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 Main
 Back Cover














Title: Florida dairy news
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00082035/00025
 Material Information
Title: Florida dairy news
Physical Description: 12 v. : illus. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Dairy Industry Association
Publisher: Cody Publications for Florida Dairy Industry Association.
Place of Publication: Kissimmee Fla
Publication Date: September-October 1954
Frequency: bimonthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Dairying -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Cattle   ( lcsh )
Milk   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-12, no. 1; Nov. 1950-Spring, 1962.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00082035
Volume ID: VID00025
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01386090
issn - 0426-5696

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Main
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
    Back Cover
        Page 41
        Page 42
Full Text


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Winners of Awards in State Pasture Contest (See Pape 28)


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There's no kind of milking magic in any
pipeline. It's still the action on the cow
that does the job.
We have said it before, and we say it
again:
"No calf, no man and no machine
can do a safe, satisfactory and
complete job of milking without
Tug and Pull! They never have
. they never will!"
SURGE milks with genuine Tug & Pull
that gets all the milk and protects the
cow's udder by holding the teat cups down
where they belong.

oIL ,Avls?


b~-
L
I

i
r


Copyright 1954 Bobson Bros. Co.


Villa it m lately

YES, Safely-Co'u


BABSON BROS. CO.
OF GEORGIA


ATLANTA HOUSTON KANSAS CITY
MINNEAPOLIS SYRACUSE TORONTO


il:


\







UNDERFEEDING LOWERS MILK PRODUCTION


UP TO 20% IN 2 OUT OF 3 COWS!


Yet, Larro SUREMILK,
properly fed, makes
most undermilkers give
up to 20% more milk!
After checking production records
of over 100,000 cows from large and
small herds, General Mills proved
that 2 out of 3 cows actually under-
milk by 20%, or 2,000 lbs. per cow
per lactation! However, when under-
fed cows were put on Larro SURE-
MILK (or SUREMILK 32 and grain)
milk production increased up to
20%, proving SUREMILK contains
all the nutrients a dairy cow needs
to milk most efficiently.
What Is SUREMILK?
SUREMILK is General Mills' bal-
anced dairy ration supplying pro-
teins, energy sources, minerals and
trace minerals needed for high profit
dairying. Both SUREMILK and SURE-
MILK 32 aid rumen bacteria in
doing a more complete job of digest-
ing roughage.
Mineral Feeding Eliminated!
Because SUREMILK and SUREMILK
32 contain Larromin, General Mills'
own trace mineral formula, no extra
mineral supplement is ever needed
when either is fed correctly.


Would you keep a cow that couldn't use all of her udder to produce milk? Would you allow 20%
of the milk to remain in the udder? You certainly wouldn't. Then why let underfeeding hold back
your cow's milk. You know, 2 out of 3 cows can really milk heavier and, when switched to Sure-
Milk, actually increased production up to 20% and morel


SUREMILK Satisfies... Or Else!
If you are not completely satisfied
with Larro SUREMILK or SUREMILK
32, notify your Larro Dealer or
salesman. He'll arrange to pick up
the unused feed and refund its pur-
chase price.


Figure the Plusses...Feed for
Plus Production
Your Larro SURE FEED Dealer has
full information on profitable dairy-
ing with SUREMILK or SUREMILK
32. To get all the milk your cows
can profitably produce, see him soon.


SUREMILK 32 Makes Ohioan
171/2c More Profit Per Cwt.
C. D. Richey, registered Ayrshire
breeder from Fincastle, Ohio, knows
he makes more profit with SURE-
MILK 32. He writes:
"I put my herd on SUREMILK 32
and grain for a full DHIA test year.
The next year, I went back to my
previous brand (a prominent na-
tional brand). The feeding method
remained the same," . but what
a difference in profit over feed cost!
ON SUREMILK 32
Price of milk per cwt.... $4.60
Cost to produce per cwt. 1.41%
Profit over feed cost
with Larro ............. 3.18% /cwt.
ON OTHER BRAND
Price of milk per cwt.... $4.98
Cost to produce per cwt. 1.97
Profit over feed cost with
other brand............ 3.01/cwt.
Extra profit from
SUREMILK despite lower
milk price.............. .17% /cwt.
Mr. Richey adds, "Needless to say,
I am back on Larro and I surely can
recommend it!"
Another testimonial which adds to
the evidence that "You're Money
Ahead When They're Larro-fed!"


^ ROAMIN' IN
THE RUMEN
rK Gby Steve Carter
of General Mills

SThe rumen of cattle
Holds billions of tiny
.-.. animals called bac-
teria. These bacteria tear down and
digest roughages. To do this com-
pletely and economically, they must
be properly fed. Just like other ani-
mals, they need a blend of proteins,
minerals, trace minerals and energy
all balanced properly.
The better the bacteria's ration is
balanced, the more complete is
roughage digestion. And since rough-
age is the basis of dairy nutrition,
an efficient job of digestion by the
rumen bacteria means more profit
over feed cost.
Larro Research Farm and other
dairy scientists are developing bet-
ter rations for the dairy cow and her
rumen bacteria. In the future, dairy
feeding may be largely a matter of
feeding her rumen bacteria.


SM-2-54
General Mills
Minneapolis 1, Minnesota


SEPTEMBER & OCTOBER, 1954


40 -1


* 1









Look how


Purina


Dealers


help you



SELL


Across the country
Purina Dealers
are running
newspaper ads
like this...
rr -


A Downright Good Drink... Anytime
That's right, Mr. Farmer . rural, village,
and city folks agree that milk is a good
drink anytime.
Folks know that milk helps keep energy
up but, compared to its nutritive value, it
is low in calories. Leading nutrition author-
ities say that milk is important for children
and adults, too, because it furnishes lots of
protein, vitamins and minerals-especially
calcium.
We ask you, is there anything better than
a tall glass of cool, fresh milk? It's refresh-
ing, isn't it? That's why so many folks are
enjoying milk with meals and in between.
As suppliers of Purina Dairy Chows to
many of our area's good dairymen, we know
something about the fine product they are
producing for you. Yes, milk's
a downright good drink . ,
anytime.
PURINA
DAIRY

More folks feed Micro-
Mixed Purina Chows to
Poultry and Livestock
than any other kind.


RALSTON PURINA COMPANY
MIAMI TAMPA DAIRY
CHOWS
H"*X*"O''U & *".*
IU UE EE EU E EE EU EE E EE UU EU I


2 0 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


I







EDITORIALS



Is This You? - Look in The Mirror

W hen you attend your convention never attend meetings. If you do, arrive late
and talk to everybody in sight. Never open your mouth during the regular
meetings. Wait until you get outside to express your views. Agree on everything
that comes up. Then criticize it the next day and don't do anything to help put it
across.
Don't pay any attention to that man who has the floor. Carry on a loud conver-
sation with your neighbors instead. Never ask prospective members to join. The
organization might get too big. Don't accept any office. It's much easier to criticize
than to do things. Raise H--- in the meetings because the dues are too high. Then
go out and spend two or three hundred bucks on a big evening.
Kick because the entertainment is either too risque or too tame.
Criticize the president and all the officers. That's to show you're on your toes.
If things don't go the way you want them to, threaten to resign, and urge all
your friends, if any, to do likewise.
If you're appointed to a committee, forget it, they might want you to attend a
meeting.
When you get a letter from the association, throw it in the waste-basket, they
might want you to do some work.
Never pay your dues on time. Let 'em worry a little bit in the office. Be against
anything that's new. The old ways were plenty good enough for grandpa, and they're
plenty good enough for you.
When a meeting is called, stand in the lobby and talk for an hour or two. Don't
let anybody hurry you. Don't do any work. Then, when others break their necks to
help the association along, you can howl that it is being run by a clique.


Kind Words For The "Dairy News" and "F.D.A."

The Florida Dairy Association and the Dairy News staff wish to share the follow-
ing comments recently received from some of our readers:
"I have just finished reading your publication, Florida Dairy News, for July-
August 1954, covering in 'Life Magazine fashion' the grand convention you had this
year at Daytona Beach. This is one of the most dramatic and interesting coverages of
a convention that I have seen for a long time. It looks like a national affair."
REX PAXTON. Sutherland Paper Co.
"Just a word of congratulations on the very fine Convention coverage in your
recent issue of the FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS. If your convention was half as good
as the pictures indicate it must have been a bang-up affair."
HENRY R. GEISINGER, Penna. Assn. of Milk Dealers
"I think you have done and are doing an excellent job in your State Convention
and with your Magazine, the Florida Dairy News. The Florida Dairy Association,
Inc., is on its toes!" CHARLES M. ULRICH, Milk Industry Foundation
"We have just had the pleasure of reviewing the last issue of FLORIDA
DAIRY NEWS. We think it a fine trade association publication and are particularly
grateful and pleased to see the article 'Florida's Dairy Council'. The presentation is
most attractive and we can't help but feel that the appreciation of the Dairy Council
Program in the State of Florida is very well illustrated and that your service to the
Dairy Councils through this article is most worthwhile."
NATIONAL DAIRY COUNCIL
"I have just read a booklet prepared by your Association giving facts on Florida
milk prices and a review of the twenty years activity of the Florida Milk Commission.
This booklet is certainly one of the finest pieces of information we have yet found
which has as its intent informing the public of activities of milk control authorities."
JAMES E. CUSHMAN, South Carolina Dairy Commission


Food For Thought

When an advertising executive (in American Milk Review, May 1954) draws a
conclusion, based on an extensive survey, that a large part of the industry's adver-
tising is considered worthless because "most of the money is spent without any basic
factual knowledge of the market, it is time to consider making some improvements.


VOL. 4 NO. 5
SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 1954
BI-MONTHLY
THE
FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS
E. T. LAY, Editor & Business Manager


Official Publication of
Florida Dairy Association

Florida Guernsey Cattle Club

Florida Jersey Cattle Club
Florida Holstein Cattle Club

Florida Association
of Milk Sanitarians

DIRECTORS
FLORIDA DAIRY ASSOCIATION
E. T. LAY, Executive Director
W. HERMAN BOYD, President, Miami

Producers
GEORGE F. JOHNSON, WYest Palm Beach
Vice President & Chairman
"Producers Council"
D. WAYNE WEBB, Tampa
JOHN SERGEANT, Lakeland
L. B. HULL, Micanopy
BILL GRAHAM, Miami
JOHN T. ADKINSON, Pensacola
IRA BARROW, New Smyrna Beach
J. H. ADAMS, Jacksonville
J. D. FUQUA, Altha
JOHN McMULLEN, Clearwater

Distributors
CLIFF D. WAYNE, Miami
Vice President & Chairman
"Distributors Council"
HERMAN BURNETT, Bradenton
J. N. McARTIIUR, Miami
H. CODY SKINNER, Jacksonville
JOHN M. HOOD, St. Petersburg
W. J. BARRITT, JR., Tampa
J. F. W. ZIRKLEBACH, Pensacola
JOHN TRIPSON, Vero Beach
GEORGE BOUTWELL, Lake Worth
CLAUDE KELLY, Daytona Beach

Additional Directors
F. W. DECKLAR, President
"Alligator Club," Tampa
WILMER BASSETT, Part-Pres., Monticello
THE FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS is
published bi-monthly by the Florida Dairy
Association, 220 Newnan St., Jackson-
ville, Florida. Subscription price of $1.00
a year. Entered as second class mail at
the Post Office at Jacksonville, Fla.,
under Act of March 3, 1879, as amended.
Business and Editorial office, 220 New-
nan Street, Jacksonville.
NATIONAL EDITORIAL
AS association


Member Florida Press Association


SEPTEMBER & OCTOBER, 1954 3








RUMELK









The SCIENTIFIC, yet PRACTICAL

MILK REPLACEMENT

for calves

Featuring -

VIABLE RUMEN BACTERIA
in desiccated form

Providing naturally -

THE VITAL FACTOR IN
RUMEN NUTRITION

*


NOW

is the time to act
and learn first hand

HOW

RUMELK WILL
Raise better calves

Save you money


Contact your local feed dealers or
write for complete details and
interesting leaflet.

Manufactured by:
W. A. DAVIS MILLING CO.
P. O. Box 1552, High Point, N. C.
or
P. O. Box 787, Deland, Fla.


HARRY FUQUA, 1954 STATE FFA DAIRY FARMER, is seen receiving the Future Farmer
Foundation $100 check and a Southern Dairies, Inc. "plaque" from J. C. Huskisson, manager.
Florida State Fair. Tampa. Other. in the picture are district FFA Dairy Farmer winners who u'ele
awarded S25 each. These aie, L to R: TERRY McDAVID. Pompano: HARRY GRIFFIN,
Bartouw: RONALD HUNT, DeLand; HILLMAN GOFF. Live Oak: DOWLIN BLACK, Gon-
zalez: and GEORGE FORD. Quincy, top district winner uho received a plaque as "District
Star Dairy Farmer" and the district prize of $25 from Southern Dairies. Inc.

West Florida FFA Member, Harry Fuqua
Wins 1954 State Dairy Farmer Award
By: A. R. COX
Executive Secretary, Florida Future Farmers
Because of the importance of dairying in a well-balanced agricultural production
program, and in line with their desire to stimulate greater participation and achieve-
ment in dairying among the Future Farmers, the FFA Foundation and Southern Dair-
ies, offer awards to our members who exhibit outstanding achievements in dairying.
These awards give recognition for all-around dairy farming programs, including such
items as home-grown cattle feed, pasture improvement, use of modern equipment
and methods, and construction and maintenance of buildings and equipment.
The FFA Foundation awards the Star Dairy Farmer $100.00, and Southern Dair-
ies gives him and each top district winner a Dairy Efficiency Plaque. In addition,
each district winner receives a $25.00 award from Southern Dairies.
Harry Fuqua, age 17, in the 12th grade and a member of the Altha FFA Chap-
ter of Altha High School, who receives his State Farmer Degree on Wednesday, June
16, is the State Star Dairy Farmer Award Winner and receives $100.00 from the
Future Farmers Foundation.
Harry is the son of a well known dairyman and farm leader, J. D. Fuqua, and
brother of a former prominent FFA member. He has gradually grown into a partner-
ship in the dairy business, starting his vocational agricultural program with 2 dairy
calves, 2 acres of peanuts, and 100 chicks for meat. This year, he has 15 producing
cows, 7 head of young stock, 10 acres of soybeans, 10 acres of corn, 2 brood sows,
and 8 hogs for meat. For feed, he is growing 10 acres of wheat, 10 acres of oats,
and 5 acres of millet.
To further his experience in managing the dairy, his Father has placed him in
charge of the dairy on the farm.
Though his work with the dairy herd has kept him busy, he has been active in
school as President of his Chapter, a member of the football and basketball teams,
and played in band. He is also President of the Young People's Sunday School Class
and B. T. U., a member of the National Guard, and a patrol leader in the boy Scouts.
District Dairy Farmer Award Winners
District I: Dowlin Black, Gonzalez; District 1:. George Ford, Quincy; District
III: Hillman Goff, Live Oak; District IV: Ronald Hunt, DeLand; District V: Harry
C. Griffin, Bartow; District VI: Terry McDavid, Pompano Beach.








J. C. HUSKISSON, Mgr., P. O. Box 1231 TAMPA, FLORIDA


4 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS












































ALL KINDS OF DAIRY CATTLE FOR SALE
50 Head of Springer Cows on Hand at All Times
TRANSPORTATION FURNISHED FOR DELIVERY TO YOUR FARM
Phone, Write or See

ROSS REYNOLDS & SON
Phone 68-325 Plant City, Fla.

SEPTEMBER & OCTOBER, 1954 5


DAIRY SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT
ENGINEERED TO MEET YOUR PARTICULAR NEEDS
FOR MOST ECONOMICAL OPERATION

"LOUDEN" Barn Equipment


CHERRY-- BURRELL" "DE LAVAL"
Coolers Milkers
Pasteurizers Separators
Ice Cream Machinery Clarifiers

WE CAN NOW SERVE YOU IN 6 FLORIDA COMMUNITIES

MILLER MACHINERY and SUPPLY CO. Tallahassee

MILLER MACHINERY and SUPPLY CO. Hllywood

MILLER LENFESTEY SUPPLY CO. Trlando


A load of Guernsey and Swiss
heifers from Orrville, Ohio, sold to
George Wilt of Lakeland, Florida
by Ross Reynolds & Son, Plant City.
The dams of this load of heifers
made 432 Ibs. butterfat last year.









































October and November are the months to plant winter
clover, lupins, alfalfa, oats, rye, fescue and rescue grass.
We would like to call your attention to the new bulletin
#517, "Winter Clovers in Central Florida" by Dr. E. W.
Hodges, Dr. G. B. Kirk and D. W.Jones of the Range Cattle
Experiment Station.
For those who have hay equipment we suggest a small block
of alfalfa.
The season is at hand for that important fall application
of IDEAL Brand Fertilizers to pastures. Contact your Wilson
& Toomer representative for dependable service, experienced
counsel and quality materials.


Working hand in hand with
Florida Agriculturefor 62years




WU LSON & TOOM ER
FERTILIZER COMPANY
Plants in Jacksonville, Tampa, Cottondale, Port Everglades
GENERAL OFFICES JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA


NEWS

DIGEST



SELLERS BECOMES D.V.M.
Leon Sellers, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs.
Leon H. Sellers of St. Petersburg, has
begun the general practice of veterinary
medicine with Dr.
H. C. Hall of Tam-
pa. His mother is
the president of the
Ladies' Auxiliary of
the Florida Dairy
Association.
Leon, Jr. is a grad-
uate of the Univer-
s:ty of Florida with
SELLERS a degree in Animal
Husbandry a n d i n
June this year he received his degree as
a doctor of veterinary medicine from Ala-
bama Polytechnic Institute, Auburn, Ala.
Prior to entering college Leon served with
the United States Coast Guard.

Milk Price Is Less
According to the National Dairy Coun-
cil, price-wise Americans paid less for
dairy products last year than previously,
in fact, LESS than the all-food average.
For example, while the all-foods index
stood at 226, the index for fresh, home
delivered milk stood at 191, which is
35% lower than the average increase for
all foods. The price indexes for other
dairy products were also favorable with
butter at 215 and cheese at 218.

Bottles Carry Milk Slogan
The slogan, "You Never Outgrow
Your Need For Milk," and the "hand
and glass symbol" will be a part of the
stock line of bottles produced by the
Thatcher Glass Manufacturing Co., El-
mira, N. Y., according to an announce-
ment of the American Dairy Association.
Also, several milk carton manufactur-
ers have made this ADA-developed sales
symbol available for the paper cartons.

New Milk Factor
The Agricultural Research Service re-
ported recently that casein, the principal
protein in milk, carries a previously un-
recognized growth factor.
Scientists from the Agriculture Depart-
ment found that chicks from casein-fed
hens outgained chicks from other hens
on a high-protein soybean ration as well
as those on a low-protein corn diet.


6 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS





Sales Opportunities For
More Milk In Restaurants
The American Dairy Association is
working in cooperation with the AMER-
ICAN RESTAURANT magazine to get
restaurants and institutions interested in
selling more milk to their customers. The
July issue of 'AMERICAN RESTAUR-
ANT' magazine was devoted to milk
sales opportunities for restaurants and
institutions and the 'Sell More Milk' idea
was presented in this fashion:
1. There was a milk cover page.
2. Editorial copy in the magazine
was devoted to milk and the sales and
profit opportunities that restaurant and
institution people have in going out after
additional milk sales.
3. The American Dairy Association
carried a double spread ad in the maga-
zine pinpointing milk sales opportunities
in restaurants and in institutions.
The American Dairy Association states
it is their opinion that "it is to the ad-
vantage of the dairy industry to concen-
trate efforts on restaurant and institution
trade."
A recent bulletin of the Milk Industry
Foundation, in discussing this same "sales
opportunity", points out that "there are
350,000 hotels, restaurants and cafeterias
in the United States but very few of them
have ever been encouraged to use more
fluid milk with meals. The restaurants
alone served 65,000,000 meals every day
during 1953. More meals should have
more milk."
Milk Is Leading Beverage
Milk is by far the most popular bever-
age sold in America according to the re-
search department of the Florida Farm
Bureau.
The bureau lists the five largest selling
drinks in the U. S. and their annual con-
sumption as follows:
M ilk ........................ 13.5 billion gallons
Coffee ...................... 6.5 billion gallons
Beer ........................ 2.6 billion gallons
Soft Drinks .............. 1.8 billion gallons
Tea .......................... 1.2 billion gallons

Mojonnier to Exhibit
In Atlantic City Show
Mojonnier products to be displayed at
the Dairy Equipment Exposition in At-
lantic City, October 24-30, will include:
Model F. Tester, Model LTS1 Lo-Temp,
pilot size, Compact-Coolers, Senior, Jun-
ior and Parallel, also ammonia controls,
Tubular Evaporator, Vacuum Pan, Tubu-
lar Cooler, Tubular Heat Exchanger, Bal-
ance Tank, Bulk Tanker, Bulk Coolers,
Cold-Wall Tank, Cut-Wrap Machine,
Counter-Current Vat, Filler with Ford
Dairy Press and Capper, Conveyor, Uni-
versal Milk Case Stacker, Case Washer,
Laboratory Equipment and Supplies, San-
itary Fittings and Volute Pump.


