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Title: Florida dairy news
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00082035/00024
 Material Information
Title: Florida dairy news
Physical Description: 12 v. : illus. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Dairy Industry Association
Publisher: Cody Publications for Florida Dairy Industry Association.
Place of Publication: Kissimmee Fla
Publication Date: July-August 1954
Frequency: bimonthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Dairying -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Cattle   ( lcsh )
Milk   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-12, no. 1; Nov. 1950-Spring, 1962.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00082035
Volume ID: VID00024
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01386090
issn - 0426-5696

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover 1
        Front cover 2
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
    Back Cover
        Page 41
        Page 42
Full Text



1


June is Dairy Month


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See Dairy Month Story, Page 16


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BABSON
BROS. CO.


will MILK Your Cows!
... and the very first job of any milking machine
is to get the cows properly and safely milked. No
matter what kind of Surge you select you know
ahead of time that any machine that bears the
Surge Nameplate does milk with the genuine Surge
TUG & PULL that holds the teat cups down
where they belong. You know that you will get
a fast and safe job of cow milking.
Parlor, Pipeline or Bucket... no machine can do
a safe, satisfactory and complete job of milking
cows without TUG & PULL. Whether you milk a
big herd in a parlor or a few cows in a lean-to
shed, the Surge Nameplate is your best guarantee
of good cow milking and all that goes with it,


OF GEORGIA
COPYRIGHT 1953 BASCRN B.AV, A,
1018 CRESCENT AVENUE N.E., ATLANTA, GEORGIA


'd __7el-qq9









EDITORIALS


JULY-AUGUST 1954
BI-MONTHLY


111111


The Dairy Industry Has a Job to Do
MILK, the dairy industry's basic and most widely used product, is not only generally
recognized as "Nature's most nearly perfect food", but it is certified by nutritional,
health and medical authorities as "essential" in the diet of practically all persons of
all ages.
A new description of the wonderful, if not magical health giving qualities of
milk has recently appeared which refers to the discovery that the long sought after
"Fountain of Youth" . is the "cow".
Now, the reason we say that the dairy industry-which produces and furnishes
this product of unquestioned and unmatched quality and value-"has a job to do", is
the fact that "some authorities believe there is evidence of a declining per capital
consumption of milk".
This situation, if true, presents a real challenge to the Dairy Industry. If the
consumers' appreciation for milk and milk products is declining, what is the reason?
What can be done about it?
We believe a partial answer can be found in the results of a recent consumer
survey made by the American Dairy Association.
This survey, which included almost 4,000 consumer interviews and was com-
pleted late in 1953, made a number of disclosures which should be valuable guides
in planning dairy industry sales and public relations programs. Here is what was
learned.
1. Children under 15 years of age, representing one-fourth of the population,
drink about half the milk.
2. The use of milk declines with advancing age. 60% drink milk at age 15
to 24, while only 43% over 55 drink milk.
3. More men than women drink milk.
4. Milk is second to coffee in the average adult diet, by a score of 87% and
43%.
5. Milk has its greatest popularity at lunch and supper.
Two conclusions were drawn from the results of the survey:
(a) The Industry must find ways of prolonging the age to which the people
continue to drink milk.
(b) The Industry must stimulate the use of milk, both at meals and between
meals.
Some of the reasons found for milk drinking habits are also important:
Health reasons account for 37% of those drinking more milk; 17% reduced
their milk consumption because they thought it to be fattening.
Other disclosures of the survey show that in comparison of consumer use of milk
and other beverages, the high preference of milk for its "health" qualities is more
than equaled by the "taste" preference of other beverages and that "availability" is
a large factor in the demand for other beverages.
What can the Dairy Industry do about it? Conclusions drawn by the authors
of the above-mentioned survey, recommend that:
(a) Ways must be found for making milk more available both at and between
meals and sales and advertising promotion be directed to the desirability of drinking
milk at any and all occasions.
(b) Means must be found to correct trend by certain consumers to drink less
milk because of a desire to lose or control weight.
Now is the time for the "Dairy Industry" to display wisdom, vision, and courage.

Why Your Association Membership is Valuable
It welds the members of the industry, particularly the smaller companies together,
giving them far greater influence than that of the individual member.
It makes possible group collection of information, on which intelligent individ-
ual judgements can be based and group action sparked by those individual judgments.
It assists members in solving new problems and in keeping up-to-date on new
developments in the industry.
It helps improve ability and increase "know how".
It furnishes contacts and the opportunity to talk "shop" with those who are the
best qualified in the same business.
It "sharpens dull tools"-refills the idea box-and replenishes enthusiasm and
determination.
It gives you valuable, individual and confidential counsel and competent repre-
sentation.

JULY &


THE
FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS
E. T. LAY, Editor & Business Manager


Official Publication of
Florida Dairy Association
W. HERMAN BOYD, President
Florida Guernsey Cattle Club

Florida Jersey Cattle Club

Florida Association
of Milk Sanitarians

DIRECTORS
FLORIDA DAIRY ASSOCIATION
E. T. LAY, Executive Director

Producers
GEORGE F. JOHNSON, WVest Palm Beach
Vice President & Chairman
"Producers Council"
D. WAYNE WEBB, Tampa
JOHN SERGEANT, Lakeland
L. B. HULL, Micanopy
BILL GRAHAM, Miami
JOHN T. ADKINSON, Pensacola
IRA BARROW, New Smyrna Beach
J. H. ADAMS, Jacksonville
J. D. FUQUA, Altha
JOHN MCMULLEN, Clearwater

Distributors
CLIFF D. WAYNE, Miami
Vice President & Chairman
"Distributors Council"
HERMAN BURNETT, Bradenton
J. N. MCARTHUR, Miami
H. CODY SKINNER, Jacksonville
JOHN M. HOOD, St. Petersburg
W. J. BARRITT, JR., Tampa
J. F. W. ZIRKLEBACH, Pensacola
JOHN TRIPSON, Vero Beach
GEORGE BOUTWELL, Lake Worth
CLAUDE KELLY, Daytona Beach

Additional Directors
W. HERMAN BOYD, President, Miami
F. W. DECKLAR, President
"Alligator Club," Tampa
WILMER BASSETT, Past-Pres., Monticello
THE FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS is
published bi-monthly by the Florida Dairy
Association, 220 Newnan St., Jackson-
ville, Florida. Subscription price of $1.00
a year. Entered as second class mail at
the Post Office at Jacksonville, Fla.,
under Act of March 3, 1879, as amended.
Business and Editorial office, 220 New-
nan Street, Jacksonville.
NATIONAL EDITORIAL
SASSOCiATIdN


Member Florida Press Association

AUGUST, 1954 1


| VOL. 4


NO. 4








RUMELK









The SCIENTIFIC, yet PRACTICAL

MILK REPLACEMENT

for calves

Featuring -

VIABLE RUMEN BACTERIA
in desiccated form

Providing naturally -

THE VITAL FACTOR IN

RUMEN NUTRITION




NOW

is the time to act

and learn first hand

HOW

RUMELK WILL

Raise better calves
Save you money


Contact your local feed dealers or
write for complete details and
interesting leaflet.

Manufactured by:
W. A. DAVIS MILLING CO.
P. O. Box 1552, High Point, N. C.
or
P. O. Box 787, Deland, Fla.


George Ford, Quincy Chapter, 1054 Star Farmer of Florida with the Florida Times-Union Trophy
and receiving the $100 from the Future Farmer Foundation from Mr. C. L. Lacy. Standard Oil
Co.. Jacksonville. George's father, Mr. IV. L. Ford received the Honorary State Farmer Degree
and Mrs. Ford was given a certificate of merit.


Quincy Dairy Youth Selected F.F.A. Star Farmer
THE FLORIDA DAIRY INDUSTRY can well be very proud of one of its dairy family
sons, young George Ford, 18-year-old high school junior and F.F.A. leader, of the
W. L. Ford family of Quincy.
On June 16th George was acclaimed the F.F.A. Star State Dairy Farmer, highest
award given a member by the Future Farmers of America in their State program. The
award was presented at the 26th annual convention of the F.F.A. Florida division at
Daytona Beach.
Along with the honors which the award carries, George received the $100 Fu-
ture Farmers Foundation prize as well as The Florida Times-Union's annual trophy,
an engraved sterling silver platter, for the excellence and success of his farming pro-
gram, leadership and cooperative activity. He also will get a Chilean Nitrate Educa-
tional Bureau leadership award of $75 to help pay expenses to the national FFA
convention in Kansas City next October.
George's parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Ford, also were honored by the more
than 600 delegates to the state convention. Mrs. Ford was presented the organization's
certificate of merit while the father, a one-time Future Farmer himself, received the
honorary State Farmers degree.
George's farm project includes 45 dairy cows-blue ribbon winners in youth
shows all over Florida--14 swine, nearly 400 head of poultry and 20 acres of
corn. His total assets at present, including livestock, land, equipment and buildings,
are valued at $29,000.
The Star Farmer is chosen from those outstanding FFA'ers receiving State Farm-
er degrees, highest awarded by the Florida association. 108 youths were presented
with their degrees-youths whose supervised farming programs total $179,000 and
average $1,650.
In addition to his selection as Star State Farmer, Ford received the top district
dairy farming award for his accomplishments in this field. He showed the grand
champion dairy cows at the 1954 4-H Dairy Shows in Quincy, Tallahassee and Chip-
ley, and had the reserve champion at the Florida State Fair in Tampa. His exhibit of
dairy cattle was recognized as the best among all F.F.A. Chapter contestants at the
1954 Florida State Fair and was awarded a beautiful trophy for this achievement.










J. C. HUSKISSON, Mgr., P. O. Box 1231 TAMPA, FLORIDA


2 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS








A De Laval Combine Milker


Helps You Cut Production Costs,


Get Bigger Milk Checks


BARN TYPE
(Above) Inslalled along the stani:hlons n the dairy barn, the De Laval Combine milks and
conveys Ihe milk to Ihe milk house, saving all carrying and pouring. Ideal lor the man who
does not want a separate milking room


Your neighbors who use De Laval Combine
Milkers will tell you that the De Laval cuts
production costs and steps-up quality and
quantity.
With milk prices what they are today,
these benefits are mighty important. You
get them whether you milk 15 to 20 cows,
or hundreds.
You get them because De Laval-origi-
nator of the Combine Milker-knows how
to engineer a Combine that meets today's
needs in your dairy exactly; may be ex-
panded as your needs change.
With either a De Laval Barn Type or a
De Laval Milking Room Combine you
mechanize the milking of your whole herd-
including the cows you were formerly forced
to milk by hand. One man milks 35 and
more cows an hour; milks them clean with
less danger of damage to teats and udders.
Milk is automatically filtered and sent
direct to cans, an aerator, or refrigerated
farm tank. As a result, you not only get
more milk--you get better milk. That means
a bigger milk check whether prices are high
or low. After milking, the entire system
is washed and sanitized mechanically by
De Laval "In-Place" Vacuum Cleaning.
Make more money in '54. Send coupon
today or call your De Laval dealer now.
Plan to see De Laval Combines in action in
dairies near you. Learn why more profit-
minded dairymen choose De Laval each year!


C Mechanized
"In-Place" Cleaning
Regardless of whether the De Laval
Combine is installed in milking room
Sor barn, it can be quickly, easily and
thoroughly washed and sanitized by
the De Laval "In-Place" Vacuum
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e e-


COMBINE MILKERS
First Since 1928
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JULY & AUGUST, 1954 1








GUERNSEY CATTLE CLUB NEWS



Guernsey Registry Tests Are Announced
FFICIAL PRODUCTION and classification test records for some of Florida's top
producing Guernseys have been recently made public by the American Guern-
sey Cattle Club of Peterborough, N. H. All Florida records are supervised by the
University of Florida and reported to the A.G.C. Club for official approval.
The American Guernsey Cattle Club is a national organization of more than 50,-
000 breeders of purebred Guernseys. It records the registration of purebred Guernseys
which trace to the Island of Guernsey, the original home of the breed, in the English
Channel. It also supervises tests of production and, through GOLDEN GUERNSEY,
INC., supervises the marketing of GOLDEN GUERNSEY MILK.


GUERNSEYS...

... GUERNSEYS
Featuring
Fall & Winter Fresheners
At Our Sales
July 29 Mid Summer Sale,
Durham, Conn.
60 Cows and Bred Heifers close
to freshening
August 2 Woodacres Cross Section
Sale,
Princeton, N. J.
46 Cows 18 Heifers 7 Bulls
August 4 Anytime Dispersal,
Salt Point, N. Y.
23 Cows 19 Bred Heifers -
6 Open Heifers
August 9 Tarbell Farms Heifer Sale
Smithville Flats, N. Y.
Selling the Entire Crop of Bred
Heifers 75 Head This is an
unusual opportunity to pick
from the cream of the crop.
August 21 Maine State Sale,
Augusta, Maine
55 Cows and Heifers
Fall Fresheners
August 25 Afton Farms Dispersal,
Florham Park, N. J.
165 Head Dehorned
Calfhood Vaccinated
MAJORITY OF COWS AND HEIF-
ERS calfhood Vaccinated and from
BANGS' CERTIFIED HERDS.
WRITE FOR CATALOGS -
We can assist you with arrange-
ments for transportation.
Our services are available for purchases
at private treaty. We have many satisfied
customers who have given us their orders.
SEATH AND SHULTZ
24 Union St. Peterborough 6, N. H.
MIKE SEATH EARL SHULTZ
Far Hills, N. J. Peterborough N. H.
Ph. Millington 7-0756 Ph. 124 and 113


J. H. CONE DAIRY, PLANT CITY
A registered Guernsey cow, Cone's
Cavalier Heiress, has completed an offi-
cial Advanced Registry record of 9,203
lbs. of milk and 509 lbs. of fat (repre-
senting approximately 4429 quarts of
high-quality milk) on two times daily
milking for 305C days, starting her
record as a senior 2-yr. old. "Heiress" is
the daughter of the outstanding Guern-
sey sire, Riegeldale Emory's Cavalier, also
owned by J. H. Cone of Plant City, that
has 18 sons and tested daughters in the
Performance Register of the A.G.C.C.
Her production record is the highest
Advanced Registry record in the state of
Florida, made by a senior 2-yr. old,
milked two times daily for a ten-month
period.
DINSMORE DAIRY CO., DINS-
MORE-The registered Guernsey bull,
Riegeldale Conqueror's Heir, has just be-
come a nationally recognized sire. His
first seven tested daughters have seven
actual official records that average 8,895
lbs. of milk and 408 Ibs. of butterfat. His
top daughter, Dinsmore Conqueror Mon-
ell, has a record of 10,791 lbs. of milk
and 523 lbs. of butterfat, on three times
daily milking, made as a junior 3-yr. old.
This sire also has had six daughters
classified for type. Two were rated Very
Good, two were rated Desirable, and two
Acceptable.
Complete official information is now
available from The American Guernsey
Cattle Club so that a thorough study of
the transmitting ability of this sire can
be made.
Dinsmore Conqueror Berline, a reg-
istered Guernsey cow also owned by Dins-
more Dairy Co., Dinsmore, has completed
an official Advanced Registry record of
11,394 lbs. of milk and 482 lbs. of but-
terfat on three times daily milking for
365 days, starting her record as a junior
2-yr. old. This production represents ap-
proximately 5349 quarts of high-quality
milk. "Berline" is the daughter of the
registered Guernsey sire, Riegeldale Con-
queror's Heir, mentioned immediately
above.


Dinsmore Empress Karen, a registered
Guernsey cow also owned by Dinsmore
Dairy Co., Dinsmore, has completed an
official Advanced Registry record of 13,-
151 lbs. of milk and 574 lbs. of fat on
three times daily milking for 365C days,
starting her record as a five-year-old.
This production represents approximate-
ly 6279 quarts of high-quality milk.
"Karen" is the daughter of the famous
Guernsey sire, Bournedale Ace's Sove-
reign, that has 28 tested daughters in the
Performance Register of the A.G.C.C.
BOUTWELL'S DAIRY, INC., LAKE
WORTH-A registered Guernsey cow,
Arrow Farm Queenetta, put 16,777 lbs.
of milk and 704 lbs. of fat into the coun-
try's breadbasket, as a six year-old on a
three times daily milking for 365 days.
This production represents approximate-
ly 7.9.17 quarts of high-quality milk. The
sire of "Queenetta" is Fra-Mar Pharaoh,
that has 21 sons and tested daughters
listed in the Performance Register of the
A.G.C.C.
CARROLL L. WARD & SON DAIRY,
WINTER PARK-A registered Guern-
sey cow, Lakemont King's Flirt, has com-
pleted an official Advanced Registry
record of 10,143 lbs. of milk and 545
lbs. of fat on three times daily milking
for 365 days, starting her record as a
junior 2-yr.-old. This production repre-
sents approximately 4883 quarts of high-
quality milk. "Flirt" is the daughter of
the famous Guernsey sire, McDonald
Farms King Ken, that has 30 tested
daughters in the Performance Registry
of the A.G.C.C.
CARROLL L. WARD, JR., GOLDEN-
ROD, FLA. Two registered Guernsey
cows have completed official Advanced
Registry records:
On three times daily milking for 365C
days, Lakemont Prince's Josephine, a jun-
ior 2-yr.-old, produced 11,219 lbs. of
milk and 546 Ibs. of fat. This production
represents approximately 5349 quarts of
high-quality milk. She is the daughter of
the registered Guernsey sire, Lakemont
Anthony's Prince, that has nine tested
daughters in the Performance Register.
Bonnie's Supreme Belle produced 12,-
123 lbs. of milk and 653 lbs. of fat
milked three times daily for 365 days,
as a junior 3-yr.-old. This production
represents approximately 5814 quarts of
high-quality milk. "Belle" is the daughter
of the registered Guernsey sire, Brays
Island Bon-Ton's Supreme, that has five
sons and tested daughters in the Per-
formance Register of the A.G.C.C.


S h04^ Ann *v

ICE CREAM CONE
1904-1954
A 'O1OLD O, 00D #ATrgI


4 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS






Guernseys Purchased
By Florida Breeders
The American Guernsey Cattle Club
has announced recent purchases of out-
standing Guernseys by Florida Gunensey
breeders. Purchases reported are:
)L. C. JACKSON, MAYO, just pur-
chased the young Guernsey sire Laeah
Justice, from R. R. Jennings, Jacksonville.
This richly bred young bull is out of
the well-bred cow, Dinsmore Garfield
Justine, that has once been classified
Desirable for type, has a production
record of 11,938 lbs. of milk and 586
lbs. of fat made as a senior 3-yr. old in
the Herd Improvement Register. He is
sired by Dinsmore Mac.
SD. L. MUSGRAVE, CLEARWATER,
has purchased the young Guernsey sire,
Milton Farms Miltons King, from the
Hood brothers of St. Petersburg. This
richly bred young bull is out of the well-
bred cow, Milton Farms Nadine, that
has once been classified Acceptable for
type, has a production record of 13,700
Ibs. of milk and 650 lbs. of fat made
as a 7-yr. old in the Herd Improvement
Register. He is sired by Foremost Royal
Milton.
VELDA DAIRY FARMS, INC., TAL-
LAHASSEE, has just purchased the
young Guernsey sire, Lockshore Rhoda's
Pre Oman, from R. F. Locke, Hickory
Corners, Michigan. This richly bred young
bull is out of the well-bred cow, Lock-
shore Crusader's Rhoda, that has once
been classified Very Good for type, has
a production record of 9,134 lbs. of milk
and 425 lbs. of fat made as a junior 2-yr.
old in the Herd Improvement Register.
He is sired by McDonald Farms Pre
Oman.
SBRADEN BALL, PENSACOLA, has
jsut purchased the young Guernsey sire,
Royal Yeoman, from Patrician Ellis, Cala-
han. This richly bred young bull is out
of the Dinsmore Mayroyal Vern, that has
a production record of 12,751 lbs. of
milk and 617 lbs. of fat made as a junior
3-yr. old in the Herd Improvement Reg-
ister. He is sired by Quail Roost Noble
Yeoman.
NEW YORK MILK PROMOTION
) Governor Dewey created a special New
York state committee to promote the
drinking of milk and use in cooking. Mr.
Irving R. Wisch, President of the Milk
Handlers and Processors Association, Inc.
of New York City, is one of the vice
presidents. Mr. Wisch is an affiliated
member of the Milk Industry Founda-
tion.
They will launch a broad educational
program to increase drinking of milk
and to make the public aware of its
nutritional values. A promotional fund
of approximately $800,000 will be
sought by an assessment on producers of
1 cent per cwt. on their output. Distrib-
utors in the same area are also contrib-
uting to the fund.


GUERNSEY SALE
THE NINETEENTH ANNUAL CONSIGNMENT SALE
of the
CHESTER COUNTY GUERNSEY CATTLE CLUB
September 8, 1954, Chester, S. C.
50 HEAD FALL FRESHENING COWS AND HEIFERS
ALL REGISTERED GUERNSEYS
For Information and Catalog


D. C. WYLIE, JR.


Write
BOX 388


CHESTER, S. C.


