the
replacements for their herds which
amounted to 8,000 or 10,000 head per
year. Today, in 1954, perhaps not more
than 2,000 head are purchased each year."
In conclusion, Mr. Scott pointed out
that he was happy to be able to report
that the principal handicaps to the devel-
opment of the dairy industry which ex-
isted 25 years ago have today been largely
overcome. These he said were: "(1) Flor-
ida tick prevented introduction of pure-
bred and good cattle. (2) There were
no good pasture grasses or pastures in
the early days. (3) Lack of interest by
many leaders who were opposed to mak-
ing loans for the purchase of dairy
cattle."
) In Commissioner Nathan Mayo's ad-
dress to the group, he paid high tribute
to Mr. John Scott and Mrs. Scott, as well
as the entire staff of the Dairy Division.
He also complimented the State Agricul-
tural Extension Service, the County Farm
Agents and the Florida Dairy Association
for the important part which each had
played in the rapid and sound develop-
ment of Florida's Dairy Industry.
Other speakers, Herman Boyd and
Andy Lay as President and Secretary of
the Florida Dairy Association, Mr. H. G.
Clayton, Director of the Agricultural Ex-
tension Service and Mr. F. W. Risher of
the State Marketing Bureau, spoke in the
highest praise of the long and efficient
service of Mr. Scott as Chief Dairy Super-
visor. It was pointed out that evidence
of the soundness of the dairy regulations
and services of the Department of Agri-
culture is the fact that Florida's milk
supply is classed as 100% Grade A, that
the State's increase in both milk and ice
cream production topped the nation dur-
ing the past 10 years with an 86% in-
crease for milk and 66% increase for ice
cream.
Mr. Lewis Smith, the first appointed
and oldest in service as assistant to Mr.
Scott, pointed out that during his 25
years service with the dairy division, milk
production per cow in Florida has more
than doubled and that both dairy farm
and milk processing plants rank with the
best in the nation in sanitary conditions
and the use of modern equipment.


ON

























Four Generations
Of "Jim Jennings"
The picture above shows why "Jim
Jennings" can be expected to be around
longer than most of us. Grandpa, or "Big
Jim", has taken care of that with a son,
a grandson and a great-grandson.
Jim I, known to most Florida dairy-
men, was for many years both a success-
ful dairyman and Secretary of the Florida
Dairymen's Association. In recent years
he has been a Dairy Supplies Representa-
tive in Florida and holds the permanent
title as "Sergeant-at-Arms" of Florida
dairy conventions. Jim and his son, Jim
II, live in Jacksonville. Jim III is an
Army Sergeant stationed at Shreveport,
La., and Jim IV lives in the same city.
Urges Farm People To Help
With Farm Census Data
"The five-year agricultural census to be
taken this fall is important to agriculture
and rural life," says H. G. Clayton, direc-
tor of the Florida Agricultural Extension
Service. He says Extension workers will
give full cooperation to the census and
he urges farm people also to give accurate
usable information.
Director Clayton suggests that farm
families fill in the census questionnaires
in advance when possible.
New Frostproof Dairy
Has Sindhi-Jersey Bull
A recent announcement by Dr. Sam
Higginbottom, President of the Christian
Service Center at Frostproof, states that
the Center has begun operation of a 20-
cow dairy herd with a new dairy barn and
processing equipment.
Of special interest to other dairymen is
Dr. Higginbottom's announcement of the
use of a Sindhi-Jersey Bull which he
secured from a herd developed at an
Agricultural Institute in India where he
formerly served as an Agricultural Mis-
sionary. Dr. Higginbottom says he hopes
the Sindhi-Jersey bull will do for the
Southern dairy farmer what the Brahman
has done in the beef cattle industry.


With the arrival of the end of the year it is time to
reflect on what you have done this year. Ask yourself these
questions:
"What was my cost per pound of beef this year? How
can I grow more and better beef next year at lower cost?"
These questions are under constant study by your
Wilson & Toomer research team. Ask us to discuss your
problems with you. We believe we can work out a manage-
ment program of maximum benefit to you.


Working hand in hand with
Florida Agriculturefor 62years




WILSON r TOOMER
FERTILIZER COMPANY
Plants in Jacksonville, Tampa, Cottondale, Port Everglades
GENERAL OFFICES JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA


NOVEMBER & DECEMBER, 1954 17


j~








GUERNSEY CATTLE CLUB NEWS


January-February Issue Of "The Dairy News"

To Be First Annual Guernsey Edition
All Florida Dairymen, particularly Florida Guernsey Breeders, will be interested
in learning that by arrangement with the "Florida Guernsey Cattle Club," the January-
February, 1955 edition of the Florida Dairy News will be the first Annual Guernsey
Edition.
Florida Guernseys and Guernsey Breeders will be featured.

The Annual Florida State Guernsey Sale, held November 9th in Largo, will be
reported in the "Guernsey Edition," January-February issue.


REPORT REGISTRY TESTS
FOR FLORIDA GUERNSEYS
T HE AMERICAN Guernsey Cattle
Club has announced the following
results of recent official Guernsey registry
tests in the state of Florida.
These tests are made under the super-
vision of the University of Florida and
reported to the AGCC for approval and
publication.
)DINSMORE DAIRY CO., DINS-
MORE A purebred Guernsey cow,
Dinsmore Illustrious Rose, has just com-
pleted a state championship production
record by producing 14,079 lbs. of milk
and 700 lbs. of fat, which is the high-
est Advanced Registry record in the state
of Florida, made by a senior four year-
old, milked three times daily for 365C
days. The sire of this cow, Emory's Illus-
trious Benjamin, owned by J. D. Bates,
Neeses, S. C., has one tested daughter in
the Performance Register of the American
Guernsey Cattle Club.
SCARROLL L. WARD, JR., GOLD-
ENROD, FLA.-Three registered Guern-
sey cows have completed official Advanc-
ed Registry records.
On three times daily milking for 305C
days, Lakemont Independent Storm, a jun-
ior two year-old, produced 7,848 lbs.
of milk and 435 lbs. of fat. She is the
daughter of the outstanding Guernsey
sire, Elm Farm Independent, that has 18
sons and tested daughters in the Per-
formance Register.
Lakemont Steadfast Dimple, also a jun-
ior two year-old, produced 8,427 lbs. of
milk and 440 lbs. of fat milked three
times daily for 305C days.
On three times daily milking for 305C
days, Lakemont Steadfast Lou, starting
her record as a junior two year-old, pro-
duced 11,091 lbs. of milk and 597 lbs.
of fat. This production is the highest
Advanced Registry record in the state of
Florida made by a junior two year-old,
milked three times daily for 305C days.


"Dimple" and 'Lou" are sired by the
registered Guernsey sire, Lakemont An-
thony's Steadfast, that has one tested
daughter in the Performance Register of
The American Guernsey Cattle Club.
Another registered Guernsey cow, Cu-
pid's Supreme Christine, also owned by
Carroll L. Ward, Jr. of Goldenrod, Fla.,
put 12,208 Ibs. of milk and 619 lbs. of
fat into the country's breadbasket, accord-
ing to the official Advanced Registry rec-
ord released by The AGCC. "Christine"
was a junior four year-old and was
milked three times daily for 365 days.
The sire of "Christine" is Brays Island
Bon-Ton's Supreme. Six sons and tested
daughters of this bull are listed in the
Performance Register of the A.G.C.C.
)DINSMORE DAIRY CO., DINS-
MORE A registered Guernsey cow,
Dinsmore Noble Phillida, has completed
an official Advanced Registry record of
12,343 lbs. of milk and 546 lbs. of fat
on three times daily milking for 365 days,
and met calving requirements. She started
her record as a senior two year-old.
"Phillida" is the daughter of the famous
Guernsey sire, Quail Roost Noble Yeo-
man, that has one son and 63 tested
daughters in the Performance Register of
the AGCC.

Peanuts, cattle, hogs and corn are the
"big four" Jackson County crops, accord-
ing to a survey recently completed by
County Agent W. W. Glenn.


Anthrax, brucellosis, cattle grubs, lice,
mastitis, screwworms and other diseases
and parasites cost the U. S. livestock in-
dustry more than 21/2 billion dollars a
year, according to the U.S.D.A.


Of the 606,550,000 gallons of ice
cream produced by more than 14,000 con-
cerns last year, slightly more than one-
half were vanilla.


LIST GUERNSEY PURCHASES
BY FLORIDA BREEDERS
The following Florida purchases of
registered young Guernsey sires have
been announced recently by the American
Guernsey Cattle Club.
SJOE L. CAMERON, Jacksonville, has
purchased the young Guernsey sire, Dins-
more Illustrious Heir, from Dinsmore
Dairy Co., Dinsmore. This richly bred
young bull is out of the well-bred cow,
Dinsmore Illustrious Rose, that has once
been classified Acceptable for type, has
a production record of 11,215 lbs. of
milk and 590 Ibs. of fat made as a junior
two year-old in the Herd Improvement
Registry. He is sired by Riegeldale Con-
queror's Heir.
SR. M. GOOLSBY, Lake Park, has just
purchased the young Guernsey sire, Jen-
well Charmer, from Boutwell's Dairy,
Inc., Lake Worth. This young bull is out
of the cow, Lanandy Lincoln Louise and
is sired by McDonald Farms Steadfast
Otho.
AIRLINE E. HOWARD & DAVID
LOCK, Punta Gorda, have just purchased
the young Guernsey sire, Cone's Roscoe
Dale, from Logan & Donegan, Largo.
This richly bred young bull is out of the
high producing cow, Riegeldale Vis-
count's Secret, that has once been classi-
fied Very Good for type, and once De-
sirable and has a production record of
18,333 lbs. of milk and 859 Ibs. of fat,
made as a nine-year-old. He is sired by
Cone's Cavalier Roscoe.
) ELMER M. & DONALD E. STEB-
BINS, Lakeland, have just purchased the
young Guernsey sire, Fairlawn Hornet's
Kenyon. from A. M. Sonnabend, Millis,
Mass. This richly bred young bull is out
of the well-bred cow, Maple Lawn's
Baron Daisy, that has once been classified
Excellent for type, has a production rec-
ord of 9,755 lbs. of milk and 508 lbs.
of fat made as a junior four-year-old in
the Herd Improvement Register. He is
sired by Fairlawn Actress' Hornet.
)HENRY D. PERRY, Hollywood, has
just purchased the young Guernsey sire,
Jeniuell Rogue, from Boutwell's Dairy,
Inc., Lake Worth. This young bull is out
of the cow, Glensmere's Rosana, and is
sired by McDonald Farms Steadfast Otho.
) R. E. McCURDY, Century, Fla., has
just purchased the young Guernsey sire,
Dinsmore Actor Jet, from Dinsmore
Dairy Co., Dinsmore. This richly bred
young bull is out of the well-bred cow,
Dinsmore Mayroyal Jedetta, that has once
been classified Excellent for type, and
once Very Good for type, has a produc-
tion record of 15,070 lbs. of milk and
619 lbs. of fat made as a junior four-
year-old in the Herd Improvement Regis-
ter. He is sired by Fairlawn Actor's
Emory.


