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Title: Florida dairy news
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00082035/00023
 Material Information
Title: Florida dairy news
Physical Description: 12 v. : illus. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Dairy Industry Association
Publisher: Cody Publications for Florida Dairy Industry Association.
Place of Publication: Kissimmee Fla
Publication Date: May-June 1954
Frequency: bimonthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Dairying -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Cattle   ( lcsh )
Milk   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-12, no. 1; Nov. 1950-Spring, 1962.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00082035
Volume ID: VID00023
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01386090
issn - 0426-5696

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover 1
        Front cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Main
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Back Cover
        Page 33
        Page 34
Full Text






















y r o r I a t a U i o n
ronlamutiotn
EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT @S.dt r of NTo2 TALLAHASSEE
WHEREAS, for almost two decades the importance of milk and dairy foods to the health and well-being of people
of all ages has been recognized and emphasized by the o observance throughout the Nation of the month of June
as DAIRY MONTH, and
WHEREAS, the House and Senate of the Florida State Legislature have by the adoption of a "joint resolution"
established official recognition of the essential nature and economic importance of milk and dairy foods and the
importance to the State's welfare of the dairy industry, which now supplies in full the State's Grade A milk supply,
by designating June as Dairy Month, and
WHEREAS, the Florida Dairy Association in cooperation with like organizations throughout the Nation, annually
sets aside the month of June as a period in which the health and life giving qualities of milk, as nature's most near-
ly perfect food, can be emphasized;
NOW THEREFORE, I, Charley E. Johns, by virtue of the authority vested in me as Acting Governor of the State
of Florida, proclaim the month of June, 1954,

airy ollonti?
in Florida and call upon our people, our civic organizations, our numerous municipalities and upon the various
agricultural representatives and agencies of the State, to cooperate in any way possible in its observance .
IN WITNESS THEREOF, I have hereby set my hand and caused to be affixed the Great
i, ~Seal of the State of Florida, at Tallahassee, the Capital, this 10th day of May, A. D. 1954.
ATTEST
? A C h(ia J ohN

Secretary of State Acting Governor


Ne







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in a ilkin
PAROR 0


<47


BABSON
BROS. CO.


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OF GEORGIA


1018 CRESCENT


COPYRIGHT 1953 BABSON BROS CO.
AVENUE N.E., ATLANTA, GEORGIA











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PEED


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VAL MASSEY DAIRY,


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. 0 0


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produced 13,500 Ibs. of
milk during her last lacta-
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ing this record with feeding
of 1 to 4 PURINA MILK
CHOW with pasture.

I


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This 18 /2 months old grade -
Holstein heifer due to fresh-
en at 23 months has been
raised from calfhood on the
PURINA growing heifer
feeding program, with pas-
ture.


1. DRY COWS
This well-conditioned 9-year
old grade Guernsey cow,
due to freshen soon, is on
the PURINA D & F feeding
program with pasture.






2. CALVES
This large 41/2 months old
grade Holstein calf was
started on PURINA NURS-
ING SHOW and CALF STAR-
TENA and is now fed D &
F CHOW.


m-P rp -'; -


Mr. Massey reports that he is very much
pleased with the results of the PURINA
feeding program with his dairy herd.
His 40 head of milking cows averaged
271/2 lbs. per cow, per day last month,
with 8 first calf heifers in the group.


Mr. Massey says that he raises all his
herd replacements on artificial breed-
ing, keeps complete breeding and milk
production records, and follows the
complete PURINA dairy feeding pro-
gram.


RALSTON PURINA COMPANY

MIAMI TAMPA CAIRY
CHOWS



2 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


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EDITORIALS


Meeting Dairy Industry Problems

By Cooperation and Teamwork

A story is told of an enterprising rooster, who upon discovering an
ostrich egg in a neighboring yard, called the hens of his flock over to
see the unusual product. As the astonished hens looked on, the rooster
was said to have remarked, "Understand now, ladies, that I am not com-
plaining. I only wanted you to see what is being done in other commun-
ities."
For more than fifty years Florida dairymen with the excellent help
of local, State and Federal Agricultural Agencies have been very busy
in their own back yards, endeavoring to solve the problems of dairy
farming peculiar to this region.
Only within the last few years has the dairy industry of the State
come of age with the achievement of the twin goals of "top quality
Grade A milk production" as well as a "volume of home milk production"
adequate to meet the demands of the State for fluid milk consumption.
Now that milk production "know how" is producing more milk than
the current demand for fluid milk in the State, there are signs of a
panicky atmosphere in the industry. We think the situation calls for a
bit of looking around with a possible comparison of our Florida condi-
tions with those of some other communities.
For instance, a report from a certain well-known dairy State, which
recently came to our attention, shows the home consumption of milk
within the State to be only 15% to 20% of the total milk produced in
that State, and this percentage includes both milk for fluid consumption
and for manufacturing.
This situation, as compared to Florida's current milk supply prob-
lems, reminds us of the man who complained that he had no shoes but
saw his situation in a different light when he discovered a man who had
no feet.
As we see it, Florida's dairy production problems and other problems
of the industry can be solved through "teamwork and cooperation among
those who are engaged in it". It is a job that will take courage and work
and expense.
May we suggest a careful analysis of our problems, the development
of action programs, the closing of our ranks and a resolve to march bold-
ly forward.
Prominent national dairy industry leaders say that the problem of
the industry is not "over production" but "under consumption of milk
and milk products". If this is true, the program ahead for the dairy in-
dustry would seem to be clearly one of education, advertising and sales,
both by individual dairies and by cooperative local, state-wide and in-
dustry-wide programs.


Meeting Another Dairy Industry Problem
National surveys show that approximately 30 MILLION adults in the U. S. are
overweight. Millions of these adults are falling for popular diet fads which do not
include dairy products.
To help correct the spreading idea that dairy foods are fattening, the National
Dairy Council sponsored a research study at Michigan State College which proved
that generous amounts of all dairy products can be safely and successfully used in
Reducing Diets.
The Dairy Council is doing a fine job telling this truthful story to the leaders of
the country who largely influence public food habits. It is up to our industry, however,
to tell the story to consumers.
In order to do this, the National Dairy Council has made available a handy inter-
esting Weight Reduction booklet based on the Michigan State Research Study. The
booklet should help correct the mistaken public impression that dairy foods are fat-
tening-a major problem of our industry.
We strongly suggest that all dairies obtain a quantity of these attractive booklets
and furnish them to consumers wherever possible.


VOL. 4 NO. 3
MAY-JUNE 1954
BI-MONTHLY


THE
FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS
E. T. LAY, Editor & Business Manager


Official Publication of
Florida Dairy Association
W. HERMAN BOYD, President
Florida Guernsey Cattle Club

Florida Jersey Cattle Club
Florida Association
of Milk Sanitarians

DIRECTORS
FLORIDA DAIRY ASSOCIATION
E. T. LAY, Executive Director
Producers
GEORGE F. JOHNSON, WVest Palm Beach
Vice President & Chairman
"Producers Council"
D. WAYNE WEBB, Tampa
JOHN SERGEANT, Lakeland
L. B. HULL, Micanopy
BILL GRAHAM, Miami
JOHN T. ADKINSON, Pensacola
IRA BARROW, New Smyrna Beach
J. H. ADAMS, Jacksonville
J. D. FUQUA, Altha
JOHN MCMULLEN, Clearwater
Distributors
CLIFF D. WAYNE, Miami
Vice President & Chairman
"Distributors Council"
HERMAN BURNETT, Bradenton
J. N. McARTHUR, Miami
H. CODY SKINNER, Jacksonville
JOHN M. HOOD, St. Petersburg
W. J. BARRITT, JR., Tampa
J. F. W. ZIRKLEBACH, Pensacola
JOHN TRIPSON, Vero Beach
GEORGE BOUTWELL, Lake Worth
CLAUDE KELLY, Daytona Beach
Additional Directors
W. HERMAN BOYD, President, Miami
F. W. DECKLAR, President
"Alligator Club," Tampa
WILMER BASSETT, Past-Pres., Monticello
THE FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS is
published bi-monthly by the Florida Dairy
Association, 220 Newnan St., Jackson-
ville, Florida. Subscription price of $1.00
a year. Entered as second class mail at
the Post Office at Jacksonville, Fla.,
under Act of March 3, 1879, as amended.
Business and Editorial office, 220 New-
nan Street, Jacksonville.
NATIONAL EDITORIAL
b I ASSOc lcATIdN


Member Florida Press Association


MAY & JUNE, 1954 3


111111








FORWARD


In 1954


With The


Florida


Dairy


Industry



Milk Producers,
Producer -
Distributors,
Distributors
& Allied Trades


UNITED

Since

1946



In the


Florida

Dairy

Association


State Dairy Extension Specialist
Says Milk Is A Food Bargain
"Milk is a big bargain. There is no surplus of milk products in Florida. And
people in the United States could wipe out the national surplus by drinking only
one-fourth of a glass more a day."
C. W. Reaves, State Extension Dairyman with the Florida Agricultural Extension
Service, made these startling statements recently in a discussion
at the University of Florida College of Agriculture of the re-
lationship of Florida to the two-point plan advocated by Secre-
tary of Agriculture, Ezra Taft Benson, for improving the na-
tional dairy situation.
"Increasing milk consumption-making people thirsty for
milk, as Secretary Benson puts it in his first point-is a job
of providing milk with a delightful fresh milk flavor and of
showing home makers its value in comparison with other foods,"
Reaves believes.
"Flavor is the biggest incentive in what we cat, and milk and REAVES
dairy products take first place, if produced and cared for prop-
erly," asserted Reaves. "Florida has high sanitary requirements and the butterfat test
of our market milk is higher than the national average. Florida's dairy farms all have
refrigeration and other modern dairy requirements."
Reaves quoted from an Iowa State Agricultural College study to show that fresh
fluid whole milk, while more expensive than milk products, is still a food bargain.
According to this study, the nutrients in a quart of milk cost 42 cents if obtained from
other foods, while as milk, they cost only 26 or 27 cents in Florida.
The Extension Dairyman said that while surplus dairy products now held in
storage by the Commodity Credit Corporation, roughly equal to eight billion pounds
of fresh milk, are a huge amount that should not be allowed to increase, it is only
six percent of the nation's total annual milk production. The drinking of only two
more glasses of milk a week by every person in the United States would absorb it.
"This extra pint per person per week is certainly needed in the national diet," he
added. "While only 15 cents of the national food dollar is spent for milk and dairy
products, they supply 20 percent of the Vitamin A, 25 percent of the protein, 50
percent of the riboflavin, and 75 percent of the calcium in the total national diet,
according to a Cornell University study."
Referring to Secretary Benson's second point emphasizing the culling of low-
producing dairy cattle, Reaves said that since the dairy industry in Florida is not con-
tributing to the national surplus of manufactured dairy products, culling should be
practiced only to the extent indicated by good herd management.
Reaves explained that all milk produced in Florida is sold as grade "A" milk
which is largely used for bottled milk and cream, with some going into ice cream mix.
There is no commercial production of butter, cheese or dry non-fat milk solids in the
state.
Grade "A" Milk In Florida
Milk commonly referred to as "surplus" in the state is actually grade "A" milk
which temporarily exceeds fluid milk demand, he continued. The seasonal demand
for milk varies widely because of the tourist business and in order to produce suffi-
cient milk for the periods of greatest demand, it is necessary to have considerable
milk above fluid milk needs at other periods of the year. Reduced prices paid for
this surplus milk emphazise the need for efficient-producing cows to show a profit
on a year-round basis.
Reaves said that while the level of production for culling should be determined
for each herd, a study of DHIA production and feed cost records shows that the
yearly production level figure should be between 4,500 and 5,000 pounds of average
test milk, (523 and 581 gallons) per cow. As these figures are based on average-
testing milk, low-testing cows should produce approximately one-sixth to one-quarter
more milk than high-testing cows to justify rentention in the herd, he explained.
Complete culling on this standard of 523 to 581 gallons per cow per year would
reduce the number of cows in herds faster than normal turnover, Reaves continued.
As a result, either there would be fewer cows to be milked or it would be necessary
to add more replacements. This should be determined in the individual herds accord-
ing to expected demand for milk, and the number of replacement heifers available or
the cost of purchasing replacement cows of profitable production ability.
Reaves pointed out that culling should be carried out along with other efficient
herd practices, including feed production, good care of cows and better breeding.


4 0 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS






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MAY & JUNE, 1954 5









DAIRY NEWS DIGEST


Members of the Dairy Industry throughout the State are invited to please
send to the "Florida Dairy News" all news about dairies, dairying and the
good people who devote their time, talents and money to this great industry.
-The Editor.


NATIONAL DAIRY CONVENTIONS
IN ATLANTIC CITY FOR '54
The 1954 Annual Convention of the
Milk Industry Foundation and the In-
ternational Association of Ice Cream
Manufacturers have been announced to
return to Atlantic City for the week of
October 24-29.
The biennial Dairy Equipment and
Supply Exposition of the Dairy Indus-
try Supply Association will also be held
throughout the week.
The Milk Industry Foundation meet-
ing is scheduled first from the 25th to
27th with the Ice Cream meeting to run
from the 27th through the 29th.
Headquarters for the Ice Cream group
will be at the Ambassador Hotel while
the Milk Foundation headquarters will
be at the Chalfonte-Haddon Hall.
Room reservation forms can be secur-
ed from either of the two national groups.
ATTEND ICE CREAM CONFERENCE
Theo Datson, Borden's Datson Dairy,
Orlando, Paul E. Reinhold, Foremost
Dairies, and Florida Dairy Association
Secretary E. T. Lay attended the annual
Spring Conference of the International
Association of Ice Cream Manufacturers,
held in Phoenix, Arizona recently.
Mr. Datson and Mr. Reinhold, both
directors of the Ice Cream Association,
participated in a series of directors' meet-
ings in addition to the general conference
while Lay participated in a conference of
state and national dairy association execu-
tives.
Burnett Dairy, Bradenton
Sold To Hood's Dairy
Herman Burnett, operator with his
father and brother of the Burnett Dairy
Farms at Bradenton since 1927, has an-
nounced the sale of the dairy plant to
the Hood's Dairy of St. Petersburg.
The Burnetts will continue operation
of their three dairy farms which include
several hundred acres of improved pas-
tures and approximately 800 dairy cows.
John Hood, oldest of three Hood Bro-
thers, with their father-E. M. Hood,
Sr.-operated the Hood's Dairy of St.
Petersburg, one of Florida's oldest inde-
pendent dairies which was established by
the father of E. M. Hood, Sr.
Both John Hood, who will manage the
Bradenton plant, and Herman Burnett
have been active leaders in the Florida
dairy industry for many years and both
are now serving as directors of the Flor-
ida Dairy Association.

6 FLORIDA DAIRY N


New Office And Plant
For Vero Beach Dairy
The Vero Beach Dairy, owned and op-
erated by John Tripson, has a new plant
and office building under construction
which the announcement said was made
necessary by the increased demands of
the Vero Beach area for milk and milk
products.
"Farm Fresh Dairy Products" is the
new slogan adopted by the dairy. Ed
Frebick is associated with Mr. Tripson
as plant manager.

Delray Beach Dairy Sold
To Circle-F Dairy Ranch
The Circle F. Dairy Ranch at Delray
Beach, owned by the Land O'Sun Dairy,
Inc. of Miami Beach, has acquired the
O. H. Anderson Dairy Farm, east of Del-
ray Beach, which includes approximately
950 acres of land and about 1,000 head
of dairy cattle.
The purchase price was reported to be
$260,000.00.

Lake Wales Dairy Sold To Borden's
Announcement has recently been made
of the sale of Kincaid's Lake Wales Dairy
to Borden's Dairy, Inc. with Florida
headquarters in Tampa.
The Lake Wales Dairy was founded in
1916, acquired by James Kincaid in 1917
and has been operated by the Kincaid
family since that time.
J. C. Kincaid will continue as manager
of the dairy.

Ft. Myers Beef Ranch
Converted To Dairying
Perry Knott, owner of a 300 acre beef
cattle ranch near Ft. Myers, is converting
his operation to dairy farming, according
to announcement of the Lee County Farm
Agent.
Knott formerly operated a dairy farm
and plant in Michigan and plans exten-
sive dairy pasture development and use
of grass silage.

New McArthur Dairy Plant
Planned At Palm Beach
Construction of a new million dollar
milk processing and distribution plant at
West Palm Beach was recently announced
as planned by the McArthur Jersey Farm
Dairy in Miami. A 20-acre tract of land
has been purchased and construction of
the plant is expected to begin within a
year, according to the Palm Beach Post.

EWS


THE FLORIDA SNOW SCENE above was
taken at the home of Mrs. Kenneth Smith of
DeFuniak Springs on March 6, 1954. Mrs.
Smith is the sister-in-lau' of Leis T. Smith,
Dairy Inspector for the State Department of
Agriculture, and this picture won for her a
$10 prize offered by the local newspaper.

R. J. Schneider Resigns
As Eustis Dairy Manager
Rudy Schneider announced recently his
resignation as manager of the Schneider-
Foremost Dairy of Eustis. Rudy and his
brother, Henry Schneider, now Foremost
Orlando manager, sold their plant, the
Schneider's Creamery, to Foremost about
a year ago.

Florida Agriculture
Honors U.S.D.A. Secretary
Leaders in all phases of Florida agri-
culture gathered in Orlando on March
20th to participate in the dedication cere-
monies at a new Horticultural Laboratory
and Entomological Research Laboratory
which had been constructed in Orange
County by the Federal Government and
to honor U. S. Department of Agricul-
ture Ezra Benson, who was the principal
speaker at the dedication ceremonies.
State and Federal governmental officials
were also present as the guests of honor.
The presiding host for the occasion
was Congressman A. S. Herlong, Jr. of
Leesburg. Special platform guests includ-
ed Acting Governor Charley E. Johns
who gave the address of welcome for
Florida and Hon. Nathan Mayo, com-
missioner of agriculture, who brought
greetings from Florida agricultural inter-
ests, and U. S. Senator Spessard L. Hol-
land, who introduced Secretary Benson.
The Entomological Research project is
concerned -chiefly in measures for the
control of insects that attack man and
transmit disease. Although conducted for
the Department of Defense in order to
protect military personnel from these in-
sects, the work of this laboratory has also
been of great value to civilians.

