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Title: Florida dairy news
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00082035/00021
 Material Information
Title: Florida dairy news
Physical Description: 12 v. : illus. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Dairy Industry Association
Publisher: Cody Publications for Florida Dairy Industry Association.
Place of Publication: Kissimmee Fla
Publication Date: January-February 1954
Frequency: bimonthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Dairying -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Cattle   ( lcsh )
Milk   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-12, no. 1; Nov. 1950-Spring, 1962.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00082035
Volume ID: VID00021
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01386090
issn - 0426-5696

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Main
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Back Cover
        Page 35
        Page 36
Full Text


































L.:I~L~ 44Z
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1954 Florida Dairy Convention Goes to "Daytona Plaza Hotel" (See page 13)


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MOOSE HAVEN DAIRY, Oaone Park



Increases Milk Production


ZUder PURINA PROGRAM


4. MILKING COWS
Lady, a grade Holstein, 6
years old, at 3 months on
present lactation is produc-
ing 60 lbs. of milk daily.
Her average is 50 Ibs. She
is fed 1 to 4 PURINA MILK
CHOW, with pasture.




3. HEIFERS
Peaches, a fine conditioned
grade Holstein heifer now
weighing 1,250 Ibs. has
been raised on the Purina
Program since calfhood. She
will freshen in about 30
days for her first calf. Now
being fed 12 Ibs. D & F
Chow daily, with pasture.


L T


1. DRY COWS
Minnie, a grade Holstein
cow now coming into her
4th lactation has a produc-
tion record of 45 Ibs. She
is due to freshen in about
60 days and is on the
"PURINA D & F PROGRAM"
with pasture.





2. CALVES
This grade Holstein heifer
calf shows excellent condi-
tion at 3 months. She has
been raised on the Purina
Calf Program with START-
ENA.


The Moose Haven Dairy located near
Orange Park in Clay County has a fine
Grade Holstein Herd of 17 milking
cows, 7 dry cows, 3 heifers and 10
calves. The entire herd is certified
Bang's and T. B. free.


M. David Clark, the herd manager, re-
ports that his herd which has been un-
der the PURINA feeding program two
years has shown a very noticeable im-
provement in condition as well as in
milk production.


RALSTON PURINA COMPANY

MIAMI TAMPA


I I~y


4111*M400















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C. I. P. Milk


AUTOMATIC INLET
COVER Keeps Flie
Out-..


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JANUARY & FEBRUARY, 1954


_----'


* 1












Extra!


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and Profits with


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There's little, if any difference between the
amount of work it takes to produce ordinary crops and
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kill their enemies with FASCO Pesticides.



NEW PORT EVERGLADES PLANT IN SERVICE
For better, quicker customer service in the lower East Coast area, we have
acquired a fertilizer plant in Port Everglades which is now in operation. This plant
is being enlarged and modernized in keeping with Wilson & Toomer standards.
In establishing this new facility for the convenience of growers in South-
eastern Florida, Wilson & Toomer is again expressing the faith it has maintained
in the great future of Florida agriculture for more than 60 years.


IDEAL Fertilizers and FASCO Pesticides-Your Profit Combination

SWILSON & TOOMER
FERTILIZER COMPANY
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G EN E R A L O F F I C E S J A C K S O N V I L L E, F L O R I D A
2 0 JANUARY & FEBRUARY, 1954




921023


EDITORIALS


111111


Dairy News Celebrates 3rd Anniversary
The Dairy News was very pleased with the birthday present received
from our very good friends the Florida Jersey Breeders on the occasion of
our 3rd birthday. The present was a request from the Florida Jersey Cattle
Club that that organization be included among those designating the Florida
Dairy News as "Official Publication." This makes the Dairy News family
inclusive of all principal Florida dairy groups.