* No Spraying!

* No Dusting!

* Nothing to Mix!


Simply Scatter By Hand
(Use a rubber glove)


Dairymen, Poultrymen, Cattlemen, Farm-
ers, Technical Personnel, and Housewives all
over the country have acclaimed this amazing
new fly killer.
It's fast-kills in minutes! Lasting-kills
for days. Kills maggots and resistant flies, too.
Now available at your favorite dealers in 5
and 10-pound bags, 25-pound drums and one-
pound shaker cans.

FLY FLAKES ARE TRIED AND PROVEN

ACCEPT NO SUBSTITUTES
Manufactured by
FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL SUPPLY COMPANY




[SFASCO


DIVISION OF WILSON & TOOMER FERTILIZER CO.
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA

SEPTEMBER & OCTOBER, 1954 7







Dairy Plant Problems Course

Set Oct. 14-16 at U off

he 17th Annual three-day conference and short course on dairy plant processing
and management problems has been announced by the University of Florida
Dairy Science Department for Thursday, Friday and Saturday, October 14-16.
The popular program, sponsored by the Dairy Science Department, University
of Florida and the Florida Dairy Association's Plant Operations Committee, offers
a splendid opportunity to milk and ice cream plant superintendents, their assistants
and supervisory processing employees. Plant owners, managers and allied tradesmen
are also invited to participate.
All conference sessions, beginning with registration at 10:00 A.M. Thursday,
October 14, and closing at noon Saturday, the 16th, will be held at the Dairy Pro-
ducts Laboratory on the University of Florida Campus.
Those interested will attend a U. of F. vs. U. of Ky. football game Saturday
afternoon following the close of the conference business sessions.


Annual Dinner
A most enjoyable feature of the three-
day program is the annual banquet and
program held Thursday evening at the
University Student Service Center.
Room Reservations
The Arrangements Committee has is-
sued a warning that those desiring hotel
and motel reservations should not delay
in making your arrangements. Those de-
siring assistance may write Dr. Leon
Mull, Dairy Science Dept., University of
Florida, Gainesville.
Football tickets must also be secured
in advance. These are $3.50 each and
may be secured by mailing check to the
"University Athletic Association, Gaines-
ville".
Program Committee
Dr. E. L. Fouts, Head of the U. of F.
Department of Dairy Science, is chair-
man of the Short Course Program and
Arrangements Committee with Dr. L. E.
Mull serving as co-chairman. The chair-
man and co-chairman of the Dairy Asso-
ciation's Plant Comimttee are Paul Bur-
ner, Dinsmore Dairy, Jacksonville, and
Charles Williams, Borden-Southern Co.,
Jacksonville.
Program Outline
Subjects on the Thursday afternoon
program are (a) Problems with HTST
Pasteurization of Ice Cream Mix, (b)
Profits in Ice Cream, (c) Problems in
Manufacture and Selling Soft Ice Cream.
Friday afternoon subjects scheduled are
(a) Effect of Feeding on Composition of
Milk, (b) Interpreting the Results of
the Cryoscope, (c) In-Place-Cleaning.
Friday afternoon subjects schedule are
(a) Synchronizing Plant Operations, (b)
Practical Aspects of Maintaining Paper
Filling Machinery, (c) Insect and Rodent
Control in Dairy Plants.
Friday evening will be given over to
participation in a dinner program of the
"North Florida Dairy Tech Club".
Saturday morning will be devoted to a
"Cultural Buttermilk Clinic" and a meet-
ing of the "Plant Operations Committee"
of the Florida Dairy Association, headed
by Paul Burner.


Short Course Speakers
Featured Speakers on the Plant Short
Course program are: Dr. R. B. Becker,
Dr. E. L. Fouts and Prof. W. A. Krienke,
University of Florida; Joseph F. Flynn,
Ex-Cello-O Corporation, Detroit; Milton
Gelbman, Foremost Dairies, Inc., Jack-
sonville; Jack Hartman, Joe Lowe Cor-
poration, New York; E. M. Searles, Na-
tional Dairies, Inc., New York; George
Tworoger, Borden Co., Miami; and
Claude B. Wells, Jr., Stein, Hall and Co.,
New York.


New College Course
Trains Dairy Executives
A welcome beginning to the solution
of the dairy industry's serious problem
of securing young prospective executive
personnel with college training in both
dairy science and management is seen in
the decision of the University of Georgia
and Rutgers University to offer for the
first time this fall a unique four-year
course intended to provide training for
students who will become executives and
leaders in the dairy industry.
The course has been designed to sup-
ply graduates with training in business
methods and with a background in liberal
arts in addition to a knowledge of dairy
technology. Graduates will be ready to
fill positions such as teacher, research
worker, laboratory technician, dairy prod-
ucts processor, quality control supervisor,
dairy plant manager, and salesman in the
dairy industry and allied fields.
The new course was made possible by
eliminating certain requirements for sub-
jects such as geology and advanced chem-
istry, and permitting the student a wider
choice among the liberal arts and in sub-
jects like letter writing, public speaking
and management. Until this year no sim-
ilar training has been available at any
American university.


SBllllliiNEilliHm
J. R. GOOLSBY DAIRY HAS NEW MODERN MILKING BARN
The above pictures shou the exterior and interior of the new Arc-Rib Milking and Feeding
Barn recently completed by the J. R. Goolsby & Son Dairy at Lake Park, Palm Beach County.
The barn handles 48 cow's at a time and is equipped with Suni-Clime 312 ft. steel stanchions,
glass windows, overhead doors and mosaic tile feed troughs.


8 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS





IS YOUR MEASURE OFF?
The Miami Herald recently reported
the following incident in dairy inspec-
tion.
"Miami's weights and measures inspec-
tors aren't the most popular people in
town with some business concerns when
they drop around with scales and meas-
uring devices.
"But red-faced officials of one Miami
dairy were very happy Tuesday over the
visit of Inspector John C. Mays.
"'Your measure is off,' Mays reported
after testing quart containers of milk.
"That usually means a date in court.
But it didn't in this case.
"The dairy has been giving its cus-
timers 341/2 fluid ounces of milk instead
of the 32 that make up a quart.
"There were hasty adjustments in the
bottle filling equipment and expressions
of thanks to the inspector."

) For Centuries ... man has searched for
the fountain of youth. Men have fought
and killed and died for a sip from this
fabled and fabulous spring. Yet, if they
only knew it, the fountain of youth was
as close as the nearest cow.
Milk will do wonders, United States
Department of Agriculture scientists have
found. It adds life to years and years to
life. And who among us doesn't want to
live six or even seven years longer than
the mortality tables of the insurance
companies say we are likely to be kick-
ing around?
Milk will do even better than that. It
will also add more than 10 per cent to
your prime of life-that wonderful per-
iod when we all get more things done
with less effort.

Observes Modern Milk Hauling
Mrs. E. E. House, editor of "Tourist
Notes" in the Leesburg Commercial, is
to be commended for observing and writ-
ing about some of Florida's newest and
modern milk handling equipment in
which Florida ranks close to the top in
the nation.
Mrs. House wrote: "Worth seeing and
investigating is the 1,200 gallon refrig-
erated stainless steel milk transport truck
belonging to the Jeffcoat dairy company.
Milk direct from the cows is poured into
the refrigerated tank, cooled and hauled
to Orlando to be processed by the Borden
company, bottled and returned to Lees-
burg for sale."

Are You Advertising?
In a breakdown of advertising lineage
increases among national advertisers, it
was revealed that of the top seven con-
cerns in the entire grocery category, four
of them were "dairy companies."
The 1953 national advertising figure
for dairy products was $15,848,000-up
24.9 per cent from 1952!


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the milking period. Temperature
rise during the second milking is
held to a very minimum with
Mojonnier Bulk Coolers.
As a result, Mojonnier Bulk
Coolers produce quality bulk milk
at the lowest possible operating
cost.
All stainless steel Mojonnier
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design insure calibration stability
plus easy cleaning.


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Call or write:
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4601 W. Ohio St., Chicago 44, Illinois


FLORIDA
FAVORITE FERTILIZER
Does Your Pocketbook
A FAVOR TOO!
Florida dairymen know that better milk
production means more profit to them.
They also know that better fertilizer
means grass, which makes for better milk
production. That's why so many dairy-
men are switching to FFF fertilizers, made
in Florida by men who know Florida
crops and soils. For profit producing re-
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Do your pocketbook a favor. Join the growing
list of dairymen using FFF brands!


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SEPTEMBER & OCTOBER, 1954 9













Where to buy



ORTHO Fly Killer M:


ALABAMA
FLORALA
The Farmers Seed Store
SAMPSON
Alabama Gin & Peanut Co.

FLORIDA
ALACHUA
Farmers Hardware Company
BELLE GLADE
The Kilgore Seed Company
BLOUNTSTOWN
Coxwell Seed & Plant Store
KOYNTON BEACH
Broward Grain & Supply Co., Inc.
BRADENTON
Check-R-Board, 809 14th St., W.
CHIEFLAND
Farm Service Store, Inc.
CHIPLEY
F-R-M Feed and Seed Store
CLEWISTON
Parkinson's, Inc.
COCOA
Farmers Supply Store
100 Florida Avenue
CRESTVIEW
Crestview Trading Company
DANIA
Broward Grain & Supply
118 N. Park Avenue
DAYTONA BEACH
Dunn Brothers Hardware
154 S. Beach Street
DEFUNIAK SPRINGS
Thompson-Hillard Milling Co.
West Florida Farmers Co-Op., Inc.
DEL RAY BEACH
Del Ray Beach Farm Supply, Inc.
DUNNELLON
Rush's Department Store
FT. LAUDERDALE
Broward Grain & Supply
106-108 W. Broward Ave.
FT. MYERS
Corbin Farm Supply
1305 Main Street
Kilgore Seed Company
Anderson Ave.
GAINESVILLE
B & G Farm Supply
1012 Main St., S.
Johnson Brothers, Inc.
111-113 S. Main Street
Kilgore Seed Company
202 S. E. 1st. Ave.
HIGH SPRINGS
Farm Supply Store
High Springs Seed Store


JACKSONVILLE
General Mills
2 Riverside Avenue
E. A. Martin Seed Co.
5126 W. Beaver St.
JASPER
Farmers Hardware & Supply
P. O. Box 348
JAY
Morgan Seed Store
KISSIMMEE
Kissimmee Feed Store
424 Broadway
Tarcai Feed and Farm Supply
Vine at Main
Tuxedo Feed & Seed Store
111 Broadway
LAKE BUTLER
Rivers Hardware & Furniture
LAKE CITY
Farmers Mutual Exchange
P. O. Box 806, 1236 N. Marion St.
Wade-Persons
LIVE OAK
Farmers Mutual Exchange
MACCLENNY
Baker County Farmers Supply
MADISON
Farmers Mutual Exchange
400 S. Shelby St.
Ivey's Farm Feed Store
314 S. Range Street
MALONE
Williams Seed & Feed Company
MARIANNA
Powledge Seed & Supply Co.
MAYO
Garden's Farm Supply
P. 0. Box 148
MELBOURNE
Farm Supply Store
MIAMI
General Mills, Inc.
7275 N.W. 7th Avenue
Hector Supply Company
235 S. Miami Ave.
Hughes Seed Store
116 South Miami Ave.
Security Feed and Seed Co.
2035 N.W. 7th Avenue
MILTON
Griffin Supply Co.
MONTICELLO
DeLoach-Hodges Hardware
OCALA
Kilgore Seed Company
909 N. Magnolia
Security Feed & Seed Co. of Ocala,
Inc., 432-434 N. Magnolia St.
Seminole Stores, Inc.
Orange & Ocklawaha


PAHOKEE
The ilgore Seed Company
PALATKA
Security Feed & Seed Co.
201 First St.
PALMETTO
Kilgore Seed Company
710 13th St.
PENSACOLA
Escambia Farmers Supply Co.
North Palafox St.
F. S. Mellen Company
42 E. Garden Street
Bryant's Feed Store
305 W. Green Street
PLANT CITY
The Gilgore Seed Co.
214 S. Collins St.
POMPANO BEACH
Broward Grain & Supply Co.
QUINCY
Southern Chemical Sales & Service
P. 0. Box No. 3
SANFORD
Kilgore Seed Store
300 W. 1st.
ST. CLOUD
Tuxedo Feed Store
TALLAHASSEE
Rivers Seed Company
309 S. Adams Street
Berry and Johnson Company
826 W. Gaines Street
Ott's Feed Store
123 W. Jefferson
TAMPA
The Quaker Oats Co.
3021 East Broadway
Tuxedo Feed Store
3109 Fourth Avenue
Amco Feed Stores, Inc.
3701 E. Broadway
Jackson Grain Company
Cass and Ashley St.
TRENTON
Tri-County Farmers Co-Op., Inc.
VERO BEACH
Lawis Feed & Supply
2018 Commerce Ave.
WAUCHULA
Kilgore Seed Company
Main and 7th.
WEST PALM BEACH
Kilgore Seed Company
910 Belvedere Road


10 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


~








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This remarkable new bail attracti and kill/
both resistant and non-resislant house flies.
Just use sprinkling can, appling ORTHO
Fly Killer M where flies are the thickest.
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your bhrn. After fln population has been re-
duced less frequent applications arc needed
and your fly control job becomes easier.


There's an ORTHO pest control for every need
Your best protection against screw worm. ORTHO 1038 Screw Worm Control
drives screw worms out of wounds, then kills them. Promotes rapid
healing of wounds.
Space spray gives rapid knock-down. ORTHO Fly Spray is an ideal space
spray which gives quick kill on contact and provides excellent control of
the lesser house fly.
2-way livestock pest control. ORTHO Kleen Stock Spray combines Lindane,
(for quick kill), with Toxaphene, (for longer lasting control). Kills many
pests which bother livestock.
Wall or "surface" spray. If you need a surface spray that gives good residual
fly control buy ISOTOX Dairy Spray wettablee or liquid). Also controls
mange, lice, ticks, and mosquitoes. ,
On all chemicals, read directions and cautions before use.


SEPTEMBER & OCTOBER, 1954


* 11







JERSEY CATTLE CLUB NEWS



A. T. Alvarez Elected President
At Jersey Breeders Annual Meeting
The Florida Jersey Cattle Club elected A. T. Alverez president for the coming
year at their 1954 annual meeting at the Hotel Seminole, Jacksonville, August 18th,
the day preceding the organization's Annual Jersey Sale. The Club's Annual Banquet
meeting was held the evening of the same day with an attendance of seventy-five
members and guests.
President W. J. Nolan, Jr. acting as toastmaster at the banquet, presented and
installed the new officers and directors who were elected at the annual business meet-
ing held during the afternoon.
In addition to President A. T. Alvarez, the new officers and directors for 1954-
55 are: Vice President, M. A. Schack, Greenwood; Secretary-Treasurer, F. E. Baetz-
man, Orlando; Directors: C. B. Skinner, Jacksonville; I. J. Pemberton, Jacksonville;
W. J. Nolan, Jr., Jacksonville; C. C. Sellers, Tallahassee; M. T. Crutchfield, Altha;
Judson Minear, Jupiter; J. K. Stuart, Bartow; W. R. Watkins, St. Cloud and B. W.
Judge, Orlando.


Annual Meeting Speakers
The speakers and honor guests at the
banquet were: J. F. Cavanaugh, Assistant
Secretary of the American Jersey Cattle
Club, and C. W. Wheeler, President of
the Georgia Jersey Cattle Club.
Mr. Cavanaugh was well received by
the Florida breeders and in his talk com-
plimented the Club for its activities.
Two very interesting color moving pic-
tures, "Grass is Gold" and the "Inter-
national Dairy Show" were presented by
the Allis Chalmers representative.
Trophies Are Awarded
During the banquet a beautiful silver
bowl was presented to Mr. and Mrs.
Welkener of Jacksonville for highest But-
terfat Production Record of their cow,
Standard Signal Ballerina, completed dur-
ing 1953 by a Florida Jersey Cow based
on a 305 Day, twice daily milking, ma-
ture equivalent milking basis.


The Polk County Dairy, run by J. J.
Smith of Bartow and owned by the Board
of County Commissioners of Polk County,
was awarded a silver platter for "High-
est Average Butterfat Production Record
per Cow for a Jersey Herd Made on
Herd Improvement Registry Test Com-
pleted During 1953".
Another record worthy of note com-
pleted during 1.953 was the record of
18,633 pounds of milk and 848 pounds
of butterfat made by Sybil Pompey Ruby
1522757 owned by Mr. and Mrs. Walter
Welkener. This record is the State Cham-
pion Milk record over all breeds regard-
less of age or number times milked daily.
It is an average of over 51 pounds milk
per day for a 365 year and was made
on twice daily milking.
The club voted to sponsor an exhibit
of Florida 4-H Jersey cattle at the re-
gional junior dairy show at Memphis,
Tennessee late in September.


FLORIDA JERSEYS AVERAGE $290
AT 14TH F.J.C.C. STATE SALE
Twenty-eight head of purebred Jerseys (twenty-five females and three bulls)
consigned from Florida's top Jersey herds, brought an average of $290.00 for a total
of $8,140.00 at the Annual State Sale held in Jacksonville, August 19. The sale,
sponsored by the Florida Jersey Cattle Club, was held at the 4-H Club livestock show
pavilion on McDuff Avenue.
The top price animal of the sale was "Morrow Robin Poppy", a four-year-old
cow bred by Carlos Griggs, Summerfield, Florida. She was purchased for $460.00
by W. J. Nolan, Jr., Alpine Dairy, Jacksonville.
It is of interest to note that the average of $290.00 for the sale was $46..00
above the average for the 1953 Florida sale and $12.00 above the average of the 1954
California Jersey Cattle Club sale.


Florida's Dairy Queen
Buys Top Price Cow
Florida's 1954 Dairy Industry Queen,
Miss Merriam Simmons of Orangedale,
who has one of the State's outstanding
records in the 4-H Club dairy program,
demonstrated her genuine interest in


dairying when she paid $415.00 for a
cow sold by Welkener Dairy. This was
the third highest price brought by a cow
in the sale.
A trophy presented before the sale for
the best fitted (best groomed) cow went
(Continued on Next Page)


JERSEY HERDS OF NORTH
FLORIDA ARE CLASSIFIED
) Three registered Jersey herds owned by
breeders in the vicinity of Jacksonville
and one herd at Green Cove Springs were
recently classified by George Hyatt, Jr.,
of the University of North Carolina, an
official classifier of the American Jersey
Cattle Club.
Animals in the herds were given in-
dividual ratings based on a comparison
with the Jersey Breed's score card which
allots 100 points for a perfect animal.
The owners and the type classification
averages given to their herds are as fol-
lows: ALPINE DAIRY, 84.31% on 243
head; MEADOWBROOK FARMS, 85.-
57% on 96 head; and WALTER WEL-
KENER, 86.39% on 99 head. Steve
Simmons' herd at Green Cove Springs
now has an average of 84.17% on 9
animals. The breed's average is 83.15%.
NATIONAL AWARDS AND
JERSEY REGISTRY TESTS
HE PROGRAM sponsored by the
American Jersey Cattle Club for
continuous improvement of the Jersey
breed has recently made two awards in
the Jacksonville area. They have also ap-
proved and announced several registry
tests supervised by the University of
Florida.
)ALPINE DAIRY COMPANY, Jack-
sonville-An outstanding bull, Blonde
Sparkling Fillpail, has been named a
Superior Sire, indicating that he has
passed on both high production and good
breed type to his daughters. He has ten
daughters tested for production. They
averaged 10,012 pounds of milk contain-
ing 494 pounds of butterfat on a twice-
daily-milking, 305-day mature equivalent
basis. The bull also has 25 daughters
classified for breed type with an average
rating of 83.70 points.
Classified for type this bull achieved
top rating of Excellent, which equals a
score of more than 90 points. Blonde
Sparkling Fillpail was bred by J. L.
Hutcheson, Jr., Rossville, Ga., and owned
and developed by the Alpine Dairy Com-
pany.
SWALTER WELKENER, Jacksonville
-Sybil Pompey Souvenir has earned the
Gold Medal award of the American Jer-
sey Cattle Club. She recently completed
a production record of 12,721 pounds of
milk and 646 pounds of butterfat in 305
days at the age of 5 years and 7 months.
Two other cows of the Walter Welk-
ener Dairy herd have received special
recognition for their outstanding produc-
tion records.
Oberserver Design Onyx Bonny pro-
duced 9,641 pounds of milk containing
555 pounds of butterfat at the age of 10
years and 5 months, and Observer Design
Lillian Lelia produced 9,521 pounds of
milk containing 507 pounds of butterfat
at the age of 2 years and 9 months.