Artificial Breeding Increased
The Graham Dairy Farm of Miami is
reported by the American Breeders Serv-
ice to have bred 986 cows during the
year 1953 by artificial insemination. The
total number of cows bred artificially in
1953 by the American Breeders Service
was reported to be approximately three-
quarters of a million.






Governor Dewey Says
"SWITCH TO MILK"
Governor Thomas E. Dewey of New
York was reported recently as threatening
the friendly relations between milk pro-
ducing United States and Coffee produc-
ing Brazil when his enthusiasm for milk
as a New York State dairy farmer led
him to coin the remark, "Switch to milk,
it's healthier, more plentiful and cheaper
than coffee."
He also went on to say that if all
citizens would drink a glass of milk a
day, the milk products surplus would
fade away.

NUTRITION RESEARCH SHOWS
DAIRY FOODS ARE BARGAIN
At prices prevailing in 1952, a Cornell
University study of Professor Herrell De-
Graff showed that while the cost of Milk
and Milk Products was only 15% of the
national food dollar, these products sup-
ply the following percentages of nutri-
tion in the national diet: 18% of food
calories, 25% of protein, 25% of fats,
20% of Vitamin A, 50% of riboflavin
and 75% of calcium.

SAYS MILK WORTH 42c
A QUART IN FOOD VALUE
It is recognized that milk costs more
in the form of fresh fluid milk. Is it
worth it? When U. S. Department of
Agriculture Secretary, Ezra Benson low-
ered the government price support from
90 to 75 per cent of parity on dairy pro-
ducts on April 1 in an effort to get
the surplus consumed, he had this to
say about the value of milk in the diet:
"Actually milk is already a bargain, price
wise. A research study at Ames, Iowa,
shows", he said, "that the value of a
quart of milk is now 42 cents. It would
cost 42 cents, in other words, for the
same nutrients from other food sources".
From this Iowa study, we see that the
26 to 27 cents per quart being paid in
Florida for fresh whole milk is not high
compared to what it provides.
In this connection it should be noted
that Florida has high sanitary require-
ments, and that the butterfat test of our
market milk is higher than the national
'average. The Agricultural Extension Serv-
ice of Florida is interested in getting
more Florida milk used, to provide a
market for this segment of Florida agri-
culture as well as to improve the nutri-
tion of urban and rural people.

"Grandma, are you with the circus?"
"Of course not, my dear; why do you
ask?"
"I heard pa say that when you came
to visit us we'd have an elephant on our
hands."


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* Lasting-Kills for Days!
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* Double Action-Kills Maggots Too!
* Flies Can't Resist 'Em!
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Fly Flakes Now Available Through
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Manufactured by
FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL SUPPLY COMPANY




c FAS CO]


DIVISION OF WILSON & TOOMER FERTILIZER CO.
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
MAY & JUNE, 1954 7


)ame5 )enninji is proud to announce to his friends

that he has been appointed to represent:

BIRELEY'S DIVISION of General Food Corporation
for the State of Florida


Fine Grape Beverage Base
* Orange Sherbet Base


* Dairy Orange Base






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


DAIRY REVIEW


Extension Service Dairy Products Laboratory
Dairy Farm Research Unit Agricultural Experiment Station


Learn To Live With Surplus


By Production Cost Control

By: P. T. DIX ARNOLD
Associate In Dairy Husbandry
University of Florida
Surplus is defined as "that which remains when use or need is satisfied." As re-
gards dairying in Florida it usually is applied to that milk which is not sold as fluid
milk to the consumer. The conventional price structure of dairy products has al-
ways been such that the highest returns are received for milk
S consumed as fluid milk. Milk manufactured into other dairy
products brings a lesser price. These are ice cream, cheese,
exaporated and condensed milk, butter, powdered milk and mis-
cellaneous specialties. Generally speaking, Florida dairymen are
primarily concerned with fluid milk. To serve the many visitors
f to the state in addition to our stable population, we must pro-
duce enough milk to meet the peak demand. The surge of in-
coming tourists ahead of cold weather in the north makes every
Idairyman hustle to get his cows into peak production, and often
ARNOLD buy more cows.
Usually this is at the time when pastures are the poorest and


production costs are high. Nevertheless
it is the duty of the dairyman to see that
ample milk of highest quality is available.
By using all the skill and knowledge
available this peak requirement has nearly
always been met. Having gotten all the
cows in "high gear" with expensive prac-
tices by mid-winter, everyone is happy
for about two or three weeks. Then
February and March brings flush green
pastures and production is stimulated.
More tourists leave than come into the
state and not all milk can find a market
in bottles. Surplus milk and lower prices
come into the picture and some grumbl-
ing is heard-usually the loudest from
the high cost producers.
In order to meet the unusually high
peak demands of a seasonal tourist mar-
ket, there is bound to be some surplus
after this season, since cows can't be
turned on and off like a machine.
The national outlook concerning dairy
prices is not bright. Large supplies of
butter, cheese and powder are already
on hand and production is expected to
increase through June. With this large
supply and no foreseeable increase in
demand, there probably will be a clamor
for reduced prices and the producer may
have to take less for his milk. This will
work an extreme hardship on the high
cost producer, leaving him no profit and
quite likely a loss. High milk prices have
kept many dairymen in business who


cannot continue long with returns sub-
stantially below fluid milk prices for all
year round production.

LOWER COSTS IN SURPLUS SEASON
Fortunately, surplus milk prices usually
coincide with favorable pasture seasons
in Florida and pasture of the right kind
can provide a large part of the cow's
diet at a very reasonable cost. Nutrients
from pasture and homegrown roughages
can be produced for from 1 to 2 cents
per pound. Last year a limited survey on
a few commercial dairies showed that
pastures stocked at about one cow per
acre produced nutrients at an average
cost of 1.85 cents per pound. This study
is being extended and more conclusive
figures will be available soon. In the
March-April issue of Florida Dairy
News, page 32, Dr. Marshall, at the
Dairy Research Unit, reported that Jer-
sey cows would consume up to as much
as 167 pounds of White Dutch Clover
per day. That is enough to maintain a
cow and produce almost 3 gallons of
milk per day. During March and April
this year, cows on excellent clover pas-
ture have been producing 30 or more
pounds of milk (about 4 gallons) a day
with about 5 pounds citrus pulp as the
only concentrate fed. The cows have
maintained their body weight. These cows
are expected to go through the summer
on these pastures at the same rate of


The University of Florida
DEPARTMENT OF DAIRY SCIENCE
Schedule of
1954 Special Events
THE FLORIDA DAIRY INDUSTRY
August 10-12
23rd Annual
DAIRY HERDSMEN'S SHORT COURSE
For dairy herdsmen, herd owners, dairy
farm helpers, DHIA supervisors, producer-
distributors and milk producers.
September 16-17
19th Annual
DAIRY FIELD DAY & CONFERENCE
For milk producer-Distributors, dairy pro-
cessors, milk producers, veterinarians, herds-
men, DHIA workers and equipment and
supply dealers.
October 14-16
17th Annual
DAIRY PLANT OPERATORS SHORT
COURSE
For dairy plant superintendents and assist-
ants, managers, owners, dairy plant em-
ployees, producer-distributors, equipment
and supply dealers.
Year Around
OPEN HOUSE
Visitors are always welcome to visit the
Dairy Products Laboratory and the Dairy
Farm Research Unit.
A worthy goal for Dairy Industry in
1954: "To better serve and better inform
all the public."

feeding, but a 16 percent protein con-
centrate will gradually replace the citrus
pulp as the clover diminishes and grasses
become the dominant pasture plants.
Grasses are lower in protein than clover
and hence require more protein in the
supplementary concentrates to take care
of the requirements for the cow.
Recently reported prices to producers
of 27 to 30 cents a gallon makes it very
difficult to show a profit for a 3 gallon
Jersey or Guernsey cow if she is fed over
4 pounds of citrus pulp and 4 pounds
of purchased grain feed per day. (Feed
costs should not be over 50-60 percent
of total cost of producing milk). She
will have to be on pasture good enough
to provide 10 or more pounds of total
digestible nutrients per day. That kind
of pasture can be available on most farms
if fertilizer and good management are
used.
PASTURE PROGRAM IMPORTANT
The Pasture Development Committee
of the Florida Dairy Association is spon-
soring a Pasture Improvement Program.
This is a very sound program and is en-
dorsed by President Herman Boyd in
these words-"We believe this program
can be worth millions of dollars to Flor-
ida dairymen if they will actively par-
ticipate and cooperate in it."
Under the 1954 price conditions for
milk and for feed it is difficult to see
how a dairyman can afford to spend his
time, energy, cow sense and executive
ability if he does not supply at least 50
percent of the nutrient requirements of
his cows from a homegrown roughage
(Continued on Next Page)


8 0 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS






Dairymen Benefit From Quality Pastures
BY: DR. SIDNEY P. MARSHALL
Dept. Dairy Science, University of Florida
The quality of forage and the quantity that cattle consume are the two factors
which determine the amount of nutrients they obtain from a pasture. A maximum
proportion of cattle's feed requirements can be furnished by pastures, provided the
forage is maintained in a palatable and nutritious condition during the entire growing
season by good management practices.
In the spring, milk production usually increases when cows
are turned on pastures. At that season the young growth of
grasses is relatively high in crude protein, digestible carbohy-
drates, minerals, and vitamins. As grasses mature there is an
Increase in indigestible crude fibre content accompanied by a
decrease in palatability and nutritive value. On a poorly managed
pasture, the quantity of forage may be adequate in late summer
.: but both the intake and quality may be so low that it supplies
S only a small proportion of the milking cows' feed requirements.
I/ Poor quality pasture is the major factor contributing to the
MARSHALL summer slump" in milk production frequently observed dur-
ing August and September.


Cattle will obtain a major proportion
of their nutritive requirements from per-
manent pasture if it is grazed at a stage
when the forage is nutritious. In runner-
type grasses, such as pangola and ber-
muda, the bud and leaves are the most
nutritious portions. Therefore, these
grasses should be grazed at a stage when
the leaves, bud, and tender portion of
the stem comprise most of the forage. A
suitable stage to graze these grasses is
when the shoots average about 5 inches
in length. If the shoots of these grasses
are allowed to grow 10 or 12 inches tall,
the tough, fibrous stem will comprise a
major portion of the forage, which re-
duces its palatability and nutritive value.
Bunch-type grasses such as the bahais
should be grazed before the leaves reach
maturity. Fertilization practices recom-
mended for the soil types and kind of
pasture should be followed.
A rotational system of grazing should
be employed in order to provide the milk-
ing herd with a continuous supply of for-
age at the proper stage of growth for
quality and palatability. It is suggested
that at least 4 pasture plots should be
used in a rotational grazing program. A
larger number could be used to advant-
age, particularly during the periods of
slow growth. Electric fences provide an
economical means of subdividing pas-
tures.
After grazing on each plot, mowing
will be needed to cut clumps of ungrazed
grass and thereby stimulate growth of new
forage in these areas. Likewise, the ma-
nure should be scattered in order to re-
duce the clumps of ungrazed forage dur-
ing the subsequent rotation. A drag for
scattering manure can be attached behind
the mowing machine or the tractor.
By providing the dairy herd with pala-
table, nutritious pasture forage through
the use of good pasture management
practices, feed costs can be reduced, milk
production increased, and a smaller acre-
age will be required to meet their rough-
age requirements.


PROTEIN VALUE OF MILK
Reprint from "National Dairy Council Digest"
One quart of milk will provide 34
grams of protein. This amount is equal
to 85 percent of the recommended pro-
tein allowance of the child of one to
three years of age and 65 percent of the
recommended protein allowance of the
child four to six years of age. The
actual biological value of milk protein
is higher than that from any other food
with the exception of egg protein.
It has been demonstrated by rat growth
studies that milk is a more efficient
source of protein for growth than a
variety of prepared baby food meats and
fish.

LEARN TO LIVE WITH SURPLUS
(Continued from Page 8)
program. The processing of purchased
feedstuffs into milk through cows is an
expensive way to produce milk. Pur-
chased feeds bear a transportation charge,
go through several processes and changes
of ownerships which add to the cost
without increasing the nutrients con-
tained before reaching the cow. This
makes high priced nutrients.
Under a good homegrown roughage
program it is possible to produce milk
at a feed cost from 10 to 20 cents per
gallon during at least 6 months of the
year. A few D.H.I.A. members have had
a yearly average feed cost of 20 to 25
cents per gallon of 4 percent fat cor-
rected milk. With this as an average, the
feed cost during the surplus months of
the year with excellent pastures must
have been quite low.
No one yet has learned how to elim-
inate the peaks and valleys of supply and
demand under a free enterprise system.
Learn to live with surplus during surplus
seasons and the lessons learned in cost
reduction during the "lean" period will
help increase net returns in times of fluid
milk over-supply.


RUMELK









THE NEW DEVELOPMENT IN SCIENTIFIC
AND PRACTICAL CALF FEEDING

RUMELK, a new and different milk replace-
ment feed that features rumen cultures
in a viable state and .enzymes has been
found to grow healthier and larger calves
than those fed on whole milk.
RUMELK was developed by George A.
Jeffreys, one of the country's outstanding
enzymologists, and president of the
George A. Jeffreys Research & Develop-
ment Co.
RUMELK is a natural feed that makes calf
feeding easy, safe and economical. This
amazing product is the long sought after
ideal calf replacement feed. After years
of research it has finally been produced
and is now available to herdsmen and
dairymen. No longer do calves have to
die from nutritional scours or food de-
ficiencies. No longer need the farmer
waste hundreds of pounds of milk to
raise a calf. RUMELK guarantees that
a calf can be raised on 20-80 pounds of
milk, depending on size and breed. Ex-
haustive field tests have proven that
calves raised on RUMELK will do bet-
ter than those fed whole milk.
The principle of RUMELK is this: The
micro-organisms and enzymes of the
mature cow is transferred through a
special patented culture contained in
RUMELK. This seeds the stomach and
intestines with beneficial organisms that
promote a healthy tone. The rumen of
the calf develops earlier, making it pos-
sible for hay and grains to be utilized
more efficiently.
RUMELK contains all the proteins of milk.
It is high in vitamin content. It con-
tains vitamin B12, terramycin and un-
identified growth factors. In addition
RUMELK contains a special bulking
enzyme that reduces nutritional scours
to an absolute minimum. This amazing
new product will do a great service to
the dairy industry, for it has definitely
been proven to save milk for market and
grow healthier and larger calves and
replacement stock.

CONTACT YOUR LOCAL FEED DEAL-
ER OR WRITE FOR COMPLETE DE-
TAILS AND INTERESTING LEAFLET


Manufactured by:
W. A. DAVIS MILLING CO.
P. 0. Box 1552, High Point, N. C.
or
P. O. Box 787, Deland, Fla.


MAY & JUNE, 1954 9













Where to buy



ORTHO Fly Killer M:


ALABAMA
FLORALA
The Farmers Seed Store
SAMPSON
Alabama Gin & Peanut Co.

FLORIDA
ALACHUA
Farmers Hardware Company
BELLE GLADE
The Kilgore Seed Company
BLOUNTSTOWN
Coxwell Seed & Plant Store
KOYNTON BEACH
Broward Grain & Supply Co., Inc.
BRADENTON
Check-R-Board, 809 14th St., W.
CHIEFLAND
Farm Service Store, Inc.
CHIPLEY
F-R-M Feed and Seed Store
CLEWISTON
Parkinson's, Inc.
COCOA
Farmers Supply Store
100 Florida Avenue
CRESTVIEW
Crestview Trading Company
DANIA
Broward Grain & Supply
118 N. Park Avenue
DAYTONA BEACH
Dunn Brothers Hardware
154 S. Beach Street
DEFUNIAK SPRINGS
Thompson-Hillard Milling Co.
West Florida Farmers Co-Op., Inc.
DEL RAY BEACH
Del Ray Beach Farm Supply, Inc.
DUNNELLON
Rush's Department Store
FT. LAUDERDALE
Broward Grain & Supply
106-108 W. Broward Ave.
FT. MYERS
Corbin Farm Supply
1305 Main Street
Kilgore Seed Company
Anderson Ave.
GAINESVILLE
B & G Farm Supply
1012 Main St., S.
Johnson Brothers, Inc.
111-113 S. Main Street
Kilgore Seed Company
202 S. E. 1st. Ave.
HIGH SPRINGS
Farm Supply Store
High Springs Seed Store


JACKSONVILLE
General Mills
2 Riverside Avenue
E. A. Martin Seed Co.
5126 W. Beaver St.
JASPER
Farmers Hardware & Supply
P. O. Box 348
JAY
Morgan Seed Store
KISSIMMEE
Kissimmee Feed Store
424 Broadway
Tarcai Feed and Farm Supply
Vine at Main
Tuxedo Feed & Seed Store
111 Broadway
LAKE BUTLER
Rivers Hardware & Furniture
LAKE CITY
Farmers Mutual Exchange
P. O. Box 806, 1236 N. Marion St.
Wade-Persons
LIVE OAK
Farmers Mutual Exchange
MACCLENNY
Baker County Farmers Supply
MADISON
Farmers Mutual Exchange
400 S. Shelby St.
Ivey's Farm Feed Store
314 S. Range Street
MALONE
Williams Seed & Feed Company
MARIANNA
Powledge Seed & Supply Co.
MAYO
Garden's Farm Supply
P. O. Box 148
MELBOURNE
Farm Supply Store
MIAMI
General Mills, Inc.
7275 N.W. 7th Avenue
Hughes Seed Store
116 South Miami Ave.
Security Feed and Seed Co.
2035 N.W. 7th Avenue
MILTON
Griffin Supply Co.
MONTICELLO
DeLoach-Hodges Hardware
OCALA
Kilgore Seed Company
909 N. Magnolia
Security Feed & Seed Co. of Ocala,
Inc., 432-434 N. Magnolia St.
Seminole Stores, Inc.
Orange & Ocklawaha


PAHOKEE
The ilgore Seed Company
PALATKA
Security Feed & Seed Co.
201 First St.
PALMETTO
Kilgore Seed Company
710 13th St.
PENSACOLA
Escambia Farmers Supply Co.
North Palafox St.
F. S. Mellen Company
42 E. Garden Street
Bryant's Feed Store
305 W. Green Street
PLANT CITY
The Gilgore Seed Co.
214 S. Collins St.
POMPANO BEACH
Broward Grain & Supply Co.
QUINCY
Southern Chemical Sales & Service
P. O. Box No. 3
SANFORD
Kilgore Seed Store
300 W. 1st.
ST. CLOUD
Tuxedo Feed Store
TALLAHASSEE
Rivers Seed Company
309 S. Adams Street
Berry and Johnson Company
826 W. Gaines Street
Ott's Feed Store
123 W. Jefferson
TAMPA
The Quaker Oats Co.
3021 East Broadway
Tuxedo Feed Store
3109 Fourth Avenue
Amco Feed Stores, Inc.
3701 E. Broadway
Jackson Grain Company
Cass and Ashley St.
TRENTON
Tri-County Farmers Co-Op., Inc.
VERO BEACH
Lawis Feed & Supply
2018 Commerce Ave.
WAUCHULA
Kilgore Seed Company
Main and 7th.
WEST PALM BEACH
Kilgore Seed Company
910 Belvedere Road


10 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS























































ORTHO Fly Killer M

.. a new easy-to-use bait


This remarkable ne%\ bait attracts and 1t/sli
both resistjnt and non-resitJ.nt house flies.
Just use sprinkling cn, .ippl)ng ORTHC)
Fly Killer M where flies are the thickest.
T.M.'S REG. U.S. PAT. OFF.: ORTHO. ISOTOX. 1038








SCIErTIFIC PEST CONTROi

CALIFORNIA SPRAY-CHEMICAL Corp.
P. O. BOX 7067
FAIRVILLA ROAD
ORLANDO, FLA.