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JULY & AUGUST, 1954 5









JERSEY CATTLE CLUB NEWS


DAIRYMEN OBSERVE REGISTRY TESTS AND AWARDS
JERSEY CLASSIFICATION Several special awards have been an-
Fifty dairy farmers attended a re- nounced by the American Jersey Cattle
cent Jersey classification at the Fairglade Club in connection with their recent
Jersey Dairy near Orlando, according to
Orange County Agent Fred Baetzman, official Jersey registry tests in the state
who is also secretary of the Florida Jer- of Florida.
sey Cattle Club. These tests are made under the super-
The official classifying was done by vision of the University of Florida and
George Hyatt, North Carolina Dairy Ex- reported to the A.J.C.C. for approval and
tension Service specialist, publication.

'~


fJ4e 3J1o7r ida


erje V


catte U/ b


invites you to attend its


J7otreentk4


Arta n ol ot wignment Sale


at Jacksonville, Florida


THURSDAY, AUGUST 19, 1954

4H Club Livestock Pavillion -


12:30 P.M. E.S.T.

1st & McDuff Streets


Just North of Highway #90

CATTLE SELECTED FROM TOP HERDS IN STATE WHICH ARE
MAKING GOOD RECORDS IN TESTING AND CLASSIFICATION
Most of the animals are fresh or close to freshening.
The Sale date is just right for helping your Fall and Winter milk base.

ANNUAL MEETING- 1:00 P.M. BANQUET 7:00 P.M.

August 18, 1954

at

HOTEL SEMINOLE, JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
SALES HEADQUARTERS Hotel Seminole, Jacksonville, Florida

For Catalog and Banquet Reservations, write
F. E. Baetzman, Secretary

FLORIDA JERSEY CATTLE CLUB, Court House, Orlando, Fla.


SALE DATE
W. J. Nolan, Jr., President


AUGUST 19, 1954
Tom McCord, Auctioneer


C. Brightman Skinner, Chrmn. State Sale Com.


SRAY ALVAREZ, ALVAREZ DAIRY,
Jacksonville-X. Standard Ivy Nanette,
a registered Jersey cow, has been awarded
a "Ton of Gold" certificate for her pro-
duction record of 2,080 lbs. butterfat-
more than a ton-from 35,237 lbs. milk
in four years. The production of X.
Standard Ivy Nanette during the four
years of official testing exceeded that of
the "average" dairy cow in the U. S. more
than two times.
SWALTER WELKENER, HOLLY
HILL DAIRY, Jacksonville-Observer
Treva Dora Bernice has been rated a
Tested Dam by A.J.C.C. for having three
offspring with official production rec-
ords. The cow's progeny averaged 9,134
Ibs. milk with 514 lbs. butterfat on a
twice- daily- milking, 305-day mature
equivalent basis. The Tested Dam rating
aids Jersey owners in the selection of
superior breeding stock. The three tested
progeny required to qualify a cow as a
Tested Dam may be either three tested
daughters or three tested sons, or any
combination thereof totaling three.
)POLK COUNTY FARMS, Bartow-
Sir Dandy Daffodil won the Florida
senior 2-year-old butterfat championship
for the Jersey breed, having produced
11,186 lbs. milk containing 610 Ibs. but-
terfat in 365 days on two-times-a-day
milking. Two cows in this same herd
qualified for Silver Medal Certificates:
Biltmore Stanfanuic Lily. whose record
was 11,866 lbs. milk containing 658
lbs. butterfat in 365 days at the age of
3 years and 1 month, and Royal Volun-
teer Aimee, whose record was 11,210 Ibs.
milk containing 616 lbs. butterfat in
365 days at the age of 3 years and 1
month.
) CLAY COUNTY FARMS, Middleburg
-Advancer Tena. a registered Jersey cow,
has earned the Silver Medal award of
the A.J.C.C. She recently completed a
production record of 13,144 lbs. milk
and 657 lbs. butterfat in 365 days at
the age of 3 years and 5 months.
) THE FAIRGLADE JERSEY DAIRY,
Orlando-Observer Dream Viola Fern, a
registered Jersey cow, recently completed
a 305-day Herd Improvement Registry
production record of 12,233 lbs. milk
containing 651 Ibs. butterfat at the age of
8 years.
SWALTER WELKENER, HOLLY
HILL DAIRY, Jacksonville-Three reg-
istered Jersey cows in this herd have
received special recognition on the fol-
lowing records: Biltmore Standard Peggy,
11,601 lbs. milk with 565 Ibs. butterfat
at the age of 11 years and 2 months;
X. Standard Ivy Elaine, 9,318 lbs. milk
with 607 lbs. butterfat at the age of 7
years and 1 month; and Magnolia Basil
Design Annie, 13,077 lbs. milk with 658
lbs. butterfat at the age of 4 years and
11 months.


6 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS







Annual Jersey Sale
August 19, Jacksonville
The fourteenth annual sale of the
Florida Jersey Cattle Club will offer for
sale a consignment of outstanding Jersey
cattle selected from the top Jersey herds
of the State. The sale is to be held at
the 4-H Livestock Pavillion in Jackson-
ville on Thursday, August 19.
Florida Jersey herds are making envi-
able records. Practically all the registered
herds in the State are carrying on con-
tinuous production testing and the milk
and butterfat records rank well in the
nation. Florida was eleventh in the num-
ber of cows on herd improvement regis-
try test, according to the 1953-54 report
just released by the American Jersey Cat-
tle Club.
Also, Florida ranked fifth in the na-
tion on the number of cows classified for
type in the same period. One Jersey cow
produced almost 19,000 pounds of milk
on official test in 1953, showing that
Jerseys are capable of heavy milk pro-
duction as well as high testing milk.
The August 19 date for the State
Jersey Sale was selected because it will
be just right for dairymen to buy cows
to help make their Fall milk base.
Annual Meeting To Be Held
SThe Annual Meeting of the Florida
Jersey Cattle Club is to be held on Wed-
nesday, August 18, at 1 o'clock at the
Seminole Hotel in Jacksonville. The An-
nual Banquet will be at the same hotel
at 7 o'clock Wednesday evening.


THE MILKMAN'S MARCH
AIDS PARALYSIS GROUP
During the month of June, many of
the "milkmen" of the nation volunteered
their services in a drive for funds to aid
victims of a disease known as MS, or
Multiple Sclerosis.
The ''Milkman's March", as the cam-
paign was called, is a campaign in which
the milk driver delivers campaign infor-
mation on the disease and campaign ma-
terials to each home where he makes
milk deliveries. The material includes an
envelope in which contributions may be
mailed to the national office of the or-
ganization.
Multiple sclerosis is a form of paraly-
sis about which little is known by medi-
cal science. The participation of dairy
milkmen in the campaign for funds to
be used in research for ways to combat
the disease has been endorsed by the
National Dairy Council and the Milk
Industry Foundation.
The Florida Dairy Association endors-
ed and participated in the Florida cam-
paign.
Mrs. Dwight Eisenhower is national
honorary chairman of the campaign.


Our
Consignment to:

The Florida Jersey Cattle Club Sale


Thursday, August 19, 1954


12:30 P.M. E.S.T.


4H CLUB PAVILLION, JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
1. OBSERVER SULTAN ROBIN 1768177, Classified: Very Good.
Born: October 1, 1949. Bred: Nov. 4, 1953 to Observer Design
Sybil Elmo 506173. Calfhood Vaccinated.
2. OBSERVER DESIGN PRUDENCE 1768204, Classified: Very Good.
Born: August 6, 1949. Silver Medal Cow. Bred: November 29, 1953
to Sybil Pompey Treva Baronet 542236. Calfhood vaccinated.
3. OBSERVER ONYX CORA 1821676, Classified: Good Plus.
Born: July 3, 1950. HIR Record 2-2 305 6931 5.7% 392. Fresh
and Selling Open. Calfhood vaccinated.
4. OBSERVER EMPORER SULTAN DESIGN 558137, 4 STAR BULL ****
Born: May 29, 1953. Tattoo: 58D. Calfhood vaccinated. Ready for
Service.


HOLLY HILL FARM

MR. & MRS. WALTER WELKENER


Rt. 3, Box 612
Jacksonville, Fla.


Gold Star Herd
Constructive Breeder 8X.


HERD T.B. & BANGS ACCREDITED.


Florida Citrus Pulp is your best feed *
value . more T.D.N. per 100 Ibs. of
feed which means more for your
Ask money. Check for yourself!



P. o. Box 403, Dept. B TAMPA, FLORIDA
Ask you feed dealer or write for FREE literature


JULY & AUGUST, 1954 0 7







DAIRYMEN!!




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"Your Guide to Animal Health"

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* DIAGNOSTIC LABORATORY
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Essay Winners Are Announced
In State 4-H Pasture Contest
Robert Parisian of Callahan, a member of the 1954 state 4-H dairy judging
team, has won first place in the 4-H essay contest on the production and use of bet-
ter dairy pastures.
Second place went to Erny Sellers of Tallahassee. Kenneth McRae, Tampa, Sandra
Dennison, Orlando, and David Findley, Jacksonville, received honorable mention.
Winners were selected during the recent annual meeting
of the Florida Dairy Association at Daytona Beach, according to
C. W. Reaves, State Extension Dairyman with the Florida Agricul-
tural Extension Service. The Association sponsors the contest,
which is directed by the Extension Service. The winning essay
will be published in this issue of Florida Dairy News and the
2nd prize essay in the next issue. Each essay covered steps nec-
essary for establishing improved pastures, maintenance of pas-
tures, and most efficient use of them for maximum milk pro-
duction and dairy profits.
Cash awards will be made to Robert and Erny during the PARISIAN
Dairy Field Day at the University of Florida on September 16.


FIRST PRIZE 4-H ESSAY
ON DAIRY PASTURES
By: ROBERT PARISIAN
4-H Member, Nnssau County
EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is the 1.it
prize 4-H Club Members' Essay on "The Pro-
duction and Use of Better Dairy Pastures", en-
tered in a State-wtide Contest for 1953 as a
part of the F.D.A. and University of Florida
Program on "Pasture Development".
THE ECONOMICAL production and use of
dairy pastures play an important role in
determining whether profits will be large
or small. Remembering that pastures us-
ually constitute a large part of a dairy's
feeding program, it is easily understood
why this is true.
The production of dairy pastures goes
hand in hand with the use of dairy pas-
tures to help the farmer realize a larger
profit. The steps in the production of
better dairy pastures will vary from local-
ity to locality, but basically they are the
same. The five basic steps are: land clear-
ing, soil preparation, liming and fertili-
zation, seeding, and maintenance.
The first step in pasture production is
clearing the land so that the pasture
crops will have the best possible chance
of survival without having to compete
with native vegetation.
Land clearing is comparatively expen-
sive and this constitutes a large part of
the total expense in pasture production.
While clearing the land it is usually
advisable to remove stumps as they often
cause breakage of machinery and are apt
to injure an animal. Too, they greatly
detract from the looks of a completed
pasture.
The second step in pasture production
is the preparation of the soil to be plant-
ed. No set method of soil preparation
can be given because of the variation be-
tween locations. The soil should be
thoroughly worked in order to destroy all
native vegetation. When possible, several
months should be allowed to elapse be-
tween the first and final stages of soil


preparation. This elapse of time aids
greatly in destroying native vegetation.
Dealing with fertilization and liming,
the third step cannot be overly empha-
sized. In almost every case the use of
fertilizer and lime is essential to suc-
cessful pasture production. The cost of
'spreading fertilizers and lime is usually
high and careful thought should'be given
to these items. They should be spread
as uniformly as possible.
To determine what fertilizer elements
are lacking, soil samples should be taken
and analyzed. In this way you insure the
use of a fertilizer analysis that will bene-
fit the pasture the most.
Careful consideration must be given
to the fourth step, seeding. When plan-
ning pasture improvement, one must have
a thorough knowledge of seed varieties
and methods of seeding. One of the best
sources of such material is the pamphlets
published by the Florida Agricultural
Experiment Stations and Agriculture Ex-
tension Service.
To be sure of as near a year-round
grazing program as possible, thought
must be given to the combinations of
grass and legumes planted. Also such
things as the location and conditions in
which the pasture is to be maintained
are to be taken into consideration.
Maintenance, which is the,fifth and
final step in pasture production, is very
important. Refertilization is the largest
item of expense here. Adequate fertili-
zation and good soil preparation do much
to control weed growth. However, mow-
ing weeds during the bloom stage is a
sound investment and a little effort here
will save a lot of time and money later.
Once a pasture has been successfully
established, its care and use must be
well planned. Care must be taken so that
it will not be overgrazed. This is best
accomplished by pasture rotation.
In pasture rotation, the pasture is fenced
off into several divisions so that one
(Cqotipued on Page 38)


8 FLORIDA DAIRY


2380 PALM AVE., HIALEAH, FLORIDA
Phone 88-6496, 7, 8


NEWS































Members of the Team, left to right, standing, Perry Smith, Erny Sellers and Beverly Simmons;
kneeling, C. W. Reaves, State Advisor, and Howard Renner.


Florida 4-H Dairy Judging Team
Selected For National Competition
FOUR FIORIDA 4-H Club Members qualified to represent the State in the Nation:,
Dairy Judging Contest by placing in the top four places in the Final State 4-H Dairy
Cattle Judging Contest on June 16th. The top four contestants in order were: Erny
Sellers, Tallahassee; Beverly Simmons, Orangedale; Howard Renner, Largo; and
Perry Smith, Hastings. Sellers had the remarkable score of 479 out of a possible 500.
The contest was held at Alpine Dairy
and Dinsmore Dairy farms in Duval Why Persons Over Twenty
County. Fourteen members who were in Should Drink More Milk
the top group at the State 4-H Dairy |IERE' WHY all persons over 20 should
Show Contet at Orlando in February drink at least 3 glasses of milk every
and who met the other requirements day:
participated in the Final Contest for 1. AN AID TO BETTER SLEEP. Most
selection of the State Team. The other people have trouble getting to sleep
members of the top fourteen were: James occasionally, and some people have con-
Thornhill, Polk County; Catherine Pari- stant trouble. There is plenty of evidence
sian, Nassau County; Milton Kelly, Cit- that a glass of milk taken at bedtime
rus County; William Schack, Jackson helps you go to sleep quickly and sleep
County; Dan Rousseau, Palm Beach better all night long.
County; Edith Cameron, Duval County; 2. HELPS YOU RELAX. Milk will
Clifford Flood, Nassau County; Tommy help you relax! A "milk habit" of 3
Lynn, Taylor County; Gloria Alvarez, glasses each day promotes a healthier
Duval County; and Wesley Smith, St. nervous system. This is one of the most
Johns County (not in order of placing). important reasons why you should de-
Parisian, Thornhill and Rousseau placed velop the milk habit.
5th. 6th and 7th. 3. ENDS CALCIUM STARVA-
The State Team will represent Florida 7ION: Three glasses of milk each day
in the National 4-H Dairy Judging Con- supplies all the calcium a normal adult
test held in connection with the National needs for teeth, bones, and body repair.
Dairy Cattle Congress at Waterloo, Iowa What's more, milk is the only practical
in early October. Sponsors for the trip source of calcium. It is difficult to eat
are the Florida Times-Union, the Florida enough other food in a day's time to
Jersey and Guernsey Cattle Clubs, the supply all the calcium needed.
Florida Dairy Association, and the State
Department of Agriculture. (Continued on Page 38)


J. P. Boyce
519 E. Giddens St., Tampa, Florida
E. E. Fulton
2531 W. Lake Shore Blvd.
Jacksonville, Florida
J. E. Orris
200 N.W. 129th St., Miami 50, Florida
G. Wrenshall
2315 Westbrook Circle"
Jacksonville, Florida


John Clay's


SUNSHINE HAY


Wire Baled


.... $40 F.O.B.


Chopped with Molasses..$50 F.O.B.

WILL FILL YOUR SILO
WITHIN 100 MILES
$15 per ton



Can supply your needs
all year round



Contact

JOHN CLAY
Clewiston Inn
Clewiston, Florida
Phone 2-3501


JULY & AUGUST, 1954 9














Where to buy



ORTHO Fly Killer M:


ALABAMA
FLORALA
The Farmers Seed Store
SAMPSON
Alabama Gin & Peanut Co.

FLORIDA
ALACHUA
Farmers Hardware Company
BELLE GLADE
The Kilgore Seed Company
BLOUNTSTOWN
Coxwell Seed & Plant Store
KOYNTON BEACH
Broward Grain & Supply Co., Inc.
BRADENTON
Check-R-Board, 809 14th St., W.
CHIEFLAND
Farm Service Store, Inc.
CHIPLEY
F-R-M Feed and Seed Store
CLEWISTON
Parkinson's, Inc.
COCOA
Farmers Supply Store
100 Florida Avenue
CRESTVIEW
Crestview Trading Company
DANIA
Broward Grain & Supply
118 N. Park Avenue
DAYTONA BEACH
Dunn Brothers Hardware
154 S. Beach Street
DEFUNIAK SPRINGS
Thompson-Hillard Milling Co.
West Florida Farmers Co-Op., Inc.
DEL RAY BEACH
Del Ray Beach Farm Supply, Inc.
DUNNELLON
Rush's Department Store
FT. LAUDERDALE
Broward Grain & Supply
106-108 W. Broward Ave.
FT. MYERS
Corbin Farm Supply
1305 Main Street
Kilgore Seed Company
Anderson Ave.
GAINESVILLE
B & G Farm Supply
1012 Main St., S.
Johnson Brothers, Inc.
111-113 S. Main Street
Kilgore Seed Company
202 S. E. 1st. Ave.
HIGH SPRINGS
Farm Supply Store
High Springs Seed Store


JACKSONVILLE
General Mills
2 Riverside Avenue
E. A. Martin Seed Co.
5126 W. Beaver St.
JASPER
Farmers Hardware & Supply
P. O. Box 348
JAY
Morgan Seed Store
KISSIMMEE
Kissimmee Feed Store
424 Broadway
Tarcai Feed and Farm Supply
Vine at Main
Tuxedo Feed & Seed Store
111 Broadway
LAKE BUTLER
Rivers Hardware & Furniture
LAKE CITY
Farmers Mutual Exchange
P. O. Box 806, 1236 N. Marion St.
Wade-Persons
LIVE OAK
Farmers Mutual Exchange
MACCLENNY
Baker County Farmers Supply
MADISON
Farmers Mutual Exchange
400 S. Shelby St.
Ivey's Farm Feed Store
314 S. Range Street
MALONE
Williams Seed & Feed Company
MARIANNA
Powledge Seed & Supply Co.
MAYO
Garden's Farm Supply
P. 0. Box 148
MELBOURNE
Farm Supply Store
MIAMI
General Mills, Inc.
7275 N.W. 7th Avenue
Hector Supply Company
235 S. Miami Ave.
Hughes Seed Store
116 South Miami Ave.
Security Feed and Seed Co.
2035 N.W. 7th Avenue
MILTON
Griffin Supply Co.
MONTICELLO
DeLoach-Hodges Hardware
OCALA
Kilgore Seed Company
909 N. Magnolia
Security Feed & Seed Co. of Ocala,
Inc., 432-434 N. Magnolia St.
Seminole Stores, Inc.
Orange & Ocklawaha


PAHOKEE
The ilgore Seed Company
PALATKA
Security Feed & Seed Co.
201 First St.
PALMETTO
Kilgore Seed Company
710 13th St.
PENSACOLA
Escambia Farmers Supply Co.
North Palafox St.
F. S. Mellen Company
42 E. Garden Street
Bryant's Feed Store
305 W. Green Street
PLANT CITY
The Gilgore Seed Co.
214 S. Collins St.
POMPANO BEACH
Broward Grain & Supply Co.
QUINCY
Southern Chemical Sales & Service
P. O. Box No. 3
SANFORD
Kilgore Seed Store
300 W. 1st.
ST. CLOUD
Tuxedo Feed Store
TALLAHASSEE
Rivers Seed Company
309 S. Adams Street
Berry and Johnson Company
826 W. Gaines Street
Ott's Feed Store
123 W. Jefferson
TAMPA
The Quaker Oats Co.
3021 East Broadway
Tuxedo Feed Store
3109 Fourth Avenue
Amco Feed Stores, Inc.
3701 E. Broadway
Jackson Grain Company
Cass and Ashley St.
TRENTON
Tri-County Farmers Co-Op., Inc.
VERO BEACH
Lawis Feed & Supply
2018 Commerce Ave.
WAUCHULA
Kilgore Seed Company
Main and 7th.
WEST PALM BEACH
Kilgore Seed Company
910 Belvedere Road


10 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS























































ORTHO Fly Killer M

.. a new easy-to-use bait


This remarkable new bait attracts and .ildh
both resis'ant and non-rej;tanr houe flies.
Just use sprinkling can, appl ing ORTHO
Fly Killer M where flies are the thickest.
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Your best protection against screw worm. ORTHO 1038 Screw Worm Control
drives screw worms out of wounds, then kills them. Promotes rapid
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Space spray gives rapid knock-down. ORTHO Fly Spray is an ideal space
spray which gives quick kill on contact and provides excellent control of
the lesser house fly.
2-way livestock pest control. ORTHO Kleen Stock Spray combines Lindane,
(for quick kill), with Toxaphene, (for longer lasting control). Kills many
pests which bother livestock.
Wall or "surface" spray. If you need a surface spray that gives good residual
fly control buy ISOTOX Dairy Spray wettablee or liquid). Also controls
mange, lice, ticks, and mosquitoes.
On all chemicals, read directions and cautions before use.