18 NOVEMBER & DECEMBER, 1954





















ROUTEMAN RECEIVES LEGACY
FROM GRATEFUL CUSTOMER
Ten years of friendliness and courtesy
paid off for T. F. Hunt, Dinsmore Dairy
retail routeman of Jacksonville, a few
months ago when a former customer
willed him $1,000. Dinsmore Dairy has
employed Mr. Hunt for more than 10
years and they rate him as a very unusual
person in the keen interest he shows
toward his customers.
Mr. Hunt was reared on a farm in
Columbia County but the loss of his wife
in 1918 forced him to seek employment
in Jacksonville. After 21 years as a con-
ductor for the Jacksonville Traction Com-
pany, Mr. Hunt began work as a route-
man for Dinsmore, selecting this work be-
cause of his desire to know and be friends
with people. Recognizing the special need
of a customer, he reacted with a spirit of
helpfulness which was so much appre-
ciated that the $1,000.00 legacy was the
ultimate outcome.
"I have had a wonderful time selling
dairy products," Mr. Hunt said. "I have
tried being friends with all my customers
and have failed with very few. Most of
my customers would do anything in rea-
son for me and so would I for them.
Christmas, a lady handed me a dollar. I
said, 'You are not expected to give me
anything for Christmas'. But she insisted
so I thanked her and told her that I ap-
preciated it very much. She said, 'and I
appreciate your picking up my paper and
bringing it in every morning'. I was very
good to one lady as she suffered with a
heart ailment and was by herself a good
part of the time. I would ask her if there
was anything I could do for her when I
delivered her milk. We got to be good
friends. Her husband suddenly took sick
and died and she was in a serious con-
dition. I went to see her every day that
I could. She died very soon and when her
will was probated, to my surprise, she
willed me one thousand dollars which I
certainly did not expect. I was very thank-
ful for it."
Mr. Hunt says that he was only being
kind and was not looking for a reward
of any kind. He says, "I believe it pays
any salesman to be kind to his customers.
He will be well paid in better business.


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NOVEMBER & DECEMBER, 1954 0 19







Florida 4-H Dairy Judging Team Wins
International Dairy Show Judging Contest
By: C. W. REAVES, Extension Dairyman
Agricultural Extension Service, University of Florida
THE FLORIDA 4-H Dairy Judging Team again brought nation-wide distinction
to the state by winning the International Dairy Show 4-H Judging Contest in
Chicago October 9.. It placed first on Ayrshires, second on Holsteins and Brown
Swiss, fourth on Jerseys, and Seventh on Guernseys, giving it the highest score in
the overall contest. It topped the second place New York team by 23 points. This
is the second year a Florida 4-H Dairy Team has won a nation-wide contest, the
1951 team having won the National Contest at Waterloo.
This year's team was composed of Erny Sellers of Tallahassee, Perry Smith of
Hastings, Beverly Simmons of St. Augustine and Howard Renner of Largo. Each
member of the team and C. W. Reaves, the team coach, received beautiful sterling
silver trays engraved to show the high team at the International Dairy Show.
Howard Renner ranked second high
individual, missing the $500 scholarship ience never to be forgotten. It was called
by only six points. Erny Sellers ranked by one of the members, "most exciting
fifth high individual and the other mem- time of our life". Pictures were taken
fifth high individual and the other mm amid congratulations of officials and team
bers were close up to give the top team
score in the o overall contest members and coaches from all parts of
Five days earlier, the team had entered the country. The team was asked to re-
the National 4-H Judging Contest at the turn to the International Amphitheatre
the National Dairy Cattle CoJudging Contess in Water the next day for a press conference. We
National Dairy Cattle Congress in Water- left Chicago during the October 10 down-
loo, Iowa. There it did satisfactorily on left Chicago during the October 10 down-
all breeds except one. The Brown Swiss pour driving around and through flooded
all breeds except one. The Brown Swiss streets but even this could not dampen
heifer class alone dropped them from streets but even this could not dampen
about sixth to twenty-second in a close the spirits of the team that knew the
contest. It placed second on Jerseys in satisfaction and joy of accomplishment.
Waterloo. Visit Memphis Dairy Show
Following that contest, the team ob- and Corn Belt Dairy Farms
served the National Dairy Cattle Congress The four team members, Extension
shows and spent some time in the Brown Dairyman C. W. Reaves, coach, and Mrs.
Swiss Barn studying that breed. The ex- Paul Simmons, mother of Beverly Sim-
perience of the National Contest and the mons, drove a total of 3,200 miles on the
additional training received in Waterloo trip. Enroute to Waterloo they attended


proved of value when the team reached
Chicago and entered the International
Dairy Show 4-H Judging Contest.
How It Feels To Win
The Awards Banquet was held in the
Saddle and Sirloin Club Ball Room at the
Stock Yards Inn. The thrill of hearing
"Florida" called out among top winners
in each of the breeds and finally come
to the announcement of winners in the
overall contest, up to third, second, and
then Florida called as First is an exper-


the Mid-South National Junior Dairy
Show at Memphis, Tennessee, where Erny
Sellers and 13 other Florida 4-H mem-
bers exhibited cattle, which gave a favor-
able impression of Florida's dairy cattle
and 4-H club activities.
At Memphis the team observed the
judging and placed all classes in the
Southern Intercollegiate Dairy Judging
Contest and gave oral reasons to C. W.
Reaves for practice. Practice was also done
on the W. E. Wagner Brown Swiss herd


INTERNATIONAL
DAIRY SHOW
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS
October 9-16, 1954


INTERNATIONAL AMPHITHEATRE

at Pekin, Illinois, the Ayrshire herds of
Frank McDonald and Son at Princeton,
Illinois and Harry Lorenz at Davenport,
Iowa and Al Paper's Holstein herd at
Stockton, Iowa. These were all excellent
herds and the owners very generously
provided classes of cattle for judging
practice. Two had photographers from
local papers out for pictures. The team
members also learned about mid-west
farming, marvelled at the immense acre-
ages of heavy yielding corn, saw corn
pickers at work, saw large numbers of
hogs, beef cattle, and dairy cattle, and a
beautiful pheasant on a post by a country
road. They were also surprised to see
dairy barns cleaned by scraping with a
shovel and sprinkled with lime instead
of washing. They learned how barn gut-
ter cleaners remove manure from the
gutters, eliminating much hand labor
when cows are kept in the barns every
night and many of the days in the win-
ter. We traveled through Southern Wis-
consin enroute from Waterloo to Chicago
and stopped at several farms.
(Continued on Next Page)


In the pictures above, members of the Florida 4-H Dairy Judging Team are seen in practice judging while on their way to the
National Dairy Show at Waterloo, Iowa and the International Dairy Show in Chicago. Picture (1), left, was taken at the farm of
W. E. Wagler, Brown Swiss breeder, Pekin, Ill. Picture (2) at right, was taken at the Holstein Farm of Al Papers, Stockton, Iowa.
This farm produces corn as seen averaging over 100 bushels to the acre.
20 NOVEMBER & DECEMBER, 1954


to
y o 1 11 1 11PW I ''









THE COVER PICTURE
Florida's 4-H Dairy Judging Team
pictured after its return from the recent
International Dairy Show in Chicago
where it won the 4-H Dairy Judging
Contest. Left to right, Howard Renner
of Largo, Erny Sellers of Tallahassee,
C. W. Reaves, State Extension Dairyman
with the University of Florida and team
coach, Beverly Simmons of St. Augustine
and Perry Smith of Hastings.

4-H Team Wins Judging
Contest At International
(Continned from Page 20)
Both at the National Dairy Cattle Con-
gress at Waterloo and the International
Dairy Show at Chicago, there were ex-
hibits of all kinds of dairy farm equip-
ment.
The team met officials of all the nation-
al breed associations. In Chicago, we were
introduced to Secretary of Agriculture
Benson by Al Wentworth, president of
the International Dairy Show (prior to
winning the contest). The day before
the contest, the team had seen Chicago
from the top of the Chicago Board of
Trade, had ridden the subway and ele-
vated trains and visited the Union Stock
Yards.
Appreciation To Sponsors
The State 4-H Dairy Team and the
Agricultural Extension Service have ex-
pressed their sincere appreciation to the
sponsors of the team's trip. The Florida
Times-Union provided one-half the ex-
pense. Other sponsors were the Florida
Dairy Association, the State Department
of Agriculture, the Florida Guernsey
Cattle Club and the Florida Jersey Cattle
Club.
Team Members Honored
By Dairy Association
At a luncheon meeting of the Board
of Directors of the Florida Dairy Asso-
ciation held in Jacksonville, November
6th, members of the State 4-H Dairy
Team and Coach C. W. Reaves were
honor guests.
Following Mr. Reaves' talk on the
team's experiences at the National Cattle
Congress and the International Dairy
Show, the team members were presented
with Honorary Junior Membership Cer-
tificates in the Florida Dairy Association.

Schack Wins 4-H Trip
On Dairying Record
William Schack, 4-H member of Green-
wood, Florida, is one of nine Florida 4-H
Boys to win a trip to the National 4-H
Congress in Chicago, November 27.
William, the son of M. A. Schack,
well known West Florida dairyman, was
Florida state 4-H winner in dairy effici-
ency for 1.953 and recently had an out-
standing entry in the Memphis Mid-South
Junior Livestock Show. William was also
recently elected an Honorary Junior Mem-
ber of the Florida Dairy Association.


4-H Girls Win Honors
In Dairy Projects
Two Florida 4-H girls were recently
accorded top state honors in Dairy Foods
Demonstration work. The winners who
were awarded a watch by the Carnation
Milk Company are Anna Lois Clark,
Gadsden County and Gladys Ann Harris,
Dade County.
Among the ten Florida 4-H girls
awarded trips to the National 4-H Con-
gress in Chicago, November 28th, the
following qualified partially on their
work in dairy foods or dairying:
Barbara Goodwin, 15, Ft. Pierce, re-


ceived her award in "Health Improve-
ment" and was county winner in "dairy
foods demonstration".
Ollie DeVore. 16, Reddick, received
her award on "Record Keeping" which
included her "dairying project".
Sara Chestang, 17, Bristol, received her
award on her "Food Preparation" pro-
gram and was area winner in "dairy
foods".

"Until a solution is found for our
traffic problems, it can be helped by
keeping more cars off the highways, by
being more particular about who gets a
drivers license." -William R. Sullivan.


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insulation for rapid cooling . 10" x 20" lids easily cleaned in wash tank . entire
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NOVEMBER & DECEMBER, 1954 21








Production and Use of Better Dairy Pastures
Second Prize 4-H Member Essay
1953 State pairy Pasture Contest
By IERNY SELLERS
4-H Member, Tallahassee
Editor's Note: The State 4-H and FFA Pasture Essay Contests are a part of the
general program of the State Dairy Pasture Improvement Contest sponsored by the
University of Florida Agricultural Extension Service and the Florida Dairy Associa-
tion. Cash prizes are offered in both the 4-H and FFA groups.
"IN MANY cases, bulldozing is needed to start an improved pasture program. The
cost will vary from ten to a hundred dollars per acre, depending upon the amount
of undergrowth on the land. If there are quite a few trees per acre, another item of
expense will be root pulling. Many of the roots can be pulled by hand, but the
expense involved would be so high that it isn't practical to do so in most cases. A
tractor with a cultivating frame and alfalfa-tooth plows, will pull roots and partially
break the land at the same time. Disposing of roots is a "must", because mowing
equipment will be severely damaged, and hay or ensilage can never be cut until the
roots are removed.
The land should be plowed until all
vegetation is turned under, but the plow program. They not only supply a large
shouldn't be set too deep or it will turn amount of emergency grazing during the
shouldn't be set too deep or it will turn dry summer months, but they can be
poor sandy soil to the surface. Soil sam- cu t for hay or ensie. Mny dairymen
ples should be taken and a complete ana- plt fth ese rops in July and have me
lysis made. If the soil has a high degree plant these crops in July and have some
of acidity the proper amount of lime of their best grazing when the other gras-
should be applied to secure the desired ses are going out.
pH range. If the soil is too alkaline, ats n er r r and cloere
applications of sulphur will help neutral- excellent winter grazing. Oats and clover
applications of sulphur will help neutral is probably the better of the two combin-
ize it. nations. Crimson and/or White Dutch clo-
Seeding and fertilizing can be accom- vers can be planted on most soils, Crim-
plished in the same operation with the son on higher, dryer land and White
proper equipment. Several varieties of Dutch on moist lowlands. Cattle should
grass should be planted to obtain a com- be taken off Crimson clover by the mid-
plete feed. After the choice of grasses dle of April to insure a good seed crop
has been made, good clean certified seed for the next year.
should be used when planting. There are There are three important steps that
several varieties of grass that have to be must be followed in a successful pasture
propagated from sprigs. This work can program: fertilization, weed control, and
either be contracted to someone who will control grazing. If either one of these
furnish sprigging equipment and the steps is not followed, the pasture will
stolons, or the sprigs can be distributed rapidly become unprofitable."
over the seedbed and plowed under to
obtain the stand.