Application is as simple ais walkingg through
sour hbrn. Alter 1',, population h.~ been re-
du.ced IC. frequent .pplici. ilon, .ire nreded
and your fly control job becomes easier.


There's an ORTHO pest control for every need
Your best protection against screw worm. ORTHO 1038 Screw Worm Control
drives screw worms out of wounds, then kills them. Promotes rapid
healing of wounds.
Space spray gives rapid knock-down. ORTHO Fly Spray is an ideal space
spray which gives quick kill on contact and provides excellent control of
the lesser house fly.
2-way livestock pest control. ORTHO Kleen Stock Spray combines Lindane,
(for quick kill), with Toxaphene, (for longer lasting control). Kills many
pests which bother livestock.
Wall or "surface" spray. If you need a surface spray that gives good residual
fly control buy ISOTOX Dairy Spray wettablee or liquid). Also controls
mange, lice, ticks, and mosquitoes.
On all chemicals, read directions and cautions before use.


MAY & JUNE, 1954 0 11






Veterinary Committee Feature

White Scours In Calves
By: DR. M. RISTIC
Department of Veterinary Science
University of Florida Agriculture Experiment Station
The Veterinary Committee of the Association desires to be of service to Florida Dairymen
through discussion in this column of any Dairy Herd problems submitted which are of general
interest. Submit your questions to the Editor, FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS. Dr. Karl Owens of
Gainesville, Chairman of the Committee, will assign the questions to a suitable authority for
appropriate answers.
Q How does white scours affect calves and how may
it be prevented? I


A By Dr. M. Ristic 'p
White scours is a highly fatal form of infectious disease 4,
which affects young calves during the first few days of life.
The disease commonly occurs in pure-bred or highly developed
grade calves in intensive cattle raising areas.
The predisposing causes are considered to be a combination DR RISTIC
of dietary and other factors. This leads to disturbances of the
equilibrium of microbic flora of the body which facilitates invasion of the host by
filterable virus and colon-type micro-organisms. Some of these micro-organisims are
normally present in the digestive tract in a non-pathogenic state. Once the condition
becomes enzootic in a particular herd the virulence of the particular strain of micro-
organism may be enhanced.
White scours is most commonly ob-
served when the calf is one to two days
old. The rapid rise of the temperature Research Facilities To
followed by a drop to subnormal when U r
death approaches is one of the character- For Universit
istic symptoms. Other symptoms con- By: DR. D.
sist of loss of appetite accompanied by Head, Dept. of
a profuse diarrhaea. The feces usually University
appear yellowish-brown to greyish-white The increasing economic importance
in color and sometimes streaked with Florida has made it desirable to enlarge
blood. Dehydration of the body, sunken in research on animal diseases.
eyes, droopy ears, dry rough coat, soiled The Department
hair and swollen navel are other symp- quiries and requests
toms of white scours. Death usually oc- cause and prevention
curs about 12 to 24 hours after the on- and poultry. Little c
set. of these diseases an
Chronic cases may be characterized by owners, dairymen, c
pneumonia and swelling of the joints. practicing veterinary
The lesions in a calf that has died diseases, in which t
from white scours are rather indefinite which little or no ex
and cannot be used successfully for diag- In the past out-o
nosing the disease. Paratyphoid infection SANeffort to seek council
is most easily confused with white scours, SANDERS effort to seek counkno
but it generally does not affect calves
younger than one week of age; more-
over, paratyphoid can be readily diag-
nosed by bacteriological examination of
the liver and spleen of the dead calf.
Rigid preventative sanitary measures
and correct feeding practices are by far
the most effective means of avoiding
losses from white scours. It is known 'a l -- i
that arrangement of the bovine placenta -.!
prevents the transfer of maternal blood ---
circulating antibodies to the fetus during
uterine life. Consequently the blood- THE ABOVE is architect' sketch of the new
e be constructed for the Department of Veterina
serum of the new born calf is deprived include poultry and large animal pathology,
of antibodies before colostrum is taken, reception, library and conference rooms, and
Moreover, the concentration of antibod- the respective laboratories are covered passages
ies is much higher in the colostrum than screened large animal experimental pens and b
The parasitology laboratory, anaplasmosis isola
in the dam's serum. Dairymen know ties which are housed in separate buildings, cot
from experience that colostrum is essen- plots for experimental animals adjoin the res


tial for the health of the new born calf,
and that the feeding of milk in the ab-
sence of colostrum may be followed by
serious and even fatal disturbance.
The antibody properties of the colo-
strum are contained in its globulin frac-
tion to which intestinal mucous mem-
brane of the newborn is permeable only
during the first few days of its life. A
delay or absence of a liberal supply of
colostrum during this period may, there-
fore be disastrous. The amount of milk
or colostrum given per day has been cal-
culated to be approximately 6 percent of
the calf's weight, gradually increased to
approximately 10 percent in a week or
two; but the daily increase should not
be more than half a pint and the calf
should receive at least four feeds during
24 hours.
Precautions should be taken that the
new-born calf does not come in contact
with infected material. If properly con-
structed and clean stalls are not available
the cow should be allowed to calve in
a clean open field, clean well sodded
plot, or on premises not previously used
for calving. New-born calves should be
kept away from stables that are likely to
be infected.

Be Improved
Veterinary Department
A. SANDERS
Veterinary Science
of Florida
of the livestock and poultry industry in
and improve the Experiment Station's work

of Veterinary Science receives daily in-
for information concerning the nature,
of diseases of dairy and beef cattle, swine
ir no research has been conducted on many
d ailments in the State. Florida livestock
attlemen, swine growers and poultrymen,
ans and others frequently encounter such
he cause has not been identified and on
perimental work has been conducted.
f-state aid was frequently resorted to in an
1 and advice of those who had facilities for
n diseased conditions of Florida livestock.
(Continued on Next Page)



6-

--


Veterinary Research Laboratory Building soon to
ry Science, University of Florida. The unit will
bacteriology, biochemical and virus laboratories,
offices. On either end and in connection with
leading to air-conditioned small animal quarters,
battery units for investigations of poultry diseases.
tion building, post-mortem and incinerator facili-
mplete the research group. Thirty acres of pasture
earch center.


12 FLORIDA DAIRY


NEWS






RESEARCH FACILITIES
(Continued from Page 12)
During the past months several new, in-
fectious diseases have been encountered
in the State. These diseases, if uncon-
trolled, stand as potential threats to the
economic production and development of
our livestock. Such diseases can be con-
trolled only in proportion to available
scientific information and knowledge
concerning them. This information may
be obtained through carefully conducted
research and experimentation by a highly-
trained, scientific staff.
The additional laboratory facilities
seen in the adjacent architects sketch
which were approved by the 1953 Legis-
lature are a culmination of many years
of hope and will provide adequate physi-
cal facilities for the Department of Vet-
erinary Science's disease research pro-
gram.
The livestock disease research program
should embrace many phases of infec-
tious, contagious, bacterial, fungus, virus,
internal and external parasitic diseases,
including protozoan blood infections and
diseases caused and transmitted by blood-
sucking pests. Plants poisonous to live-
stock, skin diseases and other ailments
which cause heavy losses to the livestock
industry should be studied and investi-
gated in detail.
The nature, cause, pathology, agents of
transmission, reservoir hosts, pathogene-
sis, treatment, prevention and control of
those conditions, ailments and diseases
which are of major economic inmport-
ance to the industry should be investigat-
ed. Progress reports and results of com-
pleted livestock disease investigations
should be made known and the informa-
tion obtained after thorough investiga-
tion should be applied under practical
field conditions to be of maximum bene-
fit to the industry.
In the immediate future it is antici-
pated that research on dairy cattle diseases
will include vibriosis, leptospirosis, ana-
plasmosis, trichomoniasis, virus infections,
poisonous plants, and other diseased con-
ditions. Investigations of internal and ex-
ternal diseases have been underway for
several years. This work is progressing
nicely and has resulted in valuable in-
formation which is being applied under
field conditions in the control of para-
sites.

A six-year old boy who was present
at the installation of a pastor, asked his
father "When they install him, do they
put him in a stall and feed him?"
"No, my boy, they hitch him to a
church and expect him to pull it."


PRACTICAL DAIRYING... No. 1


<2~~
I50


Low cost sanitation
Fast acting
Easy on udders and hands
Safe for utensils and equipment
Combats mastitis
Leaves no milkstone

For latest information on practical dairy
sanitation, write to:
B-K Dept., Pennsylvania Salt Mfg. Co.
East: 599 Widener Bldg., Phila. 7, Penna.
West: 2168 Shattuck Ave., Berkeley 4, Cal.


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the pK Way

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Clean your utensils this proven way ...
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Department


Feed MORE





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FLORIDA CITRUS PULP

The Proven Feed for


HIGHER MILK PRODUCTION


*T.D.N. Total Digestible
Nutrients-means the pro-
ductive or digestible portion
of any feed. Example com-
parison percentages; Beet
Pulp-67.8; Snapped Corn
-67.8; CITRUS PULP-75.0.


High in protein, mineral and fat content, Citrus Pulp, fed wet
or dry, is progressively palatable, does not affect milk flavor
and is mildly laxative in character. Easy to handle and store,
one pound of Citrus Pulp is equal to about 5 pounds of silage.
Successful dairymen are now feeding Citrus Pulp up to 40%
of dairy rations-replacing more expensive feed. Citrus Pulp
save you money too!


P. 0. Box 403, Dept. D TAMPA, FLORIDA
See your feed dealer or write direct for free literature


MAY & JUNE, 1954 0 13






ACTIVITIES REVIEW OF:


Florida's Dairy Councils
Current News of Dairy Council Work in Tampa-St. Petersburg, Miami & Jacksonville
This section of the Dairy News is intended to bring timely information of the
activities of Florida Dairy Council work. The material will be supplied by the
three Council directors in turn.


Hundreds Attend Weight Control Clinic

Of Dairy Council and Community Agencies
By: MRS. AMERICA ESCUDER, Director-Nutritionist
Dairy Council of Hillsborough-Pinellas Counties
Overweight persons today are made more conscious of their diminished chances
of a healthy, long life by the statistics which insurance companies have published.
In the words of a well-known doctor, "The longer the waist line-the shorter the
life span." Our physicians tell us that whatever the age, over-weight adds unnecessary
risks both in sickness and in health. Since weight control is one of the most popular
topics of discussion today, the Dairy Council of Hillsborough and Pinellas counties
initiated a series of meetings on this subject.
Instead of working alone the Dairy Council of Tampa came together with ten
other community agencies which were eager to participate in a weight control pro-
gram. The County Health Department, the gas and electric companies, the county
schools Homemaking and Lunch Room supervisors, the Tuberculosis and Health
Association, the Home Demonstration agents and Home Economists from electrical
equipment all contributed their services to this program.


Our Health Department director, Dr.
Frank V. Chappell was chairman for this
series and through him we obtained the
approval of the County Medical Associa-
tion. Dr. H. Phillip Hampton and Dr.
O. F. Deen addressed two of the meet-
ings. Our Home Demonstration State
Nutritionist, Miss Cleo Arnett came all
the way down from Tallahassee to put on
a food demonstration with our own
agent, Lora Kiser. Morrison's Cafeteria
sent over servings for four complete
meals so that the audience could get
actual practice in choosing well-balanced
reducing meals. A Tampa Electric Home
Economist and an adult Home Economics
teacher put on two food demonstrations.
We were especially fortunate in obtain-
ing the use of the Home Demonstration
kitchen and auditorium for the meetings.
The highlight of the series was a free
low-calorie breakfast served jointly by the
Home Demonstration agent, the county
Health Department educator, the state


6F~r


regional nutritionist and the Dairy Coun-
cil.
One photograph on this page shows
almost all the 125 persons who attended
this breakfast and the other shows the
nutritionists weighing and recording
weights.
The purpose of the breakfast was to
show that a "reducing breakfast" can be
nutritious, low in calories, inexpensive
and easy to prepare. The breakfast served
included the following foods:
Orange Juice-4 oz., ...... 50 calories
Ready to eat cereal-
1 individual package ....100 calories
Half a banana ................ 50 calories
1/2 pt. Homogenized Milk 170 calories
Coffee (black) .............. 0 calories

Total calories, ..............370


DIRECTORY OF
FLORIDA'S
DAIRY COUNCILS
DAIRY COUNCIL OF JACKSONVILLE
16 East Church Street
Mrs. Arlen Jones, Exec. Director
Mrs. Ann Johnson, Asst. Director

DAIRY COUNCIL OF TAMPA AND
ST. PETERSBURG
102 N. Dale Mabry Tampa
Mrs. America Escuder, Exec. Director

DAIRY COUNCIL OF MIAMI -Including
DADE, BROWARD & MONROE
COUNTIES
769 N. W. 18th Terrace Miami
Miss Rebecca Daniel, Exec. Director
Miss Frances Cudworth, Asst. Director

After breakfast many men and women
said they didn't realize you could have
a whole glass of milk plus cereal, fruit
and juice and still have less calories than
in a pancake or waffle breakfast.
A total of 604 men and women at-
tended the five meetings at which 2,450
pieces of Dairy Council nutrition mater-
ials were distributed.
Special recognition must be given to
the State Board of Health Nutritionist,
Mrs. May McBath, Hillsborough County
Health Educator, Mrs. Jean Moore and
Home Demonstration Agent, Miss Lora
Kiser without whose help and active
participation the programs would not
have been possible.
Weight control programs are designed
to teach people the difference between
foods that are "necessary for health" and
foods that "merely supply calories", but
contribute little or nothing to good nu-
trition.
In communities where there are no
health agencies the Dairy Council pro-
gram provides the only reliable and sci-
entific free nutrition education service.
(Continued on Page 26)


Below are shown: LEFT, a part of the large crowd who attended the free "low-calorie" breakfast
served as the highlight of the weight control meeting in Tampa; and RIGHT, the nutritionists
weighing guests and recording the weights. Mrs. America Escuder is at extreme right.