JULY & AUGUST, 1954 0 11







DAIRY ASSOCIATION


ACTIVITIES


C. D. Wayne Is Named 1955 President
Of the Florida Dairy Association
Will Elect Additional Directors
AT THE ANNUAL Business Meeting of the Florida Dairy Association, held May 28
in Daytona Beach, Cliff Wayne, now serving as 1st Vice-President, was named Presi-
dent-elect for the year 1955.
Mr. Wayne, who for the past several years has been Florida District Manager
of Southern Dairies, Inc. with offices in Miami, was Southern Dairies' manager in
Atlanta and President of the Georgia Dairy Association prior to hs moving to Florida.
Other officers designated to serve
with Mr. Wayne for the year 1955 are: Tripson and Johnson
st V-President, George F. Johnson, West
Palm Beach; 2nd Vice-President, T. G. Head Membership Drive
Lee, Orlando; Treasurer, W. J. Barritt, The Florida Dairy Association annual
Jr., Tampa; Assistant Treasurer, Walter membership campaign was launched re-
Burton, Jacksonville, and Executive Di- cently by the Membership Committee-
rector & Secretary, E. T. (Andy) Lay, George Johnson of West Palm Beach,
Jacksonville. producer vice-president of the Associa-
The following directors were named tion, acting as producer co-chairman and
for 1955, in addition to the officers John Tripson of Vero Beach, producer-
mentioned above: John Sargeant, Lake- distributor and member of the F.D.A.
land; L. B. Hull, Micanopy; Bill Gra- Board, acting as distributor co-chairman.
ham, Hialeah; John Adkinson and J. F. The campaign slogan is "Every Dairy
W. Zirkelbach of Pensacola; Ira Barrow, Should Be A Member". The first shot
New Smyrna Beach; John McMullen, of the drive has been fired at the dis-
Clearwater; J. D. Fuqua, Altha; Herman tributors of the state who are not mem-
Burnett and John Hood of Bradenton; bers, from the heavy guns of the asso-
J. H. Adams, Jacksonville; J. W. Mc- citation's distributor council chairman,
Arthur, Miami; D. E. Perret, Dinsmore; Vice-President C. D. Wayne.
George Boutwell, Lake Worth; Claude The Membership Committee has both
Kelly, Daytona Beach and John Trip- The Membership Committee has both
son, Veo Beach. Additional directors a producer and a distributor chairman
will include Jim Stewart, President "Al in every area of the state and all dairies
Sincu n "A and dairymen who are not active mem-
gator Club", and Herman Boyd, ex- bers of F.D.A. may be looking forward
officio director as immediate past presi- to recs of a friPndrl a ,, i ,- fl-,r
o receii t nf a friendlhr a tel for th- e iir


dent.
To Name Additional Directors
Five additional producer directors and
five additional distributor directors will
be elected at the time of the 1954 an-
nual Dairy Field Day, September 16th
in Gainesville. These were authorized by
an amendment to the Association's by-
laws adopted at the 1954 Annual Meet-
ing.
A.D.A. New Headquarters
For June Dairy Month
The National Sponsor Committee for
the "June Dairy Month" program has
announced the completion of arrange-
ments to change the national headquar-
ters and management for the program
from the National Dairy Council offices,
where it has been since its inception
eighteen years ago, to the offices of the
American Dairy Association.
Headquarters of both organizations
are in Chicago.

12 FLORIDA DAIRY


interest and membership.


Florida Dairy Association
SCHEDULE OF EVENTS
Aug. 10-12 Herdsmen's Short Course
University of Florida
Sept. 16-17 F.D.A. Directors' Meeting
In Gainesville
Sept. 16-17 Annual Dairy Field Day
Gainesville
Nov. 5- 6 F.D.A. Directors' Meeting
Jacksonville
NATIONAL DAIRY EVENTS
Oct. 25-30 Dairy Industries Exposition
Atlantic City
Oct. 25-27 Milk Industry Foundation
Convention-Atlantic City
Oct. 27-29 International Ice Cream
Convention-Atlantic City
Nov. 28-30 Southern Association of Ice
Cream Manufacturers' Con-
vention-St. Petersburg


INTRODUCING...


J YOUR


F.D.A.


p DIRECTORS

BILL GRAHAM


BILL GRAHAM
Both by inheritance and personal apti-
tude, Bill Graham is destined to be a
very successful dairyman. Elected to the
F.D.A. Board of Directors in January,
1953 he has contributed a great deal of
time and effort to Association activities,
especially as a member of the committee
which drafted the valuable series of ques-
tions and answers on the price of milk
and the Florida Milk Commission. He
is also serving on F.D.A. Committees on
Milk Production, Legislation, and Mem-
bership.
Bill is the son of Ernest R. Graham of
Hialeah, a past-president of the Florida
Dairy Association and well-known also
as a former member of the State Senate.
Bill was born and reared on the Graham's
Dairy at Hialeah, and is now Vice-Presi-
dent and General Manager of the dairy
which within the last few years has sold
its distributing business.
Mr. Graham attended both the Uni-
versity of Minnesota and the University
of Florida, graduating from the latter
in 1949. As a First Lieutenant in the U.S.
Air Force, Bill served as a radar operator.
He holds membership in SAE fraternity,
Rotary Club, and has been president of
Dade County Cattlemen.
Bill married Patricia Culbertson of
Minnesota in 1945 and they have three
small children. Phillip L. Graham, Editor
of the Washington, D. C. "Post", is
Bill's brother.

F. D. A. Ladies' Auxiliary
Re-elects Mrs. Sellers
Popular Mrs. Leon (Evelyn) Sellers
of the Sellers' Guernsey Dairy, St. Peters-
burg, who did a splendid job as Presi-
dent of the Ladies' Auxiliary for the
past year, became the first of the ladies
to receive a second term as president.
Although precedent has limited the
past presidents to one year, the Auxiliary
by-laws make no restrictions on the free-
dom of action of this important branch
of the Association.
Other officers who were also re-elect-
ed are: Mrs. Bob (Ruby) Hall, Miami,
Vice-President and Mrs. E. T. (Mar-
jorie) Lay, Secretary.


NEWS












































Milk Commission and Dairymen

Confer On Code of Ethics
A CONFERENCE of the Florida Milk Commission was held with representatives of
the dairy industry from all areas of the state, July 12th in Jacksonville, for considera-
tion of the Commission's "Code of Ethics" for the industry.
The dairy industry was represented by the Board of Directors and some forty
other members of the Florida Dairy Association.


The result of the half-day's discussions
was a general agreement that the Code,
adopted as an order of the Commission
in 1937, is somewhat out of date and
should be revised.
F.D.A. Committee Named
The Dairy Association was invited to
submit suggested revisions to the Com-
mission for consideration at a later date
and the following F.D.A. Committee
was appointed by President Boyd to draft
the suggestions:


R. L. Dressel, Miami, Chairman; C.
D. Wayne, Miami; Claude Kelly, Day-
tona Beach; T. G. Lee, Orlando; Alf R.
Nielsen, West Palm Beach; W. J. Bar-
ritt, Jr., Tampa; Bill Graham, Hialeah;
John McMullen, Clearwater; John Sar-
geant, Lakeland; Ira Barrow, New Smyr-
na Beach; John T. Adkinson, Pensacola;
Herman Burnett, Bradenton.


In the above TOP PICTURE: The Florida Milk Commission is seen in action during a July
12th all day Jacksonville conference with some 60 representatives of the dairy industry from
various areas of the state.
Standing is Raymond Lee of Clearwater, who was elected chairman of the Comission at a
meeting the previous day. Mr. Lee is one of the three public members of the Commission.
OTHER MEMBERS, LEFT TO RIGHT ARE: (1) Fred Ragland, member from the State Board
of Health, Jacksonville; (2) William Imand, Miami, public member; (3) Ben Waring, milk pro-
ducer member of Madison, who uas elected Secretary: (4) L. K. Nicholas, Jr. Commission Ad-
ministrator; (5) Chairman Lee: (6) Henry Schneider, Orlando, milk distributor member:
(7) John M. Scott, Gainesville, member for the State Department of Ariculture: (8) Mrs.
Bertha Elliott, Jacksonville, public member, and (9) R. L. Casey, Miami. attorney for the Com-
mission.
BOTTOM PICTURE: Here is shown about half the dairy group who participated in the
July 12 Jacksonville conference with the Milk Commission. SEEN STANDING, to speak for
the group, is William Herman Boyd of Miami, President of the Florida Dairy Association.


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JULY & AUGUST, 1954 13







Florida Milkman, Charles Skaff

Receives Bronze Medal Heroism Award
Seven milk driver salesmen, representing states from coast to coast and one
province in Canada, have been named by the M.I.F., national milk distributors' or-
ganization, as winners of the annual Pasteur Award for heroism or distinguished
service performed during the past year.
Among the seven receiving this unusual award was Charles'Skaff, "milkman"
driver-salesman of the Skaff & Sons Dairy of Jacksonville.
A committee of judges chosen from outside the milk industry selected one Gold
Medal winner, one Silver Medal Winner, and five Bronze Medal Winners. All the
Bronze Medal winners were of equal standing relative to their heroic accomplish-
ments. Presentation of the awards is made in their respective communities during


June Dairy Month.
Award is Presented
At Florida Convention
Dr. Charles Ulrich, official of the
Milk Industry, Foundation, personally
presented the Pasteur Bronze Medal to
Mr. Skaff during the Florida Dairy Asso-
ciation annual convention's annual ban-
quet program in Daytona Beach. Several
members of Skaff's family were guests
at the dinner to witness the presenting
of the award. Among these were his wife
and her mother, Mrs. Mary Saig, and his
mother and father, Mr. and Mrs. Moses
Skaff.
Dr. Ulrich's Presentation
"For 17 years, the Milk Industry Foun-
dation has been presenting the annual
Pasteur Awards, which were named after
Louis Pasteur, the father of Pasteuriza-
tion. Pasteur Medals have been presented
to deserving members of the Milk In-
dustry who have performed feats of brav-
ery and heroism and service to their fel-
lowmen.
"This year it is my special honor to
bestow one of these awards to one of
Florida's local sons, a driver-salesman
who is employed by the Skaff and Sons
Dairy in Jacksonville.
"This man was delivering milk on the
morning of September 8, 1953, when he
heard the screams of two women a half
block away.
"Hastening to their aid, he found that
part of a lollipop was sticking in the
throat of the 14-month old son of one
of the women. Seeing the bare lollipop
stick lying on the porch floor, he grabbed
the boy and pounded on his back and
chest to no avail-the candy refused to
budge. By this time the child was turning
blue from lack of oxygen and our driver
salesman thought of one more thing. He
held the boy tightly in his arms, pressed
his mouth against the child's and sucked,
acting the way a suction pump might
act. This did the trick-the candy was
drawn out and the child began to breathe
normally again. Our Hero then turned
his attention to the child's mother who
had fainted. He carried her into her
house and stood by until she revived.
"The man who performed this heroic
act is with us tonight-may I present Mr.
Charles M. Skaff.


PASTEUR AWARD
BRONZE MEDAL


MR. SKAFF and DR. ULRICH


"Mr. Skaff, in behalf of the Milk In-
dustry Foundation, I wish to present you
with this Bronze Pasteur Award Medal,
for your quick thinking and brave action
which saved the life of a child and per-
formed a service to your fellowmen."
(Stories of the other Pasteur award winners
will be carried in later issues of the "Dairy
Newss.)

Dairy Industries Exposition
Atlantic City October
With the 19th Dairy Industries Ex-
position looming massively in the indus-
try's calendar for the week of October
25th in Atlantic City, N. J., Dairy Indus-
tries Supply Association has prepared a
small booklet which clearly indicates
who may attend the great Show.
The primary point stressed by the
booklet is that DAIRY PROCESSORS-
and certain others closely linked to the
dairy processing field -are admitted
promptly and without fee upon simple
registration identification. So are mem-
bers of their families.
The general public is not admitted. It
is a Dairy Industries Exposition.
Among those admitted without fee to
the Show-in addition to all dairy pro-
cessors-are dairy educators and students
and federal, state, county and city offi-
cials who are concerned with dairy pro-
ducts.
A free copy of the D.I.S.A. booklet,
"Who May Attend", is available upon
request from D.I.S.A., 1108 16th Street,
N.W., Washington 6, D.C.


Florida Ranks Sixteenth
In Ice Cream Production
"Floridians are consuming over 3,-
000,000 gallons of ice cream per year
more than they did ten years ago", de-
clared Robert C. Hibben, Executive Sec-
retary of the International Association of
Ice Cream Manufacturers in speaking be-
fore the Florida Dairy Association's an-
nual convention at Daytona Beach.
Mr. Hibben pointed out that in 1943
the State of Florida produced 7,531,000
gallons of ice cream but that in 1953
the total had jumped to 11,215,000 gal-
lons. 1952 records indicate that the state
of Florida ranked 16th in ice cream pro-
duction while in milk production, it was
only 39th.
While declaring that Floridians closely
followed the national flavor preference
of vanilla first, chocolate second and
strawberry third, that percentage wise,
the Southern District was second in the
production of chocolate while taking first
honors in the production of strawberry.
They were also the record holders in the
output of variegated chocolate. Orange
sherbet is the most popular flavor com-
prising 40% of the total sales. Sherbets
are increasingly popular with consumers.
Hibben, head of the world-wide trade
group, said that there are differences in
ice cream tastes or regional patterns al-
though 174 flavors have actually been
produced. He pointed out that the high-
est production of black walnut was in
the southern states.
Mr. Hibben attributes the high rise
and the production of ice cream and
sherbets to the fact that many of the
housewives are now storing ice cream
and sherbets at home in their new refrig-
erators or food freezers. This allows the
housewife to serve ice cream not only as
a dessert but between meals and for party
dishes. She now knows that it is one of
the real important dairy foods so classi-
fied by government nutritionists.


14 0 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS







Milk Drinking Habits
Disclosed by Surveys
Suggestions for promoting consump-
tion of milk should be based on facts
as to the importance of different uses
and of under-consumption by people in
different age groups, income groups, or
areas. In surveys conducted by the Agri-
cultural Research Service in Birmingham,
Alabama and Indianapolis, Indiana in
the spring of 1953, it was found that
drinking of milk accounted for three-
fourths of all the fresh fluid milk used
at home in a week in households survey-
ed in the two cities. In Indianapolis the
largest of the other uses of milk was on
cereal; in Birmingham, for baking. In-
cluded in the total for fresh fluid milk
was whole, skim, chocolate milk and
buttermilk. Persons in all age groups
drank less milk than nutritionists recom-
mend.
In Birmingham a substantial propor-
tion of low-income households-4 out
of 10-served no fresh milk whatever
as a beverage during the week and those
drinking milk drank less than in high-
income households. In Indianapolis the
same percentage at all income levels
drank milk, but middle and high income
households drank somewhat more than
those with low incomes. While this may
indicate that price is a barrier to greater
use, increased use is probably an educa-
tional problem as well.


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JULY & AUGUST, 1954 0 15


it wt r-l I---~I s II I I


























FLORIDA DAIRY MONTH EVENTS pictured are: TOP PANEL, Left, Harold Colee (seated)
Manager, presents State Chamber of Commerce special Dairy Month News Story to Maurice
Clifford, Jacksonville Dairy Month Chairman, and Al Wells, State Chairman. Right: Miss
Merriam Simmons, State Dairy Month Queen, offers a toast to the dairy industry with Mr.
Wells, at the Jacksonville Dairy Month Luncheon. SIDE PANEL, pictures 1, 2, and 3 show
a sample of Dairy Month activities in Jacksonville parks where thousands of children learned
about cows and calves, and received free milk and ice cream (4) 50 children at Mooseheart,
Illinois, toast a champion Holstein cow with 50 quarts of milk which she produced in one day.

Florida's Greatest "June Dairy Month"

Creates New Interest and Understanding
FLORIDA has just completed its greatest observance of "June as Dairy Month".
Increased interest was shown by public officials, civic and other groups as well
as throughout the Dairy Industry.
This speaks well for the state and local Dairy Month program committees and
for the dairies and dairymen who promoted and conducted Dairy Month activities.
ACTIVITIES MANY AND VARIED
Beginning with the Governor's proclamation and announcement of the crowning
of the Queen on May 28th at the Dairy Industry State Convention in Daytona Beach,
June Dairy Month events in Florida moved off at a fast pace.
There were proclamations by mayors, the issuance of a special dairy industry
review by the State Chamber of Commerce, and special announcements throughout
the state by the press, radio and T-V news casters.
Under the organized leadership of the with a cow and calf on display and free
State Dairy Month Executive Committee milk and ice cream. These events proved
and the county and local chairman in to be very popular.
over 50 counties, Florida dairymen caught Milking contests, selection of the
on to the spirit and opportunity of the healthiest baby and most popular "milk-
event and marked up a record of par- man" also were used to good advantage.
ticipation never before experienced in the The Miami committee used one of the
state. mn'ost unusuan l ireas when thev arranged
--- --- --- --- --- --- --- ----~~--...deg-


A glimpse of Jack.onville's special Dairy
Month Luncheon whose honor guests were:
MISS MERRIAM SIMMONS, State Dairy
Month Queen, at the left side of the
speakers' table, and HAROLD COLEE of
the State Chamber of Commerce, at right
of speakers' rostrum, who addressed the
meeting on "Florida's Expanding Future".


16 FLORIDA DAIRY


Over 5,000 of the large "national"
Dairy Month posters were used in Flor-
ida. Thousands of the special Florida
posters designed by the Florida commit-
tee to promote milk and ice cream were
ordered as were several thousand of
other posters, folders, proclamation cards,
luncheon place mats, napkins, milk facts
booklets, paper hats, car and truck bump-
er strips, store signs, etc., etc.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Special events were under way through-
out the month of June including a spe-
cial program with the members of the
State Cabinet in Tallahassee, a special
luncheon for the Florida Milk Commis-
sion, special Dairy Month luncheons by
local dairy industry groups, many dairy
programs at civic clubs by dairy mem-
bers, open house visitation days at dairy
farms and plants, dairy-day programs for
children, groups in city recreation parks
NEWS


for prize cows to graze for display on
the million-dollar lawns of the Roney
Plaza Hotel in Miami Beach.
Possibly the outstanding special dairy
month program speakers were Dr. Charles
Ulrich of the Milk Industry Founda-
tion, who spoke at the Miami Dairy
Month luncheon and Col. Harold Colee
of the Florida State Chamber of Com-
merce who spoke at the Jacksonville
Dairy Month luncheon.
Miss Simmons, who participated in sev-
eral Dairy Month programs as "Queen",
might be said to be the most attractive
of our 1954 speakers.
For the prize literature of the cam-
paign, we would select the Florida Com-
mittee's place card-folder, titled "Foun-
tain of Youth". This folder states in a
few words that "The Fountain of Youth
has been discovered to be 'the nearest
Cow'."