STATE PASTURE CONTEST
FOR THE YEAR 1954-1955
]LAIRYMAN Herman Burnett of Braden-
ton, as Chairman of the Florida Dairy As-
sociation "Pasture Improvement Commit-
tee", and State Extension Dairyman C.
W. Reaves have requested the Dairy
News to publish an appeal to all Florida
dairymen to enter the second annual state
and county Dairy Pasture Contest.
There is no closing date for entering
the contest which will include your pas-
ture program from April 1, 1954 to
April 1, 1955.
There is still time for a few more to
qualify as one of the first 50 to enter
with a chance to win the handsome "elec-
tric clock radio" which the Florida Dairy
Association will award to one of the first
50 entered..
Burnett as chairman of the contest and
Reaves as director point out that "pastures
are a cash crop." Plan for ample pasture
for as many months as possible and store
silage or hay for the other months. More
and better pastures and forage can help
meet high costs of production and inter-
regional competition. Good pastures are
the cheapest source of nutrients for cat-
tle. Hay and silage provide for higher
production at lower costs during periods
in which pastures are inadequate for any
cause.
Plan of 1954-55 Contest
"The general objective of the contest
will continue to be for more dairymen to
secure the results of good pasture and
forage production, utilizing these valuable
green feeds for more efficient and profit-
able dairying. County Committees will
score all farms entering the contest and
submitting reports. Certificates of Recog-
nition will be presented all those scoring
(Continued on Next Page)


The farmer who practices rotational
grazing is nearly always a step ahead of
the one who doesn't, especially if he has
a small acreage. If a system of rotational
grazing is carried out, the land should
be divided into several fields, the size de-
pending upon the number of head of
cattle to be grazed on it. These fields
should be grazed fairly close before the
cattle are moved to the next one. After
the grass has been grazed down the first
time each year, a complete fertilizer
should be applied.
If one has an excess of good pasture,
hay or ensilage should be put up. By
applying ammonium nitrate or anhydrous
ammonia, letting the grass grow out, cut-
ting it and repeating the cycle through-
out the growing season, a good supply
of roughage can be obtained.
Unless an excess of cheap feed is avail-
able, or an irrigation system is in opera-
tion, temporary pasture, such as millet
and sudan grass is a must in every pasture


Erny Sellers, winner of 2nd place award in the 1953 State 4-H Members Essay
Contest on Dairy Pastures, is seen above in one of the pastures of his father's dairy
farm at Tallahassee.


22 NOVEMBER & DECEMBER, 1954







STATE PASTURE CONTEST
(Continued from Page 22)
75 per cent or above. County and state
winners will be named in two divisions
as follows:
"1. The one with the best overall
pasture program.
"2. The one making the most progress
over the previous year.
"Certificates and plaques will be
awarded at the Dairy Field Day.
"Join the contest and help make a
greater Florida Dairy Industry and a more
profitable business for yourself."
Congratulations Offered
Pasture Contest Winners
Following the announcement of the
1953 State Dairy Pasture Contest winners
and the awarding of Certificates at the
Annual Dairy Field Day dinner in Gaines-
ville September 16th, all winners were
forwarded a letter from Mr. C. W.
Reaves, State Extension Dairyman and
director of the contest, expressing the
joint congratulations of the Florida Agri-
cultural Extension Service and the Florida
Dairy Association.
The Certificates were provided by the
Florida Dairy Association "Pasture Com-
mittee" and were signed by H. G. Clay-
ton, Director of the Agricultural Experi-
ment Station, and the chairman of the
F.D.A. Committee.


NUTRITIVE VALOEt


T4~ D pr ton If Feed Costs t Th..

citruspp 1488 '54.00 3.63


bet pulp 1356 '68.70 15.07
TOTAL DIGESTIVE NUTRIENTS


When it comes to feed, the cost
per 100 lbs. of TDN is the fig-
ure that counts. Compare the
price of Florida Citrus Pulp with
all other feeds on a year 'round


basis. Prices vary as local feeds
come into season, but Florida
Citrus Pulp is consistently the
top Nutritive value on the list
and is available all year.


Ask your feed dealer or write for fr ee information.

OTRUS PRI(ESORS A SN ATIO


P. O. BOX 403, DEPT. D


TAMPA, FLORIDA


NOVEMBER & DECEMBER,


A load of Guernsey and Swiss
heifers from Orrville, Ohio, sold to
George Wilt of Lakeland, Florida
by Ross Reynolds & Son, Plant City.
The dams of this load of heifers
made 432 Ibs. butterfat last year.







ALL KINDS OF DAIRY CATTLE FOR SALE
50 Head of Springer Cows on Hand at All Times
TRANSPORTATION FURNISHED FOR DELIVERY TO YOUR FARM
Phone, Write or See

ROSS REYNOLDS & SON
Phone 68-325 Plant City, Fla.


--


a


1954 23









DAIRY NEWS DIGEST


Members of the Dairy Industry throughout the State are invited to please
send to the "Florida Dairy News" all news about dairies, dairying and the
good people who devote their time, talents and money to this great industry.
-The Editor.


Florida Well Represented
At National Conventions
We doubt that Florida's representation
year after year at the national Milk In-
dustry and Ice Cream Manufacturers Con-
ventions is surpassed by any State.
We have often thought that from a
distributor standpoint, a Florida conven-
tion could be held in Atlantic City.
This speaks well for the programs of
the National Conventions and the benefits
available to those who attend.
A major attraction, of course, is the
dairy equipment and supplies exposition
which is a part of the National Conven-
tions every other year. The exposition at
the 1954 Conventions held October 25
to 30 in Atlantic City was said to be out-
standing by comparison with previous
years. The unbelievable attendance was
metered at 17,000 during the first two
days and total attendance was estimated
at around 30,000. The actual number
of persons attending is much less than
this because of attendance a number of
times by most dairymen.
A slight attendance increase was regis-
tered at the Milk Industry and Ice Cream
Conventions. The increase of interest
was definitely noticeable by the excellent
attendance at business and conference
sessions.
The major themes of the programs
were the need for a better selling job and
a better public relations job.
One of the major resolutions adopted
was by the Milk Foundation in which
certain government representatives were
strongly censured for issuing statements


Miami Dairy Leader Elected
Head Inter-America Group
Mr. J. N. McArthur of Miami, recently
elected president of the Chamber of Com-
merce of the Americas, has just returned
from an extensive official tour of several


McARTHUR
tor of the Florida
several years.


South American
countries.
Mr. McArthur
is president of the
McArthur Jersey
Farm Dairy of
Miami and is im-
mediate past pres-
ident of the Mi-
ami Chamber of
Commerce. He has
served as a direc-
Dairy Association for


and opinions concerning the dairy indus-
try without having the benefit of avail-
able facts and information on the sub-
ject.
Dr. Bruce Baldwin, President of M.I.F.,
said, "Statistics provide evidence that milk
prices have consistently been in line with
costs."
Theo Datson and Paul E. Reinhold
participated in directors' meetings of the
International Association of Ice Cream
Manufacturers while Alf Nielsen and
Reinhold attended the Milk Industry
Foundation Board meetings.
F.D.A. President Herman Boyd was
the first F.D.A. producer president to at-
tend the National Conventions of distribu-
tors. He was joined by another promin-


Above are the members of the Executive Committee of the Milk Industry Foundation
recently elected at the Foundation's 47th Annual Convention in Atlantic City. L to R
are: J. O. Eastlack, assistant to the president, The Borden Co., N. Y. City, who was
elected Secretary; C. Raymond Brock, President of Brock-Hall Dairy, New Haven,
Connecticut, who was re-elected Vice-President; Dr. F. Bruce Baldwin, Vice-President of
Abbotts Dairies Inc., Philadelphia, Pa., who was re-elected President; T. D. Lewis, Vice-
President, Arden Farms Inc., Los Angeles, California, Past President and Ex-Officio
member; E. J. Mather, Chairman of the Board, Southern Dairies, Inc., Washington,
D. C., who was re-elected Treasurer and J. J. Swaner, President of Home Town Dairies
Inc., Iowa City, Iowa.


Spokesmen for Florida's beef and dairy
cattle industries at the recent National
Grassland Farming Conference in Jackson-
ville were State Senator Irlo Bronson, Kis-
simmee, past president, Florida Cattlemen's
Association (left) and Herman Boyd, Miami,
president, Florida Dairy Association.

National Grassland Farming
Conference Held In Florida
November 15 to 17 saw about 100 of
the country's leading authorities on pas-
ture development and soil conservation
gathered in Jacksonville for the first Flor-
ida conference of the Soil Conservation
Society of America.
Among the many speakers were two
of Florida's most successful and best in-
formed dairy and beef cattle pasture
producers.
Speaking on Dairy Pasture Develop-
ment in Florida was Herman Boyd of
Miami, President of the Florida Dairy
Association, whose dairy operations use
approximately 900 acres of pasture in
Dade County. The Hall and Boyd Dairy,
operated by Mr. Boyd and his partner,
Bob Hall, received the Florida Dairy
Pasture Contest Award for having the
"Best Dairy Pastures" in Florida in 1953.
Spokesman for Florida's Beef Cattle
Industry was a former president of the
Florida Cattlemen's Association, State Sen-
ator Irlo Bronson of Kissimmee. Mr.
Bronson disclosed that his beef cattle
ranges cover about 200,000 acres of both
improved and open range pastures.
The Gustafson Dairy of Green Cove
Springs, thirty miles south of Jackson-
ville, was selected for a dairy pasture tour
of the group, while the Hays Beef Cattle
Ranch, west of Jacksonville, was visited
for a look at Florida beef cattle pasture
developments.

ent Florida producer and former director
of F.D.A., Freeman Hales of Miami.
Members of the Florida delegation
were pleased to learn of the decision to
hold the 1955 Annual Spring Conference
and Board Meeting of the Ice Cream
Manufacturers Association at Hollywood,
Florida. This meeting has an attendance
of about three hundred including the
Presidents and Secretaries of the various
State Dairy Industry Associations.