M<'^ IA .&0^%. f !%


14 0 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS






DAIRY FOODS WEIGHT CONTROL DIET
DEVISED FOR BATTLE OF THE BULGE
Copies of a complete reducing diet, with emphasis placed on dairy foods, have
been recently made available to the dairy industry by the National Dairy Council.
The NDC diet, based on results of extensive research in human nutrition at Mich-
igan State College, not only provides an excellent guide for men and women who want
to take off excess pounds, but also affords a splendid opportunity for the dairy in-
dustry to step-up its sales of milk, butter, cheese and ice cream. It is believed to be
the first reducing diet based on scientific findings which uses generous amounts of
dairy products.
In addition to the weight reduction diet material, the NDC full color film "Weight
Reduction Through Diet," based on the study at Michigan State College is also made
available for showing to professional and consumer leader groups.
Industry leaders look to the NDC diet as one of the most significant develop-
ments in many years. They believe it will do much to focus attention of the public
on the fact that dairy products should be included-not left out-when weight-weary
"heavies" seriously tackle the battle of the bulge. In fact, nutritionists who have
studied the diet point out, the NDC diet is not only an excellent way to take off
weight, but affords a splendid basis for a weight retention and maintenance diet.
The NDC Diet-How It Grew
The story as to how this diet came
into being is an interesting one, and is
typical of the nutritional and promotional QUESTION BOX
work done for the dairy industry by the
National Dairy Council. On Dairy Foods, Diet
Dairy Council workers were alarmed And Nutrition
by the inroads which fad diets were mak-
ing on consumption of dairy foods, espe- Answers to questions of Dairy News
cially those containing large amounts of readers on dairy foods, diet and nu-
butterfat, such as butter, ice cream, and trition will be answered by one of the
whole milk. They reviewed reducing trained Nutritionist-Directors of the
diets which were being promoted in lay Florida Dairy Councils or other com-
papers and magazines and found the petent authority and published in the
majority of them nutritionally inadequate succeeding issue of the magazine with-
because of their failure to include dairy out identifying whose question is be-
foods. ing answered. Why not get the facts?
Weight conscious Americans, they real- Address your question to: Editor Flor-
ized, were rejecting nutritious foods ida Dairy News, 220 Newnan Street,
which they believed fattening and were Jacksonville, Florida.
turning to over-publicized fad diets to
take off their unwanted bulges.
Knowing that a sound diet should help
the person following it maintain health pounds without developing the tired,
and vigor at the same time he is losing hang-dog feeling which so often accom-
weight, the National Dairy Council turn- panies the arduous task of losing the
ed to nutrition research to solve the weight it's been so much fun to put on.
problem. They approached Dr. Margaret Actually, when the NDC diet is fol-
A. Ohlson at Michigan State College, lowed, dieting is pleasant, once a person
professor of foods and nutrition, who has made up his mind to the fact that
has done extensive investigation of nutri- extra chin and the bulging roll around
tion. his middle add neither to his youthful


A study was planned and supervised at
Michigan State College. Dr. Ohlson and
other members of the Michigan State re-
search staff worked out diets including
dairy foods for an intensive study in
weight control. Student and adult groups
underwent actual tests with the diet.
Weight reduction results were more than
satisfactory. Doctors made frequent checks
on the human "guinea pigs," and they
too were satisfied.
Get Slim and Be Healthy
The NDC diet is well balanced, in-
cluding as it does the various foods and
nutrients needed for body health and
vigor. By following this diet, the nutri-
tionists explain, a person can gradually
take off uncomfortable and unwanted


appearance nor to his chances of reaching
a venerable old age. The NDC diet is
pleasant because it deprives him of noth-
ing except the usual overdose of starches
and carbohydrates.
If the daily intake of food energy is
more than needed, up goes weight. If a
person eats a little less than he needs, he's
reducing!
But to reduce without ill effects, it's
necessary to have a diet which supplies
the protein, vitamins, minerals, fat, and
carbohydrates the body needs from food.
The NDC diet does just that.
The NDC Weight Reduction Diet may
be secured from either of Florida's three
local Dairy Council offices or from the
Florida Dairy Association.


MAY & JUNE, 1954 15


Now
Colored PINK for

Easy Identification
NOW ... In 25-lb. Kegs
DIVERSOL--For Over 25 Years the Dairy Farm's
Leading Bactericide Disinfectant


John Clay's


SUNSHINE HAY

Wire Baled ......................$40 F.O.B.

Chopped with Molasses..$50 F.O.B.

WILL FILL YOUR SILO
WITHIN 100 MILES
$15 per ton



Can supply your needs
all year round

*

Contact

JOHN CLAY
Clewiston Inn
Clewiston, Florida
Phone 2-3501























Top Honors at State 4-H Dairy Show Won


By Polk County Group and Steve Simmons


BY: SAM BURGESS, Assistant Editor,
Florida Agricultural Extension Service
Steve Simmons of St. Johns County won the "Outstanding Individual" honors
while a well trained Polk County group won the top county-group award of the 7th
Annual State 4-H Dairy Show and Judging Contest held at the 1954 Central Florida
Exposition in Orlando.
A new $50,000 "Showatorium" filled with a record number of 150 high quality
animals, well fitted and expertly handled by their 4-H owners, made the 7th Annual
State 4-H Dairy Show and Judging Contest at the Central Florida Exposition in
Orlando, February 22, the best ever.
Commissioner of Agriculture Nathan Mayo dedicated the new spacious "Showa-
torium" at 10 a.m., shortly after the opening round of the judging contest began
activities for the day. Director H. G. Clayton of the Florida Agricultural Extension
Service accepted the new facilities for the 4-H members. 0. P. Swope, president, and
Crawford Bickford, manager, of the Central Florida Exposition also took part in the
dedication.
From early morning until 6:15 p.m. the Showatorium contained a sustained bustle
of activity as judging and showing continued without pause until the Awards banquet
hour at 6:30 p.m. Four-H banners, row after row, and a giant neon-lighted four-
leaf clover (National 4-H Club Emblem) plus 4-H jackets and caps on many of the
youthful showmen assured the spectators, including parents and many dairymen, who
crowded around the twin show rings throughout the day that they were seeing Flor-
ida's 4-H dairy story in action.
Herd Improvement Exhibit
An educational exhibit on dairy herd improvement, including a U.S. Department
of Agriculture display and two 4-H cows with DHIA records for spectators to esti-
mate their production, added interest to the event. Also in the show barn were booths
sponsored by the State Jersey, Guernsey and Ayrshire clubs and the Orange County
Breeding Association.
For refreshment of the participants and spectators, the Florida Jersey Cattle Club
served Jersey Creamline milk during the judging.
The 4-H showmen were awarded a total of $2,500 in premiums, $2,000 of which
was provided by the Central Florida Exposition and $500 by the State Department of
Agriculture-and as Mr. Swope, president of the Exposition, declared at the Awards
banquet, every one who participated won. While all couldn't be grand champion,
everyone won the privilege of sharing in the top 4-H dairy event of the year and in
the impressive record compiled. A check of results shows that 35 percent of the
entrants won blue ribbons, 39 percent won red, and 26 percent received white.
Caroline Stuart, Polk, junior champion and reserve champion Jersey; Earl Crutch-
field, Jackson, senior champion and grand champion grade Jersey; Merriam Simmons,
St. Johns, junior champion and reserve grand champion grade Jersey;
Bill Sever, Dade, senior champion and grand champion Guernsey; Laura Cameron,
Duval, junior champion and reserve Charles Addison, Polk, junior champ-
champion Guernsey; Stanley Bradshaw, n an d grand cha, mpio, jAyrshire; Bi
Dade, senior champion and grand champ- ion and grand champion Ayrshire; Bilserve
ion, grade Guernsey; Johnny Firch, Pin- Boyd, Dade, senior champion and reserve
ellas, junior champion and reserve grand grand champion Ayrshire;
champion grade Guernsey; (Continued on Next Page)


4-H GIRLS DEMONSTRATE
USES OF DAIRY FOODS
Demonstrations on the use of dairy
foods by district winners in the 4-H
girls dairy food project showed the value
of combining imagination and culinary
skill with dairy products in planning a
better family menu. These demonstra-
tions, directed by Miss Cleo M. Arnett,
Extension Nutritionist, with the assistance
of Miss Bronna Mae Elkins, Assistant
State Girls' 4-H Club Agent, attracted
many spectators throughout the morning.
Girls who gave dairy foods demon-
strations during the show were:
Jeanette La Borda and Bertha Lou
Moore, Clay; Sarah Smith, Margie Platt
and Roberta Szparaga, Brevard; Gladys
Harris, Dade; Carol Goodhue, Duval;
Lynette Bowan and Anna Lois Clark,
Gadsden; Sarah Saunders and Eleanor
Freeland, Leon; Sara C. Chestang, Lib-
erty; Ollie Jane DeVore, Marion; Betty
Frazee and Esther DeVore, Marion; Win-
ifred Burry and Cherry Corbin, Palm
Beach; Mildred Stipe, Pinellas; Selma
Jay McCullers, Suwannee.
One of the several top 4-H Girls dairy foods
demonstration teams who participated in the
1954 Annual 4-H Dairy Show at Orlando are
seen below uwih their adviser, Miss Cleo Ar-
nett, State Home Demonstration Department
Extension Nutritionist. Members of the team
are Roberta Syparaga, Sara Smith and Marjor-
ie Plait of Brevard County.





A
5 !' Bffl

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RECORD OF AWARDS


N ,, II . .'. .... .\.,., *. crand chain .
p on Lradh. H ol-tcin /,.' -,. .;i, .11.,...
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N','... .1.... L 'L" L..' took a blu.-
ribbon '.ith tli onl\ rc~itercd Holstein
,how ri

slo \ in b\ L .'.',.' H '. .' .. ..: '. and a
L'radc Bruo'n Sni'' \ctrll ing ia sho" n
b\ Gc .'", l /.... P1.'.. B '.ai' Both "on
blue ribbons
BLI, ii .t.'." t"/. N,:. /"','. '"on tilt
best titrd animal contest and H. .i.,;
R, ',.i. P *..ri'. txo high indi\iduJl in
thi judelini' icontett l ith a 2"s 'cori out
ol a po:,,sibl. m0, polntN
H .,...ta R'c .;r Fr l, .11.1. 1 D ..-..
.:./ L..;;, and .11. c i 11 .i/.'.v .... v, c rc
mcimnbers of the lir't place Pinclla. C(oun-
ti judt.ping tean, i hich '-corcd ,'," out ot
a possible ,'00 points Thlc \" rt coaihc: d
b\ A-'.i.tarnt (Count\ .Ae.'nt L. E. ( un.
nineliami Tht : St iohihn Counti JudLin.
ti.-im o0 b%.-rl~ Siim'mon-. W\'isle\ nmithi,
Pt:rry Smith arnd Allen Pa.,cttia took:
..' pla c A ith (6'" -'.or Count
A.ctnt P R McNMhullin wa.. coa.li. T,.r.i'
pli,:c .tcnt to the Leon (.ountt ri iiti of
Don Hcrold, Bill Roberts. Ern Siellher
.and PIcase Stritkland. %\hich scored (i,6
A.-sistjnt (Count. A;cnt \\ ( \\ hittl
is the Leon team coach.
7 i ,, .. :. P: 1 ,'* !:n .:, .*1 ." 2
, ..I'. i.'. .' 't ./ i'. I, c, N a' .iN u, M art
'in, Ta1lor. Du.al, O)rarigc. Palm Beach.
I.Jakson. Polk. Citrus. Hillboru. Hardcc
and Sarjsotj.
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1__


- MINN







Grade A Milk For Florida
(PART II)
From "Health Notes"-Florida State Board of Health, Feb. 1954.

Editor's Note: The material in this article is reprinted from the February 1954 issue of "Florida
Health Notes", the official monthly publication of the Florida State Board of Health. The Board
of Directors of the Florida Dairy Association has adopted a resolution of appreciation to Miss
Elizabeth Reed, Editor of "Health Notes" and to the State Board of Health, for the assembling
and publishing of this splendid review of the Florida Dairy Industry and the Industry's principal
product "milk."

University of Florida Dairy Research

Boosts Dairy Farm and Plant Efficiency
The University of Florida in Gainesville is the hub of much dairying activity in
the State, and the source of much information.
The Department of Dairy Science conducts many experiments in milk products and
milk production. Nearby in the town of Hague is its dairy farm unit, which boasts a
herd of pure bred Jersey and Guernsey cattle, kept for experimentation in milk pro-
duction and pasture improvement.
Besides teaching its regular students, the department sponsors conferences and
short courses for milk sanitarians, plant operators, herdsmen, laboratory workers and
other groups in the dairy industry.
The Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations also work with herds, pastures and
feeds. The results of experiments are passed on to the cattlemen and dairy owners
by the Agricultural Extension Service, through its State Extension Dairyman, County
Agents and other extension personnel.
The County Agent is primarily concerned with the economics of production of
milk by the farmer. He works for better pastures, more home grown feeds, higher
production per cow and raising replacements for the milk herd. All of these things
add up to quality milk.
A new generation of experts is on its way up. Four H clubs encourage boys and
girls to raise their own dairy cows, which are entered by the hundreds in contests each


year.
Operation of the clubs is financed by
Federal, State and County funds. When
the time comes for a show, local civic and
business groups will join with public
agencies in putting up prize money.
With each ribbon goes some cash.
Youngsters who do not have enough
money to pay cash for a calf are often
helped by some group in the community.
In one county, the banks may arrange
these loans, which are repaid in part with
money from prizes won by the cow, or
from sale of her calves and milk.
Private business firms often step in
and help finance an out of state trip for
a boy or girl and a prize winning cow.

Florida Livestock Board
The Florida Livestock Board touches
on the dairy industry because of its con-
cern with the health of the cows. In
cooperation with the Federal Bureau of
Animal Industry, it conducts a control
program for tuberculosis, brucellosis and
other contagious diseases of cattle.
Through the State mastitis control pro-
gram, it educates the dairyman in better
milking methods, thereby aiding in the
prevention of this disease of the udder.
The board also is responsible for the con-
trol of other infectious and contagious
diseases of livestock.
All of the activity of these various
groups is resulting in Floridans today


getting a really good quart of milk for
their money.
How much food value there is in milk
depends on the butterfat and "solids
not fat" content.
The U. S. Public Health Service code
sets up minimums of 3.25 per cent but-
terfat and 8.25 per cent solids not fat.
The Florida milk code requires a mini-
mum of 3.25 per cent butterfat and 8.50
per cent solids not fat.
Individual city ordinances are more de-
manding. In Miami, Tampa, St. Peters-
burg, and most other Florida cities, the
requirements are 3.50 butterfat and 8.50
s.n.f. Jacksonville requires 4.00 percent
butterfat and 8.50 s.n.f.
The Florida consumer can be assured
that he is getting from his quart of milk
the following daily nutritive requirements
for the average man:
All the calcium necessary for one day
All the phosphorous or practically so
Vitamins A B C D and G
One third or more of the protein
One fourth of the energy.
Furthermore, milk is probably one of
the most economical food buys. There
is no waste. Every drop can be used,
and the cost is low in proportion to food
value, as well as in comparison to the
cost of other major foods.


The Laboratory
The laboratory is the watchdog of the
milk industry.
With painstaking routine it checks the
samples that arrive daily in iced con-
tainers. Everything goes along smoothly
until an unsatisfactory sample appears.
Then the pace quickens. The report goes
out to the local sanitarian, who gets busy
immediately checking possible causes of
the trouble, working with the dairyman
until the difficulty has been located and
eliminated.
The sanitarian periodically collects re-
tail samples of dairy products from deliv-
ery trucks or the dairy plant. He gets
wholesale samples from cold wall tanks
at the form or from the plant. The sam-
ples are packed in ice before shipment
to maintain a low temperature and pre-
vent bacterial growth while in transit.
State Board of Health Laboratories are
located in seven cities-Jacksonville,
Tampa, Miami, Orlando, Pensacola, Tal-
lahassee and West Palm Beach-to fa-
cilitate transportation of all specimens.
At the Lab, the milk is put through
many tests to find if it is safe, clean and
wholesome. They include:
1. Plate count, to determine the num-
ber of bacteria present.
2. The coliform test. Run on pasteur-
ized milk to show whether the milk has
been contaminated after pasteurization by
improper handling.
3. Specific gravity test. Indicates the
food solids present in the milk.
4. A test that gives the percentage of
butterfat in the milk.
5. Phosphatase test. De t e r m i n e s
whether the milk is properly pasteurized.
6. Cyroscopic test. Establishes wheth-
er water has been added to the milk and
how much.
7. Ring test. Run on milk to be con-
sumed raw to determine whether it con-
tains any brucellosis undulantt fever)
organisms.
The great majority of dairymen take
pride in the condition of their farms and
plants, and an unsatisfactory sample up-
sets them as much or more than it does
the control official. Dairy farms and
plants are places of almost constant
scrubbing and cleaning.
Pasteurization
Pasteurization is the process of heat-
ing milk to 143 degrees F. and holding
it there for half an hour, or heating to
161 degrees for 15 seconds. These temp-
eratures are below the boiling point but
are sufficient to kill bacteria that might
be dangerous.
The only significant effect pasteuriza-
tion has on milk is to change it from
unsafe to safe. Pastuerization does not
change the taste.
(Continued on Next Page)


18 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS





GRADE "A" MILK
(Continued from Page 18)

Cows Were Pioneers
Study history-of America or Florida
-and you will find the cow. On his
second voyage to the West Indies, Co-
lumbus brought them over. The firs,
cows to reach the U. S. came ashore at
Jamestown in 1611.
The early Florida settlers also brought
their cows with them, but local produc-
tion eventually began to lag behind pop-
ulation growth. Milk had to be imported
from other States, especially during the
Winter, when the tourists were here. It
came from Georgia, Alabama, Virginia,
Missouri and Indiana. The quality was
not always good.

Dairy Laws Passed
Then the Legislature decided to pass
laws that would help the industry develop
in the State. One of the requirements
of the 1929 milk law was that imported
milk be distinguished from local pro-
duction. The public soon began to notice
that milk labeled "Produced in Florida"
was fresher.
In about a year, fluid milk imports had
almost ceased, and did not return in any
considerable amount until the war, when
a million and a half new consumers were
added to the State's population. Today
Florida once again meets almost all local
demands for fluid consumption and even
ships a little to Georgia. The dairy indus-
try has expanded faster in Florida than in
almost any other place.
The State, however, still imports al-
most all milk products other than fluid
milk. In 1952, about two million gallons
of cream, three and a half million pounds
of cottage cheese and almost all ingred-
ients for ice cream, butter, cheese and
evaporated milk consumed were brought
in.
Protective legislation was not the only
factor contributing to the growth of
Florida's milk industry. The CATTLE
TIC K ERADICATION PROGRAM
made it safe for better cows to be brought
into the State. Pasture improvement pro-
grams and the use of better stock were
encouraged. More and better milk was
the result.