COVER PICTURE








ATTRACTIVE 4H DAIRY FARM GIRL

REIGNS AS DAIRY INDUSTRY QUEEN
Miss MERRIAM SIMMONS, an attractive junior at the St. Augustine high school
and member of the well-known Paul Simmons dairy family of Orangedale,
said, "I can't believe it," when she was called from her high school class to answer
the phone and received the message that she had been selected "Queen for Dairy
Month and of the Florida Dairy Industry for 1954".
Miss Simmons, who in dairy terms might be called "a champion", was selected
"Queen" by the 1954 Florida State Dairy Month Committee because of her outstand-
ing record in 4-H Club activities and particularly for her 4-H Dairy Project accom-
plishments.
P 3_1 i i


rus~oIUy ImIsL lllltpr ve to LU CI LI-
mittee of judges was the honors she re-
ceived in 1953 state 4-H dairy competi-
tion. In these events Merriam placed first
in the state in dairy cattle judging, be-
came a member of the Florida state 4-H
dairy judging team which participated
with a good record in national 4-H dairy
judging contest at the National Cattle
Congress, and had a purebred Jersey,
which she had raised, selected as one of
Florida's entries in the annual Regional
Junior Jersey Show in Memphis.
An Unusual Record
In her own words, we quote Merriam's
outline of her farm, school and 4-H Club
activities:
"I have always lived on a dairy farm:
therefore I have had a keen interest in
dairying. I help my father with dairy
chores such as: weighing milk, feeding
and caring for animals, keeping milk and
breeding records. I help my father plant
grass and gather hay. I drive the tractor
and truck to help harvest the hay.
"Last summer my brother, sister, and
I planted seven acres of pangola hay. We
have just started making hay off of it.
"I started my dairy project with a
grade Jersey calf, which won grade cham-
pion at the 4-H Show in Orlando in
1951. Last year my purebred Jersey, Crys-
tal, was selected to be shown in the
Junior Regional Jersey Show in Memphis,
Tenn. I helped show the Florida cattle
and from there I went and participated
in the National Dairy Cattle Congress
in Waterloo, Iowa. I had won first place
on the Florida 4-H Dairy Judging Team
which entitled me to this trip. Last year
I also participated in a Dairy Foods Con-
rest.
"This year I won Reserve and Junior
Champion with my grade calf. I won
third place in the Fitting Contest with
my Purebred and received all blue and
purple ribbons. I also coached the St.
John's County Team which placed sec-
ond. All four members are eligible to
participate in the final judging contest
in June.
I have been in the 4-H Club seven
years. I have been a county dress revue
winner five years which entitled me to
model them in Tallahassee at the Annual
4-H Girls' Short Course. I have been


president and 4-H delegate of my club.
This year I am president of the St. John's
County Girls' 4-H Council. I have par-
ticipated in the State Council meetings
four years at short courses. I am a
Junior Leader of our club and have re-
ceived several certificates for outstanding I
work in the 4-H Club. I won a trip to
the National 4-H Club Congress in Chi-
cago, Illinois on Girls' Records.
"At Ketterlinus High School in St.
Augustine, where this year I was a
junior, I am President of Alpha Tri-Hi- .
Y, which is a Y.W.C.A. organization. I
have won two certificates for salesman-
ship in school projects. I have also won
a trophy for being high salesman in a Miss Merriam Simmons is crowned Florida's
1954 "Queen" of Dairy Month and the Dairy
money-makng project on our Juor by Al ells at the Florida Dair
Class." Association Convention in Daytona Beach.



See the LOW POURING HEIGHT




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The low height of the Mojonnier
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Compare Mojonnier's low pouring
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JULY & AUGUST, 1954 0 17






ACTIVITIES REVIEW OF:


Florida's Dairy Councils
Current News of Dairy Council Work in Tampa-St. Petersburg, Miami & Jacksonville
This section of the Dairy News is intended to bring timely information of the
activities of Florida Dairy Council work. The material will be supplied by the
three Council directors in turn.

Better Living Through Better Eating
Is Slogan of High School Program
By Nancy Hinckley, Asst. Director
THE VITAL service which a Dairy Council may provide for a community is illustrated
in the project carried out at Miami Senior High School during the 1953-54 school
year.
As a result of health findings in this school of 2700 students, indicating that
individual diets were inadequate, a school-wide program of nutrition education was
organized. The Dairy Council directors in Miami cooperated with faculty-student com-
mittees in directing the campaign. -
Surveys showed fatigue, poor skin
conditions, nervous habits and poor diet A Message About
diseases among students. They also show- By: Dr. F. Bruce
ed a need to include parents, students, Milk Industr
faculty and professional health educators "JUNE DAIRY MONTH IS a thirty-d
in the over-all program, farmers who so carefully lend her, to th
Nutritionists from the local Dairy nomically provide us with a wealth of he,
Council were called in on department WHEN YOU CONSIDER the ease with w
meetings to discuss the project and help supplies of milk, it is hard to believe that
make plans with the aid of Dairy Coun- millions, receiving the same amount of
cil booklets, posters and films. An ex- got up at four in the morning to "tap"
tensive use was made of these materials to the store with your own pail to have yo
including two pairs of white rats used the big five-gallon can.
in a good and poor diet demonstration. Now, of course, Old Boss, as we're
Every class incorporated health educa- her today, is a glass lined tanker containing
tion in its curriculem-art classes made of milk. At the local dairy, these thousa
health posters, English teachers used oeurized and bottled in spotless surrour
health as a theme in composition writ- teot sand botd i editions.
ing, etc.; student newspapers carried Nevertheless, try as hard as we will
headline publicity in their weekly edi- ingenuity nd inventiveness for which
tions, drama groups performed skits on our Nation is famous, it still takes a
nutrition. good, old-fashioned cow to produce milk;
At the conclusion of the semester's it still takes a hard-working, early-rising
campaign, results were evaluated with dairy farmer to start the daily flow of
greatly improved nutrition found as the millions of gallons of milk to our fam-
reward for the intensive, cooperative ilies.
program.


D. C. Directors Attend
National Conference
The National Dairy Council celebrated
its 39th year of serving the dairy indus-
try at their Summer Conference held at
the Edgewater Beach Hotel, June 28, 29
and 30.
Directors and Assistant Directors from
Florida's 'three Dairy Council units at-
tended the meeting. The theme of the
3-day Conference was "Nutrition Educa-
tion in Action". The program objective
was "to explore the role of the Dairy
Council in the nutrition education pro-
gram of a community".
Among the outstanding speakers were
Richard Y. Poston, Ph.D., Department
of Community Development for South-
ern Illinois University in Carbondale,
Illinois; Henrietta Herbolsheimer, M.D.,
18 FLORIDA DAIRY


Assistant Professor of Medicine, Univer-
sity of Chicago; and Mr. Norman My-
rick, Editor, American Milk Review.
In a very interesting address Mr. Pos-
ton explained the functioning and var-
ious patterns of a community and how a
community sees its needs for nutrition
education. Mrs. Kathleen N. Lardie,
Manager of Educational Station WDTR-
TV in Detroit, and Mr. David Pasternak,
Station KSD-TV, St. Louis, discussed
television opportunities for Dairy Coun-
cil programs. A reception was held for
new members of the Dairy Council Mon-
day evening.
National Dairy Council Conferences
afford Directors and their assistants a
wealth of information, help and ideas,
enabling them to discuss together the
progress of nutritional experiments and
findings.
NEWS


DIRECTORY OF
FLORIDA'S
DAIRY COUNCILS
DAIRY COUNCIL OF JACKSONVILLE
16 East Church Street
Mrs. Arlen Jones, Exec. Director

DAIRY COUNCIL OF TAMPA AND
ST. PETERSBURG
102 N. Dale Mabry Tampa
Mrs. America Escuder, Exec. Director

DAIRY COUNCIL OF MIAMI Including
DADE, BROWARD & MONROE
COUNTIES
769 N. W. 18th Terrace Miami
Miss Rebecca Daniel, Exec. Director
Miss Frances Cudworth, Asst. Director
Miss Nancy Hinckley, Asst. Director



"June Dairy Month"
Baldwin, President
y Foundation
ay expression of thanks to the cow, to the
e processors and to distributors who so eco-
alth from milk and milk products."
which we get our daily
,within the memory of
milk meant you either
Old Boss, or trudged
ur supply ladled out of

e best acquainted with
ig thousands of gallons
ids of gallons are pas-
ndings and under the
with all the modern BALDWIN
i, with all the modern


Perhaps the best way to "see" the
tremendous operations of the dairy in-
dustry is in the following:
There are 24,000,000 "Old Bossies"
in the United States today.
The farmers and milkers on more
than 3,500,000 farms have to get out
of bed long before dawn to start the
milking that provides the more than
150,000,000 quarts of milk a day
for you and your children to enjoy in
fluid milk . ice cream . cot-
tage cheese and other dairy products.
It's a lot to ask of a cow. It's a lot
to ask of the farmer, too. Especially when
you consider that they do all the work
while we sit back and enjoy the pleasure
of tall, cool glasses of delicious, nutritious
milk, and other dairy foods, with no
more effort than it takes to walk to the
refrigerator or reach for the pitcher.
In order to pay deserved tribute, the
Nation has set aside June as Dairy
Month . a thirty-day expression of
thanks to the cow, to the farmers who so
carefully tend her, to the processors and
to distributors who so economically pro-
vide us with a wealth of health from
milk and milk products.







U. S. Official Tells Ladies
"Use Milk As Beauty Aid"
U. S. Secretary of Agriculture Ezra
T. Benson, in a recent talk before the
American Plant Food Council in Hot
Springs, Virginia, urged the use of "milk"
by women as a "beauty aid". In urging
the industry to use "more of the legiti-
mate want-creating techniques employed
so successfully by other segments of the
economy," Benson stated that it is "time
we started out-promoting some of our
competitors".
Here is a brief summary of the Secre-
tary's remarks as reported by the United
Press from Hot Springs, Virginia:
"Secretary of Agriculture Ezra T. Ben-
son complained today that American
Women 'spend more for beauty aids
than they do for milk'.
'Now please understand, I'm all for
beauty,' he told the American Plant Food
Council. 'I just happen to believe that
a pint of milk a day is itself a mighty
fundamental beauty aid.'
"Benson said it was 'high time' agri-
culture fought for consumer attention and
dollars with eye and taste appeal gim-
micks used by other industries.
'I'm a little tired of watching other
segments in the economy out-promote
agriculture,' he said. 'It's time we started
out-promoting some of our competitors.'
"Americans know about the 'pause
that refreshes,' he said. Television view-
ers can tell you the beverage that 'made
Milwaukee famous'; TV fight fans know
the answer to the query, 'What'll you
have?'
S They don't think about a de-
lightfully refreshing cool glass of milk
when they hear it,' Benson said.
"He said agriculture should use 'more
of the legitimate want-creating techniques
employed so successfully by other seg-
ments of the economy.' "



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Students in Dairy Training
Sought by Dairy Industry
THE MILK INDUSTRY FOUNDATION, na-
tional Association of milk distributors, is
trying to solve the problem of the dis-
appearing dairy college graduate.
During the past several years there has
been a decline in the enrollment of stu-
dents in the dairy departments of our
colleges and universities. This means that
there is a growing scarcity of technically
trained college men for service to the
dairy industry. The problem is made even
more acute by the fact that the school
enrollments are currently on a precipi-
tous decline and there is little evidence
which would indicate a leveling off or
reversal of this trend.
The MIF College Relations Committee
which is composed of milk dealers drawn
from various sections of the U. S., is now
working on the solution.
Prof. H. B. Henderson, Chairman of
the Dairy Division of the University of
Georgia, is assisting the College Rela-
tions Committee in their undertaking and
is acting as their consultant.


The Committee investigation is now
being carried on three major fronts:
1. Recruitment by Colleges and Uni-
versilies.
Methods of attracting likely can-
didates from secondary schools such
as scholarship programs, promo-
tional literature, guidance pro-
grams, etc. are being studied and
evaluated.
2. The College or University Curri-
cula.
Attempts are being made to
evaluate the practicality of the
training. Dairy study programs are
being analyzed to discover if they
are too broad in scope or so nar-
row that not enough specific back-
ground is provided.
3. The Industry Induction Program.
A useful plan will be developed
which can be recommended to
Dairy Management and will out-
line what training should be pro-
vided and how it should be given
to the young college graduate after
his employment by a member of
the dairy industry.


JULY & AUGUST, 1954 0 19


GOOD NEWS!
0000* EMPLOYMENT Ili: U
o-d- 00, 51 HELP WAN *TED-FEMtAjLE roai
of 5-4- ..oooJ *
I.-tll ffl_ !rO T.
-ood
.BO "60 oo NOT
\rlhnf Ix AND LA


































The bi-focal viewpoint

that makes wonderful sense



In the past few months, probably the most talked about company in
the dairy industry has been the American Can Company. We know it.
You know it. In fact, a current question throughout the trade from
dairy presidents down is, "What is Canco going to do?"
Many of you, bruised and exasperated by a work stoppage that hurt
both of us cruelly and cost each of us an enormous sum, have asked:
"How is Canco going to protect its investment and ours in a package
that has won such enthusiastic industry and public acceptance since
it first went on the market 20 years ago?"

Fair questions
You have asked, "How about us? What are you going to do to
demonstrate that you really want our business? Are you going to
support our selling with the realistic advertising and promotion sup-
port we feel your package deserves?"
Our answers to these questions are unmistakably clear and definite.


20 FLORIDA


DAIRY NEWS





Further, they reflect a fresh, affirmative attitude and we should like
you to know what it is.

A "bi-focal" viewpoint
Our working attitude will be to examine each region or market in
which our customers do business as though we were looking through
bi-focal glasses.
One part of the bi-focal lens will always consider your problems: How
you sell. How you advertise and what we can do to strengthen your
particular sales program.
The other part of the lens will always consider what we can do to
confirm in the shopper's mind a preference for our package which we
are convinced she now has.

An Independent Fibre Milk Container Department
To accomplish the aims of this bi-focal viewpoint we have established
a new and separate Fibre Milk Container Department which we be-
lieve will provide a more intimate service to the dairy industry and
more flexible and realistic support to our customers.
Each of the executives in this department will, for months to come,
work more out of suitcases than from behind desks. One is responsible
for sales. Another has direct responsibility for advertising and promo-
tion. Another has complete charge of all container manufacture, and
all will work under a General Manager who possesses an experience
which embraces manufacturing, sales and research.

Building for the Future
The American Can Company is not only in the dairy industry to stay;
we are in the dairy industry to progress. We venture to comment that
we have a heritage of accomplishment in the industry and a package
that has contributed markedly to the sales success of individual dairies
in practically every market in America.
We are working night and day on a strong, vigorous, realistic program
which will be direct evidence to you of how much we appreciate your
business and, beyond this, how aware we are of the mutual responsi-
bility we share with you to move more of your milk in our package.




AMERICAN A

CAN /

COMPANY I


The easy-to-open container


women really prefer


JULY & AUGUST, 1954 21


MIL









DAIRY NEWS DIGEST


Members of the Dairy Industry throughout the State are invited to please
send to the "Florida Dairy News" all news about dairies, dairying and the
good people who devote their time, talents and money to this great industry.
-The Editor.


WALTER G. BURTON
WALTER BURTON ELECTED
TO SOUTHERN DAIRIES' BOARD
Southern Dairies, Inc., the southern
operating division of National Dairies,
has recently extended recognition to an-
other of their capable Florida branch
plant managers in the election of the
Jacksonville Zone Manager, Walter G.
Burton, to the company's board of di-
rectors, according to an announcement
of President W. S. Obenshain at the
company's Charlotte, North Carolina
headquarters.
Walter began his services with the
company as an ice cream route salesman
in 1932. He then transferred to the
firm's office staff where he held var-
ious positions including that of zone
accountant. In 1949 he was made assist-
ant manager of the Jacksonville zone and
in 1952 was appointed to his present
position.
Walter has served as Assistant Treas-
uerer of the Florida Dairy Association
for a number of years and holds mem-
bership on several association commit-
tees.

BILL WOULD REINSTATE U.S.D.A.
BRUCELLOSIS INDEMNITY PAYMENTS
The House Agricultural Committee
has submitted to the Hoause a bill called
the Agricultural Act of 1954 which, in
addition to its provisions on price sup-
ports, provisions for an expanded brucel-
losis eradication program which will er,-
able the U. S. Department of Agricul-
ture to reinstate indemnity payments at
the $25 to $50 level for grade and pure
bred cows respectively. It is estimated
that this program would result in the
elimination of 400,000 dairy cows in
1955 and 500,000 in 1956.


Fuqua Elected President
Chipola Dairy Association
J. D. Fuqua, well-known West Florida
farm and dairy leader of Altha, near
Marianna, was named President of the
Chipola Dairy Association at a recent
meeting of the group in Marianna.
The Association includes dairies of
Jackson, Calhoun and Washington Coun-
ties.
M. T. Crutchfield of Marianna was
elected Vice President for Jackson Coun-
ty and Willard Enfinger of Chipley,
Vice President for Washington County.
L. D. Taylor, Assistant County Agent of
Jackson County, was elected Secretary-
Treasurer.
In the three counties covered by the
Association are about 100 dairymen with
approximately 4,000 milking cows.
One of the current objectives of the
Association is to secure the supervision
of the Florida Milk Commission for the
dairy industry of the area.

FLORIDA CATTLE FOR KOREA
Dade County dairymen have been con-
ducting a miniature round-up of dairy
cattle for shipment as an aid to war-
stricken Korea.
The drive is being sponsored by the
American-Korean Foundation, which said
the Miami shipment would be the first
American cows to go to Korea.

MAKING SILAGE
Palm Beach County dairymen are sav-
ing surplus grass this month by putting
up silage. Three new upright silos have
been completed and several large trench
silos are being filled. Assistant County
Agent H. L. Speer reports that the
feed saved should total more than 1,500
tons.

Industrial Commission
Tax Reduced 4% to 3%
Effective July 1st, the 4% tax on
Workmen's Compensation Insurance pre-
miums, levied by the Florida Industrial
Commission for administration of the
Workmen's Compensation Act, was re-
duced to 3%.
This should result in a 1% reduction
in Workmen's Compensation Insurance
rates.


LAKEMONT SELLS TO T. G. LEE
Carroll L. Ward, veteran dairyman of
Winter Park, who has operated the Lake-
mont Dairy for many years, announced
this week his distribution personnel at
the dairy had been joined to that of
Lee Dairy, Orlando.
In the future, Mr. Ward will con-
tinue in the production end of the dairy
business, with Lee Dairy taking over
the distribution service. The arrangement
brings an affiliation between two of
Orange County's oldest dairy firms.
The Lakemont Dairy was founded ap-
proximately 50 years ago by Ward's
father, while the T. G. Lee Dairy, cen-
tral Florida's largest producer-distribu-
tor dairy, now is in its 30th year of op-
eration.

WILBRO ADDS FOREMOST PRODUCTS
The Wilbro Dairy of Ft. Pierce, own-
ed by N. K. and G. L. Williams, recent-
ly announced completion of arrange-
ments for distribution of Foremost Dair-
ies products in their area in addition to
distribution of Wilbro Dairy milk in
glass containers.
Foremost products handled are milk
in paper cartons for store deliveries, cot-
tage cheese, coffee cream, whipped cream
and sour cream.

Orlando Dairy Farm Sold
The W. C. Ballard dairy farm near
Orlando, containing about 330 acres,
was recently sold at auction in three par-
cels for a total of $52,070.00 including
the residence and dairy barns.
No announcement was made concern-
ing disposal of the dairy herd.

TAMPA MILKMEN AID SAFETY DRIVE
The milk distributors and drivers of
Tampa gave their cooperation to a re-
cent Children's Safety Contest sponsored
by the County Citizens Safety Council.
Milk driver deliverymen distributed
25,000 milk bottle hangers bearing safe-
ty information and the rules of the con-
test.

FOREMOST IN HONG KONG
Foremost Dairies announced recently
that the company is in the process of
erecting a dairy processing plant in Hong
Kong for the purpose of supplying milk
and ice cream to the armed services of
the U. S. in the Far East.

PREDICTION OF FLORIDA GROWTH
The next ten years in Florida will see
a 750,000 population increase; a 100%
increase in improved pasture develop-
ment, from 2 million to 4 million acres
and a 50% increase in milk production
to 900 million pounds per year, accord-
ing to a prediction made recently by W.
M. Fifield, Director of the Agricultural
Experiment Station of the University of
Florida.


22 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS






DAIRY MONTH QUEEN
(Continued from Page 17)
Honored By 4-H Council
Since Merriam was crowned Florida
Dairy Industry Queen, she has received
additional recognition and honor by her
election as Vice President of the State
4-H Girls' Council at the annual conven-
tion of this group held in Tallahassee.

Congress Gets Bill on
U. S. Milk Purchases
) H. R. 9155, introduced by Congress-
man Gubsen of California, and referred
to the House Committee on Agriculture,
provides that whenever the United States
purchases milk in a State in which min-
imum prices for comparable milk sales
to private purchasers are established un-
der State law, the purchase by the United
States may be made without advertising,
and shall be made at not less than the
minimum price so established for a com-
parable private purchase.

Georgia Cancels Price Drop
) The Georgia State Milk Control Board
rescinded its order for a state-wide milk
price reduction of 2 cents per quart. The
Board's earlier order for price cut had
been postponed when protests were filed
by producers and distributors.


ED SALVATORE

Salvatore Appointed
Bowey's Representative
Announcement of the appointment of
Ed Salvatore as Florida and Georgia
Representative of Bowey's, Inc. was re-
cently made from the home office of
Bowey's in Brooklyn, N. Y. by W. C.
Hutchinson, Vice President.
Ed, who is well known throughout
the Florida Dairy Industry, has been a
dairy supplies representative in this area
for the past sixteen years, ten of which
was as representative of Bowey's.