24 NOVEMBER & DECEMBER, 1954



























SANITATION TEXT BOOK
PUBLISHED BY KLENZADE
A new Klenzade Dairy Sanitation
Handbook is announced as the outgrowth
of preceding editions and represents years
of work in assembling detailed cleaning
instructions on all phases of dairy farm
and dairy plant sanitation. The book con-
sists of 254 pages, profusely illustrated,
conveniently indexed, and attractively
plastic-bound. It is designed to be used
as a handbook or reference manual by
executive personnel in charge of sanita-
tion and covers all of the cleaning and
sanitizing aspects of milk production on
the dairy farm and milk processing in the
dairy plant.
Copies of the Handbook may be had
post paid from Klenzade Products, Inc.,
Beloit, Wisconsin at $2.00 per copy.

Chipola Breeding Group
Reports Gains For Year
A total 1598 cows were bred by the
Chipola Artificial Breeding Association
during the year just closed. This compares
with a total of 1344 for the previous year.
The Chipola ABA has been operated
for two years. Technician Reuben Mohs,
formerly with the American Breeders
Service at Racine, Wis., had bred 20,000
cows before coming to the new associa-
tion in Florida.

Borden Buys Schmid Dairy
The Schmid Dairy, which has operated
in Sarasota for the past 30 years, has an-
nounced sale of its plant and retail bus-
iness to the Borden Dairy, Tampa.
Mr. Charles J. Schmid and his son,
Charles J., who were partners in the busi-
ness, will continue operation of their dairy
farm with their milk going to Borden.
O. W. Sellers of Tampa was to be-
come manager of the plant for Borden.


TAILOR MADE DELIVERY


) No transhandling but direct
fertilizer service to the groove, E
field or pasture. i


Complete field service rendered with
major portion of deliveries effected by f l S c130t'_
a fleet of 15 trucks and trailer units di-
rect to point of consumption, coordinated FERTILIZER SERVICE for
with users' spreading requirements. For- CITRUS GROVES
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actual requirements of individual con-
S PASTURE GRASS
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DISTRIBUTORS


HOWARD FEED MILLS, INC.
Jacksonville


IRWIN GRAIN COMPANY
Kendall


NOVEMBER & DECEMBER, 1954 25
NOVEMBER & DECEMBER, 1954 25







ALLIED TRADES MEMBERS
1954 FLORIDA DAIRY ASSOCIATION 1954


Abbey, Lawrence
Adams Packing Association, Inc.
Allied Dairy Products, Inc.
American Seal Kap Corporation
Amco Feed Stores
Anheuser-Busch, Inc.
Auburndale Sales Company
B. and W. Canning Company, Inc.
Balch Flavor Co.
Batavia Body Company
Bloomer Brothers Company
Bowey's, Inc.
Broward Grain and Supply Company
California Spray-Chemical Corporation
Certified Products Company
Creamery Package Manufacturing
Co., The
Crown Cork and Seal Company
Dari-Tech Products Corporation
Dairypak, Inc.
Dennery Company, Charles
Demarest, James V.
De-Raef Corporation
Diamond Alkali Chemical Corporation
Diversey Corporation, The
Dixie Cup Corporation
Dixson Company, The
Doughnut Corporation of America
Engers, Charles
Equip Company, Inc.
Eskimo Pie Corporation
Ex-Cello Corporation
Farmers Cooperative Exchange
Filbert, Inc., W. L.
Fischman Company, The
Florida Citrus Canners Corporation
Florida Feed Mills
Florida Juice, Inc.
Foote and Jenks, Inc.
General Mills, Inc., Jacksonville
General Mills, Inc., Miami
General Mills, Inc., Tampa
Germantown Manufacturing Company
Gilbert, Allen and Company
Gulf Paper Company
Graham, E. G. (Don)
Groff C.M.C. Trucks
Hackney Brothers Body Company
Hector Supply Company
Helm Chemicals
Howard Supply Company
Igou, Inc., W. M.
International Paper Company
Irwin Grain Company
Jackson Grain Company
Jennings, James
Johnson and Johnson
Johnston, Robert A., Company
Kelco Company
Kieckhefer Container Company
Klenzade Products, Inc.
Krim-Ko Corporation


Kuder Pulp Sales Company
Lakeland Cash Feed Company
Liberty Glass Company
Lily-Tulip Cup Corporation
Limbert Brothers, Inc.
Liquid Carbonic Corporation, The
Lowe Corporation, Joe
Mahoney Extract Company, S. H.
Marathon Corporation
Maryland Baking Company
Mathieson Chemical Corporation
Martino & Company, P. C.
Meyer-Blanke Company
Meyer Manufacturing Company,
George J.
Michael and Company, David
Miller Machinery and Supply Co., Jax
Miller Machinery and Supply Co.,
Miami
Miller-Lenfestey Supply Co., Tampa
Mojonnier Brothers Company
Moredock Company, Howe E.
Morris Paper Mills
Murphy Body Works, Inc.
Nash-Kelvinator Corporation
National Pectin Products Company
Newth-Morris Box Corporation
Owen-Iillinois Glass Company
Pasco Packing Company
Paul-Lewis Laboratories, Inc.
Pennsylvania Salt Manufacturing
Company
Plenty Products
Pure Carbonic Company
Ralston Purina Company, Tampa
Ralston Purina Company. Miami
Reddi-Wip Company of Florida
Riverside Manufacturing Company
Rodar Company, The
Sauer Company, The C. F.
Savage Arms Corporation
Sealright Company, Inc.
Security Feed and Seed Company
Security Mills of Tampa
Shaefer, Inc.
Smith Company, J. Hungerford
Spartan Grain and Mill Company
Standard Packaging Corporation
Stein, Hall and Company
Sutherland Paper Company
Thatcher Glass Mfg. Co.
Universal Milking Machine Company
Vanilla Laboratories
Virginia-Carolina Chemical
Corporation
Vitex Laboratories
Warner-Jenkinson Manufacturing
Company
The Watson-Scott Company
Welch Manufacturing Company
Wholesale Brokerage Company
\illiamson Feed Mills
Wyandotte Chemicals Corporation


NEWS


DIGEST


National Ice Cream Group
Sets 1955 Florida Meeting
Announcement has just been made by
the International Association of Ice Cream
Manufacturers that the Annual Spring
Conference and Board Meeting of that
group will be held at the Hollywood
Beach Hotel, Hollywood, Florida, March
27-30, 1955.
In addition to International Associa-
tion of Ice Cream Manufacturers' direc-
tors, the attendance at this Conference
includes the Presidents and Managers of
the various State Dairy and Dairy Pro-
ducts Associations and others making a
total attendance of about 300.


Dairy Members Reappointed
On Florida Milk Commission
Henry Schneider of Orlando was re-
cently reappeared by Acting Governor
Johns for his third four-year term as a
distributor member of the Florida Milk
Commission and Ben Waring of Madi-
son was reappointed producer member.
Waring was first appointed only a year
ago to fill a vacancy left by the resigna-
tion of L. S. Sheffield of Jacksonville.
Both Waring and Schneider were en-
dorsed by the producer and distributor
members of the Florida Dairy Associa-
tion.

Judge Commends Dairy Animals
At Jackson County Fair Show
Dairymen of Jackson County received
an "Honorable Mention" classification for
their dairy animal show at the recent
County Fair.
Wilson Sparks, Assistant State Exten-
tion Dairyman, who judged the show,
spoke highly of the continued improve-
ment made by the dairymen of the area
in their dairy herds.
Reuben Mohs, technician of the Chip-
ola Artificial Breeders Association and
chairman of the dairy show, has reported
the results of the show as follows:
Champions in the three classes of arti-
ficially sired daughters-Holsteins, Flori-
da State Hospital; Guernseys, E. L. Tip-
ton, Greenwood; Jerseys, Billy Joe Allen,
Two Egg.
The Open Show championships-Hol-
stein, Florida State Hospital; Registered
Guernseys, Milton Pittman, Two Egg;
Registered Jerseys, M. A. Schack, Green-
wood; Grade Guernseys, Milton Pittman.


26 NOVEMBER & DECEMBER, 1954







State Extension Workers
Hold Annual Conference
The new farm and home development
program, through which the Agricultural
Extension Service expects to work more
closely with farm families as a result of
increased federal appropriations, was a
principal topic for discussion at the an-
nual conference of county and home dem-
onstration agents this year. The program
was held at the University of Florida in
Gainesville October 4 to 8.
Director of Extension Service, H. G.
Clayton, pointed out that the new pro-
gram will be tried on a pilot basis in
Florida for a while. Associate county
agents, to work with county and home
agents already in the counties, went to
work immediately following the confer-
ence in Holmeh-Washington, Leon-Jeffer-
son and Hamilton Columbia counties.
Each morning of the four-day confer-
ence, county and home agents met to-
gether to hear discussions of new develop-
ments in agriculture and homemaking and
to talk about problems they will be facing
in the next few months. Each afternoon
the men and women attended separate
sessions, at one of which the 4-H calf
program was outlined by T. W. Sparks,
assistant state extension dairyman.
Leading speakers included Dr. John S.
Allen, acting president of the University;
Dr. J. Wayne Reitz, provost for agricul-
ture; Miss Anna Mae Sikes, state home
demonstration agent; Dr. C. M. Fergu-
son, administrator of the USDA Exten-
sion Service; and E. W. Alton, and Miss
Mena Hogan of the U. S. Department
of Agriculture.
The three organizations related to ex-
tension work held their annual meetings
during the week and named officers as
follows:
Florida Extension Worker; Association
-Miss Ogla Kent, Dade County, presi-
dent; Clifford Boyles, Okeechobee, vice-
president; Mrs. Mary L. Minchin, Wash-
ington, secretary-treasurer.
Florida County Agents' Association
James N. Watson, Duval, president;
Loomis Blitch, Alachua, vice-president;
and R. E. Norris, Lake, secretary-treas-
urer, all re-elected.
Florida Home Demonstration Agents'
Association-Miss Ethel Atkinson, Es-
cambia, president; Miss Lora Kiser, Hills-
borough, and Miss Emma Stevenson, Bay,
vice-presidents; Miss Charlotte M. Latti-
mer, Pinellas, secretary; and Mrs. Ruth
M. Elkins, Polk, treasurer.

The National Tuberculosis Association
celebrates its 50th anniversary this year.
Since 1904, TB has dropped from first
to sixth place among causes of death in
the United States, yet 400,000 Americans
have the disease today. More than half
of those who die of TB are men over 40.


and IT IS GOOD!
-

Unmatched in its field!

Get your hands into a bag of Spartan Quality Dairy, and
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* "SQ" CALF STARTER PELLETS

* "SQ" CALF FEED (Grower)
* "SQ" 16% DAIRY
* "SQ" 20% DAIRY
* "SQ" LIVESTOCK MINERALS


,FEEDS


S50 LBS NIT



=:- A

| DAIRY
Isr>nN' ' J 1


SPARTAN GRAIN & MILL CO.
GRAND CROSSING, FLORIDA
PI'hur'._ .. i Idr,. lle 1-2_' /


NOVEMBER & DECEMBER, 1954 0 27












REGISTRY TEST REPORTS
FOR FLORIDA JERSEYS
T HE AMERICAN Jersey Cattle Club
has announced the following re-
sults of recent official Jersey registry
tests in the state of Florida.
These tests are made under the super-
vision of the University of Florida and
reported to the AJCC for approval and
publication.