Quality Dairy Herds
Today most of Florida's cows are as
good as you will find anywhere. More
dairymen are raising their own herd re-
placements; consequently, they get better
cows. Dairy herd improvement and artifi-
cial breeding have been big factors. In
1952, for example, in Florida over 24,-
000 cows were bred artificially to high
production dairy bulls. Last year about
9,000 Florida raised heifers were added
to dairy herds in the State, a great many
(Continued on Page 20)


`- P. O. Box 912-Phone MUtual 2-1291 Lakeland, Florida



See the LOW POURING HEIGHT





BULK COOLERS

1 i The low height of the Mojonnier
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SCompare Mojonnier's low pouring
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cost are a few reasons why Mojon-
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Write for Bulletin 290

"MOJONNIER BROS. CO.
4601 W. Ohio St., Chicago 44, Illinois


MAY & JUNE, 1954 19


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JERSEY CATTLE CLUB NEWS


JERSEY REGISTRY TESTS
The American Jersey Cattle Club has
announced the following results of re-
cent official Jersey registry tests in the
state of Florida.
These tests are made under the super-
vision of the University of Florida and
reported to the AJCC for approval and
publication.
WALTER WELKENER, H O L L Y
HILL DAIRY, Jacksonville, has a regis-
tered Jersey cow, Magnolia Basil Design
Annie, which has won the 305-day milk
championship for Jersey cows on Reg-
ister of Merit test for the state of Flori-
da. She is a senior 4-year-old and pro-
duced 12,607 pounds of milk containing
632 pounds butterfat on twice daily milk-
ing. This production is nearly three times
that of the "average" dairy cow in the
U.S. Magnolia Basil Design Annie earned
the top rating of Excellent when classi-
fied for breed type. This is a score of
more than 90 points on the breed's score
card, which gives 100 points to a perfect
animal.
FLORIDA SCHOOL FOR THE
DEAF AND BLIND, St. Augustine, has
a registered Jersey cow, Sultan's Queen
Bessie, which has been rated a Tested
Dam for having three offspring with of-
ficial production records. The cow's prog-
eny averaged 8,530 pounds of milk with
464 pounds of butterfat on a twice-daily
milking, 305-days mature equivalent bas-
is. The Tested Dam rating aids Jersey
breeding stock. The three tested progeny
required to qualify a cow as a Tested
Dam may be either three tested daughters
or three tested sons, or any combination
thereof totaling three.
J. K. STUART, Bartow, has a reg-
istered Jersey cow, Royal Oxford Naomi,
which has been rated a Tested Dam. The
cow's progeny averaged 9,132 pounds
milk with 497 pounds butterfat on a
twice daily milking, 305 day mature
equivalent basis.
POLK COUNTY FARMS, Bartow,
has a registered Jersey bull, Royal Oxford
Sir, which has qualified as a Tested Sire.
Ten tested daughters of Royal Oxford
Sir produced an average of 9,664 pounds
milk containing 495 pounds butterfat on
a twice-daily-milking, 305-day mature
equivalent basis, which is more than two
times the butterfat production of the "av-
erage" dairy cow in the U. S. This regis-
tered Jersey bull has been officially class-
ified for type by the AJCC and given
the rating of Very Good, equivalent to
a score of 85 to 90 percent. This sire
was bred by Mrs. Elizabeth Ireland Poe,
Thomasville, Ga., and was purchased by
his present owner in 1947.


CLAY COUNTY FARMS, Middle-
burg, has a registered Jersey cow, Poet
Ann Advancer, which has won the 305-
day butterfat championship for Jersey
cows on Register of Merit test for the
state of Florida. Poet Ann Advancer, a
junior 3 year old, produced 10,328
pounds of milk containing 613 pounds
butterfat on three milkings per day. She
earned the high rating of Very Good
when classified for breed type, which is
a score of more than 85 points on the
breed's score card.

JERSEY HERDS CLASSIFIED
The following Florida Jersey herds
were recently classified for breed type
and dairy conformation by an official
classifier of The American Jersey Cattle
Club.
CLAY COUNTY FARMS, Middle-
burg, received a score of 83.55% on 166
animals. Four animals were rated Excell-
ent, 68 Very Good, 59 Good Plus, 29
Good, and 6 Fair.
A. V. BROWN, Chattahoochee, re-
ceived an average score of 85.13%, on
19 animals. The 19 animals now classi-
fied in the Brown herd include 12 Very
Good, 5 Good Plus, and 2 Good.
FRANK L. DE BORD AND SON,
Quincy, received a score of 83.89% on
18 animals. The DeBord herd has 18
classified animals including 6 Very Good,
11 Good Plus, and 1 Good.
THE BOARD OF COUNTY COM-
MISSIONERS OF POLK COUNTY,
Bartow, received a score of 85.50% on
45 animals. Six animals were rated Ex-
cellent, 20 Very Good, 15 Good Plus,
3 Good, and 1 Fair.
Animals in the herds were given in-
dividual ratings based on a comparison
with the Jersey breed's score card, which
allots 100 points for a perfect animal.
The average score of all animals class-
ified in the Jersey breed is 83.15%

GRADE "A" MILK
(Continued from Page 19)
of these being from artificially bred ani-
mals.
Florida's current production is about
90 million gallons from 170,000 dairy
cows. Thirty two years ago the figure was
12 million gallons from 50,000 cows.

Typical Dairy Farmer
There probably is no such thing as a
typical dairy operation, but by way of
example, take the fictitious farm of
Henry Brown.
He owns a herd of about 100 Jerseys
or Guernseys. They range over an area


Florida's noble dairy cow
Stands beneath the live oak bough
Contented that her reputation
Is good as any in the nation.
With her production scrutinized
By experts qualified and wise
The consumer may imitate her action
And breathe a sigh of satisfaction.

of 400 acres, including some improved
pasture.
Mr. Brown has installed milking ma-
chines and other labor saving devices,
and with the help of his two teenage
sons is able to get most of the job done
without outside help. He has been in
the dairy business 20 years and his invest-
ment represents about $75,000. His old-
est son plans to follow him in the busi-
ness, and next fall will enroll at the
University of Florida to study dairying.
Mr. Brown delivers his milk to a dis-
tributor that also buys the production of
many other farmers.
Here is what happens to the distribu-
tor's dollar: About 60 cents goes to the
farmer for milk; more than 20 cents for
labor; nearly 18 cents for equipment,
supplies, etc., and less than two cents, or
one-third of a cent a quart, is profit.
The milking machine, now standard
equipment on almost all Florida dairy
farms, was a revolutionary discovery. It
made the job easier and faster for the
farmer.
Now another revolution is in progress,
this time involving the bulk handling of
milk. Refrigerated tanks are being used
for milk storage, and tank trucks are
hauling the milk to the processing plant.
The movement spread from the Miami
area, where most of the big dairies al-
ready have the equipment, which, if pre-
dictions come true "will some day make
the old fashioned milk can obsolete."
Many dairies employ the pipeline milk-
ing system in which milk is drawn from
the cow by machine, transferred through
a hose into the pipeline, where it is
pumped through a filter and into a cold
wall farm tank or tank truck.
The new system is catching on. In
one year alone, Florida dairies installed
68 pipe line milkers, 89 tank trucks for
hauling milk from the farm to the milk
plant, and 24 holding tanks.
Contrast this with the picture only a
couple of generations ago, when milk
was delivered in a wagon as soon as pos-
sible after milking, without being cooled.
Indeed, if it were cooled, the housewife
would complain loudly that she was not
getting "fresh" milk. This milk was
transported in covered pails and cans,
dipped out with a variety of dippers and
poured into containers provided by the
(Continued on Next Page)


20 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS






GRADE "A" MILK
(Continued from Page 20)
housewife. The dipper went from house
to house without being washed.
Other New Developments
Some restaurants and soda fountains
have installed bulk dispensers.
Paper cartons are becoming more pop-
ular.
In the products line, low-fat milk has
endeared itself to dieting ladies and
gentlemen. Deprived of its fat, it never-
theless remains a nutritious product.
Each new development, while modern-
izing the dairy industry, has created new
sanitation problems. Endeavoring to over-
come them, enforcement officials and the
dairy industry are continually studying
and conferred together. They work for
example, with manufacturers of dairy
equipment for better and safer designs.
Aside from the public bodies con-
cerned with the milk industry, there are
private organizations which work for its
advancement.
The state's producers and distributors
have banded together in the very vocal
and forceful Florida Dairy Association.
Its many programs include a legislative
committee, which has seen some of its
recommendations become law. The As-
sociation also publishes the bi-monthly
magazine, Florida Dairy News.
Then there are the Dairy Councils,
with a different purpose. The three func-
tioning in Florida are in Jacksonville,
organized about six years ago, Hills-
borough and Pinellas Counties, a joint
venture formed about three years ago,
and the Miami area, including Dade and
Broward counties, which is about a year
old.
Operating the councils are nutrition
experts whose job is to educate the pub-
lic to healthy food habits which, of
course, include drinking an adequate
amount of milk. Each council is financed
by its local dairy industry. The need for
such groups is evidenced by the fact that
per capital milk consumption in Florida
is less than a half pint a person a day.
The Florida dairy industry today is
mature, progressive and cooperative. The
people who operate it and those who
supervise it are specialists. Many laws
have been passed to safeguard both the
industry and the milk it produces.
The processes which have led to the
affixing of "Grade A" on every bottle
of milk produced in Florida have been
long, sometimes tumultuous and arduous.
The task of getting the best possible
bottle of milk to the consumer is a
continuous one, and one which the in-
dustry appears willing and able to carry.
Reprinted from Feb. 1954 Issue "Health
Notes" of Florida State Board of Health


and IT IS GOOD
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MAY & JUNE, 1954 21





























GET IN TUNE WITH JUNE
Florida Observance Is Planned
As Governor Issues Proclamation
"JUNE DAIRY MONTH" has the highest endorsement ever given any program
in any industry. It has the official approval direct from The White House and from
most of the Governors of the United States.
In Florida the program has the additional sanction of the State Legislature through
a joint resolution adopted by the House and Senate in 1951.
Participating in the 1954 Dairy Month program will be millions of dairy farmers,
thousands of milk and milk products processors and distributors, dairy equipment and
supply manufacturers, thousands of stores and restaurants, civic clubs, school groups,
the press, radio and television.
The national objective of the Dairy Month program is to create a better public
understanding and appreciation of the importance and essential nature of milk and
dairy foods to the health and well-being of people of all ages. It likewise is intended
to serve as an opportunity through the supplying of information and facts on the
industry and its products, to gain a better public understanding and appreciation ot
the essential nature and economic importance of the dairy industry in the State and
Nation.


Florida Dairy Month Plans
The Florida Dairy Association has
named both a State Dairy Month Exe-
cutive Committee and a general state-
wide program committee. The general
committee of 50 members consists of
local dairy month programs chairmen in
the various principal cities and towns
of the state.
The Miami program, sponsored by the
Dairy Council of Dade, Broward and
Monroe Counties, will probably be the
most extensive of any local program. A
kick-off luncheon for the state-wide pro-
gram will be sponsored by the Miami
Dairy Month Committee on May 24th.
Mr. Al Wells of Jacksonville, Florida
State Dairy Month Chairman, and Mr.
Charles Ulrich, official of the Milk In-
dustry Foundation, Washington, D. C.,
acting as spokesman for the national
sponsoring committee, will be chief
spokesmen for the luncheon. A further
kick-off luncheon meeting will be held
by the Florida Dairy Association Friday


noon, May 28th, in connection with the
Association's annual convention program
in Daytona Beach. At this luncheon will
be crowned the State Dairy Month Queen
who reigns over the month-long activity
as well as Queen of the Florida Dairy
Industry for the coming year.
Local program committees will spon-
sor open-house and visiting hours at dairy
farms and dairy plants, will furnish dairy
speakers at various civic clubs and meet-
ings where desired, will feature milking
contests, dairy photograph contests.
Other features of the month's pro-
gram will be exhibits and displays of
posters, literature and dairy products in
downtown areas and the display of truck
cards and bumper strips containing dairy
information and slogans.
Wide Cooperation Expected
Magazine editors of leading magazines
of the nation, reaching millions and mil-
lions of housewives, will concentrate on
dairy food feature stories in their June
issues.


President Eisenhower
Endorses Dairy Month
(In a letter to the National June Dairy
Month Chairman for 1953 President Eis-
enhou'er had the following to say about
the importance of the American Dairy
Industry:
"The American .dairy industry is one
of the Nation's greatest resources. Its very
nature directly relates the welfare of the
industry with the welfare of the whole
people.
"This Administration will cooperate
wholeheartedly with dairy farmers and
leaders of the dairy industry in working
toward solutions of all their basic prob-
lems, so that the industry y may make an
ever more substantial contribution to the
health of the American people."
Sincerely,
/s/ Dwight D. Eisenhower
Food editors, who perhaps as influen-
tial consumer leaders have more to do
with the food habits and the food pur-
chases of the nation than any other single
group, will be supplied with new ideas
for new tempting recipes, photographs,
and healthful ideas and suggestions to
housewives and homemakers for the fam-
ily table.
Radio and TV Home Economists, whose
popular beams of visual communication
reach into just about every home in the
nation, will also be furnished more tempt-
ing recipes and novel ideas for promoting
dairy products for use in telling their
vast audiences more about the economy
of dairy foods, their contribution to health
and their importance in the family meal.
Dairy industry programs throughout the
country are ready to tie the June Dairy
Month theme into their own planned pro-
motions and help rally the nation be-
hind the JUNE DAIRY MONTH ban-
ner.
For months in advance, trade press
editors of numerous trade papers in the
dairy industry, official publications, house
organs, bulletins, in the food, restaurant
and fountain field, have been spreading
the theme of the 1954 JUNE campaign
and alerting their millions of readers to
the possibilities and opportunities of
JUNE DAIRY MONTH.
Dairy Farmers Cooperate
The millions of dairy farmers through-
out the land have been hearing from their
own radio and TV stations what the dairy
industry and the food retailers are doing
to help move milk from farm to family
S. Dairy farmers and farm organizations
are taking a prominent part in the
DAIRY MONTH program. Never in the
history of the industry has there been
such well planned harmonious action on
behalf of American agriculture.
National sponsors of the "DAIRY
MONTH Program" are American Butter
(Continued on Next Page)


22 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS





June Dairy Month
STATE PROGRAM COMMITTEE
Al Wells, Jacksonville District Man-
ager of Velda Dairy Products Company,
is 1954 Dairy Month Program Chairman
with the following serving as the Execu-
tive Committee: Jerry Dressel and Vern
Tuttle, Miami; A. R. Allison and R. D.
Saunders, Tampa; Jack Dew and Brady
Johnston, Jacksonville; Claude Kelly,
Daytona Beach; T. G. Lee, Orlando;
John Binns, Sarasota and George Bout-
well, Lake Worth.
GENERAL COMMITTEE
Apalachicola, W. M. Glass, Glass Dairy;
Bonifay, Harvey Spears, Foremost Products;
Bradenton, Herman Burnett, Burnett's Dairy
Farm; Brooksville, Edwin Wernicke, Wer-
nicke Dairy; Clearwater, D. A. Sails, Clear-
water Jersey Dairy; Cocoa, L. D. Butterfield,
Perfection Dairy; Crescent City, R. I. Rauler-
son, Raulerson Dairy; Crestview, Lamar Gar-
rett, Borden's Dairy; Daytona Beach, Claude
Kelly, Foremost Dairies; DeLand, Carroll B.
Green, Green's Dairy; Dunnellon, H. E. Woo-
ten, Wooten Dairy; Fernandina, W. J. Gaines,
Gaines' Dairy; Ft. Lauderdale, H. C. Foreman,
Foreman's Sanitary Dairy; Ft. Myers, Hilton
Hart, Hart's Dairy; Gainesville, John Town-
send, Foremost Dairies, Inc.; Green Cove
Springs, Ed Gustafson, Gustafson's Dairy;
Haines City, D. W. Waters, Marbrook Dairy;
Inverness, M. A. Smith, Smith's Dairy; Jack-
sonville, Maurice Clifford, Foremost Dairies;
Lake City, Dewey Bullard, Columbia Dairies;
Lakeland, Donald Stebbins Cream Crest Dairy;
Lake Wales, J. C. Kincaid, Lake Wales Dairy;
Lake Worth, George Boutwell, Boutwell's
Dairy; Largo. Albert Gay, Seminole Dairy;
Leesburg, P. G. Jeffcoat, Pine Ridge Dairy;
Live Oak, O. Donald Hatch, Velda Dairy Pro-
ducts; Madison, Ben Waring, Hillcrest Dairy;
Marianna, J. D. Hoy, Southern Dairies, Inc.;
Miami, Forrest Greene, Borden's Dairy; Mil-
ton, R. L. Lunsford, Lunsford Dairy;
Moore Haven, D. D. Yaun, Yaun's Dairy;
Mt. Dora, Cecil Parker, Parker Dairy; Ocala,
Bill Pickens, Borden's Dairy; Orlando, R. H.
Lawrence, Perfection Dairies; Pensacola, J. F.
W. Zirkelbach, Polar Ice Cream Co.; Panama
City, Ray Bassett, Borden's Dairy; Punta
Gorda, Wm. Lamar Rose, Poinciana Dairy;
Quincy, George Powell, Foremost Dairies,
Inc.; St. Augustine, Joe Shuford, Foremost
Dairies, Inc.; St. Petersburg, Russell Beven,
Borden's Dairy, Sanford, Dan Ballinger, Perfec-
tion Dairies; Sarasota, John Binns, Land O'-
Sun Creamery; Sebring, M. G. Sorenson, High-
lands Dairy; Stuart, C. W. Moore, Moore's
Dairy; Tallahassee, Curry Bassett, Borden's
Dairy; Tampa, R. D. Saunders, Southern
Dairies, Inc.; Titusville, E. Kloss, Foremost
Products Dist.; Vero Beach, John Tripson,
Tripson's Vero Beach Dairy; West Palm
Beach, Gordon Nielsen, Alfar Creamery Co.;
Westville, James Linton, Sapp Dairies; Winter
Haven, Norlee Thornhill, Polk County Dairies.
GET IN TUNE WITH JUNE
(Continued from Page 22)
Institute, American Dairy Association,
Dry Milk Institute, Dairy Association
Executives, Dairy Industries Supply Asso-
ciation, Evaporated Milk Association, In-
ternational Association of Ice Cream
Manufacturers, Milk Industry Founda-
tion, National Cheese Institute, National
Creameries Association, National Dairy
Council, National Milk Producers Feder-
ation and The Purebreed Dairy Cattle
Association.