Bowey's, with divisional offices in
Brooklyn, Chicago and Los Angeles,
manufacture and distribute some of the
dairy industry's most popular milk flavor-
ing supplies including Dari-Rich choco-
late flavor and syrup, coffee and straw-
berry milk flavoring, Dari-O orange; ice
cream supplies including chocolate, va-
nillas, fruits, flavors, stabilizers and
colors; also egg nog mix and pineapple
for cottage cheese.
Ed says that he is very happy to be
associated with Bowey's again and invites
his many friends to take note of his
present headquarters address-205 Como
Street, Tampa, where he and Mrs. Sal-
vatore (Evelyn) and 2-year old Ed, Jr.,
reside.
During his sixteen years in Florida,
Ed has the enviable record of having
continuously been a member of the Allied
Trades Division of the Florida Dairy
Association, has missed attendance at only
one of the Association's Annual Conven-
tions and has served as Secretary-Treas-
urer, Vice-President and President of the
Allied Trades "Alligator Club". He is
now a member of the Club's Executive
Committee.
The season so far shows that a num-
ber of major league teams, while suc-
cessful elsewhere, just can't win at home.
A lot of men have the same trouble.
-From the Florida Times-Union


A1. --l'h 4. +,hse li-a B6 t


\o VarRcb ^oc1#sf( fvotiddpimk


DARI-RICH

CHOCOLATE FLAVOR SUPREME
ICE CREAM SUPPLIES
FRUITS AND SYRUPS EXTRACTS STABILIZERS

Other Money-Making BOWEY'S Products:
DARI-RICH OTHER SYRUPS,
Chocolate Syrup for making
DARI-O-ORANGE Flavored Milks:
EGG NOG MIX STRAWBERRY
PINEAPPLE COFFEE
(for Cottage Cheese)
Order now from:


ED SALVATORE, Representative
For Florida & Georgia


205 Como Street, Tampa -


Phone: Tampa 85-6902


\ r Write:
BOWEY'S INC., 771 BEDFORD AVE., BROOKLYN 5, N. Y.

JULY & AUGUST, 1954 23






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


DAIRY REVIEW


Extension Service Dairy Products Laboratory
Dairy Farm Research Unit Agricultural Experiment Station

Preventing Feed Flavors in Milk
By: DR. HOWARD H. WILKOWSKE
Department of Dairy Science
University of Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Why reeks the milk from cows on yonder hill
When they consume pasture with chlorophyll?
Y ES it's well known that certain feeds will cause objectionable flavors and odors
in milk. In such instances milk contains undesirable flavors and odors because
of improper feeding practices. On the other hand, most of the normal and desirable
A '""r flavoring constituents of milk also originate from the feed. Milk
Containing a mild feed-flavor is so common that most con-
ssumers would criticize milk as being "flat" if at least a trace
,' of fragrance were not present.
S Since many kinds of feed flavors do get into the milk it is
necessary to avoid feeding practices which cause intensive flavors
.in milk and at the same time to follow a procedure which can
be performed with the least expense. Too often little or no con-
S' sideration is given to the feed flavor problem even though pre-
DR. WILKOWSKE venting objectionable flavors in milk would, no doubt, increase
milk consumption generally.


Flavors and odors in milk are either
"fleeting" or "lasting." The lasting kinds
of off-flavors, such as rancid and bitter,
are very objectionable since these fat-
soluble defects remain in the milk during
processing and distribution. Common
sources of strong off-flavors are wild
onion, bitterweed and ragweed. On the
farm these objectionable flavors can be
controlled by preventing the cows from
consuming these weeds.
Mowing pastures early enough to pre-
vent seeding of weeds aids in keeping
them under control. With good pasture
management growth of weeds can be
minimized. Frequent mowing and fre-
quent applications or required fertilizers
are essential in keeping the pasture free
from weeds. Complete removal of all
such causative weeds from pasture areas
is the best method of prevention.
The feeds causing volatile odors in
milk include various hay crops, pasture
grasses, cereal grains when consumed
green, silage and clovers. Since these
fleeting odors are water-soluble they may
be partially removed from the milk by
simple aeration. Also, as milk is aerated
some of the volatile odors will escape
into the surrounding air. When warm
milk flows over the cooler one can smell
feed-caused odors. It is well to note the
intensity of the odor from day to day
near the cooler and when any objec-
tionable odor is detected it is a warning
that transfer of feed flavors from the
feed to the milk by the cow has reached
the point where precautions should be
taken.
(Continued on Next Page)


The University of Florida
DEPARTMENT OF DAIRY SCIENCE
Schedule of
1954 Special Events
THE FLORIDA DAIRY INDUSTRY
August 10-12
23rd Annual
DAIRY HERDSMEN'S SHORT COURSE
For dairy herdsmen, herd owners, dairy
farm helpers, DHIA supervisors, producer-
distributors and milk producers.
September 16-17
19th Annual
DAIRY FIELD DAY & CONFERENCE
For milk producer-Distributors, dairy pro-
cessors, milk producers, veterinarians, herds-
men, DHIA workers and equipment and
supply dealers.
October 14-16
17th Annual
DAIRY PLANT OPERATORS SHORT
COURSE
For dairy plant superintendents and assist-
ants, managers, owners, dairy plant em-
ployees, producer-distributors, equipment
and supply dealers.
Year Around
OPEN HOUSE
Visitors are always welcome to visit the
Dairy Products Laboratory and the Dairy
Farm Research Unit.


Plan Dairy Herdsmen's Short Course

HE DAIRY EXTENSION DEPARTMENT of the University of Florida has announced
the 1954 Annual Dairy Herdsmen's three-day Short Course will be held August
10-11-12 at the University Dairy Laboratory, and the Dairy Farm Research Unit,
Gainesville.
The Florida Dairy Association Committees on "Milk Production", "Dairy Hus-
bandry" and "Pasture Development" cooperate with the Extension Division and Dairy
Science Department of the University of Florida in planning and promoting interest
and attendance at this special Herd Management Course.
Dr. R. B. Becker of the Florida Agri-
cultural Experiment Stations and Clarence
W. Reaves, Extension Service Dairyman, AUGUST 11:
are co-chairmen for the event. 8:30 Practices gleaned from State
Featured guest professor for the course Dairy Pasture Contest,
will be Dr. J. D. Donker of the Dairy C. W. REAVES
Department of the University of Georgia. 9:30 Getting highest quality grazing,
He will discuss breeding troubles and and supplemental feeding,
the physiology of the cow in relation P. T. RIX ARNOLD
to managed milking for maximum pro- 11:00 Factors affecting butterfat tests,
duction. T W SPARKS


HERDSMEN PROGRAM
AUGUST 10:
8:30 REGISTRATION
Outline of Departmental Activi-
ties, DR. E. L. FOUTS.
9:00 Feed and pasture crops for Flor-
ida, J. R. HENDERSON
10:00 A yearly forage program,
S. P. MARSHALL
11:00 Variations in heat periods, and
relations to conception rates,
J. D. DONKER, Univ. of Ga.
1:30 Pasture Tour, S. P. MARSHALL
3:30 Analysis of feeding program on
selected farms with relation to
pastures, C. W. REAVES


1:30 Managed milking for maximum
production, J. D. DONKER
3:30 Milkers and milking methods,
J. D. DONKER
7:00 Dairy Association News
E. T. LAY, Secretary
Dairy movie, C. W. REAVES
AUGUST 12:
8:30 Surplus forage, how preserved,
J. M. WING
9:30 Ensiling methods and preserva-
tives, R. B. BECKER
11:00 Forage production practices and
methods of making silage, Class
Roundtable and discussion
1:30 Disease control and prevention,
DR. D. A. SANDERS


24 0 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS





PREVENTING FEED FLAVORS IN MILK
(Continued from Page 24)
Another way to determine the odor
of the milk being produced is to lift the
lid of the can or bulk storage tank on the
farm and take a quick "whiff." The in-
tensity of the odor will give an indication
of the degree to which the milk is be-
coming "feedy." One should not be-
come so accustomed to the day to day
milk odors and flavors that any gradual
increases in feed odors in milk which
might occur would go undetected.
Abrupt Feed Changes
One of the most common complaints re-
garding feed flavors or odors results
when abrupt changes are made from
one feed to another. Even though the
new flavor or odor may not be objection-
able the sudden change causes the con-
sumer to become aware of the different
feed flavor. No doubt the change of
flavor and odor in milk rather than the
intensity causes consumers to take notice
and is a reason for complaints. The
change of feed should be made gradually
over a period of a few days to avoid
this difficulty.
It is generally recognized that the
feeds consumed within two to four hours
before milking are for the most part
the cause of the feedy odors and flavors
in milk. Using this knowledge, the most
successful method of reducing the fleet-
ing feed flavors and odors in milk is
to remove the animals from the feed caus-
ing the off-flavor. This practice will keep
the feed flavors at a minimum. If there
is plenty of green pasture available, the
cows will easily consume a sufficient
amount of forage before going into the
dry lot. The cows will make good use
of this dry lot period for rumination
which is an essential process in feed utili-
zation.
During the daytime cows may be placed
in the dry lot about noon, or about 3
or 4 hours before the evening milking.
To do this 4 hours before the morning
milking also would be desirable but
rather impractical. However, by following
such practice at least every other milking
will reduce the total amount of feed fla-
vor imparted to the milk when the
morning and evening milks are mixed
together in the farm storage tank or at
the milk plant.
Correcting Silage Flavors
When the primary source of roughage
in the diet is silage, one way to reduce
this feed flavor in the milk is to feed
less of the total daily ration during the
night and more during the daytime.
When less is fed at night the cows will
clean it up several hours before the morn-
ing milking. Such procedure will keep
the intensity of the silage flavor to a
minimum in the morning milk. Heavier
(Continued on Page 27)


FLORIDA
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A FAVOR TOO! GIlA
Florida dairymen know that better milk
Production means more profit to the.n.
They also know that better fertilizer
means grass, which makes for better milk
production. That's why so many dairy- r
men are switching to FFF fertilizers, made
in Florida by men who know Florida
crops and soils. For profit producing re-
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COMMERCIAL MIXED FERTILIZERS AND UNPROCESSED FE
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THE
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Announces
The Appointment of

Mr. Lynwood Willis
335 W. 6th St.
Jacksonville, Fla.
As
District Representative
For Northern Florida
and

The Irwin Grain Co.
Kendall, Florida
As
Distributors For
South Eastern Florida
Inquiries may be addressed to either of the
above or to the company at Lakeland.


The P.D.Q. Company, Inc.


P. O. BOX 439


LAKELAND, FLA.


JULY & AUGUST, 1954 25


__





FLORIDA D.H.I.A. PROGRAM
DAIRY SCIENCE MARCHES ON 1954 SHOWING GOOD RESULTS


by: DR. R. B. BECKER
Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
A special summary of the proceedings of the 49th annual meeting of American Dairy Science
Association which was held at Pennsylivania Stale University, June 22-24, 1954.
FIVE COUNTRIES, besides the Canadian provinces, and 45 states were
represented by 1424 registered representatives in Extension, Produc- .
tion, Manufactures and commercial fields, of whom 15 were Flori-
dians. Many were teachers and research workers. The program com-
prised a general session, followed by five sections simultaneously, and extension ex-
hibits.
Key guest speaker was Honorable Ezra Taft Benson, Secretary of the United
States Department of Agriculture. Secretary Benson was a dairyman from boyhood
for most of his life, broadly technically trained as an agricultural economist, worked
as a county agricultural agent, specialist, and with farm cooperative organizations before
his selection to the Cabinet. Mr. Benson is greatly respected as a religious leader. Mrs.
Benson, who is a gracious teammate, accompanied the Secretary on this short "vaca-
tion trip" away from official duties.


Secretary Benson suggested that milk
dispensers are needed in prominent pub-
lic places all over this country, where the
public can obtain good milk and dairy
products in convenient packages at will.
This method increased milk consumption
considerably in the White House and
the Agricultural building in Washing-
ton. It could serve this purpose at other
prominent places nationwide, in Secre-
tary Benson's judgment. His speech was
broadcast over a wide radio hookup.
He mentioned desirability of use of
national subsidies only toward self help,
and as protection against widely fluctu-
ating markets, and believed that these
should be established on a flexible rather
than a fixed basis. A lower proportion
of parity would encourage consumption
and help to reduce stock piling of crop
and product surpluses, in his judgment.
Too high subsidies tend to price products
off the consuming market, he pointed
out. He believes that a sound farm pro-
gram contributes to national strength.
Dr. Milton Eisenhower, President of
Pennsylvania State University, gave a
small luncheon in honor of the Secretary
and Mrs. Benson, inviting representatives
of his staff and past presidents of the
Association. Dairy products from the
dairy herd and manufacturing laborato-
ries were on the menu. The Secretary ask-
ed the blessing in his sincerely gracious
way before breaking bread. There was a
homelike atmosphere, talk of foods on
their Utah farm, of scholastic activities
and of mutual friends. It is with greatest
regret that word of Mrs. Milton Eisen-
hower's death was heard over the radio
on July llth.
Technical programs were divided into
Extension, Production and Manufactures
fields. Space limitations permit discussing
Extension subject matter in this issue.
The research and teaching phases will
appear in later issues.
Michigan and Pennsylvania workers
discussed lantern slides, motion pictures


and visual aids for television-for one
to see as well as hear and discuss dairy
methods and feed production. Some of
the techniques and details of selecting
and preparing pertinent informative pic-
tures were reappraised for effective pre-
sentations.
A special section demonstrated use of
IBM for rapid machine computation of
DHIA records in states with a large vol-
ume of production testing individual
cows.
Feed and production records of DHIA
herds in New York are analysed from
punched IBM cards for group studies
and analysis. Analysis of 2,450 Holstein
herds showed 10,700 lbs. milk and 384
lbs. butterfat. Average feed was 3,130
Ibs. concentrates, 7,600 lbs. silage, 4,300
lbs. hay, with pasture on 160 days. With
larger cows and higher production, feed
consumption was above these averages.
Three discussions dealt particularly
with 4-H Clubs-achievement score card,
"young stock" and "cow production"
records to guide in feeding and manage-
ment. The weights of 806 heifers of one
breed showed need for more attention to
growing yearlings.
Improvements in recent 4-H records
were attributed to (a) offering appro-
priate recognition to members for accom-
plishment and effort, (b) integrating in-
struction in record keeping with lessons
on feeding and management, and (c)
promoting records useful to members
who keep them.
The annual discussion, led by Dr. J.
F. Kendrick of the USDA, considered
any changes needed in DHIA record
forms to keep abreast of current progress.


SStudies of the University of Florida
Agricultural Economics Department have
shown feed costs to represent approxi-
mately 53 per cent of the total costs of
producing milk.


A summary of the records of Florida
DHIA supervised herds for the 1952-53
year ending September 30, 1953, shows
an average of 6,415 pounds of milk,
4.5%, and 288 pounds butterfat for
each of the 7,143 cows completing test
during the year.
The following D.H.I.A. herd owners
deserve credit for developing their herds
to the level of production 7,500 pounds
or more of 4 per cent fat corrected milk
per cow during the 1952-53 year. This
standard for listing herds gives credit for
high production of milk and/or butterfat
and expresses it in a single figure. Carroll
L. Ward Sr., Winter Park; Carroll L.
Ward, Jr., Goldenrod; Walter Welkener,
Jacksonville; Fairglade Jersey Dairy, Or-
lando; Methodist Children's Home, En-
terprise; Hanson Collins, Orlando; B. W.
Judge, Orlando; Walter Schmid, Sara-
sota; W. J. Simmons, Jacksonville; A. T.
Alvarez, Jacksonville; Polk County Dairy,
Bartow; Armil's Farm, Largo; W. J.
Casey, Clearwater; J. K. Stuart, Bartow;
J. H. Cone, Plant City; M. A. Schack,
Greenwood; Carl Rieker, Jacksonville; J.
P. Eldridge, Orlando; R. R. Jennings,
Jacksonville; and The Pennock Planta-
tion, Jupiter.
DHIA WORK GROWS
Eight associations were included in-
stead of three represented in the 1947-48
summary. Establishment of the work in
new areas and including of new herds
in the old areas has spread the results
of D.H.I.A. work to many more dairy-
men. Almost four times as many cows
were on test in the 1952-53 year as in
the 1947-48 year.
According to State D.H.I.A. Super-
visor, C. W. Reaves, the heart of the
DHIA program is the DHIA supervisor,
who weighs, samples and tests the milk,
figures the records to show the dairy-
men where each cow and the herd stands
on the ledger and advises on rations and
feed lists. He is willing to assist the
dairyman in evaluating the efficiency of
his cows, his feeding system, his feed
production and his future breeding plans.
The test supervisor is most interested in
seeing herd improvement become a reality
with more efficient operation of better
herds resulting in a more profitable
dairy business on the DHIA members'
farms.

The Dairy Situation
SUnless adverse weather reduces milk
production, prices received by farmers
for milk and butterfat probably will con-
tinue near present levels for the rest of
this year, except for seasonal increase in
mny fluid milksheds.


26 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS





BREAD AND MILK DIET
CHILDHOOD TO AGE 99
One of the greatest living experiments
in the value of milk as a complete food
was Dr. Stephen Smith, for 60 years
a distinguished surgeon at Bellevue Hos-
pital in New York City.
When he was born in 1823 little was
known about nutritional deficiencies in
children. Smith was frail and was unable
to keep anything on his stomach. The
family doctor said, "Try him on bread
and milk."
This was done and for the rest of his
long, busy life, Dr. Stephen Smith ate
nothing but bread and milk-until he
died in 1923 at the age of 99.

FEED FLAVORS IN MILK
(Continued from Page 25)
feeding of silage during the daytime can
be followed by placing the cows in the
dry lot several hours before milking to
keep the feed flavors to a minimum in
the evening milk. Generally the silage
should be fed some distance from the
milking barn to keep the air in the barn
fresh and free from odors. Large amounts
of silage may be fed immediately after
milking which will allow 10 to 12 hours
until the next feeding. This will provide
sufficient time to clean it up several
hours before the next milking.
When feeding more than one type
of feed, it is desirable to use the stronger
flavored feeds during the daytime and
the less aromatic feeds at night. In this
manner it is possible to lessen the degree
of feed flavor in the milk by removing
the cows a few hours before milking,
a practice which is not convenient to do
during the night. Mild flavored feeds
which may be fed during the night in-
clude some of the pasture plants such
as Alyce clover and Pangola, Dallis and
Bahia grasses. The strong flavored feeds
are silage, clover (except Alyce clover),
cowpeas, millet and oats.
Occasionally an individual cow will
produce an unusually large amount of
lipase in her milk. This lipase is a fat-
splitting enzyme which will cause raw
milk to become rancid when not pasteur-
ized promptly, Lipase activity is destroyed
by pasteurization. The best practice us-
ually is to turn dry those few individual
cows which produce unusually objection-
able rancid milk.
In studies conducted by the Florida
Agricultural Experiment Station several
years ago it was reported that soybean
silage did not impart in milk any objec-
tionable off-flavor or odors (Bulletin
255). Dried grapefruit pulp and dried
beet pulp also were found to impart only
mild characteristic flavors to milk when
fed in the dry form. When dried grape-
fruit pulp was soaked, it imparted a
noticeable flavor when fed in quite large
amounts shortly before the cows were
milked (Bulletin 354).


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materials)... that tasty Beet Pulp and Wheat Bran...
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iti And dairymen quickly get sold on its milk-making
and money-making power. This feed is built to produce!

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calves . then YOU SHOULD BE AN "SQ" USER!


NOW IN SPARTAN'S



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DAIRY.
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SPARTAN GRAIN & MILL CO.
GRAND CROSSING, FLORIDA
F'hro c J U:e .:. f 1i - t



JULY & AUGUST, 1954 0 27






State Pasture Contest Is Continued

By Dairy Association and U. of F.

By: C. W. REAVES, State Extension Dairyman
And
Director of State Pasture Contest

MANY Florida dairymen will be interested to learn that the State Dairy Pasture Con-
test which was held for 1953 will be continued for 1954 with certain changes, adopt-
ed by the Contest Committee; designed to improve the contest, simplify records and
encourage more entries.


Twenty-nine dairy farmers qualified for the Certificates of
Recognition and county winners were named in 16 counties in
the first year of the Florida Dairy Pasture Contest. This is the
largest number of farmers who have participated in and made
records in a Florida pasture contest.
The State winners and those awarded Certificates in the
1953 contest will be announced at the Dairy Field Day-Septem-
ber 16 and 17, 1954. These will be for (a) best pasture and
forage program and (b) the most improved over the previous
year.
The Florida Dairy Association is to be commended for its


many constructive activities for improve-
ment of the industry both on the dairy
farm and in the dairy plant.
As a co-worker with the industry and
particularly with the dairymen, I feel
that the promotion of pasture develop-
ment and improvement, which is one of
the Association's newest projects, is one
of the most important. From informal
pasture discussions at various meetings
was developed an interest that brought
about the appointment by F.D.A. of a
standing committee on "Pasture Devel-
opment". Last year this committee recom-
mended a statewide "Pasture Contest" to
be sponsored by the F.D.A. and the
University of Florida, which was adopt-
ed.
The results of the first year's con-
test, with over 70 dairymen entering and
29 completing records which qualified
them for "certificates of merit", caused
the Dairy Association and the University
of Florida to continue the program.

Plan of 1954-55 Contest
The general objective of the contest
will continue to be for more dairymen
to secure the results of good pasture
and forage production, utilizing these
valuable green feeds for more efficient
and profitable dairying. County Commit-
tees will score all farms entering the con-
test and submitting reports. Certificates
of Recognition will be presented all
those scoring 75 per cent or above.
County and state winners will be named
in two divisions as follows:
1. The one with the best overall
pasture program.
2. The one making the most pro-
gress over the previous year.
Certificates and plaques will be award-
ed at the Dairy Field Day.