SA. T. ALVAREZ, ALVAREZ DAIRY,
Jacksonville, has a registered Jersey cow,
X. Standard Ir'y Nanette. that recently
completed a 305-day Herd Improvement
Registry production record of 11,420 lbs.
milk containing 697 lbs. butterfat at the
age of 7 years and 4 months.
~ WALTER WELKENER, HOLLY
HILL DAIRY, Jacksonville, has five reg-
istered Jersey cows that recently com-
pleted records on Herd Improvement


Florida's Greatest Annual Attraction

Fifty years of progress! That is what the Florida State Fair will
celebrate in February. In keeping with its Golden Anniversary the Fair
will be bigger, better, more exciting, and with more features, than ever
before in its 50-year-old history.
Tampa's Centennial Year will be recognized by special ceremonies .
Rotary International Day will commemorate the 50th year of this civic
organization . A Home Craftsman Show featuring Do-It-Yourself items
will occupy one of the Fair's largest buildings . The "Florida Calling"
network radio program will be broadcast from the Fair.
Of course, there will be the spectacular Gasparilla Celebration, parades,
grandstand attractions, County exhibits, Royal American Shows' Midway,
auto races, livestock shows, and many other special events 15 days and
nights of thrilling entertainment. Make your plans now to attend the
Florida State Fair on its Golden Anniversary!

SPECIAL CA TLE EVNT!


Feb 5 West Coast Dairy Show . Dairy
Breeding and Fat Barrow Shows
open.

Feb. 8 -Parade of Dairy Champions and
presentation of Livestock champion
awards.

Feb. 9 Ayrshire Sale.

Feb. 10 Fat Steer Show opens.


Feb. 11 Fat Steer Sale.

Feb. 12 Future Farmers Day.
Feb 17 Parade of Beef Champions and
F presentation of Livestock Champion
awards.
Feb. 18 Second Annual Pan American Brah-
Feb. 19 4-H lub Day.
Feb. 19 4-H Club Day.


wa A1J M NPL c- Aoiw-im -


JERSEY CATTLE CLUB NEWS


28 NOVEMBER & DECEMBER, 1954


THREE JERSEY COWS MAKE
1,000-LB. FAT RECORDS
A recent bulletin of the American
Jersey Cattle Club reports that the first
time in the history of the Jersey breed
three records each exceeding 1,000 lbs.
butterfat were recently completed by
cows in three different states within the
same week.
The cows responsible for this histori-
cal milk production development were:
Volunteer Noble Alice in the herd of Mr.
and Mrs. John Lindow, Independent,
Ore., with a record of 19,161 Ibs. milk
containing 1,097 lbs. fat; Lex Deborah of
Sibley Farms owned by John R. Sibley,
Sibley Farms, Spencer, Mass., with a
record of 20,354 lbs. milk containing
1,089 lbs. fat; and Orrland Signal Vol.
Sable in the Victory Jersey Farm herd of
Chester Elliff, Tulia, Texas, with a record
of 17,341 lbs. milk containing 1,030 lbs.
fat.
Lex Deborah of Sibley Farms in Massa-
chusetts and Orrland Signal Vol. Sable in
Texas both completed their third consecu-
tive record of over 1,000 lbs. fat. These
two cows are members of the only three-
generation groups in the Jersey breed in
which each cow has made at least one
record of 1,000 lbs. fat or more.


Registry test which entitles them to spe-
cial recognition from The American Jersey
Cattle Club. The high producing animal
in the group from the standpoint of age
was Observer Design Ramona with an
actual record of 12,777 lbs. milk contain-
ing 638 lbs. butterfat. The actual records
of the other cows all exceeded 9,500 lbs.
milk.
SWALTER WELKENER, H LLY
HILL DAIRY, Jacksonville, recently re-
ceived a ninth Constructive Breeder
Award by The American Jersey Cattle
Club. The award is one of the highest
awards made by the Jersey breed regis-
try. To be eligible for the award, Wel-
kener carried out a well balanced program
of herd improvement and breed promo-
tion. His animals have met high require-
ments of both production and type, and
a majority of the animals in the herd
were bred or owned by him for at least
four years. Seventy-eight cows were in
the herd 10 months or more of the year
and were enrolled on the Jersey Herd
Improvement Registry testing program.
These cows had an average yearly pro-
duction of 8,649 lbs. milk containing
461 Ibs. butterfat. Ninety animals in the
herd had an average type classification
rating of 86.06/%. Fifteen of the animals
were classified Excellent, the highest rat-
ing given by the Club.






U. S. D. A. Offers Help
In Brucellosis Control
Florida dairymen may secure aid from
the United States Department of Agricul-
ture in vaccinating their 6 to 8 months-
old calves against brucellosis by applying
to the Florida Livestock Board in Talla-
hassee or their local accredited veterinar-
ian.
Dr. T. H. Applewhite, U.S.D.A. Vet-
erinarian in Florida, has announced that
the aid program to livestock owners be-
came available November 1st under an
appropriation of 15 million dollars voted
by the last Congress.
The program provides for the services
of private Veterinarians to be furnished
both dairy and beef cattle owners on a
fee basis which will be paid by the U.S.-
D.A.
Dr. Applewhite said that through exist-
ing programs the disease has been well
reduced in the dairy herds of the State
during the past 15 years and the major
control problem now is among the beef
cattle of the State.
BALANCE THE BUDGET
AND THE DIET WITH MILK
Mrs. Sue B. Young, Brevard County
Home Demonstration Agent, is author of
an article published recently in the Cocoa
Tribune with the above headline, which
suggests a program dairymen would do
well to boost.
Continuing with the slogan, "For a lift
that lasts, try milk", Mrs. Young says:
"If you find your energy lagging in the
middle of the morning or afternoon, try
a tall glass of milk. You may be like
many, who feel that milk is a children's
drink. Research however, has shown that
grown-ups need milk, too. We all need
the food value milk offers to help mus-
cles and nerves function properly.
"It's difficult to have a balanced diet
without including milk. Milk not only
helps balance the diet, but also the bud-
get. No other food gives as much food
value per dollar as milk. For those of you
who buy all your milk, your food dollar
may be stretched by using evaporated and
nonfat dry milk in cooking.
"Women especially aren't drinking the
milk they need each day, and their teen-
age daughters are running a close second
as poor milk drinkers. Milk may be lack-
ing from their diets because of the fear
that milk is fattening. It isn't. Actually
a glass of whole milk has fewer calories
than a serving of many other foods. There
are only about 165 calories in a glass
(eight ounces) of whole milk. A serving
of lean beef has about 300 calories. Two
buttered biscuits have about 350 calories
and a slice of apple pie contains about
350."
The first Christmas seal sale in Ameri-
ca was conducted in 1907 by a welfare
worker in Wilmington, Delaware. It
raised $3,000 for the benefit of tubercu-
losis patients.


Forman Dairy Is Sold
To The Borden Company
Borden's Dairy has purchased the milk
distribution facilities of Forman Dairy,
according to an announcement made by
E. G. Williams, Ft. Lauderdale manager
for the Borden Dairy.
Williams said that in addition to
acquiring the customer list of the Forman
firm, Borden's bought the Forman bottl-
ing equipment and the entire milk output
of the Forman farm. Williams said there
would be no change in policy and that all
personnel of the Forman Company have
been retained.

Buy 4-H Dairy Calves
The Tri-County Dairy Association of
Pensacola sponsored a trip to Tupelo to
purchase dairy calves, reports Santa Rosa
County Agent Emmett McCall. They
placed nine calves with 4-H Club boys
and one with an adult.


QUINN R. BARTON CO.
Jacksonville, Fla.

McCormick Farmall
For The Best In . .
PASTURE
FARM EQUIPMENT

SPECIALISTS IN
MILK TRANSPORT
MULTI-STOP DELIVERY TRUCKS

INTERNATIONAL
Dealer Since 1924
1205 W. Forsyth St. Phone EL 4-8411


Dairy Helps Available
From Experiment Station
Dairymen may secure a free copy of
the following Dairy Farms Information
Bulletins by writing "Florida Agricultural
Experiment Station, Gainesville, Florida".
Bulletin 539-Trends of the Dairy In-
dustry in Florida.
Bulletin 54o-Productive Life Span of
Dairy Cattle.
Bulletin 542-Value of Alyce Clover
Pasture for Lactating Dairy Cows.




I













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NOVEMBER & DECEMBER, 1954 29


Treatment
in COWS


- IMPORTANT


DIOLUTEIN









DAIRY ASSOCIATION ACTIVITIES


Season Filled With Activities

Of The Florida Dairy Association
Largest Directors' Meeting Ever Held
Since the Association's last report in the Dairy News, which was published in
September-October issue, activities of the organization have continued at a terrific
pace. Space allowed here will permit only a summary reporting of these events with
two or three pictures. Little do most of the members of the industry realize the great
amount of time and attention that is devoted by many persons in dealing with the


problems of the industry.
Directors Meeting, Nov. 5-6
Both fun and long hours at day and
night business sessions marked the No-
vember 5-6 F.D.A. directors' meeting in
Jacksonville. Due to the attendance of
the ten new directors who do not offi-
cially become directors until January 1st,
this meeting had the largest attendance of
any directors' meeting in the history of
the Association.
The attendance of wives and special
guests at the dinner and luncheon ses-
sions made the size of these meetings
even more impressive.
In their business sessions, directors (1)
had Billy Gunter, Florida's new national
FFA president as honor guest and heard
his report of an official agricultural tour
of several weeks in England and Europe.
(2) Heard and conferred with Mrs.
Thelma Flanagan, State School Lunch
Supervisor and Mrs. Maxine Carter, Di-
rector of the Jacksonville Dairy Council,
regarding plans for promotion of greater
consumption of milk in schools and the
securing if possible of the one million
dollar. offered by the Federal Govern-
ment for use in helping to pay for ad-
ditional school milk consumed.
(3) Received and considered reports of
(a) Activities by Secretary E. T. Lay,
(b) Membership by Co-Chairman John
Tripson and George Johnson, and (c)
Finances by Treasurer, W. J. Barritt.
(4) Determined the length of the term
for each director beginning January 1st.
(5) Elected Bryan W. Judge, producer
of Orlando, to replace Gordon Eunice,
who was unable to serve as a director.
(6) Held a conference with the Flori-
da Milk Commission regarding changes
in the Commission's present so-called
"Code of Fair Trade Practices" for the
industry.
Special Honor Guests
Attend Directors Luncheon
Both the Friday night dinner meeting
and the Saturday noon luncheon session
overflowed with an attendance of over
seventy.


Honor guests at the luncheon included
U. S. Congressman Charles E. Bennett,
principal speaker; State Senator J. Gra-
ham Black and Mrs. Black; Senator
Fletcher Morgan and Mrs. Morgan; State
Representative Bill Maness and Mrs.
Maness; Representative Lacy Mahon, Jr.;
Florida's 1954 Dairy Industry Queen,
Miss Merriam Simmons; Bill Gunter, Na-
tional FFA president and members of
Florida's 1954 4-H Dairy Judging Team,
winners at the International Dairy Show.
Elect Honorary Junior Members
An impressive event at the directors'
luncheon was the announcement of Hon-
orary Junior Members elected by the
Florida Dairy Association. This came as
a surprise to the well deserving young
people present who received them. F.D.A.
Past President Wilmer Bassett, who pre-
sented these honorary memberships, was
himself a former outstanding 4-H mem-
ber and leader.