12 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


















































THE PICTURES ABOVE show some of the dairymen who played leading parts in the 14th
annual state sale of the Florida Jersey Cattle Club. TOP PICTURE: Trophies are presented to
owners of Jerseys producing record quantities of butterfat, on the individual and herd basis.
FROM LEFT ARE: MR. AND MRS. WALTER WELKENER of Jacksonville, owner of a cow,
that had the butterfat record; A. T. ALVAREZ of Jacksonville, newly elected club president
making the trophy presentation; J. J. SMITH, Bartou, manager of the Polk County Dairy herd,
which had the highest average butterfat production; and C. W. REAVES of Gainesville, exten-
sion dairyman who is presenting Smith with the award. IN BOTTOM PICTURE: This Jersey
couw, Morrow Robin Poppy, drew a price of $460, highest at the sale. Seen with the cow, left
to right, are. Carlos Griggs, owner of Summer Field Dairy at Summerfield. who sold the cow;
WV. J. Nolan, Jr. of Alpine Dairy, Jacksonille, the purchaser; and Larry Griggs, son of Carlos
Griggs.
FLORIDA STATE JERSEY SALE
(Continued front Page 12)
to Clay County Farms, Middleburg, own- Jacksonville and Skinners Dairy of Jack-
ed by I. J. Pemberton. sonville.
BUYERS AT THE SALE WERE: Laurence Gardiner was announcer
Leonard Hooks, Jacksonville, 2 animals; from the Auction Stand and Tom Mc-
Warren R. Watkins, St. Cloud, 4 animals; Cord was the Auctioneer.
F. D. Magill, Grand Crossing, 5 animals;
Alpine Dairy Co., Jacksonville, 4 ani- Sale Committee
mals; Gulf Wind Dairy, Venice, 6 ani- The Sales Committee was composed of
mals; and one animal each was purchased Chairman Brightman Skinner, Jackson-
by David Page of Fernandina, Merriam ville; W. J. Nolan, Jr., Jacksonville; C.
Simmons of Green Cove Springs, Ken- W. Reaves, Extension Dairyman; J. J.
neth Paterson of Orlando, Mala chai Smith, Bartow; M. T. Crutchfield, Altha;
Howell Waring of Madison, Elmo M. A. T. Alvarez, Jacksonville and F. E.
Pearce of Jacksonville, O. E. Harrell of Baetzman, Orlando.

SEPTEMBER &


J. P. Boyce
519 E. Giddens St., Tampa, Florida
E. E. Fulton
2531 W. Lake Shore Blvd.
Jacksonville, Florida
J. E. Orris
200 N.W. 129th St., Miami 50, Florida
G. Wrenshall
2315 Westbrook Circle
Jacksonville, Florida


OCTOBER, 1954 13







DAIRY ASSOCIATION ACTIVITIES


THE 1955 CONVENTION HOTEL OF THE FLORIDA DAIRY ASSOCIATION, the famed "Fort
Harrison" at Clearwater, Florida, is seen in the above background near the beautiful waterfront
and a few minutes from Clearwater Beach over the beautiful causeway, seen in the foreground.
The Convention dates are June 22-23-24.


STATE ASSOCIATION
DIRECTORS INCREASED
TO THIRTY-FIVE
Ten additional directors were elected
and one vacancy filled at a brief business
session held by the Florida Dairy Asso-
ciation at the Annual Dairy Field Day
meeting in Gainesville, September 16.
The election of ten additional directors,
five producers and five distributors, was
provided by an amendment to the Asso-
ciation by-laws adopted at the Associa-
tion's Annual Convention in May.
The amendment increased the number
on the board from 20, including ten pro-
ducers and 10 distributors, and the pres-
ident, to 30 with 15 each of producers
and distributors, and the president.
Election of the ten additional directors
was postponed to the time of the Annual
Field Day so that proper nominations
could be made by the Nominating Com-
mittee.
The five additional producers elected
are: A. T. (Ted) Alvarez, Jacksonville,
who is also president of the Florida Jer-
sey Cattle Club; Gordon Eunice, Or-
lando; Julian Lane, Tampa; J. T. Stew-
art, Hollywood and John Hentz, Panama
City.
Additional distributors elected, includ-
ing one to fill a vacancy, were: Earl
Lovelace, Sunnybrook Dairy, Tampa; Al
Wells, Velda Dairies, Jacksonville; Cody
Skinner, Skinners Dairy, Jacksonville;
Walter Burton, Southern Dairies, Jack-
sonville and Theo Datson, Orlando.
Other Directors
The president of the Allied Trades Di-
vision makes the 31st active director. Ex-
officio directors are the president, the
immediate past president and Dr. E. L.
Fouts, head of the Dairy Dept., Univer-
sity of Florida. Alf R. Nielsen is an
honorary director.


State Association Directors
Meet Nov. 5-6 in Jacksonville
The final regular meeting of the Flor-
ida Dairy Association Board of Directors
for 1954 is scheduled for Friday and
Saturday, November 5 and 6, in Jack-
sonville.
This meeting is attended by both 1954
directors and those elected for 1955.
New officers and directors who take om er
their duties January 1st will be installed
and 1954 President Herman Boyd, Lad-
ies' Auxiliary President, Mrs. Leon Sell-
ers and Allied Trades President Bill
Decklar will be presented with an en-
graved gavel of Florida Dairy Associa-
tion.
Meeting Schedule
General business sessions of the board
will be held Friday evening, the 5th, be-
ginning with dinner and during Saturday
morning.
The session concludes with a luncheon
and attendance at the Georgia Florida
football game in the Gator Bowl.
Governor-elect LeRoy Collins is ex-
pected to be present for a conference with
the board for a portion of the Saturday
morning session.

F.D.A. Conference Committee
Of Producers and Distributors
Named as a joint conference commit-
tee on problems between the producer
and distributor members by the board
of directors at their Gainesville meeting,
September 15th, were the following:
Producers-Bill Graham, Miami, Chair-
man; John Sargeant, Lakeland; Herman
Boyd, Miami; L. B. Hull, Gainesville;
and one additional to be named. Dis-
tributors-Cliff D. Wayne, Miami, Chair-
man; John Hood, Bradenton; W. J. Bar-
ritt, Jr., Tampa; Cotton Paul, Jackson-
ville, and H. B. Pownall, Miami.


Holsteins Are Contributed
To U. of F. Research Farm
About a year ago the director of the
Florida Dairy Association learned about
the need for research at the University
of Florida in the field of Florida's grow-
ing Holstein dairy animal population.
Herman Boyd, then producer vice-presi-
dent, was named chairman to undertake
to secure contributions for such a herd.
At the Annual Field Day in Gaines-
ville, September 16, Mr. Boyd, now presi-
dent of the Association, brought forward
seven contributors, each presenting the
Dairy Department with the amount need-
ed for the purchase of one Registered
Holstein to be selected by the University.
Mr. Boyd, who was elected president
of the new Florida Holstein Cattle Club
since he took up this project, promised
to secure sponsors for three or more ad-
ditional animals soon.
Sponsors of the first seven animals for
which checks were presented were: Her-
man Boyd and Bill Graham, Miami pro-
ducers; Brier Ice Cream Co., Plant City;
Southern Dairies, Inc.; Borden's Dairy;
Florida Feed Mills; George Johnson,
West Palm Beach producer; and Velda
Dairy Products.

F.D.A. Officers Speak
At Pinellas Producers' Meet
Florida Dairy Association President
Herman Boyd and Secretary Andy Lay
were principal speakers at the September
monthly meeting of the Pinellas County
Producers Association.
The meeting was held Friday evening,
September 17 in the County Fair build-
ing at Largo following a buffet dinner.
President John Culbreath presided and
Wilbur Casey gave a report on the An-
nual Dairy Field Day meeting held in
Gainesville, September 16 and 17.
The Pinellas County Producers Asso-
ciation was commended by Mr. Boyd as
being one of the two most active of the
various local Associations affiliated with
the State Association. The Pensacola As-
sociation was named as the other of the
two referred to.

At a Farm Bureau Conention--A Northern
Dairy Farmer told that, "It gets so cold up
north that ue have to build a fire under our
coup's to keep them from giving ice cream."
To which a Southern Chicken Farmer replied,
"It gets so hot down south that u'e have to
leed our hens chipped ice to keep them from
laying hard-boiled eggs."


14 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


1 1 1





MILK PRODUCERS ENDORSE WARING
AS MILK COMMISSION MEMBER
The directors of the Milk Producers'
Council of the Florida Dairy Association
has voted their unanimous endorsement
of Ben S. Waring of Madison for ap-
pointment by the Governor as producer
member of the Florida Milk Commission.
The action was taken at a meeting of
the group in Gainesville, September 16th,
when it was learned that Waring's ap-
pointment of over a year ago had never
become official, due to an oversight in a
bonding company report.
The F.D.A.'s sixteen Producer Council
directors represent a large portion of the
milk producers throughout the State.

Schneider's Reappointment Requested
By Milk Distributors
The milk distributor directors of the
Florida Dairy Association recently voted
their unanimous recommendation to the
Governor for reappointment of Henry
Schneider as distributor member of the
Florida Milk Commission.
Schneider's second 4-year term on the
Commission expires soon. During most
of his time on the Commission he served
as chairman.

F.D.A. Directors Meet
At Gainesville Field Day
The Board of Directors of the Florida
Dairy Association held their regular an-
nual Gainesville meeting September 15th,
16th and 17th, while at the same time
participating in the Annual Dairy Field
Day meeting at the University of Florida.
Several years ago the directors of the
Association established the custom of
holding a regular meeting in Gainesville
at the time of the Annual Dairy Field
Day with a double objective in mind.
First, it gives recognition to the import-
ance of the Field Day program at the
University of Florida and makes it poss-
ible for the directors to attend. Second,
it provides an opportunity for a special
meeting and conference with the Presi-
dent of the University of Florida and the
principal department executives and staff
members of the College of Agriculture,
the Dairy Science Department, the Agri-
cultural Experiment Station and the Agri-
cultural Extension Service.
Producers and Distributors Meet
A new directors' meeting plan was
inaugurated at the Gainesville meeting
which provides for separate producer and
distributor directors sessions and then a
combination general session. This is in
keeping with the Association's joint pro-
ducer and distributor membership plan
but had never been put into effect.
The same plan was started for gen-
eral membership meetings at the 1954
Annual Convention held in May and
(Continued on Page 24)


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SEPTEMBER & OCTOBER, 1954






Florida 4-H Teams Exhibit And

Compete in National Events
F LORIDA'S STATE 4-H Dairy Judging Team, two County Teams, and four-
teen exhibitors of Florida 4-H dairy animals are on their way to Memphis, Tenn.,
Waterloo, Iowa, and Chicago to match their abilities and their dairy animals with
the best in the nation.
Sixteen Florida 4-H Dairy animals belonging to 14 members from seven coun-
ties will be shown in competition in the Mid-South National Junior Dairy Show at
Memphis September 25 to October 1. County teams from Polk and Jackson counties
will participate in the judging contest. T. W. Sparks, Assistant Extension Dairyman,
is in charge of the Florida Exhibit at Memphis. R. K. Price and L. D. Taylor,
Assistant County Agents from Dade and Jackson Counties will assist.


Exhibitors at Memphis
The following Florida 4-H members
will exhibit animals at the Memphis
show: Ted Kretzschmar, Bill Boyd, both
of Miami; Bill Parent, Oneco; Charles
Addison, Haines City; Virginia Stuart,
Bartow; Brenda Dennison, Orlando;
John H. Talton, Jr., Apopka; Olin Fish-
er, Gotha; Ernest Fischer, Windermere;
Robin Alvarez, Jacksonville; Erny Sellers,
Tallahassee; William Schack and Martin
Schack, Greenwood; Earl Crutchfield,
Grand Ridge.
The State 4-H Dairy Judging Team
with C. W. Reaves as coach will attend
the Memphis cattle show, then proceed
to the National 4-H Dairy Cattle Judg-
ing Contest at Waterloo on the follow-
ing schedule:
September 27-29 National Junior
Dairy Show and Mid-South Fair Open
Dairy Show, Memphis.
September 30-October 2 Enroute to
Waterloo, Iowa Stops at dairy farms
for practice work and observation of mid-
western farms.
October 3 Register for National
Contest at the National Dairy Cattle
Congress, Waterloo, Iowa.
October 4 National 4-H Dairy Cat-
tle Judging Contest.
October 4 Evening 4-H Dairy
Awards Banquet.
October 5, 6 and 7 Observe offi-
cial judging at National Dairy Cattle
Congress and attend breed association
banquet.
There is a possibility the Florida team
may also participate in the Judging Con-
test at the International Dairy Show in
Chicago on October 9.
Members of the team who will repre-
sent the state in the national contest are
Erny Sellers of Tallahassee, Howard Ren-
ner of Largo, Beverly Simmons of St.
Augustine and Perry Smith of Hastings.
Sponsors of the Memphis Cattle Ex-
hibit are the Florida Jersey Cattle Club
and the Florida Dairy Association. Trucks
are furnished by the Dade County 4-H
Department and the M. T. Crutchfield
Dairy of Jackson County. Supplies are
furnished by a number of Florida Jersey
breeders.


Sponsors of the State 4-H Dairy Judg-
ing Team's trip to Waterloo are the
Florida Times-Union, Florida Dairy As-
sociation, the Jersey and Guernsey Cattle
Clubs, and the State Department of Agri-
culture.

Quincy FFA Chapter Wins
For the fourth straight year, the Quincy
FFA Chapter was declared the winner
of the State Chapter Contest. In this con-
test all of the activities and accomplish-
ments of the chapter are considered.
The Florida Chain Store Council, Inc.,
which sponsors the chapter contest,
awarded the Quincy Chapter $50 in cash
and a plaque for being the top Chapter
in the state, and $25 in cash for winning
the District Award.


District 4-H Dairy Show
and Judging Dates

Oct. 13 & 14
Tri-County Youth Fair........................ Trenton
Oct. 14
North Florida District
4-H Dairy Show and Contest..............Quincy
Oct. 19
4-H and FFA Livestock Show................Ocala
Oct. 19
District I 4-H Dairy Show and
Contest, FFA, and Open Show..... ....Pensacola
Oct. 21
District IV 4-H Dairy Show
and C contest ........................ ................Live O ak
Oct. 22
Northeast Florida Livestock Show........Callahan
Nov. 13
West Florida 4-H, FFA and
Open Dairy Show-
New Livestock Pavillion........................Chipley
Nov. 20
District VII 4-H Dairy Show
and Contest .......................................... O rlando
COUNTY
4-H DAIRY SHOW DATES
Sept. 25-Jefferson County ............Monticello
Sept. 25-Madison County ......... .......Madison
Sept. 25- Leon County ..................Tallahassee
Sept. 25-Gadsden County ....................Quincy
Oct. 9-Jackson County ............Marianna
Oct. 23-Orange County ..................Orlando
Oct. 23-Volusia County ..................DeLand
Nov. 6-Lake County ......................Tavares
Nov. 13- Polk County ......... ................Eartow
Nov. 15-Osceola County ..............Kissimmee
Nov. 13-Brevard County ......................Cocoa


FLORIDA'S STATE FFA DAIRY JUDGING TEAM from the Ocala Chapter, which
competes in the National FFA Dairy Judging at the National Cattle Congress, Waterloo, louw.
LEFT TO RIGHT are M. C. Roche, chapter leader, Duncan Wright, Carl Magee, Mickey
McGee and alternate member Jimmie Peebles.


16 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS






County Agents' Conference
Oct. 4-8 In Gainesville
H. G. Clayton, director of the Florida
State Extension Service, has announced
the annual conference of County Farm
Agents and Home Demonstration Agents
will be held October 4-8 at the Univer-
sity of Florida.
Mr. Clayton and State Home Demon-
stration Agent Miss Anna Mae Sikes will
conduct the sessions.
The women and men agents will meet
in joint morning sessions and separate
sessions in the afternoon.
Organizations of the three different
agent groups attending will hold their
annual meetings under the direction of
their respective presidents as follows:
Florida Extension Agents' Association,
Wm. C. Zorn, Apalachicola; Home Dem-
onstration Agents' Association, Miss Allie
Lee Rush, Ocala; County Agents' Asso-
ciation, James N. Watson, Jacksonville;
and Epsilon Sigma Phi, Louis T. Nieland,
Gainesville.

FARM CHILDREN
AND TRACTORS
National accident records show that
far more children are killed and injured
in farm tractor accidents than in dis-
carded iceboxes and abandoned wells.
They are victims of that deceptively
simple machine-the tractor-that can be
and often is a killer.
From May through October 1953, the
press reported 285 child victims of trac-
tor accidents.
Ninety of these youngsters were killed.
More than half were under 14 years of
age.
Do you keep young children away from
tractors? Do you carefully supervise older
children in the safe operation of tractors?
Remember that children and tractors
are a dangerous combination!


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Department


SEPTEMBER & OCTOBER, 1954


NO W


40/o


of DAIR Y RA TIONS




FLORIDA

CITRUS PULP


Yes, successful dairymen from Maine to
Florida have found the modern way to
maintain milk quality and high production at LOWER
FEED COST. These thrifty dairymen are feeding Florida
Citrus Pulp up to 40% of dairy rations replacing more expensive feed.
It's the nutritional value of Citrus Pulp that makes the difference higher
in T.D.N. (Total Digestible Nutrients). Citrus Pulp is available all year
'round for successful year-roundfeeding.
Ask your feed dealer or write for free information.

i-^ !RS ASSN ATIs


TAMPA, FLORIDA


/P. 0. BOX 403, DEPT. D


* 17








DAIRY NEWS DIGEST


Members of the Dairy Industry throughout the State are invited to please
send to the "Florida Dairy News" all news about dairies, dairying and the
good people who devote their time, talents and money to this great industry.
-The Editor.


Florida Allocated Over $1,000,000.
For Increased Milk Use in Schools
Florida has been allocated $1,036,000. of the $50,000,000 annual grant appro-
priated by Congress to be used in furnishing additional milk to schools in the current
school year.
This is not a free milk program but one which provides that where the funds
are used, half-pints of milk may not be sold for over 5 cents. This is intended to
place milk in even competition, price-wise, with other 5 cent drinks.
The money will be paid to schools on the basis of 4 cents per half-pint on all
milk consumed above the amount consumed during the last school year.


To receive this full grant of $1,036,-
000., Florida schools will have to double
their last year's consumption of milk.
This means that an extensive milk edu-
cational program among school children
will have to be carried out. Such a pro-
gram should be one of close cooperation
between the dairy industry, school leaders
and others interested in the health and
well being of school children.
Planning Sessions Scheduled
A general plan of procedure for plac-
ing the program into immediate opera-
tion was held in Tallahassee, Wednesday,
September 29th. Dairy representatives at-
tending were John M. Scott, Chief Dairy
Supervisor; Raymond Lee, Chairman,
Mrs. Bertha Elliott, Consumer Member,
and L. K. Nicholas, Administrator of the
Florida Milk Commission, and E. T. Lay,
Executive Secretary, Florida Dairy Asso-
ciation.
Local meetings in which schools, dair-
ies and others interested will participate,
are as follows: DeFuniak Springs, Oct.
4; Lake City and Jacksonville, Oct. 5;
Ocala and Orlando, Oct. 6; Tampa, Oct.
7; Tallahassee, Oct. 11; Sarasota, Oct.
12; Miami, Oct. 13 and West Palm
Beach, Oct. 14.
Dairies are expected to receive the
same price for milk utilized in this pro-
gram as that sold for other school pur-
poses.
State Committee
Dairy representatives appointed by
State Superintendent of Schools, Thomas
D. Bailey, on a 15-member State Plan-
ning Committee for this program are W.
H. Boyd, president and E. T. Lay, secre-
tary of the Florida Dairy Association;
L. K. Nicholas, Administrator, Florida
Milk Commission, and John M. Scott,
Chief State Dairy Supervisor of the De-
partment of Agriculture.


Form New Dairy Co-op
Clewiston has a new Dairy Co-op or-
ganized recently under the name of Flor-
ida Producers Co-op Dairies. Members
are Wm. K. Bixby and Julian Dickson,
Clewiston producers, and J. B. Fountain,
a Moore Haven producer.
Processing and distribution will be op-
erated in the plant of the former High-
land Dairies, Inc., which was purchased
by the group.
Dickson is supervising the plant and
Fountain is supervising sales. Distribu-
tion will be confined to Clewiston and
Moore Haven for the present.



=j L.E D7-[ M-



o* .
MAM/ Th'// /5 i//,I '
The above cartoon appeared in the Orlando
newspaper at the time of an announcement
that the T. G. Lee Dairy was constructing a
new modern dairy plant.