Modifications
The ending date of the contest will
be April 1, 1955. This date was moved
up from January 1, to permit fall-sown
winter pastures to be grazed within the
same contest year as planted. April 1 will
give an opportunity to judge the suc-
cess of the winter pasture and the spring
pasture.
Items on the report were organized
for easier completion. More lines were
provided but the new forms are easier
to fill out and easier for judges to
evaluate.
Another rule adopted is that the win-
ners one year will not be considered in
competition again for three years.
The County Committee
The County Agent will be chairman
of each county committee. The Florida
Dairy Association will appoint two dairy-
men in each county to work with the
County Agent as the County Dairy Pas-
ture Committee to promote the program
and judge the entrants. It is recommend-
ed that the County Committee visit the
farm of each entrant at least twice to
see the pastures and forage crops and to
get information to help score the pasture
record. One visit should be in the sum-
mer of 1954 to see the summer pasture
and forage crops and the other about
March, 1955 to see the winter annual
pastures, white clover, etc. Reports of
the county winners should be sent to the
State Judging Committee by May 1,
1955.
Value of Pasture Contest
Entry cards are being supplied all
dairymen who are urged to enter the con-
test because you will benefit by the
thought and consideration given your
pastures and by steps taken for their
improvement. If the report is turned in


F.D.A. Pasture Committee
The Florida Dairy Association Com-
mittee on "Pasture Development" for
1954 who conduct the organization's ac-
tivities relating to pasture, including the
State Pasture Contest, is headed by the
veteran dairyman, Herman Burnett of
Bradenton, as chairman.
Other members
are: Herman Boyd,
Miami; Glenn S.
Datson, Pinecastle;
Henry D. Perry,
Hollywood; Walter
Welkener, Al Wells,
James Watson, Jack-
sonville; Ben S. '
Waring, Madison; A If
W. A. Boutwell, Sr., BURNETT
Lake Worth; Carroll
Ward, Sr., Winter Park; T. Stin Hasel-
ton, Eustis; F. D. Magill, Grand Cross-
ing; Julian Lane, Alec White, Tampa;
H. C. Hunt, Lloyd Benson, Delray Beach;
Tom D. Salter, Milton; Warren G. Tyre,
Lake City; M. M. Bryant, J. R. Hender-
son, C. W. Reaves, C. M. Hampson,
Gainesville; W. P. Hayman, Bartow; M.
U. Mounts, West Palm Beach; M. T.
Crutchfield, J. D. Fuqua, Altha; and
John Sargeant, Lakeland.


next April 1 on a reasonably good pas-
ture and forage program, you will re-
ceive a Certificate of Recognition. You
may win additional county or state hon-
ors.
Pastures are a cash crop. Plan for am-
ple pasture for as many months as pos-
sible and store silage or hay for the
other months. More and better pastures
and forage can help meet high costs of
production and inter regional competi-
tion. Good pastures are the cheapest
source of nutrients for cattle. Hay and
silage provide for higher production at
lower costs during periods in which pas-
tures are inadequate for any cause.
Join the contest and help make a
greater Florida Dairy Industry and a
more profitable business for yourself.


28 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


m =


REAVES






















D airy .................. ........................ A d d ress.............................. ...
T otal acreage on dairy farm ...................................................................
M ajor soil typ es.................................. .. ...... .... .......... .. .
PASTURE AND FORAGE PRODUCTION REPORT
FOR YEAR ENDING April 1, April 1,
1951 1955
Average number of cattle on farm during year:
M ilking age cow s....... .. .... .... ... ........ ........ ..
Yearling heifers .............
C a lv es ........ ..................... .... ............................ ... .
Acres unimproved land used for pasture................ .... .............
Acres and varieties of permanent pastures established prior to
beginning of year................................. .. .. .. ... ...... ........
Acres and varieties of permanent pastures established during year...........
Number acres permanent pasture at end of year (total of
items 3 and 4 above.) ................................. ...................
Acres and kinds of annual crops grazed during year:..........................
Sum m er......................... W inter................................
Tons of forage harvested from acres listed under items 3 to 6 inclusive:
Cut and fed green............... Silage............... H ay................
Other crops (show kind) grown for dairy herd:
Forage, cut and fed green-Acres of (kind & amt.) Tons................
Silage-(1) Acres of (kind & amt.) (2) Tons..............(3) Types
silos used ........................
Hay-(1) Acres of (kind & amt.) (2) Tons................(3) Method
of curing......................
Total Amounts of lime and fertilizer applied:
Lime (Tons.................. ) Fertilizer (Tons... ............)
Irrigation practices employed:
M ethod................................... A cres irrigated... ............ ...............
PASTURE UTILIZATION DURING YEAR ENDING
APRIL 1, 1955
D id you practice rotational grazing?.................................................. .
N umber fields ?.................................
Average number days grazing per field per rotation..................
What provision was made for night pasture?................ ...........
Average number times fields were clipped..........................................
W as there shade in each pasture field? ....................................................
Did cows have access to water from each field?....................................
Distance from dairy barn to farthest pasture...................................
Average milk produced per cow in milk:
(a) D aily........................ or (b) Y early........................
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION on your program as to methods of
producing and utilizing pasture and forage, the costs and returns, and
the handling and feeding of the cows may be given on the back of
this form or on separate sheet.
FEEDING PROGRAM DURING YEAR ENDING APRIL 1, 1955
List months during which pasture was ample.............................
During these months, what were the approximate amounts of feeds fed
per milking cow daily:
Pounds dairy mixture..............Pounds pulp or pulp mix................
O their feeds................
In periods in which frosts, floods, or droughts reduced pasture, how
did your feeding program differ in kinds and amounts.......................

FERTILIZERS APPLIED DURING YEAR ENDING APRIL 1, 1955
Grade or kind Tons Acres Treated
T o grass p astures ........................ ................ ........................
T o legum es or m ixtures ........................ ................ .......................
T o annual grazing crops ........................ ................ ........................
T o other forage crops ........................ ................ ........................


SCORE CARD
Points
A. Amount and Quality of Pasture and Forage (according
to num ber livestock )....................... ... .............. ................. 60
B. Management:
1. Efficient Pasture Production M ethods ........................... 15
i. Good types or varieties
h. Annual fertilization
c. Supplementary fertilization at other times for needed growth
2. Efficient Utilization of Pastures.................. ............ 10
i. Practice of rotational grazing
b. Neither overgrazed nor undergrazed
c. Clipping to keep down weeds, renew vegetative growth,
and to save any excess forage
3. Efficient Handling of Cows on Pasture................................ 5
a. Distance from barn to pasture
b. Access to both water and shade in each pasture
c. Provision of night pasture
-. Efficiency of Feeding...... ..................... ....................... 10
i. Provision of some natural roughage when no pasture
b. Balancing of forage with proper kinds and amounts of
feeds
c. Economic ratio of concentrates fed to milk produced
d. Maintenance of satisfactory condition of cows
e. Satisfactory pasture for young stock (observe condition of
animals and of pasture)

Total...................... 100
C. Soundness of Farm Program
Up to 10 points may be deducted from total score if the following
conditions prevail:
a. Farm extravagantly operated
b. Inefficient use of land, labor and equipment


COUNTY WINNERS IN PASTURE CONTEST

The following are county winners in the 1953 State Dairy Pasture
Contest which was selected and announced by the judges at the
Dairy Association Convention in Daytona Beach.
GROUP 1. "Best PaUure Program": Bay County, J. M. Mowat;
Calhoun County, M. W. Eldridgc; Washington County, Lee Stanton;
Jackson County, M. A. Schack; Gadsden County, Frank L. DeBord;
Lafayette County, Bishop Jackson; Columbia County, Floyd Craw-
ford; Duval County, Walter Welken-r; Orange County, Bryan Judge
& Son; Pinellas County, W. J. Casey; Hillsborough County, Julian
Lane; Polk County, Fletcher Gardner; Martin County, Coastal Dairies;
Palm Beach County, George Johnson; Broward County, A. F. Mc-
David, and Dade County, Hall & Boyd Dairy.
GROUP 2, "Be.t Improvement Over Previous Year"; Bay County,
J. M. Mowat; Calhoun, M. W. Eldridge; Washington, Lee Stanton;
Jackson, M. T. Crutchfield; Gadsden, Frank L. DeBord; Lafayette,
Delmar Sapp; Columbia, Floyd Crawford; Duval, W. J. Simmons;
Orange, Hanson Collins; Pinellas, W. J. Casey; Hillsborough, Julian
Lane; Polk, Fletcher Gardner; Martin, Coastal Dairies; Palm Beach,
E. F. Froehlich; Broward, R. G. Goolby; Dade, Graham Dairy.
The following pasture contestants in addition to these listed in
Groups 1 and 2, scored 75% or better to qualify for the "Certificate
of Recognition", which will go to all scoring 75/r or better: Duval
County, Perret's Dairy; Orange County, Carroll L. Ward, Jr.,, Glen
Nelson and Fairglade Jersey Dairy; Palm Beach County, R. M. Goolsby
and Ocean City Dairies.
JULY & AUGUST, 1954 29


COPIES OF DAIRY RECORDS, REPORTS AND SCORE CARD

For 1954-1955 Florida Dairy Pasture Contest


Copies of entry blanks and all report forms for the 1954-55 contest are available from County Agents. Reports are to be filled out by dairy-
man and turned into his County Agent by April 15, 1955. Reports of county winners (in "best pasture program" and in "most pasture
improvement"), should be mailed by the County Committee to the Supervisor of the Contest, C. W. Reaves, Extension Dairyman, University
of Florida, by May 1, 1955.




or


FLORIDA DAIRY CONVENTION HELD HIGHLY PROFITABLE

THREE DAYS OF FELLOWSHIP AND STUDY OF DAIRY PROBLEMS

National and State Dairy Executives
Participate In Dairy Problems Clinics
T HE 27TH ANNUAL MEETING and Convention of Florida Dairymen at Daytona
,LBeach was not only blessed with one of the world's finest meeting and recreation
spots, but it was loaded with an array of Dairy Industry leadership talent that is
seldom seen at a State Dairy Convention.
The program committee invited each of these leaders for his own special exper-
ience and abilities and their performances certainly measured up to expectations.
:. Bob Hibbon, Executive Secretary of the International Association of Ice Cream
t S i Manufacturers, who is possibly the dean of American Dairy Association Executives,
i brought to Florida's ice cream manufacturers just about everything in the book on
the conditions, the progress and problems of ice cream manufacturers.
Dick Werner, Executive Director of the Milk Industry Foundation, with wide
and successful experience in the problems of milk distributors, was extremely helpful
in all sections of the program and especially with his closing address, "A Challenge
to the Florida Dairy Industry", at the convention's closing luncheon.
Charles Ulrich, Public Relations Director of the Milk Industry Foundation,
sparked his listeners with ideas on "public relations" and "the qualifications and
selection of a driver-salesman". He also made the presentation of the M.I.F. Pasteur
award for heroism to the Florida winner, Charles Skaff of Jacksonville.
The convention was fortunate in having present for the program and for parti-
cipation in the various "clinics" three of the industry's outstanding State Dairy Asso-
ciation executives. These included:
Jim Jackson of the Georgia Dairy Association, who gave important counsel
on producer problems, to say nothing of his rare collection of Southern jokes.
Dan Wettlin of the New Jersey Milk Industry Association, who brought valu-
able information and counsel on New Jersey's experience and research in public
relations and industry-wide milk sales promotion and advertising.
Fred Greiner of the Ohio Dairy Products Association, whose State Dairy Asso-
ciation program is recognized as one of the best.
(Continued on Next Page)

LEFT PANEL: (1) L to R, Herman Burnett, Dr. Wayne Reitz (Unit. of Fla.), and Alt Niehen
(2) Ladies' group (3) Charles Skaff and Mrs. Skaff with members of his family.
BOTTOM PANEL, across both pages: (1) Ira Barrow (2) Bob Hibben (3) Dick Werner
(4) Dr. Charles Ulrich (5) Fred Greiner (6) Ladies of the Nutrition Advisory group (7) Rex
prPaxton (8) Speaker-elect, Florida House of Representatives, Ted David.

















Annual Convention groups: TOP PANEL, across, both pages (1) The Convention Arrangements
Committee, L to R, Andy Lay, Raymond Beville, Claude Kelly, Mrs. Lay. Mrs. Kelly, Scoll
Piersoll (Convention Bureau Manager), Ira Barrow'. and Atwood Taylor (2) Registration .taff.
L to R, Mrs. Marjorie La,) Mrs. Elsie Remsen. Miss Mary Goodbred, Bill Decklar (Alligator
Club Pres.), and Mrs. Ora Stanley (3) Allied Trade' registration staff, L to R, Jim Steu'arl,
Bill Decklar, Joe Hammons and John Manning (4) Group registering (5) President Herman
Boyd (6) Ist V. Pres. Cliff Wayne. left, and 2nd V. Pres. George Johnson (7) Treasurer If. I.
Barritt (8) Ladie.' Auxiliary President, Mrs. Evelyn Sellers (9) Alligator President. Bill Decklar.


ANNUAL CONVENTION REVIEW (Continued)

Clinic Proves Popular
A new and successful feature in the program, not used in Florida conventions
before, was the allotment of program time for clinic discussions and action on the
main problems selected for convention consideration.
These clinics, presided over by experienced leadership selected from 'the Asso-
ciation's chief standing committee chairmen, proved to be one of the most inspiring
features of the convention. Clinics were well attended and bubbling with interest.
Specialists on the subjects under consideration were assigned to each clinic and
these had opportunity to speak later on the general conference program when the
clinic chairman submitted his report.
Clinic Subjects Considered
Subjects which received clinic consideration with recommendations to the con-
vention were: (a) Dairy Husbandry, (b) Dairy Laws, Standards & Regulations,
(c) Pasture & Milk Production, (d) Industry-wide Milk Promotion & Advertising,
(e) Public Relations, (f) Milk & Dairy Foods Educational Programs, (g) Dairy
Processing & Distributors' Problems.


Clinic Advisors and Speakers
Clinic sessions had available many of
the best-known specialists on the subjects
considered. Among these were: From
University of Florida (Dairy Science De-
partment) Dr. E. L. Fouts, Dr. Howard
Wilkowske, Dr. S. P. Marshall and Prof.
Dix Arnold; (Extension Service) C. W.
Reaves and J. R. Henderson; (Veterin-
ary Science Dept.) Dr. D. A. Sanders
and Dr. M. Ristic; State Livestock Board,
Dr. A. A. McMurray.
ADVISORS ON LAWS & STAND-
ARDS: John M. Scott, State Chief Dairy
Supervisor, and his entire staff of area
supervisors; Sam Noles, State Board of
Health Dairy Consultant; Howard Brown,
Jacksonville Health Dept.; French Koger,
Dade County Health Dept.; and C. E.
Phillips, Hillsborough County Health
Dept.
ADVISORS ON PUBLIC RELA-
TIONS and DAIRY PRODUCTS PRO-
MOTION included, in addition to the


various State and National Dairy Associa-
tion Executives present, Rex Paxton, Pub-
lic Relations Director of Sutherland
Paper Co., June Gunn of Kissimmee,
Secretary Florida Cattlemen's Association;
County Farm Agents John Henry Logan
of Clearwater, T. R. Townsend of De-
Land, and P. R. McMullen of St. Augus-
tine.
ADVISORS AND SPEAKERS ON
DAIRY FOODS NUTRITION AND
EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS were:
Florida's Dairy Council Directors, Mrs.
Arlen Jones of Jacksonville, Mrs. Ameri-
ca Escuder of Tampa, and Miss Rebecca
Daniel of Miami. Also, Miss Cleo Arn-
ett, nutrition consultant, Florida State
Home Demonstration Dept.; Miss Mar-
jorie Morrison, nutrition consultant, Flor-
ida State Board of Health, and Miss
Rita Dubois, Southeastern Extension
Agent in Dairy Foods Marketing for the
U. S. Dept. of Agriculture.
(Continued Next Page)


PANEL BELOW: (1) Jack Dew leading
singing (2) and (3) Speakers' table at Annual
Banquet (4) Business session (5) Awarding
of golf prize.


lt4.




















Annual Convention Groups: LEFT PANEL, top to Bottonin, (1) L to R, John Manning, MAr.
and Mrs,. L. B. Hull (2) Couple enjoy lunch (3) Members local ladies' arrangements commit-
tee (4) Mr. and Mis. Tominiy Thomas. front. leave Mr. and lMrv. George Johnson, back (5)
Ladies enjoy Lounge. BOTTOM PANEL, (1) Col. Harold Colee (2) Mr. and Mrs. Dick Il"er-
ner (3) L to R. Charles Daniel. Mr. and Mrs. B. A. Gihbso (4) Lyn and Leslie Williainm, the
Lay's granddaughters (5) Dick Werner and And) Lay (6) L to R. Wilmier Bassett. Mrs.
BaJse/t. Mrs. Cod) Skinne,. Mr. Skinner and lMr. Colee (7) Mr. and AMrs. Cody Skinner (i)
Mr. and Mrr. George Boutuell and daughle ..


ANNUAL CONVENTION REVIEW (Continued)


Fast Moving Program
From "early bird" sessions Tuesday
afternoon and evening through the post-
convention parties Friday night, there
was no opportunity for a dull moment.
If at times the regular program did not
suit, conventioneers were engaged in one
of the optional features of their choice,
including the incomparable beaches, the
swimming pool, the golf-putting green,
the shuffle board court, fishing, golfing,
the oceanfront lounging verandas and
the dairy bar.
A large number enjoyed the F.D.A.
Directors' social hour Tuesday evening
for "early birds". Wednesday morning
was a beehive of activity with conven-
tion arrivals, registration and general
preparations underway.
The main convention program sessions
of Wednesday afternoon, Thursday morn-
ing and Friday morning moved smoothly
and on time under the presiding of Pres-
ident Herman Boyd and Past Presidents
Theo Datson and Wilmer Bassett.
Jim Jennings, as usual, handled the du-
ties of Sergeant-at-arms in expert fash-
ion. Few fines were collected for failure
to wear badges. Tickets were collected
and attendance prizes drawn and award-
ed with such dispatch that a few late
comers were disappointed.


Luncheon Session
The luncheon programs Thursday and
Friday noon were both highlights of con-
vention interest just as was the Annual
Banquet program Thursday night.
Vice President Cliff Wayne, presiding
at the Thursday luncheon, presented the
two popular speakers: Bob Hibben of
the International Association of Ice Cream
Manufacturers, and Mr. Rex Paxton of
the Sutherland Paper Co., Kalamazoo,
Michigan.
Hibben gave an interesting summary
of the progress and developments in the
ice cream industry as well as the exten-
sive program of his Association.
Mr. Paxton, with wide experience in
trade organization work, made a plea
for recognition and support of the valu-
able service which the industry's trade
associations-both State and National
are performing.
With general praise for the program
and activities of the Florida Dairy Asso-
ciation which he said compared favor-
ably with that of much larger dairy states,
he pointed up his message with the ob-
servation that "your association will be
only as effective as you, the membership,
want it to be. This means", he concluded,
"that you must be interested enough in
your Association to support it and work
at it."
(Continted on Next Page)


32 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


:-


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i ,-->


Annual Convention Gioups: TOP PANEL, both pages, (1) AMr. Herman Bo)d (2) Mr. and
Mrs. Cliff Wayne (3) Mr. and Mrv. George John.on (4) Jim Steiwari and Mrs. Andy Lay
(5) Mri. Atwuood Taylor and MrJ. Claude Kelly (6) Mrl. Leon Sellers and Sgt. at Arms, ]in
Jennings (7) Mr. and Mrs. John M. Scott (8) Mi. and MAn. Biady John.son and the golf troph).
RIGHT PANEL, (1) L to R. golfen Joe NeSibth, Stan Brnnley) J. J Osborn and Henry
McClanahan (2) Sy Tygamt, Dolph Allion. Jack Haitian and Bill Deckler (3). (4) and
(5), Groupf enjoying the Coniention.