11 E S 0 L U T 0 N
Adopted Sept. 16, 1954 by
the Board of Directors of the
Florida Dairy Association
"WHEREAS, The Department of Dairy Sci-
ence has made valuable contributions to
the development of the Dairy Industry in
the state of Florida and the South gen-
erally, and
"WHEREAS, The members of the staff of
the Department of Dairy Science have
been recognized Nationally and Interna-
tionally for their contributions to the
science of dairying in teaching and re-
search, and
"WHEREAS, the Florida Dairy Industry de-
sires to encourage the further develop-
ment of these excellent accomplishments
by the Department of Dairy Science,
therefore,
"BE IT RESOLVED, That the Florida
Dairy Association go on record as recom-
mending the fullest support of the pro-
gram for development of the Department
of Dairy Science at the University of
Florida and that requests for financial
support, including funds for an addition
to the Dairy Products Laboratory, be in-
cluded in the next biennial budget of the
University."


1955 Directors Installed
At the close of the luncheon meeting
Past President Bassett explained that as
this might be the last opportunity before
January 1st, all officers and directors
would be officially installed. Mr. Bassett's
impressive remarks of installation were
followed by the presenting of the presi-
dent's gavel by President Herman Boyd
to President-elect Cliff Wayne, who will
take office, January 1st.
A Football Session
The directors' party of over 75 at-
tended the Florida-Georgia afternoon foot-
ball game, most of them going to and
from the Gator Bowl by special bus.
Over 40 of the group enjoyed a buffet
dinner and evening together at the home
of F. D. A. Secretary Andy Lay and
Marjorie Lay.

OTHER F.D.A. ACTIVITIES
During recent weeks Secretary Andy
Lay, Association officers, committee chair-
men and members have participated in-
* School Milk Program Conferences
in Tallahassee and eight other areas.
* National Milk and Ice Cream Asso-
ciation Conventions in Atlantic City.
* Meetings and Conferences with the
Florida Milk Commission.
* Conference of the Florida Agricul-
tural Council regarding a program to
secure a State-sponsored Animal Disease
Diagnostic Laboratory.
* National Grassland Farming Con-
ference.
* Two caucus sessions of members of
the State Senate and House of Represent-
atives.
* Dairy Plant Short Course at the
University of Florida.
* Promotion of State Dairy Pasture
Contest.
* Awarding of F.D.A. trophy at West
Florida Dairy Show.
* Editing and distributing of the Flor-
ida Dairy News and The F.D.A. Pro-
ducers Council "News Letter".
* State Meeting and Sale of Florida
Guernsey Cattle Club.
* Florida Public Health Association
Convention.
* National School Food Service Super-
visors Conference.
* Conferences with the Governor and
Commissioner of Agriculture.


30 NOVEMBER & DECEMBER, 1954


1
























Florida Dairy Association Directors, their wives and guests are seen above at November 6th luncheon of the group of Jacksonville.
At the speakers' table, standing, right to left, are Sen. J. Graham Black and Mrs. Black; U. S. Congressman Charlie Bennett; F.D.A.
President Herman Boyd; Past President Wilmer Bassett, who acted as toastmaster; Dairy Queen Merriam Simmons; National FFA
President Bill Gunter; Mrs. Fletcher Morgan and Senator Fletcher Morgan.


Honorary Junior Members
Named By Dairy Association
Thirteen young dairymen of Florida's
4-H and FFA organizations have been
honored by the Florida Dairy Association
with Honorary Junior Membership.
Announcement of the Association's cre-
ation of the Junior unit and the names of
the first thirteen to receive the honorary
membership was made by President Her-
man Boyd at a special luncheon meeting
of the Board of Directors in Jacksonville,
November 6th. Mr. Boyd said the decision
of the Board of Directors to form the
Junior Membership group was based on
a recommendation by a special committee
headed by W. A. Boutwell of which Dr.
E. L. Fouts, Head of the Dairy Depart-
ment, and C. W. Reaves, State Extension
Dairyman, were members.
In announcing the first members of the
unit, President Boyd said qualifications
for Honorary Membership provide for
outstanding leadership in Florida FFA
and 4-H dairy programs.
First Members Named
Among the first to be named and
present at the meeting to receive their
membership were Merriam Simmons of
St. Johns County, who was chosen F.D.A.
Dairy Industry Queen for the year 1954-
55 because of her outstanding dairy ac-
complishments as a 4-H member; Billy
Gunter of Live Oak and the University
of Florida, who was recently elected FFA
National President and is a former Flori-
da FFA Star Dairy Farmer; Beverly Sim-
mons, younger sister of Merriam, Perry
Smith, Hastings, and Erny Sellers, Talla-
hassee, who are members of the 1954
4-H State Dairy Judging Team which
won first place at the 1954 Chicago Inter-
national Dairy Show 4-H Dairy Judging
Contest.
Other Junior Members
Others among the first to be named
to the Honorary Junior Membership
group are: Howard Renner, St. Peters-


burg, also a member of the 1954 State
4-H Dairy Judging Team; Members of
the 1951 Florida State 4-H Dairy Judging
Team who won first place at the Water-
loo National Dairy Show and a trip to
England and Europe as the United States
team-Steve Simmons, older brother of
Merriam and Beverly, and Paul Thornhill
of Bartow, both now seniors at the Uni-
versity of Florida, and Jacksonville Al-
varez Brothers, Warren and Ray, both
dairy farming with their father. George
Ford, Quincy, winner of the F.D.A. 1953
State Fair FFA Exhibitor Trophy, a 1954
District FFA State Dairy Farmer and
1954 State FFA Star Farmer; Harry
Fuqua of Altha, selected 1954 FFA State
Star Dairy Farmer, and William Schack,
Greenwood, 1953 State winner of the
State 4-H Dairy Efficiency Award.


Better Roads Program
Endorsed By F.D.A. Board
At their last meeting, November 6th
the Board of Directors of the Florida
Dairy Association endorsed the following
"better roads program" sponsored by the
Florida Highway Users Conference:
"A. Allocate to the State Road Fund
for urgently needed road improvement
the unpledged surplus of motor vehicle
license tag revenue now going to the
General Fund. (The surplus not used for
school construction was over $19,000,000
for the last fiscal year.)
"B. Reorganize the State Road Depart-
ment for more efficiency and stagger the
terms of State Road Board members to
enable a continuing improvement pro-
gram.


The five young people seen above were pictured during the November 6 Florida
Dairy Association Meeting in Jacksonville as President Herman Boyd (at left) presented
them with "Honorary Junior Membership" in the Association. LEFT TO RIGHT, after
Mr. Boyd, are: Miss Merriam Simmons, 1954 Florida Dairy Industry Queen; Bill Gunter
of Live Oak, recently elected National President, Future Farmers of America; Miss
Beverly Simmons, sister of Merriam, Perry Smith and Erny Sellers, Members of Florida's
1954 State 4-H Dairy Judging Team.


NOVEMBER & DECEMBER, 1954 31







ACTIVITIES REVIEW OF:


Florida's Dairy Councils
Current News of Dairy Council Work in Tampa-St. Petersburg, Miami & Jacksonville
This section of the Dairy News is intended to bring timely information of the
activities of Florida Dairy Council work. The material will be supplied by the
three Council directors in turn.
Dairy Council Material In This Issue Sponsored By:
MRS. AMERICA ESCUDER, Director
Tampa Dairy Council

Dairy Councils Work With Home Economists


DAIRY Council nutritionists do some of
their most effective work with teachers of
Home Economics in public and private
schools, but they also work closely with
the Home Economists in Business. These
are the women known as HEIB's. They
are employed by the gas and electric
companies and by the manufacturers and
sales agencies of food products and house-
hold equipment. The Dairy Council nutri-
tionists are members of HEIB and of the
National Home Economics Association.
Home Economists are the links between
industry and the housewife. Because they
are in personal touch with the woman of
the house, they know what she wants;
and, at the same time, they keep her in-
formed of new developments that can im-
prove the comfort of her home and the
health of her family.
A Home Economist sells her ranges,
toasters, refrigerators, and other cooking
equipment by demonstrating to the home-


maker how easy it is to cook delicious
meals. The Dairy Council nutritionists
work hand in hand with the Home Eco-
nomists and supply them with the latest
information on nutrition, recipes and
menus which include the dairy foods we
need for health. In Hillsborough and
Pinellas counties the Dairy Council has
put on thirty-four (34) demonstrations
and nutrition talks jointly with the Home
Demonstration agents and the Home Eco-
nomists from the utility and equipment
companies.
The photograph shows the large at-
tendance at one of these lectures and food
demonstrations.
Mrs. America Escuder of the Hillsbo-
rough-Pinellas Dairy Council is State
Chairman for the HEIB group during
1954-55 and Mrs. Maxine Carter of the
Jacksonville Dairy Council is Chairman of
the Food and Nutrition section of the
Florida Home Economics Association.


Joint efforts of the Dairy Council, the Florida Power Corporation and the State Board
of Health have resulted in twenty nutrition lectures and food demonstrations in Pinellas
County with the crowd of approximately one hundred shown here being typical of the
attendance.


DIRECTORY OF
FLORIDA'S
DAIRY COUNCILS
DAIRY COUNCIL OF JACKSONVILLE
16 East Church Street
Mrs. Maxinc Carter, Exec. Director

DAIRY COUNCIL OF TAMPA AND
ST. PETERSBURG
102 N. Dale Mabry Tampa
Mrs. America Escuder, Exec. Director
Mrs. Betty Hornbuckle, Asst. Director
Mrs. Harriet L. Hastings, Asst. Director

DAIRY COUNCIL OF MIAMI Includ-
ing DADE, BROWARD & MONROE
COUNTIES
769 N. W. 18th Terrace Miami
Miss Marion Cudworth, Exec. Director
Miss Nancy Hinckley, Asst. Director

News of The Units
National President Milton Hult at-
tended the American School Food Service
Association meet-
ing in Miami
B e a c h recently
and while in the
area was the
speaker at a spe-
cial called meeting
of the Dairy Coun-
cil of Dade,
Broward and
Monroe counties MRS.CARTER
at Miami. He also
visited and attended a meeting of the
board of directors of the Jacksonville
Dairy Council.
New personnel
in Dairy Council
work in Florida
include Mrs. Max-
ine Carter, who
became the direc-
tor of the unit in
Jacksonville on
October 1. Mrs.
Carter is a gradu-
ate of Florida
State College for Women and served an
internship in dietetic work at Vanderbilt
University Hospi-
tal where she later
became dietitian.
She has also been
an instructor in
Home Economics
at the Florida
State University.
Mrs. Carter is ac-
tive in Home Eco-
nomic and Diet- MRS. HASTINGS
etic Associations,
local, state and national and is president
of the Jacksonville Dietetic Association.
She is also active in P.T.A. and the
Baptist Church.
(Continued on Next Page)


32 NOVEMBER & DECEMBER,


1954




A:'


More Youngsters Reading
Dairy Council Materials
Nearly 300,000 of the nation's sixth
grade school youngsters are reading Food
News this fall. National Dairy Council
which develops the fall and spring publi-
cation to fit the classroom needs of inter-
mediate grades reports this a 67 per cent
increase in circulation since the founding
of Food Newus two and one-half years
ago.
Food News presents interesting stories
about dairy foods and other food pro-
ducts. It is designed to encourage good
eating habits among children by bringing
food studies together with other class
room subjects, such as reading, writing,
science and geography.