Lee Dairy Building
New $500,000 Plant
The T. G. Lee Dairy, Orlando, has
announced the awarding of a contract for
the construction of a new $500,000.00
office and plant building near the site
of the company's present plant.
Features of the new plant will be a
hostess room seating 150, a modern dairy
store and milk bar, a parking area to
accommodate up to 75 cars, and the lat-
est dairy equipment.


DAIRYMEN IN THE NEWS
SJACK McMULLEN, Clearwater pro-
ucer, recently addressed the Kiwanis
Club of Largo on "The Florida Dairy
Industry." Jack is past president of the
Pinellas County Dairy Association and a
director of the Florida Dairy Association.
SJOHN M. SCOTT, Gainesville, Chief
Dairy Supervisor of the State Department
of Agriculture, issued a recent summary
of progress made by the Florida Dairy
Industry. The information was quoted in
the press at Live Oak, Lake City, Moore
Haven, Lake Wales and Milton.
) AUSTIN GRAHAM, JR., Polk County
Health Department dairy and sanitation
supervisor, made a splendid talk on "The
Dairy Industry of Polk County", Sep-
tember 13th to the Winter Haven Chap-
ter, Future Farmers of America.
A. R. (Dolph) ALLISON, Tampa
manager of Borden's Dairy, addressing
the Bradenton Rotary Club, recently quot-
ed the Bible and other ancient records to
point out the recognition of milk as an
important and essential food through the
ages.
Allison pointed out that Florida's milk
standards are among the highest in the
nation with no milk of less than Grade
"A" quality being bottled.
) Members of the Lafayette County Dairy
Association with twenty-one present vot-
ed at their August meeting to engage in
cooperative buying of citrus pulp. Curry
Bassett, Manager of Borden's Dairy, Tal-
lahassee, who receives all Lafayette Coun-
ty milk, addressed the group on the dairy
outlook for the coming year. County
Agent S. L. Brothers said, "the picture
is not too rosy, but not too gloomy."
) C. W. REAVES, Florida's efficient and
energetic State Extension Dairyman, was
a guest speaker on the WFLA (Gaines-
ville) Farm Hour recently. Reaves dis-
cussed the accomplishments of the Flor-
ida Dairy Herd Improvement Association
program.
) PALM BEACH DAIRIES cooperated
in a "school safety campaign" during
the opening week of school by delivering
"safety information leaflets" to homes,
which were prepared by the Junior Cham-
ber of Commerce.

Red Cross Selects Bevan
Disaster Relief Head
The St. Petersburg and South Pinellas
County Chapter, American Red Cross
has named Russell Bevan, St. Petersburg
manager of Borden's Dairy, chairman
of the Red Crooss disaster relief com-
mittee.

New Dairy in Palmetto
Dr. C. K. Newton, well known milk
producer and operator of an animal clinic
in Bradenton, recently opened a new
$50,000.00 milk plant in Palmetto under
the name of The Cream Crop Dairy.


18 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS






West Florida Dairy Show
November 13 in Chipley
The West Florida Dairy Show, nor-
mally held in August, was postponed to
November 13th so that the show could
be held in the new Live Stock Pavillion
under construction by the State Depart-
ment of Agriculture.
The show has grown steadily in size
and popularity from a small beginning
eight years ago and now includes all
counties from Pensacola to Tallahassee.
With the addition of the open adult
division to the original 4-H and FFA
divisions, interest in the show received a
considerable boost.
Washington County Agent Red Davis
is general manager for the show and W.
W. Glenn, Jackson County Agent, will
serve as master of ceremonies.

Land O'Sun Farm Unit
At West Palm Beach
The Land O'Sun Dairy at Miami
Beach is developing one of the state's
largest and most modern dairy farm op-
erations in Palm Beach County, a few
miles west of Palm Beach.
Howard G. Rowe, manager of the
farm, states that a new dairy barn now
under construction will be one of the
largest and most modern in the South.
The milking barn will provide for the
milking of 320 cows at one time, he said.
The 2,500 acre development now has
about 1,000 cows with 600 in production
but the dairy is expected eventually to
supply about 4,500 gallons of milk a
day.
A complete overhead pipeline milking
system is now in operation with 2,000
gallon stainless steel storage tanks from
which the milk is transferred direct to
stainless steel tank trucks for transfer to
the Miami Beach plant.

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SEPTEMBER & OCTOBER, 1954


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* 19





NEW "HOME-USE" SURVEY PROVES


2 out of 3

housewives

prefer Caneo

Snap Cap

milk cartons


IATS
CLSED
4)


DISA
60) nrentioneerd
Come see our big new program
to help you sell more in '55. Booth B11
October 25-30, Atlantic City, N. J.


20 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS







CT~0'


Housewives Housewives
using glass using paper
Total containers cartons
housewives regularly regularly

Prefer
Canco 68% 28% 40%
Snap Cap

Prefer
paper 32% 12% 20%
carton "X"


T HIS recent New Orleans survey was a carefully conducted,
home-use comparison test. All of the families in the survey were
provided with a four-day supply of milk. One half of this supply
was delivered in Canco Snap Cap quart cartons, the other half in
another type paper carton.
Every family had ample opportunity to compare such features
as ease of opening and closing ... ease of pouring and storing. Also,
since a representative number of these families had children, they
could see for themselves the advantages of each carton in the
hands of their youngsters.
Snap Cap came out far ahead not only among families who
previously used glass regularly but among those who used paper
containers regularly before the test.
Here's proof again that the Canco container is a positive selling
asset for your brand.


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The easy-to-open carton


M


women really prefer


SEPTEMBER & OCTOBER, 1954 21


ku~ rc~i~ L"I


I,

\ More than twice the families
preferred Canco Snap Cap over the
~ .\L --u' other type of carton tested in

\ August, 1954, New Orleans survey



HERE ARE THE RESULTS!






/THE PLACE OF THE DAIRY INDUSTRY
IN RAPIDLY EXPANDING FLORIDA
by: COL. HAROLD COLEE
Executive Vice President
Florida State Chamber of Commerce
An address made at the Annual Meeting of the Florida Dairy Association, Daytona Beach,
Thursday evening, May 27, 1954.
ONE OF THE more resourceful, therefore enthusiastic hands behind State Cham-
ber operations is that given the organization by the dairy industry.
Our association has been a long one, a pleasant one, and a profitable one.
As operating head of the State Chamber, I welcome the opportunity of partici-
pating in your annual meeting.
Your industry has come a long way from the scrawny tick
and disease-ridden cow the early settlers brought with them, to
a cow recognized today as being among the best yet developed,
after years of painstaking effort.
Currently, there are 1,265 of you dairymen in Florida.
You milk 196,736 cows. You produce 112 million gallons ,
of milk. You operate 160 milk plants. You operate 72 whole-
sale frozen desert plants. You operate 352 retail frozen desert
plants. You produce about 16 million gallons of frozen deserts.
You import 1,600,000 gallons of milk which is largely for
manufacturing purposes. You import two million gallons of COLEE
40 per cent cream. You import 5,600,000 pounds of cottage
cheese.
That's a broad statistical picture of dairy operations in Florida at the moment,


based on 1953 figures.
By working as a team in improving
your products, and by harmonizing your
communications with the public -you
have become a powerful solid factor in
the State's economic life.
You now serve the dairy needs-most
of them-of 3,268,000 persons-that's
the current official population of Florida
-and by 1960 you should be serving
an estimated 4,000,000 persons.
Migration to Florida, at the present
time, figures at about 7,860 persons a
month. There is no better proof of the
State's frontier-like characteristics than
this flow of new settlers.
The total income of Floridians in 1952
-that is, the buying power of our resi-
dents-came to more than four billions
of dollars-$4,088,000,000, to be exact.
On that basis the average Floridian earn-
ed $1,319 in 1952, against the national
average of $1,639.
Thus it will be seen that Florida is
knocking at the door of that elite com-
pany of states the higher-bracketed
coterie.
But Florida was not even of Junior
economic significance say 50 years ago.
Cattle-raisers, then, by using a carbon
paper, could brand two animals at a
time, so thin were the state's cattle.
When the State Chamber was founded,
about 38 years ago, its first objective was
the eradication of the cattle tick. It was
not until 1949 that this task was fully
accomplished. Safeguards, of course, must
never be let down.
Your own industry grew alongside that
of the beef cattle industry, and neither
was to become strong until insects and di-
seases were put under reasonable control,


and what seemed to be insurmountable
pasturage problems, overcome.
The Florida cowboy today is riding
herd on a $100 million beef cattle in-
dustry that has shoved the state ahead
of several western steak producing states.
Sun-bronzed cowpokes are galloping over
Florida pasturelands that today support
1,386,000 head of beef cattle. It is not
too much to say that the cowboy of song,
story and movie is losing out to the queer
critter with tight blue jeans, battered felt,
and a Florida accent. The roundup is
outmoded: fat beef cattle graze on com-
pact pastures in the shade of palms, pines,
and hardwoods.
The milk produced by you Florida
dairymen in 1953 sold for some $50
million. The retail sale value of Florida's
combined dairy products approximates
$125 million annually.
The worth of the dairy and beef cat-
tle industries to Florida cannot be calcu-
lated in terms of holdings and of annual
production, obviously. These industries
are woven into the State's economic fab-
ric; they form, with other interdependent
enterprises, the State's all-important tap
root. And the very mention of the inter-
dependence of Florida industries, one
upon the other, arouses a bit of specula-
tive banter which asks, in bold type: Who
invested what in what, and how much?
In our lifetime a commonwealth has
arisen before our very eyes, from ham-
mocks and wastelands.
Has the drama of it all escaped us?
In his initial bulletin-that was in
1888-the first director of the State's
agricultural experiment station wrote:


Florida Tops The Nation
In Dairy Industry Growth
Florida holds an imposing lead over
all states in the rate of increase in milk
and ice cream production.
U. S. Department of Agriculture re-
ports show a Florida ice cream produc-
tion increase of 66% for the five year
period, 1948 through 1952, and Okla-
homa second, with a 33% increase. The
national average was minus 1%.
Florida's lead in milk production was
even greater with an 86% increase as
against a national increase of 11% and
a Southeastern average of 30% for the
13-year period, 1940 to 1953.

"The director of the station is not
without a deep sense that his work is, to
a great degree, a peculiar one, owing to
the latitudinal and climatic characteristics
of Florida. Other stations have helps
from correspondent and analogous sur-
roundings that afford mutual advantages
in station work. But the Florida station,
located on a peninsular between ocean
and gulf, alone must work out its own
material."
He had practically nothing to go on,
he said, and no other state, at first, had
been as bare of resources. The land was
not naturally fertile.
Now comes the question: Who made
Florida fertile?
The land is so fertile today that it
produces half a billion dollars in agricul-
tural wealth annually.
Who invested the time, the money, the
know-how when there seemed to be so
little promise of reward?
Research Brings Progress
It has been 66 years ago since the agri-
cultural experiment station was estab-
lished. Nothing was done the first year,
the director has told us.
I might add to the narrative this fact:
although governmental agricultural re-
searchers had been on the job in Florida
for 28 years at the time of the founding
of the State Chamber, it was not until
1920, four years after the organization
was formed, that the first field laboratory
was established-at Lake Alfred, to study
citrus production.
Since that time, as you well know,
farm experiment stations are found in
many parts of Florida, wherever the need
exists, and extension services to diffuse
the discoveries-to give them practicabil-
ity-are available to all persons.
In the minutes of the State Chamber
will be found much of the Florida farm
research story, aborning. In a moment I
am going to answer the question raised:
"Who made the lands of Florida fertile?"
(Continued on Page 24)


22 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS






Velda Enlarges Dairy
The Velda Dairy Farm near Tallahas-
see has recently added 702 acres to its
present large operation. $123,000 was
the purchase price paid by A. V. Davis
of Miami, owner of Velda Corporation.

Kiwanians Give Milk
Through the combined efforts of the
Pensacola and Warrington Kiwanis clubs,
six hundred thousand bottles of milk
have been contributed to needy school
children since the program was inaugu-
rated in 1932.
Milking Shorthorns Sold
Fifty head of purebred milking Short-
horn cattle were sold September 18 at
the Livestock Pavillion in Quincy.
This was the second Quincy Shorthorn
auction sale sponsored by the Illinois
Shorthorn Breeders Association.

Orlando Dairies Visited
By 4-H Club Group
Forty-one Orange County 4-H dairy
boys and girls recently made a tour of the
Borden, Foremost and Perfection dairy
plants in Orlando, under the leadership
of Assistant County Farm Agent H. F.
Swanson.

STATEMENT OF OW1NEIRSHIP, management.
and circulation required by the Act of Congress
of August 21, 1912, as amended hy the Acts of
March :;, 1!:. and July 2, 19144 (Title 21,
United States Code 23:) of Florid t Dairy News
published hi-n monthly at Jacksonville, Florida, for
October I 1954.
1. The Ilams and address of the publisher.
editor, managing editor, and business managers
are: Publisher, Florida Dairy Association. 2211
Newnan Street, Jacksonville, FIloida; Editor and
Business Manager, E. T. Lay, 220 Nevwnan
Street, Jacksonville. tlorida.
2. The ioner is: Floridn Dairy Association.
Inc.. 221 Newnan St.. Jacklsonville, Florida. (Non
Profit ('orporlation, no capital stock.
'. The knolln ionldholders, imrtg.aes, and
other security holders ownnitng or holding 1 petr-
cent or more of total lamlount f hlnds, iorlt-
gages. or other securities are: None.
E. 'T. LAY. llusiness Manager
Sworn to and slubsclibed before me this 22ind
day of Sel pt e 'ber, 1951.
L. 1i. CANOVA
(My commission expires Malclh 19, 1941
(Seall



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Borden Buys Clearwater Dairy
The Clearwater Jersey Dairy, operated
for the past twenty-four years by D. A.
Sails, recently announced sale of its dis-
tribution business to the Borden's Dairy,
Tampa.
Mr. Sails will continue operation of his
dairy farm with his milk production from
several hundred cows going to Borden's.

Beware of the Bull
A Hillsborough County dairy worker
was recently badly bruised up when at-
tacked by a bull which he failed to see
while herding cows into a barn.


HAY-

Leafy Alyce Clover in square
bales f.o.b. field, near Bushnell.
Contact me promptly, please.
Flowertree Nursery, William C.
C. Hawkins, Mail, Eustis, Florida.
Phones 5024 Black, 5015 Blue.


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* 23






THE PLACE OF THE DAIRY INDUSTRY
(Continued from Page 22)
The same State Chamber minutes reveal America's future Florida's future,
over the years, the continuing fight made never held greater long-pull promise.
to better Florida living conditions in each The nation has a $500 billion backlog
segment of the state's economy, of urgent needs: $100 billion for hous-
Let me say now that the force respon- ing; $60 billion for highways; $40 bil-
sible for making Florida an agricultural lion for schools; and $300 billion for
state developed in the farmer himself, various durable equipment.
For the most part he was a settler and The better you know Florida and
was "broke". Naturally, he became dis- America the better the future looks.
satisfied and, I might say, remains so
until this day, but in the earlier days he One of the nation's leading credit men,
jogged, urged, and shoved an agricul- Henry eimann, sees the nation with a
tural program down the throats of com- 200-million population not too far
patriots who might have settled for a away, say, by 1980. There will be, he
tourist economy and nothing else. says, different highways to serve 75
A short few years ago you dairymen million motor vehicles. Employment will
needed an improved University of Flor- total 80 million persons. The life span
ida laboratory; a "barn" you ed i will be increased by at least 10 years.
Well, you got it. You got it, I am glad Farmers will grow crops that will feed
to say, with the State Chamber's help. I industrial machines, Mr. Heimann con-
have noticed, and you have noticed, that tinues, which we shall see in Florida, in
when you dairy farmers want something greater and greater proportion. New types
badly enough and furnish your State of livestock feed will be developed. The
Chamber with the proper spark, you rays of the sun will be used for power.
eventually get it. We two groups can Workmen will produce in six hours as
recruit many battalions on our side when much as they now produce in eight hours.
the chips are down. Add to these prospects-the promise of
A few years back the State Chamber Dr. Leland I. Doan, President of the
was asked by the citrus industry to scare Dow Chemical Company:
up a few thousand dollars for investigat- "The development of electric power
ing uses. It is not always easy to identify by atomic energy on a free enterprise
the end result of dollars spent, but we basis is as certain to come one day soon
got busy and got a few laws and cus- as anything can be certain in life".
toms changed which enabled the Citrus You cannot talk about America with-
Commission to spend a small amount of out talking about this Florida of ours
money on laboratory research. The great which constitutes the Nation's biggest
concentrate formula came out of the state east of the Mississippi; except
laboratory, as a result. Georgia.
This sugess, again, the possibility Have you, at any other time, observed
that progress stems from a discontented a opportunities in all phases of
people. All down through the ages this as many opportunities in all phases of
has seemed to be true. Florida's economic life as you see about
has seemed to be true. you at this moment?
What of the Future? you at this moment?
When you and I sit at the banquet, or Here is a state-community the develop-
conference table, there comes to mind the meant of which has attained great momen-
achievements we have chalked up to- tur, thanks to the all-American character
gether, and a sense of what may be done of its citizenry whose enterprise recog-
by us in the future. This is the result nizes no barriers.
of organized team work. I say "organized Where would you find a more suitable
team work" because there seems to be place for the investment of sinew, talent
so much "organized dissension" in Amer- and money?
ica today. I need not point out to you men and
Even so, Americans have more than women of the soil, the Florida resources
twice as much spending power today as as I see them, for you see them, too. A
in 1940. Individual savings now total part of this asset-I need to remind you
250 billions against 68 billions in 1940. -is the state's geographic position with
Each day of the week 11,000 babies are respect to the lands to the north of us
born. What a boon it is to the travel and and to the south of us; we are mid-
vacation industries that folks are work- hemispheric, and because this is so Flor-
ing shorter hours than 10 years ago and ida is bound 'to play a major role in the
some 40,000,000 people enjoy paid va- future relations between Canada and the
cations! United States and the Latin countries,
And America is going suburban! Com- these land masses making up the most
munities are springing up like magic dynamic sector of the free world.
everywhere, right here in Florida if you Then-is it not just plain, common,
please. That growth requires new jobs, everyday sense to vision the Florida of
new services, new houses, new streets, tomorrow, the Florida, say, of 25 years
new schools and new transportation fa- hence-as being twice the economic
cilities. weight the State now is?


World's Champion Milk Producer
GREEN MEADOW LILY PABST, a Hol-
stein-Friesian cow, of Green Meadow Farms,
Elsie, Michigan, is the world's champion milk
producer. She produced 42,805 pounds of
milk in one year. This is about 54/2 quarts
of milk a day. In describing Lily's personal
characteristics her owner, Merle Green, says
she eats the same feed as most cows. Her
main delicacy is carrots of which she will eat
a bushel a day if available. Mr. Green says
she is quite a pet and seems to know she's
a "personality" among cows. Not satisfied
with a world's record in milk production, Lily
recently presented her owner with twin
heifer calves.


F.D.A. DIRECTORS MEET
(Continued from Page 15)
will be used in all meetings when de-
sired.
Action of Directors
Both the producer and distributor ses-
sions spent considerable time in discuss-
ing provisions of the "Code of Fair
Trade Practices" now in force as orders
of the Florida Milk Commission.
These discussions brought about the
adoption of a motion providing for a
joint producer-distributor conference com-
mittee concerning provisions of the Code
and other problems between producers
and distributors.
Other Actions
Three special resolutions were adopted
as follows:
(1) Favoring the support of legisla-
tion to create a State Livestock Disease
Diagnostic Laboratory to be operated un-
der the direction of the State Livestock
Board.
(2) Commending t h e progressive
program and accomplishments of the De-
partment of Dairy Science of the Uni-
versity of Florida and urging provision
for adequate future budgets for the nec-
essary growth and expansion of this es-
sential service to Florida's expanding
dairy industry.
(3) Electing Dr. John S. Allen an
honorary member of the Florida Dairy
Association because of his demonstrated
friendship, his interest in and cooperative
attitude toward the Florida Dairy Indus-
try and the Florida Dairy Association.


24 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS





"YOUR FOOD TODAY ...
SHAPES YOUR FIGURE TOMORROW."
An interesting booklet of 16 pages tell-
ing how "you can retain or regain your
youthful figure" through diet, may be se-
cured from any of the Dairy Council of-
fices or from the Florida Dairy Association.
Also, if you have a particular question
pertaining to nutrition or diet, rite to
the Florida Dairy News; one of the Direc-
tors of the Dairy Council offices or other
competent authority will be asked to give
us an answer for you. This will be pub-
lished without revealing the identity of the
questioner.

Millet Proves Popular
Duval County Silage Crop
County Farm Agent Jim Watson re-
ports several Duval County dairymen as
having good success in growing Millet
as a silage crop.
One of these, the Meadowbrook Farms
owned by A. C. and C. B. Skinner, is
expecting a yield of twenty tons Millet
per acre with six to eight cuttings during
the season.
The Skinner brothers expect to put up
a total of about 500 tons each of Millet
and grass silage.