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MAY & JUNE, 1954 23


GOOD NEWS!


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I






























Florida Dairy Industry to Study Problems


May 26-28 at Daytona Beach Annual Meeting


Dairy Farmers together with Milk and Ice Cream Distributors will spend three
profitable and enjoyable days at the Florida Dairy Association's 1954 Annual Meet-
ing and Convention at Daytona Beach, May 26-28.
Meeting in the popular Daytona Plaza Hotel, directly on world-famous Daytona
Beach, the dairymen will be joined by prominent national leaders of the dairy indus-
try, dairy production and processing specialists of the University of Florida, nutrition
and dairy foods educational specialists, dairy supply and equipment specialists and
the state's leading dairy supervisory, regulation and inspection authorities.
HCId[ Bd. MC A i 1'r I JI i f r


el i1man oy o am llll, IpeUlsuIIL 0I
the Florida Dairy Association, will be


BOYD MRS. SELLERS

the general presiding chairman and will
be assisted by Vice Presidents Cliff
Wayne, distributor of Miami, and George
Johnson, producer of West Palm Beach.
The business program beginning Wed-
nesday, May 26 at 2:15 P.M., is divided
into three general sessions to be held
Wednesday afternoon, Thursday morn-
,ng and Friday morning. Producers and
distributors will have one separate ses-
sion and producers will have a dairy
pasture and farm tour Thursday after-
noon.
Some of the convention's best speakers
will appear at two special luncheon pro-
grams scheduled for Thursday and Fri-
day with an additional outstanding pro-
gram planned for the annual banquet
Thursday evening.

24 FLORIDA DAIRY


Giving valuable assistance in making
the convention a success from both a
recreational and a business standpoint,
will be the 75 to 100 Allied Trades Mem-
bers who make up the famous "Alligator
Club" of the Florida Association. These
gentlemen pass around an abundance of
expert information and advice in addi-
tion to sponsoring the convention fellow-
ship hour, entertainment and dance on
the Wednesday evening schedule.
Bill Decklar of the Lily-Tulip Cup
Corporation of Tampa and president of
this group will direct the Alligator Club's
activities, assisted by Jim Stewart, Vice
President of Miami, Secretary-Treasurer
Joe Hammond of Tampa, and their ar-
rangements chairman O. L. Bobo of Jack-
sonville Beach.
The Ladies Auxiliary. under the lead-
ership of President Evelyn Sellers of St.
Petersburg and Secretary Marjorie Lay,
has had a special program planning meet-
ing at the convention hotel and have
named Mrs. Claude Kelly and Mrs. Att-
wood Taylor of Daytona Beach as co-
chairmen of ladies' program arrange-
ments. With swimming, strolling, sun-
bathing, golf putting, boating, lunching,
breakfasting, shopping, sightseeing and
taking part in the regular entertainment
featured with the men, the ladies should
not have too much time for boredom.


INTRODUCING


YOUR


F.D.A.


DIRECTORS

L. B. HULL

L. B. "RED" HULL, elected to the
F.D.A. Board of Directors at the annual
meeting in 1953, has been a producer
only since 1947 but his background and
experience make him especially well-
qualified for successful dairy farming
and leadership among the producers.
Born on a cattle ranch near Orlando
in 1906, he worked on both cattle ranch-
es and in citrus groves until 1941 when
he took charge of dairy equipment and
supplies for General Mills, Inc., Orlando.
In 1943 he was made manager of the
Miami Branch of General Mills where
he remained until he purchased his dairy
farm between Gainesville and Micanopy.
For two years Mr. Hull operated the
Sunshine Dairy Products, Inc., but he
sold this business in 1951. Because of his
varied experience, "Red" is one of our
best known and most popular producer
directors. He is chairman of the Field
Day Program for 1954 and a member of
several industry-wide committees includ-
ing those on "Advertising and Sales Pro-
motion" and "Laws, Standards, Regula-
tions and Inspection".


NEWS


i V
Ai..J-d 'C*
Ndi
a















MIss MORRISON MISS DUBOIS


Q


WETTLIN


GREINER


CONVENTION PROGRAM
SCHEDULE
Tuesday Evening May 25
7:00 P.M.-Directors' Open House for
Early Birds
Wednesday May 26
10:00 A.M.-Opening Registration-Hotel
Daytona Plaza
12:00 Noon-"Early Bird Luncheon"
2:15 to 3:45 P.M.-FIRST BUSINESS
SESSION-Joint Plant and
Producer Program
3:00 P.M.-Ladies' Putting Tournament
and Beach Party.
6:15 P.M.-"Alligator Club" Reception
and Social Hour
7:30 P.M.-BUFFET DINNER
8:45 P.M.-Entertainment and Dance
Courtesy "Alligator Club"
Thursday May 27


9:15
11:00
11:00
10:30
12:30
2:00
2:00
6:30
7:30
8:00


A.M.-SECOND JOINT BUSINESS
SESSION
A.M.-Plant Program
A.M.-Producer Program
A.M.-Ladies' Boat Trip and Lunch-
eon
P.M.-Luncheon-All Men
P.M.-Farm and Pasture Tour-
(Optional)
P.M.-Recreation: Golf Tournament,
Boating, Fishing, Swimming
P.M.-Fellowship Hour-Visiting
P.M.-President's Reception
P.M.-ANNUAL DINNER AND
PROGRAM Entertainment
and Dancing
Friday May 28


9:00 A.M. to 12:00 Noon THIRD
JOINT BUSINESS SESSION
10:30 A.M.-"Ladies' Auxiliary" Breakfast
Meeting
10:30 A.M.-"Alligator Club" Annual
Business Meeting
12:45 P.M.-FINAL LUNCHEON MEET-
ING (All delegates and
ladies)
2:15 P.M.-Adjournment of Convention


WERNER ARNETT


THEY'RE ON THE PROGRAM
YOU'LL WANT TO HEAR THEM
ROBERT C. HIBBEN, Exec. Sec'y.,
International Ass'n. of Ice Cream Mfrs.;
RICHARD C. WERNER, Exec. Director
and CHARLES ULRICH, Public Rela-
tions Director, Milk Industry Founda-
tion; UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
STAFF MEMBERS: Dr. E. L. Fouts, C.
W. Reaves, Dr. Howard Wilkowske, Dr.
S. P. Marshall, J. R. Henderson, Walter
Krienke, Dr. D. A. Sanders, Dr. M. Ris-
tic and Dix Arnold.
DAN WETTLIN, JR., N. J. Milk
Industry Association; FRED GREINER,
Ohio Dairy Association; REX PAXTON,
Sutherland Paper Co.; MISS RITA DU-
BOIS, U. S. Department of Agriculture;
MISS MARJORIE MORRISON, Nutri-
tionist, Fla. State Board of Health; SAM
NOLES, Dairy Consultant, Fla. State
Board of Health; JOHN M. SCOTT,
State Dairy Supervisor; HON. TED
DAVID, Speaker-elect, Florida House of
Representatives; HON. TURNER
DAVIS, President-elect, Florida State
Senate; RALPH TOWNSEND, Volusia
County Agent.
Business Program Features
Theme of the Convention is "Solving
Florida's Dairy Problems" Realizing that
the Florida Dairy industry is confronted
with some problems more serious than in
recent years, the annual meeting program
committee has provided for working
clinic sessions on seven different sub-
jects which include (a) Dairy Husbandry,
(2) Dairy Laws, Regulations and Stand-
ards, (3) Dairy Pasture and Milk Pri-
duction, (4) Joint Milk Promotion and
Advertising, (5) Public Relations, (6)
Dairy Foods Nutrition Education, and
(7) Milk and Ice Cream Processing and
Distribution.


SCOTT COLEE


FOUTS


BARROW


DECKLAR


NIELSEN NOLES




F" DrS





DAVID DAVIS


MAY & JUNE, 1954 25


HIBBEN PAXTON


JOHNSON WAYNE












FLORIDA GUERNSEY
REGISTRY TESTS
The American Guernsey Cattle Club
has announced the following results of
recent official Guernsey register tests in
the state of Florida.
These tests are made under the super-
vision of the University of Florida and
reported to the AGCC for approval and
publication.
DINSMORE DAIRY FARMS, Dins-
more, has made a Guernsey State Champ-
ion record with their registered Guernsey
cow, Dinsmore Noble Marie. She has
completed an official Advanced Registry
record of 11,262 pounds of milk and
543 pounds of butterfat on three times
daily milking for a ten-month period,
starting her records as a senior four-year-
old. This production represents approxi-
mately 5349 quarts of high-quality milk
and is the highest Advanced Registry
record in the state of Florida made by a
senior four year-old, milk three times
daily for a ten-month period. The sire
of this cow, Quail Roost Noble Yeoman,
also owned by Dinsmore Dairy Co., Dins-
more, has one son and 52 tested daugh-
ters in the Performance Register of the
AGCC.
DINSMORE DAIRY FARM, also has
a registered Guernsey cow, Dinsmore Ma-
jestic Georgella, which has completed an
official Advanced Registry record of 16,-
400 pounds of milk and 698 pounds
of butterfat (representing approximately
7681 quarts of high-quality milk) as a
five year-old, milked three times daily
for 365 days. She is the daughter of
"Dinsmore Majestic Rose King" which
has 52 tested daughters listed in the
Performance Register of the AGCC.
C. E. DONEGAN DAIRY, Largo,
has a registered Guernsey cow, Dinsmore
Maxmost Bloom, which has produced
13,463 pounds of milk and 611 pounds
of butterfat (representing approximately
6279 quarts of high-quality milk).
"Bloom", a seven year-old, was milked
730 times while on test. Her production
is the highest Herd Improvement record
in Florida made by a seven year-old in
the 365C day division. She is the daugh-
ter of Quail Roost Maxmost which has
133 sons and tested daughters listed in
the Performance Register of the AGCC.
CARROLL L. WARD & SON DAIRY,
Winter Park, owns two registered Guern-
sey cows which have completed official
Advanced Registry records. On three
times daily milking for a ten-month per-
iod, Belmont View Brilliant's Buena, a
senior two year-old, produced 10,896

26 FLORIDA DAIRY


pounds of milk and 527 pounds of but-
terfat. This production represents approx-
imately 5117 quarts of high-quality milk.
She is the daughter of the famous Guern-
sey sire, Sky Brook Maxim Brilliant, that
has one son and 36 tested daughters in
the Performance Register. Lakemont
King's Betty produced 10,878 pounds of
milk and 526 pounds of butterfat milked
three times daily for a ten-month period,
as a junior two year-old. This production
represents approximately 5117 quarts of
high-quality milk. "Betty" is the daugh-
ter of the famous Guernsey sire, McDon-
ald Farms King Ken, that has 25 tested
daughters in the Performance Register.

Guernseys Purchased
By Florida Breeders
The following Florida purchases of
registered young Guernsey sires have
been announced recently by the American
Guernsey Cattle Club.
GEORGE H. FARLESS, Orlando, has
just purchased Lakemont Peerless Duke
from Carroll L. Ward & Son, Winter
Park, Fla. This richly bred young bull
is out of the well-bred cow, Lakemont
King's Iris, that has once been classified
Desirable for type, has a production rec-
ord of 11,945 pounds of milk and 488
pounds of butterfat made as a senior two
year-old. He is sired by Coker King's
Peerless.
J. E. BARRINGTON, Live Oak, has
just purchased Dinsmore Noble Winston
from Dinsmore Dairy Co., Dinsmore,
Fla. This richly bred young bull is out
of the well-bred cow, Dinsmore Mayroyal
Winnie, that has once been classified Ex-
cellent for type, has two production rec-
ords of 12,754 pounds of milk and 589
pounds of butterfat made as a senior
three year-old and 14,638 pounds of milk
and 657 pounds of butterfat made as a
five year-old. He is sired by Quail Roost
Noble Yeoman.
J. E. BARRINGTON, Live Oak, has
also purchased Dinsmore Musketeer from
Dinsmore Dairy Co., Dinsmore, Fla. This
richly bred young bull is out of the well-
bred cow, Dinsmore Princess Muffett,
that has once been classified Very Good
for type, has a production record of
12.455 pounds of milk and 571 pounds
of butterfat made as a seven year-old.
He is sired by Quail Roost Noble Yeo-
man.
S. A. WRIGHT, JR., Jacksonville, has
just purchased Dinsmore Rosemost from
Dinsmore Dairy Co., Dinsmore, Fla.
This richly bred young bull is out of the
well-bred cow, Dinsmore Majestic Gilda,
that has once been classified Very Good
for type, has two production records of

NEWS


GUERNSEY CATTLE CLUB NEWS


Alice J. Jennings
Alice J. Jennings, wife of our popular,
long time sergeant-at-arms of dairy as-
sociation meetings, was one of the best
known and most loved regular attend-
ants at F.D.A. Annual Meetings as well
as other dairy industry events. Her
many friends know about her death
early in April and her absence at this
annual meeting and future gatherings
will be keenly felt. Many will remember
how Alice sold hats for our hill-billy
and county-fair parties.
Mrs. Jennings lived in Jacksonville
for the past 28 years and had been very
active in the work of the Episcopal
Church and its mission work. She also
worked with Jim in the Big Brother
movement, taking many boys into their
home. She was a member of Eastern
Star. Her sympathy and understanding,
as well as her good sportsmanlike quali-
ties, made her scores of friends, many
of them in the dairy industry and its
allied trades. A large congregation
gathered in St. Johns Cathedral in Jack-
sonville for funeral services.
In addition to her husband, Mrs. Jen-
nings is survived by two sons, Howell
and Herbert Andrews, a stepson, James
Jennings, Jr. and seven sisters.

WEIGHT CONTROL CLINIC
(Continued from Page 14)
In communities where other health
agencies are active, the Dairy Council in-
tensifies, strengthens and expands nutri-
tion education.
The main concern and purpose of any
Dairy Council is to disseminate scientific-
ally accurate nutrition information. The
advantage of this program to the dairy
industry is that in teaching good nutri-
tion we must teach the essential role that
milk and milk products have in the diets
of both old and young.

17.237 pounds of milk and 830 pounds
of butterfat made as a junior four year-
old, and 18, 343 pounds of milk and
787 pounds of butterfat made as a five
year-old. He is sired by Quail Roost
Maxmost.
V. G. MAPES, St. Cloud, has just
purchased the young Guernsey sire,
Lakemont Peerless Noble, from Carroll
L. Ward & Son, Winter Park, Fla. This
richly bred young bull is out of the well-
bred cow, Lakemont King's Ray, that
has once been classified Desireable for
type, and has a production record of
9,343 pounds of milk and 421 pounds
of butterfat, made as a junior-two-year-
old. He is sired by Coker King's Peer-
lyess.
VELDA DAIRY FARMS, INC., Tal-
lahassee, has just purchased the young
Guernsey sire, Hansenarea Baron, from
Laurence D. Hansen, South Valley, N. Y.
This richly bred young bull is out of the
well-bred cow, Hansenarea Salvele, that
has a production record of 11,358 pounds
of milk and 507 pounds of butterfat
made as a junior-two-year-old. He is
sired by Douglaston Baron Kenyon.





V

Rumen Microorganisms Why We Have Butterfat Variations
In Calf Feed BY DUD l. WW IMTCD DP ... ... I.


By GEORGE A. JEFFREYS
The Rumelk Co., Salem, Virginia
The mountains of milk produced as
food for man would not be possible
without the aid of billions of microbes.
Thousands of different kinds live and
work as a well organized society in the
rumen world and their sole purpose is
to digest and eat the roughage and food
consumed by the cow and then the cow
in turn easily digests these microbes.
The type of animal in which these
marvelous works of nature take place is
called the ruminant or cud chewing ani-
mal. This class includes the sheep, goat,
camel, llama and even elephants. In fact
it is one of the worlds most important
group of animals to man because they
are the only animals that can utilize the
microbe world so that milk, butter and
wool can be made from roughage.
The dog, cat, man and other animals
cannot digest roughage such as hay, straw
corn stalks and other fibrous plants.
Their food must be of a concentrated
type. In the ruminant however, mother
nature has provided a way to digest this
roughage through the microbe.
The ruminant does not secrete its own
enzymes of digestion like the cat, dog
and human. Instead of an ordinary stom-
ach the ruminant has as many as four
stomachs, the principle and largest one
is called the rumen. The rumen is a stor-
age and fermentation tank all in one. To
show how large it is in a mature animal,
the weight of the rumen is equal to one
fifth of the animal's weight. So, in a
1000 lb. steer the entire rumen and its
contents would weigh approximately 200
lbs.
The rumen acts like a washing ma-
chine. In addition to this, part of the ru-
men contents are regurgitated in the form
of a ball called the cud. This takes place
about once every minute. The cud
in being chewed mixes the material more
thoroughly and tears the tough fibers
apart and exposes them to the billions
of microbes. All this physical action is
to make every part of the roughage
available to the action of the microorgan-
isms.
It is estimated that 10% of the rumen
contents consists of bacteria and protozoa.
This can be classed as high protein
food. Since the life cycle of these or-
ganisms is short with the old dying off
and the new generations being produced,
this provides a continuous supply of an-
imal protein from roughage and minerals
such as urea. As fast as the bacteria are
produced they are moved along down the
alimentary tract to become digested and
utilized as food.
The most notable feature of digestion
in the rumen is its perpetual progression.