News Of The Units
(Continued from Page 32)
Miss Nancy Hinckley, assistant director
in Miami, was introduced in the last issue.
Mrs. Harriet L. Hastings is the new
assistant director of the Hillsborough and
Pinellas County Dairy Council. She is a
graduate of Pennsylvania State University
with a degree in Home Economics in the
field of institutional administration. Fur-
ther study in foods and training with the
National Restaurant Association have
qualified her for work with the DC.

Two-month totals were given in news
sent out recently by both the Miami and
Jacksonville units. Together, the two
units distributed 146,295 pieces of Dairy
Council Health Education material in just
two months.

The Dade, Broward and Monroe coun-
ty Dairy Council conducts a weekly TV
program. Marian Cudworth plans recipes
which are prepared by her and the TV
mistress of ceremonies. Women have
written to express appreciation.

In Jacksonville, Nicky and Micky, a
pair of white rats being used in a fourth
grade feeding experiment, have been the
stars on a television program.

With diet programs, student nurse
courses in diet therapy, Junior 4-H Club
contests, and Home Demonstration Clubs
projects for November, as well as the
New 6th grade Food News distribution,
the Dairy Council directors and their as-
sistants are promoting dairy products to
an ever increasing number of people. The
ultimate benefit is to both the consumer
and the dairymen.
School Milk Program
Directors of Florida's three Dairy Coun-
cil units participated in conferences dur-
ing October with state and a local school
administrative and food service represent-
atives concerning a program for accept-
ance of a U. S. Department of Agricul-
ture appropriation of $1,000,000.00 for
increased use of milk in Florida schools.


This outstanding Dairy Council display, sponsored jointly by the Dairy Council
of the Miami area and the National Dairy-Council, was used recently at three different
health and food group conventions held in the Miami area. These were the Florida
Public Health Association, the American School Food Service Association and the
American Dental Health Association. Marian Cudworth, director, is explaining the
services of the Dairy Council units of Florida to Miss Betty Bond, a health educator from
Daytona Beach.


Dairy Council Marks 40th Anniversary
To MARK its 40 years of service to dairymen, the National Dairy Council plans to
make its coming Winter Conference-Annual meeting a banner affair, according to
Milton Hult, president.
The event is scheduled for the LaSalle Hotel, Chicago, January 24-26. Leaders
from every phase of dairying are expected to attend. The Milk Foundation, Chicago
Dairy Council affiliate, is official host.
Planners for the 40th anniversary con-
ference are considering a dramatic por- and regional office in New York make up
trayal of Dairy Council history which the Dairy Council organization.
closely parallels the record of achievement
of the dairy industry for nearly half a The distribution of NDC educational
century, and merchandising materials more than
l r n wl be g n d doubled last year over the previous year,
Special recognition will be given dis- indicating high acceptance and use of
tinguished scientists whose findings have these materials where they are made avail-
contributed to knowledge of the value of able.
dairy foods in the diet. Among them is
Dr. E. W. McCollum, Johns Hopkins The NDC program makes an invalu-
University, whose discovery of vitamin A able contribution to "self-help" programs
in 1913 started scientific research that has now going on in the industry to use up
proved the all-around merit of milk and dairy surpluses, Hult believes. It teams
dairy products in the human diet. up with the advertising of the American
Visitors will also take a look into the Dairy Association and other allied groups
in serving as a market conditioner."
future when new research projects are
discussed along with plans for NDC ex-
pansion and program development.
In August of 1954, total milk produc-
Program Reaches Millions tion was down 1% as compared to Aug-
The Dairy Council programs reach ust 1953. This was the first time this has
more than 60,000,000 people of all ages
through 67 locally organized and financed happened since September 1952. Is this
units in 77 large markets. These units to- the beginning of a trend ? It is too early to
gether with the national office in Chicago tell, but these statistics should be watched.


DECEMBER, 1954 33


I 1 1%

Ir


J


NOVEMBER &















J. C HUSKISSON Mr., P. Box 1231
J. C. HUSKISSON, Mgr., P. O. Box 1231


TAMPA, FLORIDA


STATE FAIR DAIRY CATTLE SHOW
SET FOR FIRST WEEK, FEB. 5-12
Dairy cattle exhibits, contests and the parade of champions are scheduled for the
lirst week of the Florida State Fair at Tampa.
The 1955 Fair, which runs from Saturday, February 5th through Saturday, the
19th, will be celebrating its 50th Anniversary.
The dairy cattle show will include an Open Show for Ayrshire, Guernsey and
Jersey Breeds and shows of Brown Swiss and Holstein-Friesian cattle.
Included also will be separate 4-H and FFA Dairy Cattle Shows and the Florida
West Coast Dairy Show with both 4-H and FFA entries.


Dairy Show Schedule
Opening Day, Saturday, February 5th
will have the West Coast Show and the
judging of the regular 4-H and FFA State
entries.
Sunday afternoon, Feb. 6, the Holstein
and Ayrshire Dairy Cattle Show Judging
2:00 P.M.
Monday, Feb. 7. the Jersey and Brown
Swiss Cattle Show and Judging-9:00
A.M.
Tuesday. Feb. 8. the Guernsey Cattle
Show and Judging-9:00 A.M.
At 5:00 P.M., the parade of Dairy
Cattle.
Champions and awarding of trophies
and ribbons in both adult and youth
groups.
IWednesday. Feb. 9. Ayrshire Cattle Sale
-9:30 A.M.
Saturday, Feb. 12, FFA Team Judging
of Dairy Cattle.
Special Dairy Exhibitor Awards
In addition to the regular cash awards,
totaling $2500.00 for each breed, and
ribbons which go to various winning en-
tries, special awards will be made as fol-
lows:
'Premier Dairy Exhibitor" Award. A
revolving trophy sponsored by the Florida
Dairy Association.
"Premier Dairy Breeder" Award. A re-
volving trophy presented by the Florida
Grower and Rancher magazine.
"Herdsmen Awards" of $40.00, $20.00
and $10.00 to the first, second and third
best taken care of exhibits.
FFA Dairy Judging
The State Champion FFA Dairy Judg-
ing Team selected at the Fair qualifies
them to compete for national honors at
the 1955 American Dairy Cattle Con-
gress at Waterloo, Iowa.
Special Youth Days
FFA Members Day is Saturday, Feb. 12.
4-H Members Day is Saturday, Feb. 19.
The Dairy Show superintendent will be
Thomas W. Sparks, Assistant State Exten-
sion Dairyman while the judge will be
Prof. Fordyce Ely of Ohio State Univer-
sity.


Help Fight T3




954 CHRISTMAS GREETINGS 1951
Buy Christmas Seals

U.S.D.A. Reports
Florida Milk Production
Sixty-six Florida dairies milking
5,549 cows reported November 1st,
69.89? of their herds in production as
against 71.1%/r in 1953. Average daily
production was up slightly over a year
ago from 2.24 gallons to 2.35 gallons.
Citrus pulp costs were down from
$2.87 to $2.04 but little pulp is available.
Prices of grain and concentrate dairy
feeds showed an increase over a year
ago from $3.56 to $3.69 with a 3.65%
gain in their use.


Classified Advertising
RATE FOR ALL CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING IS 10e PER WORD


FOR SALE

RANCH EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES-CATTLE
WATERING TANKS. Ten-foot steel rein-
forced Concrete, 2'/ feet wide. $60.00, delivered,
$10.00 your truck. Four foot wide tanks, $80.00
and $70.00. Orlando Concrete Specialties. Box
6122, Station 6, Orlando, Florida. Phone 3-4111.
LEAI,'. I'ROTIIIN RICH ALFALFA HAY.
l-scle. Pangola and Pensacola grass hay.
SQUAIII : RANCH', phone 980, Lee.surg,

N E\V DEMONSTRATOR INTERNATIONAL,
Mill Truck. Complete with automatic trans-
mission and 62 ca.s( body. List .$312-1.00, sacri-
fice $2118.(10. QUINN R. BARTON CO., P. O.
I.ox 27:"1, .Tacksonville, Fla. Phone EL 4-8411.


DAIRY SCIENCE MARCHES ON
(Continued from Page 11)
The Washington Utilization Research
Branch studied the milk enzyme xan-
thine oxidase which they believe con-
cerned with keeping quality of dried milk
and frozen cream. Destruction of this en-
zyme by high heat treatment of milk dur-
ing the processing made it appear that
inhibiting action of this enzyme is nec-
essary in dry milk solids in producing a
good loaf of bread. Such milk powder
has longer keeping quality also.
The fat splitting enzyme lipase is be-
ing studied at the Illinois and Ohio sta-
tions. Methods to detect adulteration of
milk fat were reported in two papers.


I Hc rlum HAIIIIIMt v nuiEL, ULLLAnWA1li wlh'nre the 195Y Annual iMecting
and Convention of the Florida Dairy Association is scheduled for June 22-24.


34 NOVEMBER & DECEMBER, 1954



















ADAMS PACKING ASSN., INC.
Citrus Pulp, Citrus Meal, Citrus Molasses
Jim Coates, Sales Mgr., By-Products Division


Auburndale, Fla.


Phone 8-4301


= I iNc. D /-R7ich
Chocolate Products Fruits and Flavors
Ed Salvatore
205 Como Street, Tampa Ph. 85-6902


DAIRYPAK INCORPORATED
PURE-PAK MILK CONTAINERS
J. H. STRACK PHONE: 3-4223
3064 Liberty St. (At Van), Daytona Beach, Fla.
J. H. Strack Phone: 3-4223


CHARLES DENNERY, INC.
New Orleans
Ice Cream Coating, Fruits and Flavors
Ira Stone 1026 E. Walnut St.
Ph. Mutual 5-3284
LAKELAND, FLA.


JAMES V. DEMAREST
MFRS. REPRESENTATIVE
Fine Chemicals, Vitamins and Minerals
Chemo Puro Mfg. Corp.
Hanovia Chemical & Mfg. Co.
P. 0. Box 787 Deland, Fla.


VETERINARY MEDICINES


GULF PAPER COMPANY, INC.
Ice Cream (Linerless) Cartons,
Butter Cartons
J. H. McVoy
50 E. Magnolia St. Pensacola, Fla.



* DOUGLAS J. HEADFORD
FLA. REPRESENTATIVE
Green Spot Orangeade Concentrate
Krim-Ko Chocolate Flavorings
616 Jessamine Ave. Phone 2-0148
Daytona Beach, Fla.


PATRONIZE

OUR

ADVERTISERS


HELM SANITATION CHEMICALS
HANS B. AHLEFELDT
Phone: ELgin :!-3721
Union Terminal Warehouse
Jacksonville, Fla.


JIM JENNINGS
MFRS. REPRESENTATIVE
Bireley's Dairy Orange Base
Welch Mfg. Co. Ice Cream Spoons
Route 9, Box 356 Jacksonville, Fla.



CHOCOLATE AND
COCOA DIVISION

-'Ciolal~te flor Ice Cream and Milk
JOE L. HAMMONS
Rte. 1, Box 304 TELEPHONE
Odessa, Florida Tampa 90-239(


KELCO COMPANY
Dariloid Dricoid and Sherbelizer
W\. E. TARVIN, Phone Evergreen 9722
2370 Capri Drive Decatur, Georgia


KIECKHEFER CONTAINER CO.
Pure-Pak Paper Milk Bottles
R. J. Evans -M. A. Knowles
I'hone ELgin 6-1;;;4
4700 Pearl St. Jacksonville, Fla.