Milk Promotion in Oregon
SOregon dairymen have formed a new
non-profit group to promote the sale
of milk products. It represents an ex-
tension of activities of dairies of the
Portland milkshed who have been volun-
tarily promoting the sale of milk for
some years. Funds will be raised by a
contribution of 1 cent per hundred of
quota milk annually.

Fluid Milk Consumption Up
SThe non-farm consumption of fluid
milk and cream has been on a fairly
steady upward trend over most of the
period from 1924 to 1.953. The milk
used for fluid consumption by non-farm
population increased from 26 billion
pounds in 1924 to 29 billion pounds in
the late 20's, dropped back to about 27
billion pounds in 1930, increased to 31
billion pounds in 1940, rose sharply
during the war period to a temporary
peak of 42 billion pounds in 1946, drop-
p-ed back to less than 41 billion pounds
in 1948 and since that time has gradu-
ally increased to a new record of 45
billion pounds in 1953. When combined
with the fluid milk consumption on
farms, much of which is processed and
redelivered to the farms, it accounts for
56,300,000,000 pounds of milk or 46%/
of the total production of milk on farms.

IT'S NOT INCOMPETENCE
)Do you get along well wih oth ers?
According to a Harvard University survey,
the main reason people lose their jobs is be-
cause of "inability to get along with people".
Another reason is "lack of imagination".
"Incompetence" uas found to be a minor
reason.


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SEPTEMBER & OCTOBER, 1954


* 25




















The Annual Dairy Field Day Banquet at the University of Florida


Dairy Feeding and Management Program


Attracts Record Field Day Attendance

Dairy Industry Honors Dr. John S. Alien, Acting President of University of Florida


A grade "A" program, perfect weather and more active advance
credited with boosting the 19th Annual Dairy Field Day Meeting at
of Florida to its highest level of both attendance and interest.
The splendid program of the 1954 Field Day held September
the result of the most careful consideration and planning on the part o
of Florida Agricultural Experiment Station Dairy Department staff
Day Committee of the Florida Dairy Association.
Much credit for the excellent program and the efficient manr
it was conducted should go to the chairmen of the joint sponsoring
Dr. Sidney Marshall, who provided the leadership on the part of the
ment staff, and L. B. (Red) Hull, well known dairy producer of G
served as chairman of the Dairy Association Field Day Committee.


Special Program Features
While each session of the program
seemed to be "special," we will classify
as tops on the program (a) the address
of Mr. John F. Thompson of Ralston
Purina Mills, St. Louis, on Dairy Herd
Management Practices, (b) the Fellow-
ship Session and Annual Dinner Thurs-
day evening, and (c) the Tour of the
Experiment Station Dairy Farm Research
Unit.
Annual Dinner
The Annual Dinner and program held
at the University Student Service Center
was both an enjoyable and impressive
occasion. Surprise and welcome guests
were Dr. John S. Allen, Acting President
of U. of F., and Mrs. Allen.
F.D.A. President Herman Boyd turned
the master of ceremonies duties for the
meeting over to Dr. Wayne Reitz, U. F.
Provost for Agriculture, who presided
with just the right amounts of wit and
dignity.


Among the honor
guests in addition to f
Dr. and Mrs. Allen,
were: Hon. Billy
Matthews, member
of Congress who was
the principal speaker;
State Senator-elect L.
K. Edwards of Oca-
la; State Representa-
tive Ralph Turling-
ton of Gainesville;
Miss Merriam Simmons,
Dairy Industry Queen of
her Maid of Honor, Mis
of Callahan; Mr. John I
State Dairy Supervisor,
and Mr. H. G. Clayton, E
Agricultural Extension Sei
Thompson, Ralston Purina
Dr. and Mrs. Everett L. F
lyn Sellers, President of t
ies' Auxiliary; W. A. Bou
dent Florida Guernsey C


promotion are
the University

16 and 17 was
f t-h T Tn;Unvr;;i


Mrs. Boutwell; A. T. Alvarez, President
Florida Jersey Cattle Club, and Mrs. Al-
varez; L. K. Nicholas, Administrator,
Florida Milk Commission.


and the Field Dairy Awards Presented
The Annual Dairy Field Day, which
ler with which is the outstanding producer event of the
organizations: year, is selected as the occasion for pre-
SDairy Depart- senting the principal annual dairy farm
-ainesville, who awards of the year.
In addition to the usual awards ore-
sented in the "Efficient Dairy Produc-
tion Contest" and the "National Dairy
Herd Honor Roll Winners," the first
annual awards were made in the Stare
Dairy Pasture Contest.
The winners of these contests are re-
ported in separate stories.
F.D.A. Honors Dr. Allen
A surprise event of the annual dinner
program was a ceremony conducted by
President Boyd and the Directors of the
THOMPSON Florida Dairy Association in which they
presented Dr. Allen, Acting President of
1954 Florida the University, with an Honorary Mem-
)rangedale, and bership Emblem.
s Patricia Ellis President Boyd pointed out that this,
M. Scott, Chief the only honorary membership in the
and Mrs. Scott Association, was voted by the Board of
director Florida Directors in recognition and appreciation
rvice; Mr. John of the interest which Dr. Allen had
Co., St. Louis; shown in agriculture and more especially
outs; Mrs. Eve- the Dairy Industry, the Department of
he F.D.A. Lad- Dairy Science of the University and the
twell Sr., Presi- activities of the Florida Dairy Associa-
attle Club, and tion.











r'


* *' ~'"-



-- .4


THE ANNUAL FIELD DAY STORY IN PICTURES-
TOP-Left: The welcome sign with F.D.A. office secretary Mrs. Elsie Remsen and Director
J. D. Fuqua at the registration desk. Right: A portion of the speakers' table at the banquet
program with U. S. Congressman D. R. (BILLY) MATTHEWS speaking.
BOTTOM PANEL-(1) "RED" HULL, F.D.A. Field Day Chairman, welcoming the group
in the opening session. (2) LEADERS OF THE FIELD DAY PROGRAM, L to R, HERMAN
BOYD, F. D. A. president; DR. S. P. MARSHALL, Chairman for the Dairy Department; DR.
R. W. BLEDSOE, U. of Fla. Presiding Chairman of 1st session and "RED" HULL. (3) C. W.
REAVES, State Extension Dairyman, presenting Dairy Herd Production awards and (seated)
DR. J. WAYNE REITZ, U. of F. Provost for Agriculture, who acted as master of ceremonies
at the annual banquet. (4) DR. KARL OWENS, chairman of the F.D.A. Veterinary Commit-
tee, speaking. (5) AWAITING A BUSINESS SESSION are L to R: HERMAN SOMERS,
herdsman, U. of F. Dairy Farm Unit; PROF. P. T. DIX ARNOLD, Dairy Dept. Staff, and
CHARLIE DONEGAN, Largo dairyman, a Field Day "old timer". (6) Two attractive and
prominent young ladies whose records in recent 4-H dairy history is most outstanding. MISS
MERRIAM SIMMONS (right), 1954 "Florida Dairy Industry Queen", and her "maid of honor",
MISS PATRICIA ELLIS, Callahan. Both were members of the 1953 4-H State Dairy Judging
Team. (7) Four ladies enjoying buffet lunch at the U. of F. Farm Research Unit. L to R, MRS.
W. A. KRIENKE, MRS. W. A. BOUTWELL, SR., MRS. E. L. FOUTS and MRS. J. M.
WING. (8) Seen during the U. F. Research Farm tour are L to R: DR. D. A. SANDERS,
Head of Dept. of Veterinary Science; DR. R. B. BECKER, U. F. Dairy Husbandman and E. T.
LAY, Manager, Fla. Dairy Ass'n.
RIGHT PANEL-(1) Three bus loads of dairymen inspecting experimental pastures at
the U. F. Dairy Research Farm at Hague. (2) Buffet lunch is served in the milking barn at the
U. F. Dairy Farm. (3) The spotless feeding and milking barn of the U. F. Farm is converted
into a dining room for 150 Field Day visitors. (4) Group seen inspecting the U. F. Farm Re-
search facilities are, L to R: JOHN HOOD, Hood's Dairy, Bradenton; DR. R. B. BECKER;
MRS. HOOD; JIM JENNINGS, Allied Trades Member, and T. G. LEE, Orlando dairy owner.
(5) Inspecting the U. F. Dairy Farm milking barn are: DR. HOWARD WILKOWSKE, Dairy
Dept. Staff; W. W. GLENN, Jackson County Farm Agent; DR. E. L. FOUTS. head of Dairy
Dept., and M. A. SCHACK, prominent Jackson County dairyman.


Holsteins Contributed to U. F.
Another unprogrammed event of the
annual dinner was the presenting to the
University of Florida Dairy Department
by a group of dairymen of seven young
Registered Holstein dairy animals as the
nucleus of an experimental Holstein herd
for the Dairy Research Farm. An-
nouncement of the contributors is made
elsewhere.
F.D.A. Election
A break in the Field Day program
permitted a short business session of the
Florida Dairy Association, which was
conducted by President Herman Boyd.
Ten additional Association directors-
five producers and five distributors-
were nominated and elected under a plan
adopted at the Association's Annual Con-
vention in May. These are listed in a
separate story.


Resolutions Adopted ,-h
(1) In memory of Dr. J. Hillis Miller,
the late President of the University of
Florida, who was the principal speaker
at the 1953 Annual Field Day Dinner.
(2) In recognition of the progress
and outstanding program of the Depart-
ment of Dairy Science of the U. of F.,
appreciation for its services to the Flor-
ida Dairy Industry and urging support
of adequate budgets for its future de-
velopment.
(3) In appreciation to the University,
the Dairy Department staff and all those
who participated in the program and
otherwise contributed to the success of
the 1954 Annual Dairy Field Day.

A FIELD DAY SUMMARY of speakers'
material on all program subjects will
be carried in the Nov.-Dec. issue, Flor-
ida Dairy News.


'H
'CP


r ,J~
PlllfJ~iiL~


Am i. b

40



















PICTURED AT THE ANNUAL FIELD DAY BANQUET ARE, Left: HERMAN BOYD
(L) and BOB HALL receiving trophy from HERMAN BURNETT, chairman of the F.D.A.
Pasture Contest Committee, as 1st Place Winners for the "Best Dairy Pastures In 1953".
AT RIGHT- DAIRYMAN FLOYD B. CRAWFORD of Lake City, receives the 1st Place
State Winner trophy for "The Most Improvement In Dairy Pastures In 1953".


Miami and Lake City Dairies

Win State Dairy Pasture Contest
The Hall and Boyd Dairy, Miami, and Floyd B. Crawford Dairy, Lake City,
were awarded top honors in the 1953 State Dairy Pasture Contest when the final
winners were announced during the Annual Dairy Field Day in Gainesville, Septem-
ber 16th.
In addition to the two statewide winners, awards were presented to 23 county
winners and 6 other contestants whose pasture program scored 75% or better.
The 1953 Contest, which ended April 1, 19.54, was sponsored by the Florida
Dairy Association and the Florida Agricultural Extension Service. C. W. Reaves,
State Extension Dairyman, was in charge of the Contest and was assisted by the
Pasture Committee of the Dairy Association.
Information on the pastures of the two State Winners will be given in a later


issue of the Dairy News.
County Pasture Winners
County winners in the "Best Pasture"
group were. Bay County, J. M. Mowat,
Panama City; Calhoun County, M. W.
Eldridg', Altha; Washington, Lee Stan-
ton, Chipley; Jackson County, M. A.
Schack, Greenwood; Gadsden, Frank L.
DeBord, Quincy; Lafayette, Bishop Jack-
son, Mayo; Columbia, Floyd Crawford,
Lake City; Duval, Walter Welkener,
Jacksonville; Orange, Bryan Judge &
Son, Orlando; Pinellas, W. ]. Casey,
Clearwater; Hillsborough, Julian Lane,
Tampa; Polk, Fletcher Gardner, Lake
Wales; Martin, 1W. J. Matheson (Coast-
al Dairies), Palm City; Palm Beach,
George Johnson, West Palm Beach;
Broward, A. F. McDavid, Pompano,
Dade, Hall & Boyd Dairy, Miami.
County winners in the "Most Pasture
I",.I. .: ... ," group (where different


from Best Pasture Winner) were: Jack-
son County, M. T. Crutchfield, Marianna;
Layfayette County, Delmar Sapp, Bran-
ford; Duval, W. J. Simmons, Jackson-
ville; Orange County, Hanson Collins,
Orlando; Palm Beach County, E. F.
Froehlich, West Palm Beach; Broward
County, R. G. Goolsby, Hollywood; Dade
County, Graham Dairy, Hialeah.
Other Pasture Winners
Dairies receiving a score of 75% or
better who received a "Certificate of
Recognition" were: Ferret's Dairy, Dins-
more, Duval County; Carroll L. Ward, Jr.
of Goldenrod, Glen Nelson of Orlando
and Fairglade Jersey Dairy, Orlando, all
of Orange County; R. M. Goolsby, Lake
Park, and W. P. Portier (Ocean City
Dairies) of Delray Beach, both of Palm
Beach County.


COVER PICTURE PASTURE CONTEST WINNERS
WINNERS IN STATE DAIRY PASTURE CONTEST SHOWN ON COVER ARE: Left to
right, (1) B. IV. JUDGE, Orange County Best Dairy Pasture; (2) ELBERT CAMMACK, Orange
County Certificate of Recognition; (3) WALTER WELKENER, Duval County; (4) M. A.
SCHACK, Jackson County; (5) HANSON COLLINS, Orange County winner on Most Improve-
ment of Pasture; (6) HERMAN BOYD of Hall & Boyd Dairy, Dade County (STATE WINNER
in Best Dairy Pasture); (7) W. J. CASEY, Pinellas County; (8) CARROLL WARD, JR., Orange
County Certificate of Recognition; (9) W. J. SIMMONS, Duval County winner on Most Im-
provement; (10) F. B. CRAWFORD, Columbia County (STATE WINNER in Most Improve-
ment in Pasture); (11) LEE STANTON, Washington County, and (12) C. W. REAVES, State
Extension Dairyman and member State Dairy Pasture Committee. (Other county and recogni-
tion award winners were not present when picture was taken.)


Register in Pasture Contest
To Win Clock-Radio Drawing
One of the first fifty to register for
the 1954-55 State Pasture Contest will
win a handsome clock-radio awarded by
the F.D.A. Pasture Committee.
The drawing will be held at the No-
vember 5 F.D.A. directors' meeting in
Jacksonville.
Any dairyman can register at his Coun-
ty Agent's office or by mailing the regis-
tration card which was furnished all
dairymen by mail some time ago from
the Florida Dairy Association office.
An additional "entry card", copies of
pasture record and report forms, sample
score card and complete information on
the pasture contest can be secured from
County Agents or by request to the Flor-
ida Dairy Association.

State Dairy Pasture Contest
Plans For Year 1954-55
The general objective of the contest
is for more dairymen to secure the re-
sults of good pasture and forage produc-
tion, utilizing these valuable green feeds
for more efficient and profitable dairy-
ing. County Committees will score all
farms entering the contest and submitting
reports. Certificates of Recognition will
be presented all those scoring 75 per cent
or above. County and state winners will
be named in two divisions as follows:
1. The one with the best overall pas
ture program.
2. The one making the most progress
over the previous year.
Certificates and plaques will be award-
ed at the Annual Dairy Field Day in
Gainesville.
The contest will end April 1, 1955,
so as to include the full winter and spring
pasture programs.
Join the contest and help make a great-
er Florida Dairy Industry and a more
profitable business for yourself.
Pasture Essay Contests
The 4-H and FFA Pasture Essay Con-
tests are also continued in which cash
awards and certificates will go to the 1st,
2nd and 3rd state winners and certifi-
cates to all essay entries scoring "good"
or better. The awards are to be made
in both the 4-H and FFA divisions.


4-H Pasture Essay Winners
Winners of the 1953 State 4-H Club
Essay Contest on "The Production and
Use of Better Dairy Pastures" were: 1st,
Robert Parisian, Callahan, and 2nd, Erny
Sellers, Tallahassee.

Student: "Have you any blue neckties to
match my eyes?"
Clerk: "No, but we have some soft hats to
match your head."


28 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS




















.7-~ -4q.W "W W -%3.


Pictured above is a front and back view of one of the Annual Dairy Field Day program
sessions in action. The speaker is Dr. Karl Owens, Gainesville veterinarian and chairman of
the F.D.A. Veterinary Committee.


DAIRY EMPLOYMENT
WANTED
Information on the following persons
desiring employment in a Florida dairy
is available in the office of the Florida
Dairy Association:
(1) Experienced in northern milk and
ice cream plant as superintendent.
Age 33; married; Catholic; 4 quar-
ters in Dairy Science, Iowa State
College; Farm background; Serv-
ice, World War II. References.
(2) Experienced in large northern dairy
plant as office manager, credit man-
ager, Labor and Personnel Rela-
tions Director. Age 37, married,
Graduate Univ. of Pittsburg. Excel-
lent experience. References.
(3) Assistant Superintendent or Quali-
ty Control. Experienced in quality
control, inspector, laboratory work,
plant processing. References.


Classified Advertising
RATE FOR ALL CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING IS 10c PER WORD


FOR SALE
RANCH EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES-CATTLE
WATERING TANKS. Ten-foot steel rein-
forced Concrete, 2'% feet wide. $60.00, delivered,
$50.00 your truck. Four foot wide tanks, $80.00
and $70.00. Orlando Concrete Specialties. Box
6122, Station 6, Orlando, Florida. Phone 3-4111.
DAIRYMEN, ARE YOU IN NEED OF
BREEDING STOCK? Holstein, Swiss, Guern-
sey Fresh or springing cows, fall freshen-
ing heifers, open helfers, heifer calves. Any
number shipped anywhere; Bang tested or
vaccinated. Registered or high grade. Selected
from Wisconsin's finest herds. Reasonably
priced. ROBERT H. WALTER, Phone Meno-
monee Falls 0263, Lannon, Wisconsin.
35754DN


(4) DAIRY FARM WORKER now in
North Carolina, married, exper-
ienced with dairy herd and farm-
ing operation and use of milking
machines.


Thomas A. Edison, inventor of the electric
light 75 years ago said: "Our electrical world
and the better uay of life it makes possible
is due to free enterprise, not socialism, to in-
vestors' money, not taxes; to individual initia-
tive, rather than government."


100 LBS.NET

PDQ.
4 MOVEN-D ENDAULE -UUIC
*O aiA -






SUPPLEMENT

T HE PD.Q. C
'aAjend1otimda
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All You Need
For Profitable
Livestock Maintenance


Bread and Milk Prices
"A remarkable coincidence" is what a
writer in the Tallahassee Democrat calls
the submitting of identical bids by dairies
and bakeries on milk and bread supplies
for schools.
The writer could have made a point
of the fact that while the dairies bid a
lower price on milk than similar bids a
year ago, the bids for bread were 4 cents
a loaf higher than a year ago.

CUT MEDICINE COSTS
WE SELL DIRECT TO THE DAIRYMAN
NAME BRAND QUALITY PRODUCTS

MERCK and Co.

PENSTREP
400,000 units Procaine Penc G
0.5 Gr. Dihydrostreptomycin
1 to 12 VIALS ................$1.60 each
13 to 25 VIALS ............... 1.44 each
26 or more VIALS ............ 1.37 each
WRITE US YOUR PROBLEM





2380 PALM AVE. HIALEAH, FLA.
PHONE: 88-6496


THE
P.D.O. COMPANY

Announces
The Appointment of

HOWARD FEED MILLS
Incorporated
1801 W. 15th Street
Jacksonville
as
DISTRIBUTORS
for
NORTHERN FLORIDA


BALANCE YOUR FALL AND WINTER FEEDING PROGRAM
WITH P.D.Q. SELF-RATIONING SUPPLEMENTS.
P.D.Q. DOESN'T COST IT PAYS!



The P.D.Q. Company, Inc.
P. 0. BOX 439 LAKELAND, FLA.