Reprinted from MILK PRODUCERS REVIEW
In my twenty years experience in butterfat check-testing, the most frequent query
I have heard is why there is a variance in tests. That applies not only to the difference
between D.H.I.A. tests and composites, but also the variance between a composite test
and check-test of the same sample.
As to the first query, concerning the D.H.I.A. tests, I cannot forget that I was
once a herdsman on a large dairy farm, and the day the tester was present we really
milked those cows thoroughly. Every last drop of strippings was obtained, as the
record for the entire month depended on this one day's test. I think that is only human
nature, but if you compare this one-day herd test with a 15-day composite, you find it
is usually higher than the plant sample.
TESTS VARY FROM DAY TO DAY
The Inter-State, on numerous occasions, has checked on fresh samples taken from
the weight vat at the milk plant. We have found that samples of the same patron
taken every day will vary, in some instances, as much as a whole percent from one day
to the next, but the average of these daily fresh tests for fifteen days always checks
very closely with the composite sample which represents the milk for the same period.
In some instances in the past, weigh
vats have been found that, due to their ed by the sulphuric acid which is almost
shape or construction of the strainer com- twice as heavy as milk. The separation of
apartment, did not permit the milk to mix the fat is then completed by centrifuging
uniformly. These cases were usually cor- the test bottles. This force brings the
rected by the installation of an agitator, butterfat completely to the surface and
and in several instances a new weigh vat by subsequent additions of water any
of a different shape corrected the diffi- foreign matter is washed out of the fat,
culty. which is forced up into the graduated
BABCOCK TEST IN USE neck of the test bottle where it can be
The second question, that of why the accurately read.'
check-tester's results and the plant man- .02% VARIATION ALLOWED
ager's were not always the same, can be This test requires the use of glassware
traced to the nature of the Babcock test which must be State approved, and al-
itself. This test devised by Dr. Stephen though two different individuals test the
M. Babcock in 1890, proved so superior same sample of milk by the Babcock
to any others, particularly as to its rapid- method, their results may vary slightly.
ity, simplicity and inexpensiveness, that it The law recognizes this fact and generally
met with universal favor. ...


The method is based on the action of
centrifurgal force and the reaction of
sulphuric acid upon the constituents of
milk other than fat. The acid dissolves
all of the constituents of milk except the
fat. This chemical action generates so
much heat that it causes the fat to liquify.
The fat being the lightest part of the
milk tends to rise to the top and separate
from the rest of the milk, the specific
gravity of which has been greatly increas-

Once an animal has been weaned it re-
mains for the rest of its life in a state
of active digestion. This is in direct con-
trast to carnivorous animals which eat
and digest highly nutritous and concen-
trated protein and whose digestive pro-
cess in the stomach is over in three or
four hours. The nature of the foodstuffs
eaten by the ruminant together with the
countless numbers of bacteria necessary
to ferment and digest such resistant sub-
stances as fibrous bulky foodstuffs, re-
quires as much as 24 hours, and storage
space. Time is important to the ruminant
and to allow sufficient time and suffic-
ient space to digest such material, a fer-
mentation vat is necessary and this i0
provided by the reticulum and rumen.


considers .0u percent iiiference as check -
ing.
The mercuric chloride preservative tab-
lets used in composite samples generally
keep the milk in good condition for
about a month, particularly if it is held
at a temperature under 60' Fahrenheit.
The plant tester, who first tests the sam-
ples, must handle the composite samples
so they are not "oiled off" by too high
a temperature when they are heated pre-
paratory to mixing, otherwise subsequent
tests will tend to run lower by a point or
two. Also, the formation of mold on the
bottom of the stoppers and the insides
of the bottles is likely to result in a lower
test. Then, too, there is the danger of the
tester under-reading or over-reading, and
here human nature is again a factor. Sev-
eral persons reading the same test may
disagree as to the result.
The state agencies who deal with the
testing of milk require all testers of milk
and cream to pass a rigid examination
and be licensed. Even so, variations do
and will continue in check-testing as long
as the Babcock method is used and differ-
ent individuals, who think and act on
their own initiative, perform the testing,
but so far no more accurate and rapid
method has been found.


MAY & JUNE, 1954 27







80 Dairy Calves
Given 4-H Boys
By: SAM BURGESS
Florida Agricultural Extension Service
Florida's 4-H Dairy Program received
a big boost this spring when 80 4-H boys
in Gilchrist, Dixie, Union and Brevard
counties received high quality dairy calves
in three separate but similar programs.
All the calves are heifers, daughters
of cows in production in Broward County
dairies and proven sires by artificial in-
semination and, when received, each had
the potential of becoming a fine family
milk cow. Of even greater value, how-
ever, is the training in dairying each boy
will receive as he cares for his calf day
after day. Many will groom their calves
for exhibition in 4-H dairy shows and
keener competition is bound to result.
At Trenton on March 10, County
Agents Leonard Cobb of Gilchrist and
Don Adams of Dixie together distributed
44 calves. Thirty went to 4-H boys in
Gilchrist and 14 went to boys in Dixie.
On March 25 at Lake Butler, 28 4-H
boys of Union County received calves
from County Agent Bill Cowen. C. D.
Geieer, vocational agriculture teacher at
Union County high school, assigned
calves to 26 FFA boys and three FHA
girls at the same time. This project, in
which Cowan and Geiger cooperated de-
veloped from plans of a Farm Bureau
committee for a Union County Fair this
fall and received enthusiastic support
from other organizations and individuals
in the county.
C. W. Reaves, dairy specialist, and
Wilson Sparks, assistant dairy specialist,
with the Florida Agricultural Extension
Service, were present at both Trenton
and Lake Butler to help get the new
dairy projects off to a good start. They
gave the young people instructions in the
fundamentals of dairy calf feeding and
care.
Harrell V. Cunningham, assistant Bre-
vard County agent, distributed calves to
eight 4-H boys on April 3. He kept these
calves three weeks to get them started
right. Cunningham plans to have a
County 4-H show this year with these
calves and he hopes some of them will
be ready to compete in state shows.
These county agents picked up the
calves at Ft. Lauderdale and trucked
them to their home counties after arrange-
ments to get the calves had been made by
Broward County Agent B. E. Lawton and
Robert S. Pryor, assistant county agent.
Reaves pointed out that while these
distributions will enlarge and strengthen
the over-all State 4-H Dairy Program
conducted by the Extension Service they
are only a part of it. Other grade calves
are secured for 4-H projects from time
to time and registered animals are ob-
tained where circumstances permit. Both

28 FLORIDA DAIRY


HUNDREDS OF GIRLS MAKE SPLENDID RECORD
IN FLORIDA'S 4-H CLUB DAIRY PROGRAMS
A recent issue if the Florida Dairy News called attention to the great progress
and accomplishments in the sound boyhood training of Florida's 4-H Boys' Club
program and particularly their extensive activities in dairy training. The publishing of
that information brought to the attention of the editor the equally splendid and pos-
sibly more unusual work of Florida's 4-H Club Girls in dairy and dairy foods training.
Our readers will be most interested and perhaps surprised to learn, as I was, that
there are 382 4-H girls who own and care for 391 dairy cows and calves in 4-H dairy
training projects. Many of these calves are secured directly from loans made possible
by the girls' affiliation with 4-H work. t g d b t a -
the girls develop both team and individ-
Miss Emily King, State Girls 4-H ual demonstrations.
Club Agent reports, concerning the re-
sults of dairy animal projects for girls Those in advanced work have county
that, "We have noticed in these girls, and area eliminations before qualifying
definite character development along for participation in the State Dairy Foods
with their responsibilities. Besides caring Demonstration, an annual feature of the
for their dairy animals, the girls are Central Florida Exposition and State 4-H
given the opportunity to show them at Dairy Show.
county, district and state-wide dairy Nineteen of the State's 4-H Girls in
events. At these shows, the girls' ability dairy-foods-demonstration qualified as re-
to groom and show the animal is judged presentatives of their counties and partic-
along with the quality of the animal. ipated in the dairy foods demonstrations
"By-products of such opportunities are at the 1954 Annual 4-H Dairy Show at
greater poise, self-confidence, and secur- Orlando. These nineteen girls represented
ity. These girls also learn the value of eleven different counties of the State.
using sanitary practices in caring for the Much credit for this outstanding char-
home milk supply." ac, ; ,- dn ronm amnnr F.nr;ia'
,-- r etbuldlin rora ao Florida's


We were further surprised to learn
that there are also 770 4-H Club girls
participating in Florida 4-H Dairy Foods
programs, through which the girls learn
the value of dairy products in the daily
diet, even though a family cow may not
be practical. In this dairy foods program


the Guernsey and Jersey breeders' asso-
ciations of Florida and several Ayrshire
breeders in the state are interested in
helping 4-H members get registered an-
imals, Reaves said.
"We know that not all club members
should have registered animals," he de-
clared. "Many should have grade animals.
However, the standard or aim is to place
the best animal with each club member
that the family's finances and his poten-
tial ability will permit. Better animals
develop more pride of ownership, are
more valuable when grown, and their
offspring are more valuable to keep or
sell."
In addition to the county and district
4-H shows leading to the annual State
4-H Dairy Show and Judging Contest at
the Central Florida Exposition grounds
in Orlando, the State 4-H Dairy Pro-
gram includes other competitions based
on the work done in 4-H dairy projects.
These are: The 4-H Efficient Dairy Pro-
duction Contest, the Dairy Achievement
Award, the Butterfat Production Con-
test and the Pasture Essay Contest. Four-
H girls also participate in the Dairy
Foods Demonstration Program supervised
by Home Demonstration foods specialists
and agents.


teen-age girls is due our State 4-H Girls
Club Agent, Miss Emily King, her Assist-
ant, Miss Bronna Mae Elkins, State Home
Demonstration Agent, Miss Anna Mae
Sikes and her Assistants Miss Cleo Arn-
ett, Extension Nutritionist and Miss Alma
Warren, Assistant Agent.


Alvarez Wins State 4-H
Butterfat Production Award
At the 1954 State 4-H Dairy Show
in Orlando, Warren Alvarez of Jackson-
ville was awarded the State Feed Dealers
Association trophy as the 4-H Club own-
er of the highest butterfat producing cow
for the past year.
Warren's cow, X Standard Ivy Nan-
ette. won the award on a production
equivalent record of 10,494 pounds of
milk and 571 pounds butterfat.
Placing second in the competition was
Virginia Stuart of Bartow, whose cow,
Draconis Signal Betty, produced 9,376
pounds of milk and 486 pounds of but-
terfat.
Edith Cameron, also of Duval County,
placed third with her animal, Valori
Hazel Gem, whose milk production was
10,655 and butterfat production, 421
pounds.
Both the Alvarez and Stuart animals
were former grand championship winners
at the State 4-H Dairy Show.
Others whose animals placed high in
the butterfat production contest were:
William Schack, Jackson County; Jack
Dodd, Orange County and Donald Han-
son, Duval County.


NEWS


~









superintendent and T. W. Sparks, assist-
ant extension dairyman, was ringmaster.
Judges were: Frank W. Fitch, extension
dairyman, University of Georgia, Jerseys;
Floyd Barlow, Glenwood, former Ohio
Guernsey field man, Guernseys; R. M.
Thompson, Orlando, former director of
the New York Holstein Friesian Associa-
tion, Ayrshires and Holsteins; Lloyd
Warren, Albertville, Ala., Southeastern
field representative of the American Jer-
sey Cattle Club, and M. O. Watkins,
assistant director, Florida Agricultural
Extension Service, showmanship; K. S.
McMullen and W. J. Platt, district
agents, extension service, fitting.
W. W. Brown, State Boys' 4-H Agent,
and Grant Godwin, Assistant State Boys'
4-H Club Agent, were in charge of the
judging contest. Miss Ethyl Holloway,
District Home Demonstration Agent,
Tallahassee, was show clerk. Paul Thorn-
hill, former member of Polk County 4-H
Club and National Champion 4-H Judg-
ing Team, judged written reasons in the
judging contest.

Awards Banquet Honors Winners
Of State 4-H Show
As the show ended participants hurried
to the Orlando Chamber of Commerce
Building for food and recognition at the
4-H Dairy Awards Banquet. Dr. J.
Wayne Reitz, provost for agriculture,
University of Florida, presided as awards
were presented. Director Clayton and
Miss Anna Mae Sikes, state home demon-
stration agent, Tallahassee, were present
with Provost Reitz and show officials
at the speakers' table.
Mr. Bickford was paid special tribute
for his untiring service to the 4-H dairy
program by Mr. Brown, who presented a
4-H plaque to the exposition manager.
Herman Boyd, Miami, president, Flor-
ida Dairy Association, presented that or-
ganization's revolving trophy for the best
County Group, to the Polk County dele-
gation. Leon County received the plaque
for the second best County Group, pro-
vided by the Spartan Grain and Mill
Company, Jacksonville, and Duval Coun-
ty received the plaque of the Kuder Pulp
Sales Company, Lake Alfred.
The loving cup and plaques for the
Jersey winners were presented by Wil-
liam Nolan, Jr., Jacksonville, president of
the Florida Jersey Cattle Club.
W. A. Boutwell, Lake Worth, presi-
dent of the Florida Guernsey Cattle Club,
presented trophies awarded the Guernsey
winners.
Ayrshire awards were made by Philip
Schuyler of Sarasota and New York, who
represented the Ayrshire Breeders Asso-
ciation.


The top Holstein showmen received
their awards from Mr. Herman Boyd as
president of the Florida Holstein Club.
Steve Simmons received the showman-
ship trophy presented by the American
Savings Building and Loan Association.
Beverly Simmons received the best fit-
ted animal revolving trophy, formerly
held by her brother Steve, from Charles
Johnson of Dinsmore Dairy Farms, spon-
sors of the trophy.
The Florida Times-Union trophy for
the "top dairy judging team" was pre-
sented by Steve Willis, Times-Union
farm editor, to the Pinellas County team.
T. J. Hughes, agricultural news editor, of
the Florida Grower and Rancher pre-
sented a plaque to the second place St.
Johns County judging team. The Orlando
Sentinal-Star plaque to the third place
Leon County team was presented by Don
Vincent, farm editor, American Jersey
Cattle Club medals for the three top in-
dividual judges were presented by show
officials.
Awards to winners in the Efficient
Dairy Production Contest were made by
John Norfleet, Orlando, for Southern
Dairies and the National Dairy Products
Corporation. Receiving these were: Wil-
liam Schack, Jackson, state winner; and
district winners, Dick Salter, Santa Rosa;
Erny Sellers, Leon; Leslie Goff, Suwan-
nee: Donald Hanson, Duval; Harold
McGee, Marion; Fred Whilden, Orange;
James Thornhill, Polk; and George Gor-
den, Dade. Paul Hayman, Polk County
agent, accepted the award to the winning
county.
Also recognized were James Thornhill,
state 4-H dairy achievement winner for
1953, and Warren Alvarez, Duval, who
won the production record contest spon-
sored by the Florida Feed Dealers Asso-
ciation, Warren's cow, X Standard Ivy
Manette, produced 10,442 pounds of
milk and 568 pounds butterfat in 305
days with two milkings a day.


STRICTLY POLITICAL
"Strictly political," as John Temple
Graves in an editorial in the Charleston
News and Courier sees it, is the Supreme
Court's "invitation" to Attorney-General
Brownell to appear before it in the school
segregation cases next fall, since the
Eisenhower Administration will be put
on the spot, whatever stand Mr. Brown-
well takes. The move "does not enhance
the Supreme Court's reputation for exalt-
ed detachment," says Editor Waring.
The country has never been honest
with itself on the race question. When
you read the Declaration it is hard to
realize that even though Negro slavery
was already an institution among the


STATE 4-H DAIRY SHOW
(Continued from Page 17)


MAY & JUNE, 1954 29


Classified Advertising
RATE FOR ALL CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING IS 10c PER WORD


FOR SALE

60-80 TONS HIGH QUALITY leafy alfalfa
hay. This hay is freshly cut and runs approx-
inmately 20% protein. $.$1).0 per ton f.o.b.
our ranch. SQUARE G RANCH Phone
989 Leesburg, Florida.

One USED PURE-PAK FILLER SEALER,
Model LT-20, with Rotary Accumulating Table;
GUARANTEED TO BE IN EXCELLENT
CONDITION. GENERAL MILLS, INC., 711
West Cass Street, Tampa, Fla.

RANCH EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES-CATTLE
WVATERING TANKS. Ten-foot steel rein-
forced Concrete. 2'% feet wide. $60.00, delivered,
$50.00 your truck. Four foot wide tanks, $80.00
and $70.00. Orlando Concrete Specialties. Box
6122, Station 6, Orlando, Florida. Phone 3-4111.
DAIRYMEN, ARE YOU IN NEED OF
BREEDING STOCK? Holstein, Swiss, Guern-
sey Fresh or springing cows, fall freshen-
ing heifers, open helfers, heifer calves. Any
number shipped -anywhere; Bang tested or
vaccinated. Registered or high grade. Selected
from Wisconsin's finest herds. Reasonably
priced. ROBERT H. WALKER, Phone Meno-
iuonee Falls 0263, L.annon, Wisc'onsin.
35754DN

SKIM MILK SALES ZOOM
The sales of fluid skim milk for six-
teen Connecticut dealers increased 535
per cent between January, 1948 and June
1951.
For forty-five large U.S. cities, the
increase from January, 1947 to February,
1935, was 531 per cent.
It appears that with each decrease of
10 per cent in price, sales increased
40 per cent and vice versa. This is the
average experience of a group of major
United States cities where the volume
of fluid skim milk is about 2.4 per cent
of whole milk. In the control experiment
in one market, where skim sales aver-
aged 5.8 per cent of whole milk, 10 per
cent price changes resulted in a 20 per
cent sales change.
Skim milk seems to be sold equally
to all income groups.
The product preferred seems to con-
tain some extra cream and non-fat solids.
colonies, no signer found anything in-
compatible with the proposition that all
men were created free and equal.
Today we think of slavery as un-
American, and it is. It became so in
1865. But segregation isn't un-Ameri-
can, since it has been American way from
the beginning and still is. It may be
wrong, unjust, un-Christian and any-
thing else you want to-call it, but how
can what has always been a way of
America be "un-American"?