S. H. MAHONEY EXTRACT CO.
Vanilla Products
D. C. Mulligan, Florida Representative


221 E. Cullerton Rd.


Chicago 16, Ill.


KELVINATOR
Division of American Motors Corporation
WM. C. MAYFIELD


llowell lonuse Suite 202


Atlanta, Ga.


NATIONAL PECTIN PRODUCTS CO.
Ice Cream Stabilizers & Emulsifiers
Pectin Stabilizers for Ices, Sherbets & Fruits
J. C. Head, Phone Norfolk, Va. 63-3939
RFD No. 1, Box 48, Bayside, Va.


NEWTH-MORRIS BOX CORP.
Ice Cream, Popsicle, and
Miscellaneous Folding Boxes

Jacksom ille, Fla., Phone: ELgin 3-9779
Miami,, a., Phlone: MUrray 8-8431


OWENS-ILLINOIS GLASS CO.
Douglas Milk Bottles
C. Pa. Parnialee V. H. Adams
1102 Barnett Bldg. Jax. 2, Fla.
Phone ELgin 3-6134-5



PAUL-LEWIS LABORATORIES, INC.
Lactivase-For the I'revention of oxidized flavor
in bottled milk, ice cream, storage cream
FIAVOR-PAK FOODS, INC., Miami, Fla.



PENN SALT MANUFACTURING
CO.
BK Powder Cleaners Acids
Bottle Alkalies
JOE FOSS
788 Waring Road Memphis, Tenn.


RIVERSIDE MANUFACTURING
COMPANY
MOULTRIE, GEORGIA
Masterbilt Uniforms
James M. Stewart Dave Freeman


SCHAEFER ICE CREAM CABINETS
MILK COOLERS
Representative E. G. "Don" Graham
Distributor Dudley Cawthon, Inc.
1034 N.W. 22nd St., Phone 82-1671, Miami


STANDARD PACKAGING CORPN.
Tamper Proof Seals Flexible Vacuum
Packages Liner Materials
Larry Hodge
1121 duPont Bldg. Miami, Fla.



THATCHER GLASS MFG. CO., INC.
Glass Milk Containers
\V. T. LOVE, Florida Representative

3221 Pinehurst P1. Charlotte 7, N.C.


UNIVERSAL MILKING MACHINE
DIVISION
Pail-less (Pipe line) Milking Machines
L. H. Hall Factory Representative


5240 N.W. 7th Avenue


Miami. Fla.


Advertise


In The Dairy News


DECEMBER, 1954 35


ALLIED TRADES MEMBERS

FLORIDA DAIRY ASSOCIATION

Special Card Ad Directory


NOVEMBER &












No Legislation Advocated
By Florida Dairy Industry
The Florida Dairy Association through
President W. H. Boyd of Miami recently
officially advised the Dade County Health
Department that the Association had not
considered nor discussed any proposals
for amendments to existing State Laws
governing the dairy industry.
Mr. Boyd said the information was
sent because of certain news stories which
led to a misunderstanding concerning sug-
gestions that had been made by one dairy
firm for what they believed would im-
prove some provisions of the present
laws.
Court Permits Tampa Dairy
Milk Sales In Sarasota
A Tampa milk distributor recently won
a legal battle in Sarasota Court against
a Sarasota City Health Department order
prohibiting the Tampa milk from dis-
tribution in Sarasota.
The prohibition against the Tampa
firm's milk was based on a Sarasota ordi-
nance requiring all raw milk processed
for sale in the city to have a bacteria
count of not over 50,000.
The Tampa plant contended that all
milk processed for distribution in Sara-
sota met the requirements of the law al-
though the milk from some of their pro-
ducers was over the 50,000 limit. It was
argued that the milk meeting the Sarasota
requirements was processed separately.
Cheaper To Buy Milk
Pinellas County Commissioners at a
recent meeting in Clearwater deferred
action on installing pasteurization equip-
ment at the County Home, as ordered un-
der a new state law, after Keith Simons,
Home director, said "the amount of milk
now used at the Home could be pur-
chased cheaper than the Home itself
could produce it if forced to process it."
Simons was also quoted as stating that
'at present, it appeared that going out
of the dairy business would be the cheap-
est way out".
Bad Judgment And Experience
"One of the best stories I have heard
lately is about a dynamic individual, self-
made and proud of it, but retaining his
lively sense of humor. He was asked:
'What is the secret of your success?' To
which he replied: 'My good judgment.'
"'What gave you your good judg-
ment?'
'Experience'.
'What gave you your experience?'
'My bad judgment.'
"I guess any man who has been active
in business could echo those sentiments,
and quote plenty of proof."
-Bruce Barton


What Skill Can Build
Anybody Can Burn Down
The story which suggests these thoughts
brings to mind the title of a book, "It
Can't Happen Here", and the habit of
a certain large bird which escapes danger
by putting his head in the sand.
Members of the Florida dairy indus-
try might well think between the lines
of the above as they read of the following
situations in another well known state
where the Milk Control Commission re-
voked the license of a milk distributor
for "continuing illegal and uncooperative
actions". The chairman of the Commis-
sion said concerning its action in denying
reinstatement of this dairy's license that
"for the past twelve months the operator
has consistently and unreasonably defied
the laws and regulations governing the
dairy industry. A continuation of these
actions under the guise of self-righteous-
ness," he said, "would tend to violently
disrupt the entire dairy industry of the
state and has already placed in public
jeopardy the good name and sound busi-
ness practices of thousands of dairy farm-
ers and hundreds of dairies".
In concluding an official statement to
the press, the Chairman of the Commis-
sion added, "We realize that that in tak-
ing this step, the Commission again will
be subjected to every type of unprincipled
criticism, but in carefully considering the
welfare of the citizens of the state and a
sound future for the dairy industry we
cannot continue to allow such 'opportun-
ists' to willfully violate provisions of the
milk control act whenever it suits their
purposes".
Concerning criticism, the records in the
above case show that 2,594 column inches
of news space was devoted to discussion
and editorials about it over a period of
about a year. While much of this news
and comment was of an impartial nature,
much of it attacked the milk commission
and the dairy industry in general.
Florida dairy conditions are certainly
not without their problems and those who
can take time out for a "forward look"
should remember that it is easy for one
to burn down what many with skill and
ingenuity have built.

Prolific Cow
"Bossie", a Guernsey cow belonging to
Mrs. Alice Hoagland of Fremont, Mo.,
has had three sets of triplet calves in a
row and all within fewer than 26 months.
All the five bulls and four heifers were
normal at birth and only two died.


NEWS AND VIEWS


TRAIT
Character and Integrity
Social and Civic Interests
Tact
Appearance Neatness
Good Nature Sense of
Humor
Self Confidence
Dendendability
Poise and Self Control
Ability to Develop
Feeling of Importance
of Customers
Total Rating


RATING


Milk Commission Acts
Among the recent orders issued by the
Florida Milk Commission are:
(1) Classifying the definition of a
"Cash and Carry Dairy". Such a dairy is
one "where milk is produced and sold
direct to customers at a bona fide farm
by the owner or lessor who is the pro-
ducer." Such producer may also sell a
portion of his milk to a distributor.
(2) Directing the suspension of a dis-
tributor's license to distribute milk in a
certain town for a period of 30 days. Vio-
lation of the Commission's minimum
milk price order for the area was given
as cause for the action.


Orange Artificial Breeders
Reelect Leaders for 1955
Hanson Collins was reelected president
of the Orange County Artificial Breeders'
Association for the coming year at the
group's recent annual meeting in Orlan-
do.
Other officers reelected were Elbert
Cammack, Vice President, B. W. Judge,
Treasurer and County Agent Fred Baetz-
man, Secretary. T. G. Lee, G. A. Brock-
bank and Kenneth Patterson were elected
directors for three-year terms.
A special guest speaker for the occa-
sion was Mr. Leland Lamb, representa-
tive of the American Breeders Service.

The South calls its sons, past and pres-
ent, home today not as to a lost cause or
forgotten corner but to a nation's eco-
nomic frontier, political balance, social
laboratory, spiritual bulwark and fighting
heart.


36 NOVEMBER & DECEMBER, 1954


HOW DO YOU RATE
ON PERSONALITY TRAITS?
The Milk Industry Foundation lists the
following personality traits as desirable
for a dairy "driver salesman". They ap-
pear to us as desirable for just about any
of us.
Check your own rating with the fol-
lowing scale: Excellent, 10. Good, 8.
Passable, 5. Poor, under 5. Total your
score and compare with Excellent 90,
Good 70, Passable 50 and Poor, under









If You Plan to Buy Guernseys

Make certain that your herd sire and foundation animals are worthy and come from a breeding
establishment whose breeding and testing program is on a permanent basis that insures increased
value in the animals you buy.
The Dinsmore Herd is built on the blood of several of the ancestors of FOREMOST MAY ROYALTY,
who is considered by many of the experts as one of the greatest living Guernsey bulls of the breed.
We have over 100 of his daughters in our herd today and nearly 100 cows in calf to his service.


\ 4

FOREMOST MAY ROYALTY

58 AR Daughters

Others on test
27 Very Good and Excellent daughters
Sire: Foremost Royal Valor
'Dam: Foremost Loyalty
18229-856-Jr4C



The right kind of Guernsey bull will add -
PRODUCTION TO YOUR HERD
COLOR, QUALITY, AND BUTTERFAT TO YOUR MILK

Florida has led the United States in the rapid increase in sales of Golden Guernsey
MILK THAT SELLS FOR MORE MONEY -

Golden Guernsey, Inc., had a booth at the 1953 American Medical Association Annual Meeting.
Over 6,000 doctors sampled Golden Guernsey milk. Many of them said they "never tasted milk like
that before." Only Guernseys produce milk "LIKE THAT."
Guernseys are the only breed to produce milk that has scored 100 in national competition.

Write for a copy of our picture folder and a list of young bulls for sale--THEN SELECT


Dinsmore Guernseys
FEDERAL ACCREDITED 57790 J. B. LANOUX, Herdsman NEGATIVE TO BANG'S
10 miles north of Jacksonville
Dinsmore Farms Near u. S. 1 Dinsmore, Florida


EARL A. JOHNSON CHARLES F. JOHNSON


---;- : -,__-;_I--__-


V. C. JOHNSON


BRADY S. JOHNSTON









Here's where your



start ..EURITY





tZ/ EGG
You can produce 30 to 40 dozens of eggs from this bag of Security Egg Mash
and Scratch. It is built to help you produce a steady flow of large, Grade A, i
eggs and to maintain good condition. Careful ingredient selection, extensive
research and precision manufacturing are the reasons why Security does a
better job.




SECURITY 4Ki aM &
DAIRY

SApproximately 40 gallons of milk can be produced from this bag of Security
26. Dairy Feed, fed along with available roughage. Lowered feeding cost per
SFEEDS gallon of milk produced can be yours on a Security Program. There is a
Specific Security Dairy Feed for any phase of your cows' life and for a maxi-
-- U mum utilization of your pasture and roughage.
ie UR TY ,ILLS


o-. ho


You can produce 150 pounds of pork from this bag of Security, fed along BI'G
with corn. Selected, choice ingredients are blended into an appetizing feed Hn6
with the right amounts of vitamins, minerals and carbohydrates for building H O
big frames, putting on the maximum amount of flavorful pork in minimum
time and getting proper finish. SEE YOUR SECURITY DEALER.


SECURITY MILLS, INC. KNOXVILLE, TENN.




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