SEPTEMBER & OCTOBER, 1954


* 29







GUERNSEY CATTLE CLUB NEWS



37 Animals Average $327.73 At

East Coast Guernsey Sale

Florida Guernsey breeders purchased all the thirty-seven animals offered at the
Annual East Coast Guernsey Sale held September 3rd at Lake Worth.
The sale was held at the farm of W. A. Boutwell, Sr., President of the Florida
Guernsey Cattle Club, which sponsored the sale.
The top female in the sale was Brays Island Queen Alice, consigned by Brays
Island Plantation, Yemassee, South Carolina. She was purchased by K. P. and Betty
Detjen of Hollywood for $550.00.
The top price bull, Jenwell Charmer, was consigned by the Boutwell Farm at
Lake Worth and purchased by R. M. Goolsby, Lake Park, Florida for $330.00.
The total sale price of the thirty seven animals was $12,125.00. The heaviest
buyer was W. J. Matheson for Coastal Dairies, Stuart, Florida, who bought nine
animals for a total of $2,945.00, while the second heaviest buyer was Boutwell's
Dairy which paid $1,645.00 for five animals.
The sale was managed by Ralph Coarsey who also read pedigrees. Mrs. Coarsey
acted as clerk for the sale. Tom McCord was the auctioneer.
East Coast Sale Record
The following sale record gives the lot number, name of animal, purchaser and


price.
Bayville Royal Unicorn (Male), Perry's
Farm, Hollywood, $300.; Bayville Rose Ca-
nary, Coastal Dairies, Inc., Stuart, $260.; Bay-
ville Just Prue, Maurice Hiett, Sarasota, $325.;
Bayville Sparkling Robbie, Coastal Dairies,
Stuart, $255.; Laurel Cliff Corinne, Jack P.
Dodd, Maitland, $390.; Manor Infanta, Jack
P. Dodd, Maitland, $275.; Maywood Con-
queror's Nola, Jack P. Dodd, Maitland, $270.;
Burkeville Emory's Carol, Coastal Dairies,
Stuart, $300.; Minoborya J. Anne, Jack P.
Dodd, Maitland, $370.; Brooke's Cross Sinda,
Boutwell's Dairy, Lake Worth, $240.; Jen-
well Charmer (Male), R. M. Goolsby, Lake
Park, $330.; Jenwell Dewdrop, Coastal Dair-
ies, Stuart, $390.
Jenwell King Emily, Mrs. Floyd B. Craw-
ford, Lake City, $380; Grandview Predictors
Senator (Male), R. M. Goolsby, Lake Park,
$160.; Arden Ace's Betty, Coastal Dairies,
Stuart, $450.; Arlo Noble's Fairest, Jack P.
Dodd, Maitland, $290.; Valkyrie Lucky Marty,
Coastal Dairies, Stuart, $370.; Brays Island
Queen Alice, K. P. & Betty Detjen, Holly-
wood, $550.; Brays Island Queen Valorie,
K. P. & Betty Detjen, Hollywood, $420.;
Dinsmore Mayroyal Adonis (Male), William
H. Boyd, Miami, $135.; Dinsmore Noble
Leafy, Maurice Hiett, Sarasota, $375.; Dins-
more No Mix Hope, W. P. Waldrep, Holly-
wood, $400.; Edisto Farms Belladonna, Car-
roll Ward, Jr., Goldenrod, $335.
Edisto Farms P. Consort, Carroll Ward, Jr.,
Goldenrod, $365.; Brookberry Lone Adonis
(Male), Perry's Farm, Hollywood, $250.;
Brookberry King's Della, W. P. Waldrep,
Hollywood, $365.; Oakhurst Countess Garnett,
Boutwell's Dairy, Lake Worth, $450.; Implad
Frances of Vaughandale, Coastal Dairies, Inc.,
Stuart, $310.; Vaughandale's Wendr Bout-
well's Dairy, Lake Worth, $290.; Vaughan-
dale Wonder Girl, Boutwell's Dairy, Lake
Worth, $275.; Walrep's Phillip Judie Sub),
Coastal Dairies, Inc., Stuart, $360; Waldrep
Grandee Betty, Floyd B. Crawford, Boutwell's
Dairy, Lake Worth, $390; Lakemont Peerless
Mona, W. P. Waldrep, Hollywood $245;
Ward Haven Hazel M. Mary, Coastal Dairies,
Stuart, $250.; Lakemont Judy's Patty, Carroll
Ward, Sr., Winter Park, $435.


HIGH RECORDS SHOWN IN
GUERNSEY REGISTRY TESTS
HE AVERAGE COW in the United
States produces only about half as
much milk and butterfat as the average
purebred Guernsey cow on official test.
Guernsey cows on official registry tests
have steadily increased their production
records over the years.
The University of Florida supervises
the records for Florida and sends them to
the American Guernsey Cattle Club for
approval. The most recent announcements
from the A.G.C. Club include the fol-
lowing:
) DINSMORE DAIRY COMPANY,
Dinsmore-D:nsmore Majestic Melissa
has just completed a state championship
production record with 14,993 pounds of
milk and 687 pounds of butterfat, which
is the highest Advanced Registry record
in the state of Florida, made by a senior
four-year-old, milked three times daily
for 365C days. The sire of this cow,
Dinsmore Majestic Rose King, also own-
ed by Dinsmore Dairy Company has test-
ed daughters in the Performance Register
of the American Guernsey Cattle Club.
Dinsmore Levity Lindy has completed
an official record of 11,788 pounds of
milk and 577 pounds of fat on three
times daily milking for 365 days, start-
ing her record as a three-year-old. This
production represents approximately 5581
quarts of high quality milk. "Lindy" is
the daughter of the outstanding sire,
Gayoso Coronation Levity, that has one
son and 20 tested daughters in the Per-
formance register.


Another Dairy Queen
The new "Miss Universe," Miriam
Stevenson from South Carolina, reports
that she has had a staple diet of home-
made buttermilk for many years. The
Stevenson family are Golden Guernsey
dairymen in Winnsboro, South Carolina.
From the looks of "Miss Universe,"
buttermilk sure should be a staple in a
lot more girls' diets!
Florida's 1954 "Dairy Industry Queen,"
Miss Merriam Simmons, is also a dairy
farm girl who likes milk.

) CARROLL L. WARD & SON, Winter
Park-Three registered Guernsey cows in
this herd have completed official records.
On three times milking daily for 305C
days, Lakemont Admiral's Mona, a junior
two-year-old, produced 9,925 pounds of
milk and 511 pounds of fat. She is the
daughter of the registered sire, Owen's
Place Mona's Admiral, that has four
daughters in the Performance Register.
Lakemont King's Karon produced 11,-
233 pounds of milk and 530 pounds of
fat milked three times daily for 365 days,
as a senior two-year-old. This cow is the
daughter of the famous sire, McDonald
Farms King Ken, that has 33 tested
daughters in the Performance Register.
Lakemont Judy's Marion produced 10,-
670 pounds of milk and 590 pounds of
fat on three times daily milking for 365C
days, starting her record as a senior two-
year-old. "Marion" is the daughter of
Riegeldale Emory's Judicator, that has
one son and 32 tested daughters in the
Performance Register.
)BOUTWELL'S DAIRY, INC., Lake
Worth Jenuell Merry Christmas has
completed an official Advanced Registry
Record of 9,431 pounds of milk and 472
pounds of fat on two times daily milking
for 365C days, starting her record as a
junior two-year-old. "Christmas" is the
daughter of Klondike Raider's Merry
Boy, that has one son and eight tested
daughters in the Performance Register.
) C. E. DONEGAN, Largo-Kenners-
ley Ida produced 11,663 pounds of milk
and 594 pounds of fat when milked two
times daily for 365 days as a six-year-old.
"Ida" is the daughter of Blakeford Con-
fident, that has one son and 29 tested
daughters in the Performance Register.
)WALTER SCHMID & SON, Sarasota
-Jackson's Radiant Ruth produced 11,-
850 pounds of milk and 538 pounds of
fat as a seven-year-old, milked two times
daily for 305C days. "Ruth" is the daugh-
ter of Linwood's Jackson, that has seven
tested daughters in the Performance Reg-
ister.

Doctor: "The pains in your leg may
be due to old age."
Patient: "Old age, nothing! The other leg
is the same age, and it's all right."


30 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS





FLORIDA BREEDERS PURCHASE
REGISTERED GUERNSEY SIRES .


The following Florida purchases of
registered young Guernsey sires have been
announced recently by the American
Guernsey Cattle Club.
) MOORE BROS., Stuart, have just pur-
chased Jenwell Standby from Boutwell's
Dairy, Inc. of Lake Worth, Fla. This
richly bred young bull is out of the well-
bred cow, Pennbrook's Prince's Clara,
that has a production record of 11,470
pounds of milk and 512 pounds of fat,
made as a five-year-old. He is sired by
Jenwell Merry Lad.
) SHADOWLAWN FARMS, INC., Pen-
ney Farms, has just purchased Elmo Joe's
Majesty from Elmo M. Pearce, Jackson-
ville. This young bull is out of the cow,
Valor's Betty-Beth, and is sired by Cam-
eron's Gardener Bette Jewel.
~ SHADOWLAWN FARMS has also
purchased Laveah Champ from R. R.
Jennings of Jacksonville. This richly bred
young bull is out of the well-bred cow,
Dinsmore Garfield Justice, that has once
been classified as Desirable for type, and
has a production record of 11,938 pounds
of milk and 586 pounds of fat, made
as a senior three-year-old. He is sired by
Dinsmore Max.
) ALEXIS KERENOFF, Tampa, has just
purchased Sellers Farm Le Fortune from
L. H. Sellers of St. Petersburg. This
young bull is out of the cow, Three H
Golden Della May and is sired by Mc-
Donald Farms Le Oberlin.
) HOMER W. WASSON, St. Augustine,
has just purchased Prince of Dallas Pines
from W. B. & E. E. Fox of St. Augus-
tine. This young bull is out of the cow,
Sunbeam's Golden Lassie, and is sired
by Bodden's Hanson Fred.
) D. LOCKS, Punta Gorda, has just pur-
chased Woodacres Bright Leader from
Harold J. Brooks & E. V. Coleman, Sara-
sota. This richly bred young bull is out
of the well-bred cow, Woodacres Royal
Bountiful, that has been classified Very
Good for type, has two production rec-
ords of 11,364 pounds of milk and 605
pounds of fat made as a junior two-year-
old in the Herd Improvement Register,
and 12,360 pounds of milk and 659
pounds of fat made as a five-year-old. He
is sired by Langwater Bright Lad.
VELDA DAIRY FARMS, INC., Talla-
hassee, has just purchased McDonald
Farms Pre Taurus from J. M. McDonald,
Cortland, N.Y. This richly bred young
bull is out of the well-bred cow, Land-
meadow Ivy Queen, that has twice been
classified Very Good for type, has a
production record of 12,499 pounds of
milk and 655 pounds of fat made as a
junior three-year-old in the Herd Im-
provement Register. He is sired by Mc-
Donald Farms Prediction.


". ''A

ABOVE ARE THE TWO TOP PRICE ANIMALS OF THE FLORIDA EAST COAST
GUERNSEY SALE.
AT THE TOP, is the top price male, "JENWELL CHARMER", consigned by the Bout-
well Dairy, Lake Worth, Fla. THE BUYER, R. M. GOOLSBY Dairy, Lake Park, Fla., is second
from the right. The consignors, 1V. A. Boutu'ell, and Earl Jensen of the Boutwell Dairy, Lake
Worth, Fla., are seen at the right and left of Mr. Goolsby.
AT BOTTOM, is the top female, "BRAYS ISLAND QUEEN ALICE", consigned by Brays
Island, Yemassee, S. C.; M. DETJEN, the purchaser, Hollywood, Fla., is seen in the center
and the contending bidder, W. J. MATHESON, Stuart, Fla., at the right. Holding the cow is
MERTON SOWERBY, herd manager of the Brays Island Dairy.


SEPTEMBER & OCTOBER, 1954


* 31






Annual Florida Guernsey Sale
Set For November 9 In Largo
The 16th Annual Florida Guernsey Cattle Club Sale will be held in the New
Youth and Livestock Building on Pinellas County Fair Grounds, Largo on Tuesday,
November 9th at 1:00 P..M
The following consignors are sending some of their best Guernseys: From North
Carolina: Brookberry Farm, Winston-Salem; Maegeo Farms, Lexington; Quail Roost
Farms, Rougemont; Riverview Farm, Durham; Slagle Dairy Farm, Franklin. From
South Carolina: Hill Top Farm, Union; Gippy Plantation, Moncks Corner; Edisto
Farms, Denmark; J. McK. Jeter, Union. From Georgia: Ben-Bow Quitman; Nejasco
Farms, Canton. From Florida: Lay Laine Guernsey Farm, Goldenrod; Lakemont
Dairy, Winter Park; John Cone, Plant City; Boutwell's Dairy, Lake Worth; Dins-
more Dairies, Dinsmore.


Most of them have been consigning
cattle to our Sales for several years and
appreciate the prices which have been
received.
Col. Tom McCord of Montgomery,
Alabama will serve as Auctioneer and
Ralph Coarsey of Trion, Georgia will
read pedigrees.
Sale Committee
Members of the Sales Committee,
which has already completed its selection
trip, are: R. R. Jennings, Chairman; Car-
roll Ward, Sr.; J. H. Logan; Thomas
Sparks; Walter Schmidt; W. P. Wal-
drep; Earl Johnson and C. J. Jacobs.


The demand for Guernsey cattle in this
area of Florida has increased on account
of the Florida sales as well as for the
very good reason that the sale of "Golden
Guernsey" milk has increased rapidly dur-
ing the past few years.
Consignors and buyers are invited to
come early to the sale and enjoy Gulf of
Mexico fishing as well as the Annual
Banquet of the Florida Guernsey Cattle
Club which is held in the Largo Fair
building the evening before the sale.
This dinner, sponsored by the Pinellas
County Commissioners, is always a de-
lightful occasion and all those interested
are invited to attend.


Dairy Conventions and Exposition
Set for Atlantic City, October 25
A high percentage of Florida dairy plant executives will be found in Atlantic
City the week of October 25-30 attending the National Milk and Ice Cream Asso-
ciation Conventions and the gigantic Dairy Equipment Exposition.
It is doubtful if any industry provides its members with a finer program of
trade information and training than is provided executives of the dairy industry by
the combined National Conventions of the Milk Industry Foundation and the Inter-
national Association of Ice Cream Manufacturers.


Equipment Exposition
Every second year when the Conven-
tions are held in Atlantic City, in addi-
tion to the programs of the two Conven-
tions, there is the added attraction of the
Dairy Equipment Exposition which com-
pletely fills the gigantic two story Ex-
position Hall. In the Exposition will be
found on exhibit and demonstration all
the latest and most modern dairy equip-
ment and supplies.
Early Bird Party
An early-bird entertainment program
is provided for Sunday evening, Octo-
ber 24 at the Chalfonte Hotel. This is a
fellowship and musical program.
Milk Foundation Meetings
The Milk Foundation with headquar-
ters at the Haddon Hall Hotel, starts
with a general session Monday morning,
round table sessions for breakfast Tues-
day and Wednesday mornings, sectional
meetings Tuesday morning, and conclud-
ing with a joint general session with the
Ice Cream Convention Wednesday morn-
ing.


Ice Cream Meetings
Headquarters and meetings of the Ice
Cream Convention will be at the Ambass-
ador Hotel.
Beginning with the joint session with
the Milk Foundation group Wednesday
morning, the Ice Cream program pro-
vides for Sectional meetings Thursday
morning on production, laboratory, sales
and accounting.
For Friday morning a general session
is scheduled.

Directors To Attend
Florida members of the Board of Di-
rectors of the two National Associations
are expected to participate in the Atlan-
tic City meetings of both groups. Theo
Datson, Borden's Dairy, Orlando and
Paul Reinhold, Foremost Dairies, Jack-
sonville are Florida directors of the In-
ternational Ice Cream Manufacturers
group while Reinhold and A. R. Niel-
sen, Alfar Creamery, West Palm Beach
are directors of the Milk Industry Foun-
dation.


NEW MILK BOOKLET
Many families that get too little milk
might be encouraged to use more, if the
importance of including liberal amounts
of milk in a food budget were explained
to them, say food economists of the U.S.
Department of Agriculture.
In a new booklet, "Milk and its Pro-
ducts-Facts for Consumer Education",
the economists have brought together
much information on the value of milk
for good nutrition, amounts needed, and
up-to-date facts on kinds of milk and
milk products on the market, along with
other pointers on buying and use.
Single copies of the booklet are free
from the Office of Information, U. S.
Department of Agriculture, Washington,
D.C.
Quoting from the booklet the authors,
Irene F. Wolgomat and Lillian J. Fin-
cher, have the following recommenda-
tions for milk ...
"When you drink milk, you are get-
ting about 100 different nutrients, in-
cluding vitamins, minerals, and high qual-
ity protein. Three-fourths of all the cal-
cium in this country's food supply comes
from milk, and this mineral, needed for
strong bones and teeth, is the nutrient
most often short in family food.
"Because of the great amount of nour-
ishment in milk, it is a 'good buy' for
the money it costs. Family food plans at
low-cost as well as those at moderate
cost level, developed in the Department,
have always included liberal quantities of
milk. These plans suggest three to four
cups of milk a day for children and two
or more cups for adults, with increased
amounts for expectant and nursing
mothers.
Food for Elderly Citizens
Milk, a very important food in the
diet of older people, is often considered
too expensive, but actually is an inexpen-
sive source of calcium. On a tight budget,
evaporated milk or non-fat milk may be
used, especially for cooking, according to
Rosalind Lifquist, home economist of the
U. S. Department of Agriculture.

PELLET MILL INSTALLED
Evidence of the increased demand for
the products of the Lakeland Cash Feed
company is seen in the new Pellet and
Crumble Mill now being installed in the
plant on Lake Mirror Drive, Lakeland.
Designed and fabricated by Sprout Wal-
dron Co. of Muncy, Pennsylvania, the
new mill, costing in excess of $10,000,
is the first of its kind in Florida and the
Southeast. It represents the latest in effi-
cient manufacturing of pellets and crum-
bles and will increase the output of these
feeds some fourfold. The manufacturing
of feed products in pellet form has made
great strides during the past few years,
the consumption having increased from
about 10% to 50% of all manufactured
feeds used by cattlemen.


32 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS




















Cross over the new $22,000,000 Bridge and visit with your Guernsey friends from Cuba, Florida and


the Southeast:


16TH ANNUAL STATE GUERNSEY SALE

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1954 1:00 P.M. FAIRGROUNDS, LARGO, FLORIDA




MR. SUN SAYS:

"Visit the land of the sun and
expanding markets for cattle
a n d Golden Guernsey milk.
Golden Guernsey milk sales have
increased more than 50% in South Florida during
the last six months."

CONSIGNMENTS HEAVY TO BRED HEIFERS
AND FRESH COWS FROM OUTSTANDING
President W. A. Boutwell, front row third from left,
GUERNSEY BREEDERS IN NORTH AND SOUTH and Earl Jensen, second from left, with Dr. Roberto
E. Paralon, Havana, Cuba, consistent heavy pur-
CAROLINA, GEORGIA AND FLORIDA. chasers of top Guernseys at Florida Sales.
Sales Committee:
Raymond Jennings, Chmn., Carroll Ward Sr., Thos. J. Sparks,
Walter Schmid, W. P. Waldrcp, Earl Johnson, J. H. Logan,
C. J. Jacobs.
Auctioneer:
Tom McCord, Montgomery, Ala.
Pedigree Reader:
Ralph Coarsey, Trion, Georgia

"Home of Florida State Guernsey Sales"
This new Youth and Livestock Building
Pinellas County Fairgrounds
Largo, Florida ... A U ... ...... ......
4 591 Flid 4 HJU-lU, I Ed ., i T ith C W.


jI 7j rlrlUU "u-n juu l Iuln a m w l n., r.
Extension Dairyman.