ANNUAL CONVENTION REVIEW (Continued)


Annual Banquet Program
We have heard of "Annual Banquet"
programs which were referred to as a
"blow-out" or "brawl". These were most-
ly an abundance (usually too much)
food, fun and hilarity.
The Florida Dairy Convention banquet
program was intended to be the peak of
the three day's program in good food to
eat, good food for thought and pleasant
fellowship. It was!
Someone referred to it as "an impres-
sive occasion".
Honor guests and speakers filled the
long speakers' table reaching from side
to side of the large Marine diningroom
of the Daytona Plaza Hotel. Music by
an Orlando radio and T-V orchestra and
a generous dinner menu, which natural-
ly included an abundance of milk, ice
cream and other dairy products, kept the
group of about 350 busy until the special
events began.
Featured Speakers
Honorable Ted David of Hollywood,
Florida, who is Speaker-elect for the
House of Representatives of the 1955
Florida Legislature, spoke briefly on leg-
islative matters and Mr. Gordon Roberts,
President of the Roberts Dairy Company
of Omaha, Nebraska, gave a brief address
on dairy industry developments.
The principal address, which \was a
real inspiration to those whose future is
to be linked with the destinies of the


State of Florida, was made by Col. Har-
old Colee, Executive Vice President of
the Florida State Chamber of Commerce.
Iihe story of Flcrida's rapid growth
presented by Mr. Colee, together with
the convincing evidence of the state's
continuing development was indeed a
challenge to the dairy industry to keep
up with or head of the "Florida proces-
sion".
Queen is Crowned
Topping the banquet program was
the presenting and crowning of Florida's
Dairy Month and Dairy Industry Queen
for 1954-55. The Queen, Miss Merriam
Simmons, an attractive 4-H dairy farm
girl from St. Johns County, was presented
by Mr. Clarence Reaves, State Extension
Dairyman who was her leader in 4-H
dairy activities, in which she has re-
ceived highest honors. She was crowned
by Mr. Al Wells, 1954 Floridai Dairy
Month Chairman. Queen's attendants
were M:sJ Marjcrie Morrison and Mrs.
Arlen Jones, Jacksonville; Miss Cleo
Arnitt, Taliahassece, and Miss Rita Du-
bois, Raleigh, N. C
Nielsen And Skaff Honored
In brief ceremonies conducted on be-
half of the Milk Indus ry Foundation,
Dr. Richard Werner presented Alf Nie!-
sen of the Alfar Creamery, We.t Pal n
Beach, long recognizeJ for his leader-
ship in the dairy industry both in Florida
and nationally, with the M.I.F. Distin-
guished Service Certificate.
(Coni.ntied on Page 34)


JULY & AUGUST, 1954 33


xv


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CONVENTION

)r Li hri .i pr1 i ir.t..J ( .irl Nk.ill :
S..-k-onm ill. rlL M I F I.,.-i Br:,ri.ZL PaI.
..ur M .l-ial f'--i Ir -[ r, ilm ,,,h hL 1:1, ,.i

Entertainment Features
(-)B ,ns. ~i, i j . ,l'u:>ili .1 ._ )rr .1f 'ir I
I.i i I l i n.t .i J .i,, rhn IrtL'r- l .rI I. li.
S.ll lri rl.' i.l r [ 1, h 11 ,_ i.II H 1..








l for a number of years have accepted the
responsibility of much of the entertain-
S lment program for. thne various Florida
dJ ,,ro,zp t.. ilur., ... thz, Li, [ '0. ,



Iairy meeting dgs.I Innt
STh.ese Allied Trades members .of the.



Florida Association have won the friend-
hipn favor and appreciation of membeid rs
client to the Florida dairy industry by the con-



-, ivention "attending, -spending, and -lend-
sBg". By this we mean that their "attend-
fo a numbe r of y ears have accepted they ped
re nsibely in providing convention entertain-
ment progrand they lend their r cooperationda
airy mereetindedgs.
These Allied Trades members of the
S Florida Association have won the friend-







Shipwreck Party
The "Alligator s" sppeciatio n of members
oa the Florida dairy industry by the con-








*jj Wednesday night. This proved to be an
excellent fion "attending, -spending, and get ac-
uin ted featurhis e to say nothing of thend-
ance" is above the average, they "spend"




freely in provide seeing how conventionn entertain-lly"
A. meant and they lend their cooperation



whpeople dress whe n they have been ship-
Shipwreck Partywreck
The "Alligators" special entertainment
feature was their "shipwreck party" on
Wednesday night. This proved to be an
excellent first day re-union and get ac-
quainted feature to say nothing of the
fun of seeing how unconventionallyy'
people dress when they have been ship-
(Continued on Next Page)


34 FLORIDA


REVIEW


-r*


/1


DAIRY NEWS


:\"






















Convention Groups: LEFT PANEL, (1) Mr. and Mrs. Cliff Wayne, Mrs. Walter Burton and
George Johnson (2) Mrs. Tommy Thomas framed by the shapely legs of George Johnson, seen
also in (3). RIGHT PANEL, (1) Hawaiian Dance (2) Entertaining at the piano (4) Magic
and Mystery (4) Songs (5) Dairyman E. F. Froehlich turns grass skirt dancer.


CONVENTION REVIEW
(Continued)


Costume prizes were awarded by the
"' Alligators" to (a) Mr. and Mrs. H. B.
Pownall of Miami for the "most orig-
inal" costumes. These were "Adam and
Eve" suits being leaves pinned over bath-
ing suits. (b) Mrs. John Hood of Brad-
enton for the "most logical" dress, which
was a dressing gown. (c) Mr. and Mrs.
Bill Harman of Jacksonville for the
most practical" dress, which were plain
farmer clothes.

Floor Show Pleases
., The "Alligator" party was progressive
from the outdoor costume and fellowship
hour to an indoor buffet dinner, then to
the beautiful Ocean Room for a floor
show and dancing.
The floor show and its pretty magician
and dancers will not soon be forgotten
by those dairymen who got into the
magician act and the Hawaiian dance
contest. Ray Bassett of Panama City pro-
S.duced a lot of laughs in his efforts to
S,'* assist the magician and Ed Froehlich of
'.i West Palm Beach was nothing less than
a "scream" in the men's "grass skirt"
dance contest.
S A. S '-* The barn dance Thursday night fol-
lowing the banquet program was so much
fun the excellent orchestra from Orlando
was prevailed upon to play an hour and
thirty minutes beyond their contract time.

Golf Tournament
The "Alligator Club" golf tourna-
ment, always a popular annual conven-
tion feature, was won for the second
year straight by Brady Johnston, manager
of the Dinsmore Dairy Co., Jacksonville.
(Continued on Page 36)


JULY & AUGUST, 1954 35














































































FLORIDA DAIRY NEW!
FLORIDA DAIRY NEW!


I a


CONVENTION FOLKS seen on this page
rescued from the convention "shipwreck" are:
(1) L to R, Ray Bassett, J. A. Taylor, Curry
Bassett (2) L to R, Mrs. George Johnson,
George Heine, Angie Barker and Joe Ne-
Smith (3) Pres. and Mrs. Boyd (4) George
Neely (left) and Dick Werner (5) L to R.
Bob Hall, Jim Osborn and Clark Comstock,
enjoying a good one. (6) Fred Greiner and
Mrs. Greiner of the Ohio Assn. and Dan
IWettlin of the N. J. Assn. (7) Stan and
Marie Brumley (goin' fishing ) (8) Mr. and
Mrs. H. B. Pounall, Miami, in their fig leaf-
Ist prize-shipwreck costume (9) Bob Meagher,
left, and Frank Holt (10) Mr. and Mrs. Bob
Hibben (11) T. G. Lee, left, and Ira Barrow.


CONVENTION REVIEW
(Concluded)
Brady thus retained the handsome re-
volving trophy, while runners-up receiv-
ed consolation prizes.
Ladies' Auxiliary
The ladies' attendance was good and
the Ladies' Auxiliary, under the leader-
ship of President Evelyn Sellers of St.
Petersburg, kept everyone busy and
happy.
During the first afternoon, the ladies
were guests of the Alligator Club for
an outdoor "get acquainted" party on
the beachfront terrace. Thursday morn-
ing there was a "game party" and Friday
morning the ladies' annual meeting pro-
gram. The election of Ladies' Auxiliary
officers and directors is reported separ-
ately.
F.D.A. Business Meeting
The Annual Business Meeting of the
F.D.A. membership was the last feature
of the closing day's schedule except the
closing Friday luncheon session.
This session affords the membership
an opportunity to hear the annual reports
of the President, the Treasurer and the
Secretary. Officers and Directors for the
coming year are elected and all resolu-
tions are presented for consideration.
Separate reports of these subjects will be
found elsewhere in the Dairy News.
Florida's 1955 convention will be held
lune 22-24 and most likely in North
Florida or the West Coast area.

"GREEN GOLD"
"Grass is the largest agricultural re-
::ource that's left open for expansion,"
according to a new film produced by
Republic Steel Corporation under this
title.

In HUMAN RELATIONS, the five
most important words are: "I am proud
of you." Four most important words are:
"What is your opinion?" Three most im-
portant words are "if you please." Two
most important words: "Thank you."
Smallest word: "I".

, The first ice cream freezer was invent-
by a woman, Nancy Johnson of Philadel-
phia.







RESOLUTIONS ADOPTED
BY ANNUAL MEETING
The Annual Meeting of the Florida Asso-
ciation usually determines the guiding poli-
cies of the industry for the year ahead, either
by formal resolution or merely through under-
standings molded by speakers, clinic confer-
ence sessions and numerous personal contacts.
Among the formal resolutions adopted at
the 1954 F.D.A. Annual Meeting are the fol-
lowing:
(a) Providing for amendment to the
F.D.A. by-laws to add E producer and E di.-
tributor directors to the present board, which
has 10 producers and 10 distributors.
i(b) Naming Alf R. Nielsen an honorary
director.
....ACQ....Extending the sympathies of the mem-
bership to the relatives of deceased members:
Mrs. Jim (Alice) Jennings, member of the
Ladies' Auxiliary; Dr. J. Hillis Miller, an
Honorary Member and member of the "Order
of Bell Cows".
(d) Expressing appreciation for the serv-
ices of the nations and state dairy industry
associations who loaned the services of their
executives for participation in the annual
meeting program.
(e) Endorsing and offering cooperation
in the "Eat More Beef" campaign of the
Florida Cattlemen's Association.
,(f) Expressing appreciation to F.D.A. of-
ficers, directors and others who served the
association during the past year, particularly
past president Wilmer Bassett and directors
who retired from service on the board.
(g) Expressing appreciation to all who
had a part in making the annual convention
the enjoyable, successful and profitable occa-
sion that it was.
(h) Expressing recognition of the vital
need for furtherance in every way possible of
the common interests of producers and dis-
tributors and dedicating the efforts and ener-
gies of the association to the solution of the
common problems of the producer and dis-
tributor members.
(i) Endorsing and pledging cooperation
in support of a program of more extensive
research into the cause and control of the
diseases of dairy cattle and for providing the
necessary equipment, facilities and personnel
for this purpose, to the Florida Agricultural
Experiment Station of the University of Flori-
da.
(j) Requesting the association's Board of
Directors to consider possible means of financ-
ing a public relations and educational pro-
gram.
(k) Requesting the Board of Directors to
confer with Mr. John Scott, State Dairy Su-
pervisor, in an effort to develop new and
more practical regulations for the processing
and packaging of cottage cheese.
(1) Commending the Florida Dairy Coun-
cils, the State Board of Health, the Florida
Home Demonstration Department and the U.
S. Dept. of Agriculture for the splendid pro-
grams which they are conducting in dairy
foods nutrition education.

"BELL COWS" NAME SCOTT
NEW MEMBER
JOHN M. SCOTT, Chief Dairy Su-
pervisor of the Florida State Deparment
of Agriculture and former professor in
Dairying at the University of Florida,
was awarded membership in the Florida
Dairy Association's honorary leadership
fraternity, "The Order of Bell Cows"
during the 1954 F.D.A. convention. Pro-
fessor Scott became the 12th member of
this group of which Alf Nielsen is
President.


ALLIED TRADES MEMBERS REPRESENTED

AT 1954 FLORIDA CONVENTION


ADAMS PACKING ASSN., INC.
J. L. Coates, Winter Haven
BLOOMER BROS. CO.
Walter D. Williams, Ft. Lauderdale
BROWARD GRAIN & SUPPLY CO.
J. C. Hughes, Ft. Lauderdale
CALIF. SPRAY-CHEM. CORPN.
Earl L. Stripling Jr., Orlando
CREAMERY PACKAGE MFG. CO.
F. S. Brumley, Atlanta, Ga.
CROWN CORK & SEAL CO.
Harry Hoover, Jacksonville
DAIRYPAK, INC.
Hugh Macaulay, Waynesboro, Ga;
Jack Strack, Athens, Ga.
DENNERY, CHARLES, INC.
George A. Weill, New Orleans,
Ira Stone, Lakeland
DE RAEF CORPORATION
I. E. "Bud" Fear, Kansas City, Mo.
DIVERSE CORPORATION
E. E. Fulton, Jacksonville;
J. K. Bradford, Jr., Atlanta, Ga.
DOUGHNUT CORP. OF AMERICA
Eugene W. Tannenbaum, East Meadow,
N.Y.;
Paul Kellenberger, Jacksonville
EX-CELL-O CORPORATION'
Joe Radke, Atlanta, Ga.
FLA. CITRUS CANNERS COOP.
R. W. Bennett, Lake Wales
GENERAL MILLS, INC.
John W. Manning, Orlando
HACKNEY BROS. BODY CO.
James R. McLendon, Jr., Albany, Ga.;
T. J. Hackney, Jr., Wilson, N.C.
HECTOR SUPPLY CO.
R. D. Harrell, Hollywood
HELM SANITATION CHEMICALS
H. B. Ahlefeldt, Fernandina Beach
HOWARD FEED MILLS, INC.
L. W. Howard, Jr., Jacksonville
Paul W. King, Jacksonville
INTERNATIONAL PAPER CO.
W. M. Scott, Atlanta, Ga.
JOHNSON & JOHNSON
Elmer E. Kihlstrum, Evergreen Park, Ill.
JOHNSTON'S, ROBT. A.
Joe L. Hammons, Tampa
KIECKHEFER CONTAINER CO.
Robert J. Evans, Jacksonville
Murray A. Knowles. Jacksonville
KLENZADE PRODUCTS, INC.
Ray Salmons, N. Miami Beach
LIBERTY GLASS CO.
Harold O. Rogers, Atlanta, Ga.
LILY-TULIP CUP CORPN.
S. T. Tygart, Jacksonville;
F. W. Decklar, Tampa
LIMPERT BROS.
Clay Harris, Vineland, N. J.
LIQUID CARBONIC CORPN.
O. L. Bobo, Ponte Vedra Beach
LOWE, JOE, CORPN.
Jack Hartman, Cleveland, Fla.;
Paul Deutsch, Jacksonville


MANUFACTURING REPRESENTATIVES:
Abbey, Lawrence F., Jacksonville (Wyeth
Laboratories)
Demarest, James V., Deland (Bonewitz
Laboratories, Chemo Puro Mfg.
Corp., Hanovia Chemical & Mfg.
Co.)
Engers, Charlie, Salem. Va. (Bireley's)
Graham, E. G. (Don), Miami (Schaefer,
Inc.)
Jennings, James, Jacksonville (Bireley's,
Welch Mfg. Co., Morning Glory
Milk Powder Co.)
MARATHON CORPORATION
Bruce Larsen, Jacksonville
MARYLAND BAKING CO.
Martin Shaw, Atlanta, Ga.;
Jim Mott, Jacksonville
MATHIESON CHEMICAL CORPN.
Maury Duggan, Atlanta, Ga.;
J. Hugh Attaway, Atlanta, Ga.
MILLER-LENFESTEY SUPPLY CO.
Syd Lenfestey, Tampa
MILLER MACHINERY & SUPPLY CO.
Elroy Decker, Miami;
Ray Arkley, Miami
MOJONNIER BROS. CO.
Lee P. Bickenbach, Lakeland
MURPHY BODY WORKS
Seth G. Butner, Wilson, N. C.
OWENS-ILLINOIS GLASS CO.
Clark Comstock, Jacksonville
PASCO PACKING CO.
Joe Graham, Jacksonville
PENN. SALT MFG. CO.
A. K. Wells, Winchester, Ky.
PLENTY PRODUCTS, INC.
Ben E. Lisle, Decatur, Ga.
REDDI-WIP CO. OF FLA.
Aaron Block, Jacksonville
RIVERSIDE MANUFACTURING CO.
Jim Stewart, Coral Gables;
Dave Freeman, Jacksonville Beach
SAVAGE ARMS CORPN.
John Lowry, Atlanta, Ga.
SCHAEFER, INC.
Jess Kaiser, East Point, Ga.
SEALRIGHT CO.. INC.
J. K. Sheek, Mocksville, N. C.;
Robt. Meagher, Neptune Beach;
Jim Osborn, N. Miami
SPARTAN GRAIN & MILL CO.
A. A. Fretwell, Jacksonville
STANDARD PACKAGING CORPN.
Larry Hodge, Miami;
Bob Smith, Atlanta, Ga.
STEIN, HALL & CO.
Claude B. Wells, Jr., Asheville, N.C.
SUTHERLAND PAPER CO.
Rex Paxton, Kalamazoo, Mich.;
Jack Powell, Jacksonville
THATCHER GLASS MFG. CO.
Joe Stanley, Philadelphia, Pa.;
W. T. Love, Charlotte, N.C.
WHOLESALE BROKERAGE CO.
S. R. Pearson, Tampa.
WYANDOTTE CHEMICALS CORPN.
Henry H. McClanahan, Miami


JULY & AUGUST, 1954 37


DAIRY
SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT






TAMPA ORLANDO







Digestive System of

i The Newly Born Calf
PART II
By: GEORGE A. JEFFREYS,
The Rumelk Company, Salem, Virginia
THE CONDITIONS present in the diges-
tive system of the adult ruminant are
different from those present in the new-
ly born animal. In the latter, milk or milk
substitute is the sole source of nourish-
ment for the first week or more of life.
Now, milk cannot be digested in the nor-
mal manner in the rumen so nature pro-
vides a way to by-pass the rumen and
makes the nmilk flow into the stomach
called the abomasum which is designed
by nature to digest milk.
When a calf suckles milk, the milk
passes directly to the abomasum along a
channel or grove which also has open-
ings to the rumen. This opening is nor-
mally closed in a newly born calf and
later as it opens it automatically closes
when the calf suckles milk permitting
the milk to flow into the abomasum.
Soon after birth the opening to the
rumen gradually begins to open particu-
larly when the calf eats solid food such
as hay. It becomes important therefore
that the rumen start functioning as soon
as possible to assure the calf a healthy
growing start.
Under natural conditions the rumen
of a calf becomes inoculated by the calf
sucking the mothers tit which usually
has rumen bacteria adhering to it deposit-
ed by the mother cow licking herself.
Or, the mother cow in licking the calf
deposits the bacteria on the calf's mouth.
Very often however when a calf is
taken away from the mother too soon
or for various other reasons, then the
rumen may not become inoculated soon
enough and the growth of the calf be-
comes retarded. This is usually indicated
by a rough coat and pot belly condition.
This condition can be prevented by
transferring the cud of the cow to the
calf and is practiced by many dairymen
particularly in the old country. The Ohio
Agricultural Experiment Station has dem-
onstrated the value of such cud trans-
fers. However, it not always feasible or
practical to be transferring cuds to calves
at every feeding time.
At the Rumelk Experiment Station,
it was found that when rumen bacteria
were present in a calf feed at all times
the rumen of the calf became inoculated
much sooner. It was concluded that if
the rumen bacteria could be preserved
and included in a calf replacement feed,
then this would serve to inoculate a calf
much sooner without the trouble of mak-
ing messy cud transfers.
A method of preserving rumen bac-
teria on an enzyme digested cellulose base
was developed by the author. Such base


SEE INSIDE



The above is a reproduction of the Florida Cattlemen's Association "Eat More Beef"
Campaign folder. Inside the folder is found the following interesting facts on beef
consumption:
(a) The average INDIAN (of India) consumes 2 pounds of meat per year,
reaches an average height of 5' 1" and has a life span of 27 years.
(b) The average JAPANESE consumes 21/2 pounds of meat per year, reaches
an average height of 5' 2" and has a life span of 45 years.
(c) The average AMERICAN consumes 70 pounds of meat per year, reaches
an average height of 5' 10" and has a life span of 64 years.
(d) The average AUSTRALIAN consumes 246 pounds of meat per year,
reaches an average height of 6' and has a life span of 67 years.


is the natural habitat of the rumen bac-
teria. The process* provides the right
anaerobic conditions for preservation
along with stimulating enzymes. The cul-
ture is now universally used by veterinar-
ians** and in the calf replacement feed,
Rumelk.
A calf with a properly inoculated ru-
men has less trouble from digestive
scours. Such calf can start to eat hay
much sooner, often at the end of seven
days. Obviously, from what has been
said, a calf should not eat hay unless
it has the bacteria to digest the hay.
A hay eating calf grows a stronger and
larger frame that makes a larger animal
more economical.
When a calf replacement feed contains
preserved rumen bacteria it assures that
the calf will become inoculated as soon
as the rumen begins to open. In addi-
tion should the rumen cease functioning
or be sterilized because of disease or some
toxin or drug, it will become reinoculated
through the feed thus bringing about a
quick recovery of rumen function.
Preserved rumen culture therefore is
an important ingredient in a calf feed
chat will produce better and larger calves
with less nutritional disorders.
*Patents Pending
**Ru-Zyme

) One quart of MILK is 2 pounds of
Nature's most nearly perfect food.
) MILK is one of rhe outstanding food
buys today.