DID YOU KNOW?
. That American milk consumers are
a hard drinking bunch? They downed
more than 12 billion quarts last year.
.. ten and one-half quarts of rich milk
are needed to provide the four pints of
rich cream necessary to make one pound
of butter?
S. that ice cream is a highly nutritious,
as well as delightful food? Government
charts list ice cream in Group IV of the
Seven Basic Food Groups.
.that dairymen throughout the world
come to the U. S. to observe and study
America's efficicient low-cost system of
milk production, distribution, sanitation,
pasteurization and supply?
... that vanilla, chocolate, and strawberry
are America's favorite ice cream flavors?
About 51% of all ice cream sold is van-
illa, 18% chocolate, and almost 10%
strawberry.
S. .though most mothers make an effort
to see that their families get enough milk,
according to a U. S. Government report,
women generally "have a poor record as
milk consumers, often taking far less
than they need for adequate nutrition"
S. that more whisky is consumed in
Washington, D. C. than milk?


KENTUCKY DAIRYMEN TO SPEND
$200,000.00 ON ADVERTISING
A bill to create a Kentucky Dairy Com-
mission to finance the promotion of dairy
products was passed recently by the Ken-
tucky Senate, 25 to 8, the House having
already passed it 80 to 1. Milk producers
must vote a majority acceptance of the
plan.
A six-member commission will be cre-
ated, to consist of the commissioner of
agriculture, head of the dairy section of
the University of Kentucky, and four
others to be appointed by the dean of the
college of agriculture at the University
of Kentucky.
If the plan is ratified by producers, the
commission will inaugurate a program to
stimulate the use of milk and dairy pro-
ducts through advertising, research and
sales promotion.
The program will be financed by a
check-off of 2c per cwt. of whole milk
production or 1/2 per pound of butter-
fat. It is estimated that the check-off
will yield between $200,000 and $250,-
000 yearly. In the case of small producers
who sell direct to consumers, his first
3,000 pounds a month is exempt from
the check-off.
All milk and cream handlers, who will
collect the check-off from the producers,
will be required to register with the
commission once a year. The registration
fee will be $1.


Milk Sanitarians And Laboraforians
Hold Successful Annual Conference
By: H. H. WILKOWSKE, Secretary
Florida Association Milk Sanitation
The Tenth Annual Conference of the Florida Association of Milk Sanitarians
was held on the University of Florida campus in Gainesville, on April 13 to 16,
1954. Highlighting the program was the awarding of Ten-Year Service Citation
Certificates. Ten outstanding members of the Florida Association received this award.
The citation, jointly awarded by three organizations, read "In recognition of out-
standing service in Florida Association of Milk Sanitarians, active membership in
the International Association of Mlk and Food Santarians, regular participation in the
annual conferences conducted by the Department of Dairy Science, University of
Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, and for contributing to the improvement
and protection of public health through the sanitary control of production, process-
ing and distribution of dairy products."
The meeting got off to a good start Mr. N. A. Mason, Pittsburgh Plate Glass
with the Laboratory Section featuring a Company, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania,
thorough discussion and practice period pointed out that new chemical compounds
dealing with all phases of the Cryoscope. are now available which, when added to
No doubt this subject was of more than paint, increase the cost about one dollar
usual interest in view of the fact that per gallon, but which are extremely suc-
five court cases are pending at the pres- cessful in solving the mold and mildew
ent time in the Dade County (Miami) paint problem around many dairy and
area based upon alleged watered milk de- food establishments throughout the entire
tected by cryoscopic examinations, country.
Several outstanding speakers from out- The following were additional popu-
of-state were on hand to make the pro- lar subjects on the program: Control of
gram of interest to the 125 people attend- Filth in Foods, Coliforms, Bulk Milk
ing. Mr. W. H. McClean, Senior Sani- Dispensers discussed by Dr. W. H. Has-
tarian of the U. S. Public Health Service kell; Latest information on plastics and
from Atlanta, presented and demonstrat- rubber; The State and National Cattle
ed the operation and testing of a HTST Disease Program; and, a round table
system. A portable (about 750 pounds!) discussion of the Procedures for Sampl-
unit has been fabricated for this purpose ing Milk from Cold Wall Tanks.
which can be used very effectively in
presenting a better understanding of this D. H. I. A. TESTING PROGRAM
subject. Mr. G. M. Wilkins, of Ingersoll- By: C. W. Reaves
Rand, New York City, presented an in- State D.H.I.A. Supervisor
teresting talk, with slide illustrations on A recent DHIA report of the Bureau
air agitation of milk. He pointed out of Dairy Industry showed that 5.3 per
that such a system meets all sanitary regu- cent of all milk cows in the United
lations and is being installed in numer- States were on test on January 1, 1954.
ous large dairies in several states. Our Florida had 5.4 per cent (8305 cows) on
friend, Dr. G. H. Hopson, DeLaval Sep- DHIA test, or just over the national
arator Company, Poughkeepsie, New average. The figures are based on all
York, again appeared on the program milk cows whether in dairy herds or on
after several years absence to bring us farms as family milk cows.
up to date on the many aspects of pipe A study in progress of the relation-
line milkers. In addition to his usual ship of the amount of pasture and forage
excellent discussions, he had an actual- fed in DHIA tested herds showed that
size equipment set-up to show cleaning those herds receiving the larger percent-
of milkers and pipe lines by vacuum ages of their total feed from pasture and
circulation. forage (within the limits practiced in
Mr. William A. Hadfield, Pennsyl- Florida) produced more milk than those
vania Salt Manufacturing Company, Phil- herds receiving more of their total feed
adelphia, gave an interesting discussion intake in the barn. This spotlights the
of water problems related to sanitation value of providing more forage to Flor-
and noted that Florida is one of num- ida dairy herds as pasture, chopped for-
erous states that have many different age, hay or silage or any combination of
types of water with which to contend, these forms of feed supply.
I I


30 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


AWeA


~%~ ~;t~-






























































THE ABOVE PICTURES OF THE FLORIDA MILK SANITARIANS CONFERENCE SHOW:
TOP, The Annual dinner of the group at the University of Florida; CENTER, LEFT TO
RIGHT: Officers and Directors elected April 16th for 1954-1955-Past-President, L. L.
Chaffee, Milk Sanitarian, Pinellas County Health Department, St. Petersburg; Director, J. S.
Massey, Milk Sanitarian, Escambia County Health Department, Pensacola; President, C. O.
Stoy, Dairy Supervisor, Dade County Health Unit, Miami; Director, S. O. Noles, Milk Con-
sultant, State Board of Health, Jacksonville; Vice-President, H. H. Rothe, State Dairy Super-
visor, Gainesville; Director, R. D. Lundy, Milk Sanitarian, Glades-Hendry County Health De-
partment, Moore Haven; Director, J. D. Robinson, State Dairy Supervisor, Plant City; Secretary-
Treasurer, H. H. Wilkowske, University of Florida, Gainesville. Another Director, W. R.
Thompson, Milk Sanitarian, City Board of Health, Jacksonville, was not in the picture. BOT.
TOM, LEFT TO RIGHT, RECIPIENTS OF 10 YEAR AWARD OF THE FLORIDA ASS'N.
OF MILK SANITARIANS-C. O. Stoy, Dade County Dairy Supervisor, Miami; H. H. Rothe,
State Dairy Supervisor, Gainesville; W. Howard Brown, Director of Food and Laboratory Divi-
sion, Jacksonville Health Department; H. F. Cameron, Sanitation Officer, Clay County Health
Department, Green Cove Springs; L. A. Scribner, Milk and Food Sanitarian, Orlando; E. L. Fouts,
Head, Department of Dairy Science, University of Florida; A. G. Shaw, State Dairy Supervisor,
Tallahassee; B. J. Northrup, Bacteriologist, Pinellas County Health Department, St. Peters-
burg; and L. T. Smith, State Dairy Supervisor, Jacksonville. Not shown, J. M. Scott, Chief
Dairy Supervisor, Gainesville.


National Milk Standard
Proposed In Congress
House Bill 8368, introduced in the
House of Representatives by Congress-
man A. H. Anderson, provides for uni-
form sanitation standards for milk and
milk products shipped in interstate com-
merce.
The bill, which was referred to the
House Committee on Agriculture, would
amend the National Agricultural Market-
ing Act by adding the following new
section:
"Sec. 7 (a) The purpose of this sec-
tion is to remove those barriers to the
free movement of milk and milk pro-
ducts in interstate commerce which now
exist because of milk marketing agree-
ments and orders issued under this Act,
and because of various State and local
sanitation requirements; and to provide
uniform sanitation standards governing
milk and milk products shipped in inter-
state commerce.
"(b) The Surgeon General of the
Public Health Service shall prescribe uni-
form sanitation standards governing pro-
duction and handling of milk and milk
products shipped in interstate commerce.
As used in this section, the term 'sanitary
milk or milk products' means milk or
milk products produced in a State whose
chief agricultural officer has certified to
the Secretary of Agriculture of the United
States that milk and milk products pro-
duced in such State are produced and
handled in compliance with the standards
prescribed under this subsection.
"(c) No marketing agreement or order
issued under this Act shall apply to, or
be effective in, any marketing area in
which any Federal, State, or local restric-
tions operate to prevent the free market-
ing of sanitary milk or milk products
shipped into such area in interstate com-
merce.
"(d) No Federal, State, or local law
shall operate to prevent the free market-
ing, in any area of the United States, of
sanitary milk or milk products shipped
into such area in interstate commerce."

Protein Needs of Children
Protein requirement is high during
early childhood. This is a period of in-
creasing muscle mass and continuous cal-
cification of the hard tissues. Both pro-
cesses require protein. The small child,
subjected to infections, had a tendency to
high temperatures in response to infec-
tion, which further increases protein need.

Milk cools many times faster in water
than in air of the same temperature. Milk
will cool more in 15 minutes in 600 water
than it will in one hour in most refriger-
ators. Quick cooling with water and then
placing in a refrigerator is the best way
to cool and store the home milk supply.


MAY & JUNE, 1954 31







SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE

APPOINTED FOR OAKITE
John N. Lee has been appointed tech-
nical service representative in the Miami
area for Oakite Products, Inc., manu-
facturers of indus-
trial cleaning and re-
lated materials. Mr.
Lee, a graduate of
Davidson C o I lege,
North Carolina, re-
cently completed an
intensive, eight-week
course at Oakite's
New York headquar-
ters and in the field. LEE
He is filling the post
left vacant by the death of M. E. Withers
a few months ago.


F. W. Decklar, Sr.
The many friends of our Alligator
Club President, Bill Decklar, will regret
to learn that his father died very suddenly
a few weeks ago in Jacksonville. Dying
at the age of eighty-one, Mr. Decklar had
a few years ago retired from long time
employment with the Duval County
School System. Bill was an only child
and his parents had come to Jacksonville
for the sake of their son's health when
he was quite young.

Florida Employee Booklet
Receives National Award
Top national honors were awarded
Florida Power & Light Company for its
employee booklet "Howdy Pardner" in
the Public Utilities Advertising Associa-
tion's 1954 Better Copy Contest, accord-
ing to a recent announcement of Public
Utilities Advertising Association at their
national convention in Boston.
The 20-page prize winning booklet is
given to all new employees. Inside the
cover it starts out, "You're one of us
now and we're glad you are. So relax,
pull up a chair, and let's talk about you."
It then gives the new employee all the
information about pay days, retirement,
holidays, work hours, hospitalization and
life insurance, and other company bene-
fits. It is easily read because of its sim-
plicity and unique conversational style.


The good old days were those when
Uncle Sam lived within his income-and
without most of ours.


The man who is good at making ex-
cuses is seldom good at anything else.


"Daddy, don't they ever give showers
for the groom?"
"No, son. There will be storms enough
for him after the bride begins to reign."

32 0 FLORIDA DAIRY


ADAMS PACKING ASSN., INC.
Citrus Pulp, Citrus Meal, Citrus Molasses
Jim Coates, Sales Mgr., By-Products Division
Auburndale, Fla. Phone 8-7061

CHARLES DENNERY, INC.
New Orleans
Ice Cream Coating, Fruits and Flavors
Ira Stone 1026 E. Walnut St.
PhI. Mutual 5-3284
LAKELAND, FLA.

JAMES V. DEMAREST
MFRS. REPRESENTATIVE
Fine Chemicals, Vitamins and Minerals
C'heno Puro Mfg. Corp. Bonewitz Laboratories
Hanovia Chemical & Mfg. Co.
P. 0. Box 787 Deland, Fla.

GENERAL MILLS, INC.
Dairy Equipment and Supplies
John W. Manning, Phone 48-1703
2515 Galiano St. Coral Gables, Fla.

GULF PAPER COMPANY, INC.
Ice Cream (Linerless) Cartons,
Butter Cartons
J. H. McVoy
50 E. Magnolia St. Pensacola, Fla.

DOUGLAS J. HEADFORD
FLA. REPRESENTATIVE
Green Spot Orangeade Concentrate
Krim-Ko Chocolate Flavorings
616 Jessamine Ave. Phone 2-0148
Daytona Beach, Fla.

HELM SANITATION CHEMICALS
HANS B. AHLEFELDT
Phone 3-5721
Union Terminal Warehouse
Jacksonville, Fla.

JIM JENNINGS
MFRS. REPRESENTATIVE
Bireley's Dairy Orange Base
WVelch Mfg. Co. Ice Cream Spoons
Route 9, Box 356 Jacksonville, Fla.

ROBERT A. JOHNSON CO.
Dairy Chocolate & Cocoa Products
J. L. Hammons


916 S. Rome Ave.


Tampa, Fla.


KIECKHEFER CONTAINER CO.
Pure-Pak Paper Milk Bottles
R. J. Evans M. A. Knowles
Phone 6-1334
4700 Pearl St. Jacksonville, Fla.

S. H. MAHONEY EXTRACT CO.
Vanilla Products
D. C. Mulligan, Florida Representative
221 E. Cullerton Rd. Chicago 16, Ill.


NASH-KELVINATOR CORPN.
ICE CREAM CABINETS
Wm. C. Mayfield
Howell House Suite 202 Atlanta, Ga.

NATIONAL PECTIN PRODUCTS CO.
Ice Cream Stabilizers & Emulsifiers
Pectin Stabilizers for Ices, Sherbets & Fruits
J. C. Head, Phone Norfolk, Va. 63-3939
RFD No. 1, Box 48, Bayside, Va.

NEWTH-MORRIS BOX CORP.
Ice Cream, Popsicle, and
Miscellaneous Packers
Phone: 3-9779
Box 3254, Station "F"
Jacksonville, Fla.

OWENS-ILLINOIS GLASS CO.
Douglas Milk Bottles
C. W. Parmalee C. N. Comstock
1102 Barnett Bldg. Jax. 2, Fla.
Phone 3-6134-5

PAUL-LEWIS LABORATORIES, INC.
Lactivase-For the Prevention of oxidized flavor
in bottled milk, ice cream, storage cream
FLAVOR-PAK FOODS, INC., Miami, Fla.
MILLER MACHINERY & SUPPLY COMPANY
Miami and Jacksonville, Fla.

PENN SALT MANUFACTURING
CO.
BK Powder Cleaners Acids
Bottle Alkalies
JOE FOSS
788 Waring Road Memphis, Tenn.

RIVERSIDE MANUFACTURING
COMPANY
MOULTRIE, GEORGIA
Masterbilt Uniforms
James M. Stewart Dave Freeman

STANDARD PACKAGING CORPN.
Tamper Proof Seals Flexible Vacuum
Packages Liner Materials
Larry Hodge
1121 duPont Bldg. Miami, Fla.

THATCHER GLASS MFG. CO., INC.
Glass Milk Containers
W. T. LOVE, Florida Representative
3221 Pinehurst PI. Charlotte 7, N.C.

UNIVERSAL MILKING MACHINE
DIVISION
Pail-less (Pipe line) Milking Machines
R. D. Archer-Factory Rep.-Ph. 84-7467
1100 N.E. 134 St. No. Miami, Fla.


NEWS


ALLIED TRADES MEMBERS
FLORIDA DAIRY ASSOCIATION

Special Card Ad Directory


~~rc~*





DINSMORE ANNOUNCES the Sale of an
Excellent Cow in the

Guernsey Sale of The South
to

Grand View Guernsey Farm
Pfafftown, N. C.


DINSMORE MAYROYAL WILLOW EXCELLENT, 1953
1211 9-558-Jr4-365C. On retest, 5 yrs. 2 mos., making over 2 Ibs. fat per day
Sire: Foremost May Royalty
27 Very Good and Excellent daughters-many more to be classified. Over 100
daughters in Dinsmore Herd.
Dam: Dinsmore Royal Willow
14284-611-365C
More than half-sister to Dinsmore Royal May (Excellent '49 '50 '51, $10,000).
It was hard to let "Willow" leave Dinsmore, but she has given us three'daughters, and we have a
young full sister that should be tops as well as two maternal sisters. Her dam and sire are still breed-
ing, too. We have also sold a Very Good three-quarter sister, Dinsmore Mayroyal Denese, on test milking
up to 49 lbs. These two should be very profitable investments for their new owners, just as some of their
sisters have been during the last two years in other top auction sales.


Dinsmore Guernseys
FEDERAL ACCREDITED 57790 J. B. LANOUX, Herdsman NEGATIVE TO BANG'S


10 miles north of Jacksonville
Near U. S. 1


EARL A. JOHNSON CHARLES F. JOHNSON


Dinsmore, Florida
BRADY S. JOHNSTON


Dinsmore Farms


V. C. JOHNSON







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,-1 3


HELPS TURN CALVES

-INTO GOOD PRODUCERS

Feed Security Calf Starter until the twelfth week-then it's
Security Calf Grower to help you grow growth calves of
large size with sleek coats and over-all healthy appearance-
the type of herd replacements that are good producers.
Security Calf Grower contains trace minerals to aid sound
bone development... adequate amounts of Vitamins A
and D.
Let Security Calf Grower help you turn your calves into
producers.


Florida Dairy News May-June, 1954


S-54-20




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