-SALE SPONSORED BY-

FLORIDA GUERNESY CATTLE CLUB
W. A. Boutwell, Sr., Lake Worth, President
W. P. Waldrep, Hollywood, Vice-Presidnet
Write to J. H. Logan, Secretary-Treasurer, Clearwater, Florida
for Free Catalog, Reservations and other information.
0 Headquarters: Sea Shell Hotel, Clearwater Beach il0


SEPTEMBER & OCTOBER,


1954 0 33





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


DAIRY REVIEW


Extension Service
Dairy Farm Research Unit


Dairy Products Laboratory
Agricultural Experiment Station


1111H


The Weight of a Gallon of Milk
By: WALTER A. KRIENKE
Department of Dairy Science
Florida Agrciultural Experiment Station
In dealing with liquid products it frequently becomes necessary to convert a
measured-quantity value into a weight value. For milk and some of the other liquid
dairy products such mathematical calculations are every day occurrence in many milk
plants.
One may very well ask the question, what is the weight of a gallon of milk,
and receive different answers from different individuals. The different answers can
be expected if actual weight-volume relationships have been established by carefully
weighing a certain volume of milk or if the specific gravity of the milk had been
determined and this value had been used in converting a weighed amount into the
volume it occupied. Generally, however, a certain set figure, perhaps 8.6 pounds,
is used as the weight of a gallon of milk without taking into account the specific
gravity of the milk.
Specific Gravity
In dealing with volume-weight relationship it is well to keep in mind the
definition of specific gravity. It is the relationship (ratio) of the weight of a given
volume of a substance and the weight of an equal volume of some other substance
taken as a standard (for liquids and for some solids, water is the standard), taken
at the same temperature or at stated temperatures. The specific gravity of water is
taken as 1.00000 at 40 C (39.20 F) because at this temperature its density is 1.00000.
At 600 F the density of water is 0.99903. As a gallon occupies 3,785.4 cc. or
ml. the weight of a gallon of water at 600 F is 8.3372 pounds. Having a specific
gravity of 1.030 at 600 F a gallon of milk will therefore have a weight of 8.5873
pounds. If the specific gravity of the milk had been 1.034 a gallon of it would have
weighed 8.6210 pounds. These differences are not large except when considered
in terms of percentage and for long periods of time. For example, at 200 gallons
per day for 365 days and at 60 cents per gallon the monetary difference would be
$171.70. At 20,000 gallons per day, as would be the case for some of the larger
plants, there would be a difference for the year of $17,170.
The following table has been prepared to supply the weights of a gallon of
milk at 600 F corresponding to respective specific gravity values.
Sp. gr. 1.028 1.029 1.030 1.031 1.032 1.033 1.034
Pounds 8.5706 8.5789 8.5873 8.5956 8.6040 8.6123 8.6040
Coefficient of Expansion
In addition to differences in specific gravity being responsible for differences
in the weight of a gallon of milk the weight is also influenced by differences in the
temperature of the milk. Temperature differences can be corrected for by applying
an appropriate coefficient of expansion value.
Given previously was the value 8.3372 pounds as the weight of a gallon of
water when at a temperature of 600 F. At 39.20 F (40 C) the weight of a gallon
of water is more, being 8.3454 pounds.
The difference between these two values for water cannot be used in arriving
at the differences for milk at the two temperatures. This is because of differences in
expansion between water and milk as the temperature is raised. Therefore, each
must be calculated on the basis of its own coefficient of expansion value.
The coefficient of expansion of milk varies slightly with differences in butterfat
content, but the usually expected differences in fat content of large volumes of mixed
milk will not account for sufficient differences in the coefficient of expansion value
to justify special formulas and multiple values. Between temperatures of 400 to 750
F the coefficient of expansion value for whole milk is 0.0176 per cent per degree F.
At temperatures above 750 F the value is 0.215 per cent per degree F. The change
at 750 F is not as abrupt as the listed values indicate, but for practical purposes
where either considerably higher or lower temperatures of milk, than 75 F, are in-
volved these values may be used without serious errors.
An example will serve to illustrate the mathematics involved. The milk in a
farm tank has been measured and reported to be 380 gallons at 420 F. Adjusting


Herdsmen's Short Course
Tops Attendance Records
The University of Florida's Annual
three-day Dairy Herdsmen's Short Course
held in August broke previous records
for attendance and demonstrated its value
so convincingly to those who attended
that all went home as active Herdsmen's
Short Course "Boosters" for next year.
One spokesman for the dairymen called
on the over-forty who attended to show
their appreciation for the excellent train-
ing offered by working for an attendance
of 100 for the 1955 course.
The program was planned and directed
by Dr. E. L. Fouts, Head of the U. of
F. Department of Dairy Science, Dr. R.
B. Becker, veteran Dairy Husbandman
with the Dairy Department, and C. W.
Reaves, State Extension Dairyman of the
Agricultural Extension Service.
Cooperating closely with the Univer-
sity in planning and promoting attend-
ance for the Course were the Milk Pro-
duction, Dairy Husbandry and Pasture
Development Committee of the Florida
Dairy Association.
Among the subjects covered in the
course were: Feed and pasture crops for
Florida; A yearly forage program; Var-
iations in heat periods, and relationship
to conception rates; Analysis of feeding
program on selected farms with relation
(Continued on Next Page)


to 600 F with the coefficient of expansion
value of 0.0176 per cent per degree F
this value must be multiplied by 18 (600
F 420 F) and therefore it becomes
0.3168 per cent. This new value multi-
plied by 380 equals 1.20 gallons to be
added to the measured amount to give
381.2 gallons at 600 F. If the specific
gravity of the milk was found to be
1.0325 at 600 F the weight of the milk
will be 8.6082 times 381.20 or 3,281
pounds for the measured 380 gallons at
420 F. Had the temperature of the milk
been 510 F and the specific gravity 1.029
at 600 F the weight of the measured 380
gallons would have been 3,264 pounds.
This difference of 17 pounds per day
(about two gallons) will amount to 6,205
pounds for a year.
By using a single value as the weight
of a gallon of milk errors are introduced
when converting measured quantities into
calculated weights. The change to farm
tanks and the use of large storage tanks
in plants for milk make it imperative that
weights of milk arrived at through mathe-
matical calculations be based on the spe-
cific gravity of each lot of milk and that
the coefficient of expansion of milk be
applied to account for temperature effects
when measured quantities of milk are in-
volved in transactions and in plant opera-
tional accounting.


34 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS






Winter Dairy Pastures Pay
By: DR. SIDNEY P. MARSHALL
Department of Dairy Science
Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
OATS WILL provide an excellent quality pasture which will stimulate higher
milk production during late fall, winter and early spring when the roughage
supply is usually short and the demand for milk is good. In addition to being a
cheap source of feed, oat pastures that have been well-fertilized are high in crude
protein content and a rich source of carotene, a precursor of vitamin A. This carotene
not only enriches the vitamin A potency of the milk and imparts an attractive golden
color, but also helps to protect milk against the occurrence of oxidized flavor.
During three years of grazing trials with oat pastures at the University of Florida
Dairy Research Unit, lactating cows obtained an average of 1,467 pounds of total
digestible nutrients per acre from oats grown on Orlando fine sand. Average daily
production of the cows was 26.8 pounds of milk during 126-day grazing seasons,
and the pasture supplied 61.1 percent of the total digestible nutrient intake of


the cows.
Dairy heifers gained an average of
1.13 pounds per day during 145 day
grazing periods on oat pastures without
supplemental feeding. This growth rate
was 156 percent of that considered to be
normal for animals of their ages. The
heifers made an annual total gain of 235
pounds per acre of pasture grazed and
obtained an average of 1814 pounds of
total digestible nutrients per acre from
it during the two-year period.
The crude protein content as well as
the yield of feed can be increased ma-
terially by fertilization of oats. Forage
from well-fertilized pasture has analyzed
30 percent crude protein on the dry mat-
ter basis, whereas that from poorly fer-
tilized areas may contain only 12 or 14
percent crude protein. When cattle are
consuming high-quality forage, their con-
centrate ration may be composed of less
expensive, low-protein ingredients, such
as citrus pulp, corn and oats.
The cost of producing oat pastures
averaged about $40.00 per acre. Returns
calculated as the feed replacement value
of the pasture were $81.65 per acre for
the oats planted on Orlando fine sand
(grazed by the cows) and $103.60 per
acre for those grown on Scranton loamy
fine sand (grazed by the heifers).
Subdivide Oats Pasture
Oats ordinarily will supply grazing
from late November or early December
into April, depending upon growing con-
ditions and planting date. Pastures should
be grazed when the oats are about nine
inches tall and the forage consumed be-
fore elongated stem joints form. For
most efficient and satisfactory use of the
oats, the pasture should be subdivided
into about four to six plots and these
grazed rotationally. This subdivision can
be accomplished inexpensively with an
electric fence. Since oats grow slowly
during cold weather, it is desirable to
allow an accumulation of growth to occur
during late fall for use during the colder
winter period. The carrying capacity of
the oat pastures in these trials has been
below one cow per acre during the colder
period of about mid-December to mid-


February. During the warmer periods ol
fall and spring, the carrying capacity
ranged between one and two cows per
acre.
Use of Legumes
Interplanting oats with legumes (Ken-
land red clover, crimson clover, or white
clover) on land where growing condi-
tions are favorable for their production,
will increase the yield of feed and extend
the grazing season. Dairy heifers grazing
oats interplanted with Kenland red clover
gained 377 pounds and obtained 2921
pounds of total digestible nutrients per
acre of pasture during a 191-day grazing
season. Should these temporary pastures
not be needed for grazing in the spring
after permanent pastures come into pro-
duction, this excess forage can be pre-
served as silage or hay for use during
periods of pasture deficiency.


to pastures; Getting highest quality graz-
ing and supplemental feeding; Factors
affecting butterfat tests; Managed milk-
ing for maximum production; Milkers
and milking methods; Surplus forage,
how preserved; Ensiling methods and
preservatives; Herd disease control and
prevention.
Those registered for the record attend-
ance were: Dick Salter, Salter Dairy, Mil-
ton; Hubert A. Christmas, Christmas
Dairy, Cottondale; Oliver T. Burgess,
Anderson & Burgess Dairy, Marianna; M.
A. Schack, Schack's Dairy, Greenwood;
E. P. Yocum, Jr., Southern Dairies, Inc.,
Marianna; T. P. Love, Herd Manager,
Fla. State University, Tallahassee; C. W.
Haufler, Borden's Dairy, Tallahassee;
Donald D. Mowat, Mowat Dairy, Lynn
Haven; Jack Dew, Southern Dairies, Inc.,
Jacksonville; Leonard Hodn, Hodn Dairy,
Jacksonville; A. B. Sanchez, Velda Dairy
Corp., St. Augustine; H. D. Zimmerle,
Velda Dairy Products, Green Cove
Springs; J. F. Braun, Braun's Dairy,
Jacksonville; W. L. Bouchillon, Clay
County Farms, Middleburg; Frank T.


SEPTEMBER &


Florida Milk Research
Promises Improved Quality
Research at the Florida State Univer-
sity's Department of Chemistry and at
the University of Florida's Agricultural
Experiment Station on abnormal flavors
and the sourin gof milk has produced re-
sults which may be among the most im-
portant discoveries in recent years. Both
centers of study have been experimenting
with the effects of menadione, containing
vitamin K, when fed to dairy cows.
George C. Kelley and Karl Dittmer in
Tallahassee have determined that the
feeding of menadione greatly retards
souring of milk, both raw and pasteur-
ized. They consider their studies prelim-
inary and expect further research to re-
veal the practical methods of adding men-
adione to dairy feed.
Walter A. Krienke at the University
of Florida has been feeding menadione
in experiments to discover measures which
will correct objectionable flavors in milk.
Recently an article by Mr. Krienke was
published in Hoard's Dairyman, in which
the author discusses his experiments at
length. He concludes, "Milk producers,
milk and dairy products processors, and
distributors, and especially consumers of
milk and its products will welcome the
day that oxidized flavor can be pre-
vented."

SELF SERVICE
A rich widow lady named Carrie
Just wasn't too anxious to marry;
But a salesman named Pete
Rushed the gal off her feet,
Some bargain he got-Cash and Carrie!


Denham, Jr., Foremost Dairies, Inc., Jack-
sonville; Val Lee, Miller Machinery Co.,
Jacksonville; Harvey B. Brown, Brown's
Dairy, Orange Heights; Malcolm Smith,
Smith's Dairy, Inverness; Hilton Teal,
Teal Dairy, Winter Garden; James M.
Waters, Marbrook Dairy, Haines City;
H. V. Moore, C. L. Reagan Dairy, St.
Petersburg; C. L. Reagan, Reagan's Dairy,
St. Petersburg; J. W. Watkins, Bayou
Vista Guernsey Farm Dairy, Clearwater;
Harry Ankers, Clearwater; L. E. Cun-
ningham, Pinellas County Asst. Farm
Agent, Largo; Lawrence Reagan, E. L.
Reagan Dairy, Pinellas Park; Marion A.
Pettit and Charlie O. Pettit, Pettit's Dairy,
Punta Gorda; Frank Coune', Jackson
Grain Co., Tampa; Clyde J. Harris, Man-
go; J. B. Sampson and J. B. Sampson, Jr.,
Sampson's Dairy, Mango; William Mul-
lineaux. Mullineaux Dairy, Tampa; Rob-
ert N. Morris, Tampa; Robert T. Cord,
Ft. Lauderdale; Ray Johnson, Jr., John-
son's Dairy, Pompano; Howard P. Hol-
man, Marietta Silo Corp., Hollywood;
and E. T. Lay, Fla. Dairy Association,
Jacksonville.

OCTOBER, 1954 35


Herdmen's Short Course
(Continued from Page 34)





ACTIVITIES REVIEW OF:


Florida's Dairy Councils
Current News of Dairy Council Work in Tampa-St. Petersburg, Miami & Jacksonville
This section of the Dairy News is intended to bring timely information of the
activities of Florida Dairy Council work. The material will be supplied by the
three Council directors in turn.

Dairy Council Material In This Issue
Sponsored by:
MRS. ARLEN JONES, Director
JACKSONVILLE DAIRY COUNCIL
Milk Is Popular Food At Breakfast In All Lands
(This story is presented as a sample of Dairy Council information furnished to schools.)
Breakfasting around the world finds milk and Dairy Products one of the uni-
versally popular foods. The foods eaten at breakfast differ from land to land. Since
this month is "Better Breakfast Month," how would you like to check your American
food habits with people of other lands?
If we were in Australia we woud have fresh stewed fruit, dry cereal in summer
and oatmeal porridge in winter. As a topping on the oatmeal a favorite of theirs is
clotted Cream. This is made from sweet cream by bringing it to a boil slowly then
cooling. Then the thickened cream is skimmed from the top. It is sweet and de-
licious.


If we were having breakfast in Egypt
you would probably have brown beans
that had been cooked a long time and
reheated in lots of butter. Eggs cooked
in butter might be served with the beans.
A basket of soft white Egyptian bread,
made in loaves ten inches across and cut
into four pieces, would be on the table.
On the bread they use white Egyptian
cheese or marmalade. Although they use
a great deal of butter in cooking they
do not use it on bread. Everyone would
drink milk, too-Buffalo milk. Buffalo
milk is whiter than cow's milk; it is used
for making cheese and butter as well as
to drink.
In Brazil we might be expected to eat
five or six times during a day. About
seven in the morning, school children
usually have a large crusty roll of white
bread split and buttered. With this they
drink a big cupful of warm, sweetened
milk, often flavored with coffee. A salty
cheese is also served at breakfast.
In China, breakfast is very simple. The
main dish is a porridge of very thin,
soft rice. Children have salty, dry soy-
beans or peanuts and pickled vegetables
with it. There may be either duck or hen
eggs but cows' milk is very scarce and
in its place a soybean milk is made at
home or distributed in glass bottles that
are corked. In most of the large cities
along the coast some cows' milk is avail-
able.
In Norway the children go to school
for breakfast at eight o'clock. Only on
Sunday and holidays do they eat with
the family. The following items may ap-
pear on the breakfast they have at school:
oranges, whole grain bread with goat's
milk cheese, hardtack with butter, milk,
a raw carrot or an apple, a tablespoon of
cod liver oil or cod liver oil paste. Peo-
ple in Norway drink a great deal of milk.


A n otd One E4o Day
FRUIT
CEREAL OR EGG
1 9.- OR BOTH
.-. -.vf BREAD
AND BUTTER
..._ MILK
So we see how milk is universally pop-
ular as a drink and food for breakfast.
Wherever people are concerned with
proper nutrition they will rely on dairy
products as essential parts of their daily
meals.

Milk Consumption Is Up
According to a publication issued by
the National Dairy Council (How Amer-
icans Use Their Dairy Foods), milk con-
sumption was 11 quarts per capital higher
during 1953 than before World War II.
This represented an increase of 7%/
above the pre war consumption and
means that Americans drank over 61/2
billion more quarts of milk in 1953 than
in 1939. According to this publication
the quantities of dairy foods consumed
during 1953 by the average American
were: 164 quarts of whole milk and
cream; 8.6 lbs. of butter; 7 lbs. of
cheese; 15.3 quarts of ice cream & frozen
dairy products; 17.1 lbs. of evaporated
and/or condensed milk and 4.2 lbs. of
non-fat dry milk solids.


DIRECTORY OF
FLORIDA'S
DAIRY COUNCILS
DAIRY COUNCIL OF JACKSONVILLE
16 East Church Street
Miss Maxine Carter, Exec. Director

DAIRY COUNCIL OF TAMPA AND
ST. PETERSBURG
102 N. Dale Mabry Tampa
Mrs. America Escuder, Exec. Director
Mrs. Betty Hornbuckle, Asst. Director

DAIRY COUNCIL OF MIAMI Including
DADE, BROWARD & MONROE
COUNTIES
769 N. W. 18th Terrace Miami
Miss Marion Cudworth, Exec. Director
Miss Nancy Hinckley, Asst. Director

Highlights of Dairy
Council Activities
) All Dairy Councils of the state have
been busy with putting the program for
the school year into effect while the
teachers held workshop sessions and plan-
ned their courses of study. School lunch
employees have been instructed in the
specific contributions of milk to the nu-
tritional value of meals served.
) In October the Dairy Council staffs will
offer their services to the local restaurants
for this is National Restaurant Week.
SBesides the radio and television activi-
ties of the Tampa directors, they have
discussed Food and Beauty with 50 teen-
age girls at the YWCA, showing them a
film and distributing nutrition literature;
helped Den Mothers of 40 Cub Scout
groups with plans for improving snack-
time refreshments; participated in 4-H
Club programs, judging dairy food dem-
onstrations; talked with 160 hospital kit-
chen employees at a food handlers' course
sponsored by the Health Department;
participated in a conference of managers
of small hospitals which was the first
workshop of this kind in the area.
) All the Dairy Councils act as public
relations agencies in their communities
speaking to educational, professional, civic
and social groups and providing free nu-
tritional services by way of printed ma-
terials.

New Officers and Directors
Jacksonville Dairy Council
The officers of the Dairy Council of
Jacksonville for the year beginning July
1954 are as follows: J. H. Adams, presi-
dent; H. C. Skinner, vice-president; W.
G. Burton, treasurer and A. E. Johnson,
assistant treasurer. In addition to these
the board of directors include Brady S.
Johnston, Mrs. Margaret Long, Walter
Nolan, J. W. Carr, Leonard Gressman,
Don E. Perret and A. W. Wells.


36 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS








Dade County Dairy Council
Names New Executive Director
Miss Marian Cudworth is the new
Executive Director of the Dairy Council
in Miami, where she has been assistant
to Miss Rebecca Daniel for the last
eighteen months. Miss Daniel recently re-
signed to take a position with the Dade
County Tuberculosis Society.
Miss Cudworth has
a background of ex:-
perience which pre-
eminently qualifies
her for her work
with the Dairy Coun-
cil. She has been a
dietitian at Fairmont
State College and an
e assistant director of
CUDWORTH a nationwide food
advertising company.
Reared on a dairy farm in New York
State, she graduated from Cornell Uni-
versity and has done graduate work at
Miami University. She is active in many
professional, civic and social organize
tions in Miami.
Miss Nancy Hinckley has been ap-
pointed assistant to Miss Cudworth. She
is a graduate of the University of Miami
and has had experience in test kitchens
and as a home service representative.
The following officers and directors
for the ensuing year were elected at the
Council's recent annual meeting:
Frank J. Holt, president; Wiley Wal-
drep, vice-president; Vernon Tuttle, treas-
urer; Ed. C. Fogg III, secretary; Joe C.
Nesmith, J. N. McArthur, Jerry Dressel,
Bill Graham and Henry Perry.

WHY PICK ON MILK?
You can raise the price of liquor
and the only squeal you hear
Is from a thirsty public
that demands more gin and beer.
The same way with tobacco
they will pay without a peep,
And smoke at least as heavy
as they did when it was cheap;
They will pay tax on movies,
they will ante up and go;
They will pay a raise with pleasure
on the things they wear to show.
But raise the price of MILK, Oh Boy!
they'll fight with all their breath.
They may have a growing youngster
Who is bound to starve to death,
They say the family allowance
can never stand so much,
It's nice to save that windfall
for nylon hose and such;
They won't ask for bigger wages
just to spend it all on MILK!
They will show the wicked farmers
and their "scheming thieven ilk";
They will march with hoisted banners,
they will cable, write and wire;
They will drag the local dairymen
by the whiskers through the mire.
They don't mind paying raises
for their liquor, smokes and silk,
But not the slightest fraction
u'ill they tolerate on MILK.
From "Wisner Dairigram"
July Issue of "The Milk Dealer"


A dairy TV program for homemakers is conducted by MRS. REBBA FOX on WSUN-38, St.
Petersburg. She it shoun on the left in the top picture above. Helping her prepare milk drinks
is MRS. BETTY HORNBUCKLE, assistant director of the Dairy Council of Hillsborough-
Pinellas Counties.
OLGA HANSCOMB. on the left in the second picture. has MRS. AMERICA ESCUDER, direc-
tor of the Tampa Dairy Council as her guest every Tuesday on WFLA, Tampa. Olga's program
is called "Homemakers Forum" and lasts a half hour.
MRS. ARLEN JONES, director of the Jacksonville Dairy Council, is shown in the louer picture
during a demonstration before a teachers' u'orkshop group preparatory to using the materials
furnished by the Dairy Council in the school program.