FIRST PRIZE 4-H ESSAY
(Continued from Page 8)
part can be grazed while the rest grows
and recovers from the last grazing.
In this way, hay crops and grass
silage can be harvested from the unused
portions. Good quality hay produced in
the summer months means lowered feed
bills in the winter months.
Better pastures mean that fewer acres
will support more cows and require less
fence and maintenance. In short, better
pastures combined with better manage-
ment mean larger profits and greater
prosperity for the dairy farmer.

WHY DRINK MORE MILK
(Continued from Page 9)
4. HELPS LOSE WEIGHT COM-
FORTABLY: Whole milk should be a
part of reducing diets because it keeps
protein, mineral, and vitamin levels high
while supplying only a fraction of the
calories you need.
5. "OVER 35 ENERGY: The need
for milk for persons over 35 is almost
as great as that of a child.
6. FOOD BARGAIN: Drinking at
least three glasses of milk every day is
one of your best and cheapest health
habits. Milk's value to you is far greater
than its cost.
(From Georgia Dairy News Bulletin)


38 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS







Mojonnier Representative

Mojonnier Bros. Co., Chicago, large
manufacturers of dairy and food pro-
cessing equipment, announce the appoint-
ment of Kenneth D. Pylant as sales
engineer for Flori-
da. A former in-
structor in the State
of Florida education
department, he was
appointed d i s t r i ct
supervisor for the
Florida Live Stock
Sanitary Board in
S1948 and served in
PYLANT that capacity for al-
most four years. He
later served in the Production Marketing
Administration, at Fayetteville, Tenn. A
graduate of Tennessee Tech, with a B.S.
Degree in Agricultural Science, Pylant is
well equipped to serve the growing list
of Mojonnier customers in this southern
area.


"Miss Universe" Likes Milk!

) HERE'S TO . "good health" and
"beauty from nutrition" is what Miss
Jackie Loughery, Miss Universe of
1953, said to Mr. Raymond Brack,
Vice-President of Milk Industry Founda-
tion, as she drank "a toast to 1954
Dairy Month".
Miss Laughery, formerly Miss Brook-
lyn and Miss New York State, says
she is a strong advocate of "at least
3 glasses of milk a day" for good
health and good looks.


ADAMS PACKING ASSN., INC.
Citrus Pulp, Citrus Meal, Citrus Molasses
Jim Coates, Sales Mgr., By-Products Division
Auburndale, Fla. Phone 8-7061




SINC. Da. Rich
Chocolate Products -Fruits and Flavors
Ed Salvatore
205 Come Street, Tampa Ph. 85-6902

CHARLES DENNERY, INC.
New Orleans
Ice Cream Coating, Fruits and Flavors
Ira Stone 1026 E. Walnut St.
Ph. Mutual 5-3284
LAKELAND, FLA.

JAMES V. DEMAREST
MFRS. REPRESENTATIVE
Fine Chemicals, Vitamins and Minerals
Chemo Pure Mfg. Corp.
Hanovia Chemical & Mfg. Co.
P. 0. Box 787 Deland, Fla.

GENERAL MILLS, INC.
Dairy Equipment aad Supplies
John W. Manning, Phone 48-1703
2515 Galiano St. Coral Gables, Fla.


VETERINARY MEDICINES
Sold direct to the dairyman
Fred Becker Ben Zirin, Ph.G


GULF PAPER COMPANY, INC.
Ice Cream (Linerless) Cartons,
Butter Cartons
J. H. McVoy
50 E. Magnolia St. Pensacola, Fla.


a DOUGLAS J. HEADFORD
FLA. REPRESENTATIVE
Green Spot Orangeade Concentrate
616 Jessamine Ave.- Phone 2-0148
Daytona Beach, Fla.

HELM SANITATION CHEMICALS
HANS B. AHLEFELDT
Phone 3-5721
Union Terminal Warehouse
Jacksonville, Fla.

JIM JENNINGS
MFRS. REPRESENTATIVE
Morning Glory Non Fat Milk Solids
Bireley's Dairy Orange Base
Welch Mfg. Co. Ice Cream Spoons
Route 9, Box 356 Jacksonville, Fla.

ROBERT A. JOHNSON CO.
Dairy Chocolate & Cocoa Products
J. L. Hammons
916 S. Rome Ave. Tampa, Fla.

KIECKHEFER CONTAINER CO.
Pure-Pak Paper Milk Bottles
R. J. Evans M. A. Knowles
Phone 6-1334
4700 Pearl St. Jacksonville, Fla.


S. H. MAHONEY EXTRACT CO.
Vanilla Products
D. C. Mulligan, Florida Representative
221 E. Cullerton Rd. Chicago 16, Ill.

NASH-KELVINATOR CORPN.
ICE CREAM CABINETS
Wm. C. Mayfield
Howell House Suite 202 Atlanta, Ga.

NATIONAL PECTIN PRODUCTS CO.
Ice Cream Stabilizers & Emulsifiers
Pectin Stabilizers for Ices, Sherbets & Fruits
J. C. Head, Phone Norfolk, Va. 63-3939
RFD No. 1, Box 48, Bayside, Va.

NEWTH-MORRIS BOX CORP.
Ice Cream, Popsicle, and
Miscellaneous Packers
Phone: 3-9779
Box 3854, Station "F"
Jacksonville, Fla.

OWENS-ILLINOIS GLASS CO.
Douglas Milk Bottles
C. V. Parmalee C. N. Comstock
1102 Barnett Bldg. Jax. 2, Fla.
Phone 3-6134-5

PAUL-LEWIS LABORATORIES, INC.
Lactivase-For the Prevention of oxidized flavor
in bottled milk, ice cream, storage cream
FLAVOR-PAK FOODS, INC., Miami, Fla.
MILLER MACHINERY & SUPPLY COMPANY
Miami and Jacksonville, Fla.

PENN SALT MANUFACTURING
CO.
BK Powder Cleaners Acids
Bottle Alkalies
JOE FOSS
788 Waring Road Memphis, Tenn.

RIVERSIDE MANUFACTURING
COMPANY
MOULTRIE, GEORGIA
Masterbilt Uniforms
James M. Stewart Dave Freeman

SCHAEFER ICE CREAM CABINETS
MILK COOLERS
Representative E. G. "Don" Graham
Distributor Dudley Cawthon, Inc.
1034 N.W. 22nd St., Phone 82-1671, Miami

STANDARD PACKAGING CORPN.
Tamper Proof Seals Flexible Vacuum
Packages Liner Materials
Larry Hodge
1121 duPont Bldg. Miami, Fla.

THATCHER GLASS MFG. CO., INC.
Glass Milk Containers
W. T. LOVE, Florida Representative
3221 Pinehurst P1. Charlotte 7, N.C.

UNIVERSAL MILKING MACHINE
DIVISION
Pail-less (Pipe line) Milking Machines
L. H. Hall Factory Representative
5240 N.W. 7th Avenue Miami, Fla.


JULY & AUGUST, 1954 39


ALLIED TRADES MEMBERS
FLORIDA DAIRY ASSOCIATION

Special Card Ad Directory


I# I










Florida Dairy Association Announces



Additional 1954 Membership Dues Received


Abramovich, Rudolph, Dairy
Abrams, John, Dairy
Adams, C. J., Dairy
Adams, C. R., Dairy
Adkinson, E. W., Dairy
Adkinson, John, Dairy
Alfar, Creamery
Anderson, Harry, Dairy
Anderson, M. A. Dairy
Ard, F. D., Dairy
Arrow D Dairy
Armil's Farm Dairy
Ball, Braden, Dairy
Barlow, J. B., Dairy
Barker, J. S., Dairy
Barrow, Ira, Dairy
Barrow, W. R., Dairy
Bassett's Dairy
Beach Park Dairy
Bixby, W. K., Dairy
Bishop, V. E., Dairy
Borden's Dairy (all Fla.)
Borden Southern Co.
Bowie, Albert, Dairy
Boutwell's Dairy
Bowman, R. F., Dairy
Breezy Acres Dairy
Brewton, A. M., Dairy
Brown, Harvey, Dairy
Brown, J. Martin, Dairy
Bryant, M. M., Dairy
Buckeye Dairy
Bundersen, H. W., Dairy
Burnett & Clark Dairy
Burnett & Pipkin Dairy
Butler, R. K., Dairy
Bylsma, Frank, Dairy
C. & M. Dairy
Calhoun, A. C., Dairy
Campbell, A. B., Dairy
Carlton, J. T., Dairy
Chavers, Ben Dairy
Chavers, E. M., Dairy
Chavers, J. W., Dairy
Chavers, T. L., Dairy
Chestnut Dairy
Clark, C. R., Dairy
Clary, M. M., Dairy
Cleveland's Dairy
Click, D. S., Dairy
Clovd, J. S., Dairy
Coats, Turner, Dairy
Collins, H. E., Dairy
Combee, Orris, Dairy
Coody, C. A., Dairy
Cooley, H. S., Dairy
Cooper, N. P., Jr., Dairy
Corley Island Dairy
Cowling, W. B., Dairy
Creighton, C. F., Dairy
Creighton, Clyde, Dairy
Creighton, Robert, Dairy
Crump, J. E., Dairy
Danson, Wm., Dairy
Datson, Clarence, Dairy
Datson, Glenn, Dairy
Day, R. E., Dairy
Dennis, F. L., Dairy
Dennis, W. C., Dairy
Dinsmore Dairy
Dooley, J. Roy, Dairy
Dothan Ice Cream Co.
Doub, Frank, Dairy


Dover Dairy
Dressel's Dairy Farm
Dubrock, John, Dairy
Eicher, Leland, Dairy
Eicher, Ward, Dairy
Ellison, Floyd, Dairy
Fairglade Dairy
Fairglade Jersey Dairy
Farless Dairy
Farrar, F. H., Dairy
Farrar, W. R., Dairy
Fellsmere Dairy
Florida Dairies Company
Florida Dairy, Inc.
Flowers, Ira, Dairy
Folsom, W. E., Dairy
Fortner & Glidewell Dairy
Foster Brothers Dairy
Foy, C. H., Dairy
Froehlich, E. F., Dairy
Galbreath, W. K., Dairy
Garrett, Claude H., Dairy
Gerber, C. 0., Dairy
Goolsby, R. G., Dairy
Graham's Dairy
Gray, Tom, Dairy
Greenland Dairy
Grimes, Lawrence, Dairy
Griswold, John, Dairy
Gustafson Dairy
Hadden, J. M., Dairy
Hagood, H. H., Dairy
Hall & Boyd Dairy
Halley, Wess, Dairy
Hammond, A. L., Dairy
Hammond, W. L., Dairy
Harmony Hill Farm Dairy
Harms, Harry, Dairy
Harms, Marshall, Dairy
Harrison, R. E., Dairy
Hathcock, C. H., Dairy
Hayes, S. M., Dairy
Heibert, Ben, Dairy
Hemberger, J. C., Dairy
Hill, H. A., Dairy
Hillcrest Dairy
Holly Hill Dairy
Hood's Dairy, St. Pete.
How-Ann Dairy
Hull, L. B., Dairy
Hurst, L. R., Dairy
Jantz & Winger Dairy
Jennings, R. R., Dairy
Johnson Bros. Dairy
Johnson, C. Ray, Dairy
Johnson, George F., Dairy
Johnson, H. P., Dairy
Johnson, I. S., Dairy
Jones Dairy, Bartow
Jones, Marshall E., Dairy
Jones, Mrs. T. L. & Son, Dairy
Joyner, Joseph, Dairy
Kelly, J. F., Dairy
Kersey, J. E., Dairy
Kirton, Dudley, Dairy
Knuth, O. C., Dairy
Kohen, M. M., Dairy
LaBelle Dairy
Lake View Dairy
Land O'Sun Creamery
Lay Laine Guernsey Dairy
Lee, T. G., Dairy
Lepley, Albert, Dairy


Liles, M. J., Dairy
Linneman, Harry H., Dairy
Long, C. L., Dairy
Lowery, H. H., Dairy
Lucas, C. L., Dairy
Lunsford, J. C., Dairy
Lunsford, R. L., Dairy
M & W Dairy
Madis Stock Farm Dairy
Marbrook Dairy
Martin, A. 0., Dairy
McArthur Farms, Inc.
McArthur Jersey Farm Dairy
McCarter Quality Dairy
Products
McClamrock, G. B., Dairy
McCurdy, R. E., Dairy
McDaniel Dairy
McMullen, Jack, Dairy
Melear, C. R., Dairy.
Melear, T. F., Dairy
Melvin, Edgar M., Dairy
Miller, F. B., Dairy
Miami Creamery Buyers
Mininger, E. B., Dairy
Mitchell, F. E., Dairy
Moncrief, P. A., Dairy
Moore's Dairy
Mora, E. M., Dairy
Myers, E. H., Dairy
New Palm Dairy
Oak Hill Dairy
O'Farrell, John, Dairy
Owens, T. S., Dairy
Pace, E. G., Dairy
Palmetto Dairy
Parker, D. B., Dairy
Pearce, Elmo, Dairy
Peacock, Drew, Dairy
Peerless Ice Cream Co.
Penn, I. L., Dairy
Pennwood Farm Dairy
Pensacola Dairy
Perret's, G. A., Dairy
Perry, H. D., Dairy
Peters, Francis, Dairy
Peters, Orval, Dairy
Peters, Wilbur, Dairy
Phelps, Wyllys I., Dairy
Pineland Dairy
Pipkin, R. O., Dairy
Poole, Ode L., Dairy
Polar Ice Cream Co.
Puritan Miami Beach Dairy
Purvis, R. A., Dairy
Raattama, Henry, Dairy
Rainbow Dairy
Ramer, J. R., Dairy
Ranch Dairy
Reagan, E. L. & Son, Dairy
Richardson, J. P., Dairy
Roberts Dairy Co.
Rollo & Bell Dairy
Royal Dairy Farms, Inc.
Russell, Claud, Dairy
Russell, Robert, Dairy
Russell, Roy, Dairy
St. Andrews Bay Dairy
Salter, Tom D., Dairy
Sargeant Dairy Farms
Sasser, B. F., Dairy
Schack, M. A., Dairy
Schmid, Charles F., Dairy


Schmid Guernsey Dairy
Schmid Milk Co.
Schneider, Raymond, Dairy
Scott, W. J., Dairy
Seale, R. S., Dairy
Selby Dairy Products
Sellers Guernsey Dairy
S.E.Z. Dairy
Sheffield, Leslie, Dairy
Shepard, Marco, Dairy
Siglefouse, A. B., Dairy
Silas, F. D., Dairy
Silcox, J. E., Dairy
Simmons, W. J., Dairy
Skinner's Dairy
Skaff & Sons Dairy Farm
Smiley Bros. Dairy
Smith, Jake, Dairy
Smith, M. C., Dairy
Smith, T. L., Dairy
Snapper Creek Dairy
Spanish Dairy
Southern Dairies, Jacksonville
Southern Dairies, Miami
Stacey, Ralph, Dairy
Stanton, R. S., Dairy
Stebbins, Elmer, Dairy
Steele, B. R., Dairy
Stewart, J. T., Dairy
Stoltzfus, J. J., Dairy
Stuart, J. K., Dairy
Sunny Brook Dairy
Sunny Brook Dairy Farm
Superior Ice Cream Co.,
(All Florida)
Swindell, P. A., Dairy
Suarez, L. B., Dairy
Sunday, E. C. & A. E., Dairy
Sunday, E. V., Dairy
Sunset Dairy
Taylor, J. S., Dairy
Thomas, C. W., Dairy
Thornhill Dairy
Tower Dairy
Trail Dairy
Turner, Bert, Dairy
Urban. Fred, Dairy
Valrico Dairy
Van Landingham, J.C., Dairy
Van Pelt, J. L., Dairy
Velda Corporation (All Fla.)
Velda Dairy Farm
Vero Beach Dairy
Vidak, W. S., Dairy
Vucovich, Clinton, Dairy
Wakefield, W. H., Dairy
Walker, Ben, Dairy
Walters, E. M., Dairy
Waters, W. D., Dairy
Waters, W. T., Dairy
White Belt Dairy Farms, Inc.
Whitfield, Wilson, Dairy
Whitfield Bros. Dairy
Wickersham, G. R., Dairy
Wiggins, W. C., Dairy
Williams, C. F., Dairy
Winter Haven Jersey Dairy
Wimmer Dairy
Wise, Macon, Dairy
Woodberry, W. P., Dairy
Yates, Evans, Dairy
Yaun, F. D., Dairy
York, D. W., Dairy


40 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


I _







Golden Guernsey Producers


- Still Living


That Have Produced


Over 50,000


Pounds


of Milk


AT DINSMORE


DINSMORE MAXMOST FLORENCE

Highest yearly record...................................... 14,060


Lifetime record ..


.....................106,365


DINSMORE MAJESTIC GILDA
State Champion, Jr. 4 yr old
Highest yearly record ..................................... 18,343
Lifetime record ..... .............................. 101,344


Dinsm ore Victress ........................
Dinsmore Medico Patsy ...........
Dinsmore Glorious Dewdrop
Dinsmore Faymost Irene.........
Dinsmore Maxmost Vesta
Dinsmore Medico Prissy .........
Dinsmore Princess Nellie......
Dinsmore Princess Muffett ......
Dinsmore Maxmost Rubella ...
Dinsmore Majestic Verlaine...
Dinsmore Holtra Emily ............
Dinsmore Valmax Fayoline...
Dinsmore Medico Ballet ........
Dinsmore Medico Rilma ............
Dinsmore Holtra Bertelle .........
Dinsmore Queen Fazia ............
Dinsm ore Lelah ..........................
Dinsmore Gay Hester ...............
Dinsmore Queen Florette
Dinsmore Majestic Piety........
Dinsmore Royal Willow ............
Dinsmore Majestic Simone ....


........................ 1 15 ,2 0 8
........................ 9 8,5 80
....................... 92,679
......................... 9 0 ,6 0 9
......................... 8 2,8 9 0
......................... 8 2 ,6 6 1
......................... 8 2 ,0 7 0
......................... 7 6,4 55
....................... 7 5,396
........................ 7 4 ,2 9 1
........................ 7 3,7 95
......................... 7 3 ,5 15
... ..................... 7 2 ,16 8
.................... 7 1,4 30
......................... 7 1,13 6
......................... 7 0 ,6 6 8
........................ 6 9 ,4 6 0
......................... 6 8,6 6 6
...-........... 68,522
.- ........ .... 67,743
.................... 67,422
........................ 6 5 ,1 16


Dinsmore
Dinsmore
Dinsmore
Dinsmore
Dinsmore
Dinsmore
Dinsmore
Dinsmore
Dinsmore
Dinsmore
Dinsmore
Dinsmore


Royal Justine ..............................
Queen Gertrude ..........................
Valmax Edith ................
Medico Image ................................
Princess Juniata ..........................
Majestic Leatrice ...........................
Empress Karen .................................
Queen Lettie.
Royal Julttie ....................................
R o y a l Ju le ..........................................
Maxmost Aggie ............................
Royal Flame .................................
Queen Precious ..............................


Dinsmore Maxmost Pride .......................
Dinsmore Royal Buttercup ....................
Dinsmore Valor Phoebe ...........................
Dinsmore Royal Dorcas ..........................
Dinsmore Queen Eden .............................
Dinsmore Maxmost Honoria .............
Dinsmore Holtra Dorothy .....................
Dinsmore Valmax Roselle ....................
Dinsmore Holtra Wren ...........................
Dinsmore Royal Emerola ......................


IF YOUR HERD CAN STAND MORE LONG-TIME PRODUCTION


SELECT


Dinsmore Guernseys
FEDERAL ACCREDITED 57790 J. B. LANOUX, Herdsman NEGATIVE TO BANG'S


Dinsmore Farms


10 miles north of Jacksonville
Near U. S. 1


EARL A. JOHNSON CHARLES F. JOHNSON


Dinsmore, Florida
BRADY S. JOHNSTON


........................... 64 ,5 85
......................... 6 3,3 17
........................... 6 3,124
.......................... 6 2,807
........................... 59,0 30
........................... 57 ,5 24
........................... 56 ,59 3
..................... ... .. 5 6,5 89
......................... 5 6,37 3
.......................... 55 ,6 54
......................... 55 ,6 44
........................... 5 5,3 0 2
........................... 54 ,2 83
......................... 54 ,189
.............. 54 ,124
........................... 54 ,10 3
........................... 5 3,9 6 5
........................... 5 3,37 6
.......................... 5 2,67 3
........................... 5 1,94 5
........................... 5 1,6 84
.......................... 5 1,5 5 9


V. C. JOHNSON































HELPS TURN CALVES

INTO GOOD PRODUCERS

Feed Security Calf Starter until the twelfth week-then it's
Security Calf Grower to help you grow growth calves of
large size with sleek coats and over-all healthy appearance-
the type of herd replacements that are good producers.
Security Calf Grower contains trace minerals to aid sound
bone development... adequate amounts of Vitamins A
and D.
Let Security Calf Grower help you turn your calves into
producers.




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