THE NATIONAL DAIRY COUNCIL is making very elaborate plans for cele-
bration of its 40th Anniversary the last week of January, 1955. The Council was
organized in 1915 by leaders in the dairy industry with the assistance of leading
health and nutritional authorities. It is a non-profit, research and educational organ-
ization promoting national health through a better understanding of dairy foods and
their uses.


SEPTEMBER & OCTOBER, 1954


* 37






Polk County Dairy Is State Winner

In DHIA Efficient Production Contest
The Polk County Dairy of Bartow and the B. W. Judge & Son Dairy of Orlando
received first and second place awards respectively when winners of the 1953 contest
were announced, September 16 at the Annual Dairy Field Day meeting in Gainesville.
The DHIA Efficient Dairy Production Contest awards are furnished by the Na-
tional Dairy Products Corporation through Southern Dairies, Inc. The results secured
by DHIA members are measured by a score card on the basis of which County win-
ners are selected by the County Con-
mittees in each County with DHIA work. VALUE OF DHIA AWARDS
The District and State Judg'ng Commit-
tee selects the District and State winners The Efficiency Production Awards are
in the DHIA Members' Division and in made to recognize outstanding work by
the DHIA Supervisor's Division. The Ts or
Dairy Herd Improvement work (called dairymen and by DHIA Test Supervisors
DHIA) is supervised by the Dairy Of- in their dairy herd improvement work
fice of the Agricultural Extension Service with the members of their association.
and the various County agricultural Supervisors are graded both on the tech-
agents nical parts of their work and on the re-


DISTRICT DHIA WINNERS
DHIA Members Division
North Florida District
1st, W. J. Simmons, Jacksonville
2nd, Walter Welkener, Jacksonville
East Florida District
1st, B. W. Judge & Son, Orlando
2nd, Lakeside Dairy, R. W. Click, Moore
Haven
WIest Coast District
1st, Polk County Dairy, Bartow
2nd, John Cone, Plant City

COUNTY DHIA WINNERS
COUNTY
WASHINGTON .................... 1st-Lee Stanton
JACKSON ....................... 1st-M. A. Schack
2nd-Anderson & Burgess
GADSDEN ........................st-Frank DeBord
LEO N .................... ................1st- F. E. W illis
DUVAL............ ................1st- W J. Simmons
2nd-Walter Welkener
VOLUSIA .... ... ............1st-St. Johns Dairy
2nd-Taylor's Dairy
LAKE .................. .......... st- Lakeview Dairy
MARION ........................1st-Jaymar Farms
SEMINOLE ......................st-J. P. Eldridge
ORANGE .... ........ .st-B. W. Judge & Son
2nd--Fairglades Tersey Dairy
INDIAN RIVER ........ st-Vero Beach Dairy
ST. LUCIE ........ ......... ....1st-Wilbro Dairy
PALM BEACH ......... ....1st-Geo. F. Johnson
2nd-J. Ford Rousseau
GLADES .... .................st-Lakeside Dairy
2nd-Sykes & Sheridan
HENDRY ..... ...... ..st-W. K. Bixby
PINELLAS ...................... ....1st- W J. Casey
2nd-C. E. Donegan
HILLSBOROUGH ..... ............1st-J. H. Cone
2nd-J. B. Sampson
POLK ...... ...... ....1st-Polk County Dairy
2nd-J. K. Stuart
MANATEE ....................st-Walter Schmid
2nd-Palmetto Stock Farm
SARASOTA ..... 1st-Edmondson Farms, Inc.
2nd-E. V. Coleman

DHIA SUPERVISOR AWARDS
Statewide winners in the DHIA Sup-
ervisors division were: First, W. E. Del-
aney, Jacksonville; Second, E. W. Bran-
non, Jr., Winter Park.
State winners are not considered again
for 3 years and District winners may not
win the first place district award for 3
years, but may compete for State honors.


sponse they secure from the membership
in adoption of improved dairy practices.
The winning dairymen are owners of
herds which have made good records in
production, increases in production over
the previous years, have produced and
efficiently utilized home-grown feeds and
pasture, have fed balanced rations, and
have carried out a good breeding pro-
gram, a dairy cattle health program, and
other improved practices. DHIA records
are a help in attainment of these goals
when they are utilized in the daily man-
agement and long time planning of the
dairy enterprise. DHIA Supervisors cal-
culate records and assist the owners in
utilizing them for building higher pro-
ducing and more profitable herds.


'L.















PICTURED ABOVE, ARE WINNERS IN
THE 1953 "EFFICIENT DAIRY PRODUC-
TION" AWARDS which were presented at
the Annual Field Day. TOP-Mr. IF. E.
DELANEY and MRS. DELANEY, Jackson-
ville, winner of the DHIA Supervisors' Effi-
ciency Award. BOTTOM-WINNERS OF
THE DAIRY HERD EFFICIENT PRODUC-
TION AWARD: Left. IV. J. SIMMONS,
Jacksonville, winner of the Norti Florida
District award, and B. 1W. JUDGE SR. AND
JR. of Orlando winners, of the East Florida
District award and 2nd place state winner.
First place winner, J. J. SMITH, Polk County
Dairy, was not present.


DAIRIES QUALIFY FOR HERD HONOR ROLL
Fourteen Florida dairies participating in the DHIA program who qualified for
the National 1953 Dairy Herd Honor Roll averaged 6.415 pounds of milk and 288
pounds of butterfat, 4.5 per cent test. This is 47% above the Florida dairy cow aver-
age production of milk and 57% above the average of butterfat production.
To qualify for the production honor roll a dairy herd must complete production
records of 350 or more pounds butterfat per cow on a year's test. The records must
be approved by State Extension Dairyman C. W. Reaves.
The 1953 Honor Roll Diploma was awarded to the following dairies during the
Annual Dairy Field Day in Gainesville, September 16:


HERD


YEARLY PER COW AVERAGE


Polk County Board COWS
of County Commissioners........Bartow ....................44
*Carroll Ward, Sr................. Orlando ....................80
Walter Welkener.................... Jacksonville ............90
*Carroll Ward, JrOrlando ................. Orlando .... 89
Fairglade Jersey Dairy............Orlando ..............119
Methodist Children's Home....Enterprise ................19
H anson Collins...................... Orlando ................38
Walter Schmid & Son............Sarasota ..............103
Alvarez Jersey Farm................Jacksonville ............86
W J. Sim m ons........................Jacksonville ..........131
B. W. Judge............... Orlando .................124
J. K Stuart............................ Bartow ........ ........ 66
M A Schack............................G greenwood ..............25
W J. Casey............................ Clearwater ..............67


LBS.
MILK
9,254
9,556
8,275
9,243
8,094
6,847
8,001
7,956
7,513
7,647
8,372
7,196
6,958
7,580


AVERAGE
% TEST
5.4
4.8
5.4
4.8
5.0
5.7
4.8
4.7
5.0
4.8
4.4
5.0
5.1
4.6


* Herds marked thus were milked three times daily


38 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS

















ADAMS PACKING ASSN., INC.
Citrus Pulp, Citrus Meal, Citrus Molasses
Jim Coates, Sales Mgr., By-Products Division


Auburndale, Fla.


Phone 8-7061


- I INC. ari-ich
Chocolate Products Fruits and Flavors
Ed Salvatore
205 Como Street, Tampa Ph. 85-6902


DAIRYPAK INCORPORATED
I'PRE-PAK MIl, ('( )NTAINEKRS
J. II STRIACIK -- I'ItoNE: ;:-422:r
3064 Liberty St. (At Van), Daytona Beach, Fla.
J. H. Strack P'lone: :;-422:;


CHARLES DENNERY, INC.
New Orleans
Ice Cream Coating, Fruits and Flavors
Ira Stone 1026 E. Walnut St.
Ph. Mutual 5-3284
LAKELAND, FLA.


JAMES V. DEMAREST
MFRS. REPRESENTATIVE
Fine Chemicals, Vitamins and Minerals
Chemo Puro Mfg. Corp.
Hanovia Chemical & Mfg. Co.
P. 0. Box 787 Deland, Fla.


GENERAL MILLS, INC.
Dairy Equipment and Supplies
John W. Manning, Phone 48-1703

2515 Galiano St. Coral Gables, Fla.


VETERINARY MEDICINES

Sold direct to the dairyman
Fred Becker Ben Zirin, Ph.G






GULF PAPER COMPANY, INC.
Ice Cream (Linerless) Cartons,
Butter Cartons
J. H. McVoy
50 E. Magnolia St. Pensacola, Fla.


DOUGLAS J. HEADFORD
FLA. REPRESENTATIVE
Green Spot Orangeade Concentrate
Krim-Ko Chocolate Flavorings
616 Jessamine Ave. Phone 2-0148
Daytona Beach, Fla.


HELM SANITATION CHEMICALS
HANS B. AHLEFELDT
Phone 3-5721
Union Terminal Warehouse
Jacksonville, Fla.


JIM JENNINGS
MFRS. REPRESENTATIVE
Morning Glory Non Fat Milk Solids
Bireley's Dairy Orange Base
Welch Mfg. Co. Ice Cream Spoons
Route 9, Box 356 Jacksonville, Fla.



ROBERT A. JOHNSON CO.

Dairy Chocolate & Cocoa Products
J. L. Hammons

916 S. Rome Ave. Tampa, Fla.



KELCO COMPANY
Dariloid Dricoid and Sherbelizer

W. E. TARVIN, Phone Evergreen 9722
2370 Capri Drive Decatur, Georgia



KIECKHEFER CONTAINER CO.
Pure-Pak Paper Milk Bottles
R. J. Evans M. A. Knowles
Phone 6-1334


4700 Pearl St.


Jacksonville, Fla.


S. H. MAHONEY EXTRACT CO.
Vanilla Products
D. C. Mulligan, Florida Representative


221 E. Cullerton Rd.


Chicago 16, Ill.


KELVINATOR
Division of American Motors Corporation
WM. C. MAYFIELD


Howell House Suite 202


Atlanta. (Ga.


NATIONAL PECTIN PRODUCTS CO.
Ice Cream Stabilizers & Emulsifiers
Pectin Stabilizers for Ices, Sherbets & Fruits
J. C. Head, Phone Norfolk, Va. 63-3939
RFD No. 1, Box 48, Bayside, Va.


NEWTH-MORRIS BOX CORP.
Ice Cream, Popsicle, and
Miscellaneous Packers
Phone: 3-9779
Box 3254, Station "F"
Jacksonville, Fla.


OWENS-ILLINOIS GLASS CO.
Douglas Milk Bottles
C. W. Parmalee C. N. Comstock
1102 Barnett Bldg. Jax. 2, Fla.
Phone 3-6134-5



PAUL-LEWIS LABORATORIES, INC.
Lactivase-For the Prevention of oxidized flavor
in bottled milk, ice cream, storage cream
FLAVOR-PAK FOODS, INC., Miami, Fla.
MILLER MACHINERY & SUPPLY COMPANY
Miami and Jacksonville, Fla.


PENN SALT MANUFACTURING
CO.
BK Powder Cleaners Acids
Bottle Alkalies
JOE FOSS
788 Waring Road Memphis, Tenn.


RIVERSIDE MANUFACTURING
COMPANY
MOULTRIE, GEORGIA
Masterbilt Uniforms
James M. Stewart Dave Freeman


SCHAEFER ICE CREAM CABINETS
MILK COOLERS
Representative E. G. "Don" Graham
Distributor Dudley Cawthon, Inc.
1034 N.W. 22nd St.. Phone 82-1671, Miami


STANDARD PACKAGING CORPN.
Tamper Proof Seals Flexible Vacuum
Packages Liner Materials
Larry Hodge
1121 duPont Bldg. Miami, Fla.



THATCHER GLASS MFG. CO., INC.
Glass Milk Containers
W. T. LOVE, Florida Representative

3221 Pinehurst P1. Charlotte 7, N.C.


UNIVERSAL MILKING MACHINE
DIVISION
Pail-less (Pipe line) Milking Machines
L. H. Hall Factory Representative


5240 N.W. 7th Avenue


Miami, Fla.


Advertise


In The Dairy News


I


SEPTEMBER & OCTOBER, 1954


ALLIED TRADES MEMBERS

FLORIDA DAIRY ASSOCIATION

Special Card Ad Directory


* 39











Pensacola Editorial
Commends Dairy
Industry
The dairies of the Pensacola area de-
serve not only the praise which they
have earned from the Pensacola Journal
through maintenance of high standards,
but further commendation upon their re-
lations with their newspaper, which the
following Pensacola Journal editorial in-
dicates.
"Milk producers have every reason to
be proud of the results of the first U. S.
Public Health inspection of the Pensacola
Milk Shed in seven years. Results re-
vealed that the quality of the milk pro-
duced and the sanitary standards of the
producers compare favorably with those
of other producers throughout the state,
according to the report made by Dr. J. C.
McSween, director of the Escambia Coun-
ty Health Unit. This is a more than sat-
isfactory state of affairs.
"Producers were graded on a scale
which took into consideration every phase
of milk production from the care given
cows to the cooling of the milk, with
Pensacola Milk Shed producers averaging
92.88 of a possible 100 per cent. Equal-
ly-in fact, slightly better-results were
seen from the 94.93 rating given pas-
teurization plants by the U. S. Public
Health Service.
"Everything else aside, there is much
reason for gratification in the fact that
since the last survey was made indica-
tions are that the number of plant pro-
ducers has doubled and during the last
three years production of pasteurized milk
also has doubled to reach a total of 13,-
315 gallons sold daily. Three pasteuriza-
tion plants are serving 145 plant pro-
ducers whose milk comprises 99.60 per
cent of that sold in this area, with only
55 gallons of retail raw milk sold daily
and that outside Pensacola city limits
where sale of raw milk is prohibited.
"That standards of production are high
and satisfactory in every sense makes the
job being done even more valuable. It
is certain that nothing is being sacrificed
to either quick profits or supply of what
is becoming an increasing demand. We
may all take pride on that score. The
most exacting standards are being met, as
the ratings indicate, and from every
standpoint both producer and consumer
have reason for mutual congratulations."

Court Drops Milk Cases
Eighteen milk-adulteration cases against
dairies of the Miami area were recently
dropped by the Circuit Court at Talla-
hassee.


Youth Should Drink Milk
Dr. Angelo Patri gives some sound
advice to "youth" in a recent syndicated
newspaper article. Dr. Patri said:
"It is a pleasant thing to see so many
of our young people asking for milk.
Recently a party of youngsters sat at a
soda counter drinking their cokes and
gingerale when the biggest, heftiest one
of the lot said, 'Milk, please.' The
crowd laughed good naturedly and he
smiled broadly. 'I like milk,' he said.
'You ought to try it some time.' Six
feet 4 inches, 160 pounds of him, and
he liked milk! Not bad.
"There are not enough boys and girls
liking milk. The girls shy away from
it thinking it will make them fat. It
will not be likely to add more calories
than the other drinks they take without
a thought to their weight. True, milk is
food, good food, the best youngsters can
take. It puts power in their bodies, the
light of health in their eyes, the color
of youth in their skins. It is a real
beauty food. Look at a baby's skin and
see what a complexion milk creates."
Dairy News Editor
Receives Recognition
Andy Lay, founder and editor of the
Florida Dairy News, official publication
of Florida's various dairy organizations,
has recently been named a member of the
"Agricultural Committee" of the Nation-
al Editorial Association.
The organization, representing numer-
ous publications, will hold its 1955 Con-
vention in St. Petersburg.
Statewide Half-Gallon Price
Set by Milk Commission
Milk in half-gallon paper containers
as well as two quart containers when
fastened together, may be sold at one cent
less than the price of two quarts, accord-
ing to a statewide order adopted recently
by the Florida Milk Commission.
The Commission also rescinded an old
order requiring a five cent deposit on
glass milk bottles when purchased at a
store.
) "The reason a dollar won't do as much
for people, as it once did-is people
won't do as much for a dollar, as they
once did."

November 28-30
Annual Convention
Southern Association of
Ice Cream Manufacturers
Vinoy Park Hotel
St. Petersburg, Florida


NEWS AND VIEWS


40 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


County Owned Dairy
To Be Discontinued
The County Commissioners of Polk
County voted in an August meeting to
discontinue the operation of a county
owned purebred Jersey dairy which Polk
County has operated for many years to
supply milk to county institutions.
The action was based on studies of the
dairy's cost of operation which indicated
the milk produced was costing the coun-
ty 35 cents a quart as against commercial
prices of 26 to 27 cents a quart.
The Commission recognized in voting
to discontinue the dairy that during its
many years of operation it had served a
worthwhile purpose in the county other
than furnishing a wholesome local milk
supply to the county's institutions. The
maintenance in the county of a pure bred
dairy herd during the years when dairy-
ing was becoming established, was con-
sidered a strong factor in encouraging the
breeding of top quality dairy cattle to
make Polk County one of the state's lead-
ing milk production areas today.
The dairy contributed greatly to the
encouragement of 4-H and Future Farm-
er boys and girls in taking up dairy pro-
jects by contributing pure bred calves
to worthy youngsters in these programs.
Mr. J. J. Smith, manager of the dairy,
is recognized as one of the leading dairy-
men of the state and has won many
honors in the Dairy Herd Improvement
Association and the Florida Jersey Cattle
Club. He was recently awarded the Flor-
ida Jersey Cattle Club trophy for having
the "Highest Average Butterfat Products
Per Cow" among Florida Jersey herds in
1953.

Milk Price Decontrolled
Press Wants It Back
Recently, retail price control was re-
moved in Vancouver, Canada. The fol-
lowing is quoted from an editorial in
the Vancouver Sun:
"The provincial government faces a
major milk crisis only six months after
abolishiing retail price controls against
the advice of the entire dairy industry.
All Vancouver distributors but one lost
money on milk sold during the first three
months of decontrol. To get out of the
red, they're tending to ignore the fixed
price which provincial milk board regu-
lations compel them to pay to producers.
Worried producers claim some of them
aren't getting the guaranteed price now
and none will get it eventually unless the
government restores retail price control.
The industry fears that any substantial
decrease in what producers get for milk
will force some of them out of dairy
farming altogether and cut Vancouver's
milk supply."






DINSMORE CONSIGNS 5 FEMALES


To Florida


Guernsey


Cattle Club Sale


LARGO, FLORIDA...


November 9, 1954


Four of our Consignments are Daughters of these two Sires


FOREMOST MAY ROYALTY
54 AR Daughters-Others on test
27 Very Good & Excellent daughters.
Sir: Foremost Royal Valor
Dam: Foremost Loyalty
18229-856-Jr4C

1. Dinsmore Mayroyal Kate
Dropped August 4, 1952
Due November 22, 1954 to
service of Foremost May Royalty himself.
Dam: Dinsmore Garfield Kamosa
13452-610-Sr3

3. Dinsmore Noble Murrell
Dropped July 9, 1952
Due November 20, 1954 to Dinsmore Juryman
Dam: Dinsmore Mistress Muriel
Same family as Royal May $10,000

5. Dinsmore Lady Amaryllis
Due November 20, 1954 to Dinsmore Juryman
Sire: Quail.Roost Master Mac


QUAIL ROOST NOBLE YEOMAN
58 AR Daughters-Others on test
Records up to 15000# milk-none mature
Sire: Cesor Noble Maxim
Dam: Quail Roost Bright Maid
13337-649-Sr2C

2. Dinsmore Noble Irma
Dropped December 22, 1950
11451-500-Sr2 in 336 days on test
Due Sale day to Riegeldale Conqueror's Heir
Dam: Dinsmore Mayroyal Irna
Classified VG-died while on test.

4. Dinsmore Noble Fatinitza
Dropped August 11, 1952
Due November 20, 1954 to Dinsmore Juryman
Dam: Gayoso Levity Favorite
8959-474-Sr2C

Dropped February 18, 1952
Dam: Dinsmore Garfield Alyssum


Dinsmore Guernseys
FEDERAL ACCREDITED 57790 J. B. LANOUX, Herdsman NEGATIVE TO BANG'S


Dinsmore Farms
V. C. JOHNSON


10 miles north of Jacksonville
Near U. S. 1
EARL A. JOHNSON CHARLES F. JOHNSON


Dinsmore, Florida
BRADY S. JOHNSTON








Here's where your



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You can produce 30 to 40 dozens of eggs from this bag of Security Egg Mash
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SECUR ITY G A1JAff
DAIRY
Approximately 40 gallons of milk can be produced from this bag of Security
Dairy Feed, fed along with available roughage. Lowered feeding cost per
FEEDS gallon of milk produced can be yours on a Security Program. There is a
specific Security Dairy Feed for any phase of your cows' life and for a maxi-
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CjTy KI fW LL



You can produce 150 pounds of pork from this bag of Security, fed along B BIG
with corn. Selected, choice ingredients are blended into an appetizing feed HOG
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big frames, putting on the maximum amount of flavorful pork in minimum
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SECURITY MILLS, INC. KNOXVILLE, TENN.




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