4-H Program Valuable Youth Training
As we enter the season of numerous youth fairs and livestock shows
sponsored by the State's 4-H and Future Farmer organizations in which
thousands of our rural youth enthusiastically participate, there comes to mind
the question, "What do these youngsters gain from these activities?"
The most adequate answer of course would be had by seeing for ones
self by a visit to one of these shows, the concrete results of the philosophy
incorporated in the 4-H program which is "Learn by doing and make the
best better."
In the words of a prominent 4-H leader: The purpose of the 4-H Club
movement is to teach rural boys and girls from 10 to 21 years of age the
latest and best agricultural and home economics practices and the finer and
more significant things of rural life.
4-H Club leadership includes in addition to a state director in each of the
boys and girls divisions, the County Farm Agents and Assistant Agents, and
the County Home Demonstration Agents and Assistants.
The girls, as "future home makers," learn to prepare meals, sew, im-
prove their homes, preserve foods, care for children, repair electrical appli-
ances, home safety, handicrafts, and various other phases of homemaking.
How much they have gained by the 4-H teaching method will be told
in cakes, cookies, pies, canned goods, and the like all of which will be
entered in competition at the various shows and contests held throughout
the state.
The boys programs include the raising, caring for, judging and exhibit-
ing of beef and dairy cattle and other farm animals and poultry, tractor
driving, electricity, various farming operations, soil conservation, pasture
development, etc.
Important objectives of 4-H Club uork are listed as follows:
1. Development of individual abilities and capacities for learning.
2. Development of high moral character.
3. Encouragement of qualities of effective citizenship.
4. Formation of proper habits.
By dwelling on these phases the 4-H movement teaches youngsters to
solve their own problems, attain self-reliance, develop desirable ideals and
standards for farming, homemaking, community life, and family life, and to
gain a sense of responsibility for their attainment.
In learning to create better homes and run better farms, 4-H'ers develop
their capacity for usefulness. They learn to think creatively and independent-
ly and they learn to work to reach the goals they plan and set up.
However, planning, setting up and working on a project is not the only
phase of 4-H Club programs. Also included are fun, fellowship and recrea-
tional activities. There are club picnics, trips to points of interest, club swim-
ming and hiking parties, games, singing and other activities which form the
'fun' part of the 4-H Club program.
In short, Florida youngsters who wisely choose to identify themselves
with this program have the opportunity to gain a thorough, well rounded and
useful education as a 4-H Club member.


VOL. 4


NO. 1


JANUARY-FEBRUARY, 1954
BI-MONTHLY


THE
FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS
E. T. LAY, Editor & Business Manager


Official Publication of
Florida Dairy Association
W. HERMAN BOYD, President
Florida Guernsey Cattle Club
Florida Jersey Cattle Club
Florida Association
of Milk Sanitarians
DIRECTORS
FLORIDA DAIRY ASSOCIATION
E. T. LAY, Executive Director
Producers
GEORGE F. JOHNSON, West Palm Beach
Vice President & Chairman
"Producers Council"
D. WAYNE WEBB, Tampa
JOHN SERGEANT, Lakeland
L. B. HULL, Micanopy
BILL GRAHAM, Miami
JOHN T. ADKINSON, Pensacold
IRA BARROW, New Smyrna Beach
J. H. ADAMS, Jacksonville
J. D. FUQUA, Altha
JOHN MCMULLEN, Clearwater
Distributors
CLIFF D. WAYNE, Miami
Vice President & Chairman
"Distributors Council"
HERMAN BURNETT, Bradenton
J. N. MCARTHUR, Miami
H. CODY SKINNER, Jacksonville
JOHN M. HOOD, St. Petersburg
W. J. BARRITT, JR., Tampa
J. F. W. ZIRKLEBACH, Pensacola
JOHN TRIPSON, Vero Beach
GEORGE BOUTWELL, Lake Worth
CLAUDE KELLY, Daytona Beach
Additional Directors
W. HERMAN BOYD, President, Miami
F. W. DECKLAR, President
"Alligator Club," Tampa
WILMER BASSETT. Past-Pres., Monticello
THE FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS is
published bi-monthly by the Florida Dairy
Association, 220 Newnan St., Jackson-
ville, Florida. Subscription price of $1.00
a year. Entered as second class mail at
the Post Office at Jacksonville, Fla.,
under Act of March 3, 1879, as amended.
Business and Editorial office, 220 New-
nan Street, Jacksonville.
NATIONAL EDITORIAL
S ASSOCIATION


Member Florida Press Association


JANUARY & FEBRUARY, 1954 3




















ORDER YOURS TODAY
FROM YOUR QUONSET DEALER


Complete, well-illustrated refer-
ence for the farmer planning a
stall-type dairy barn.


Here's what agricultural leaders say about
the books:
"We hope you can spare enough copies for
our students," Dairy Husbandry Dept., eastern
agricultural college.
"They will be of real service in our planning
work with farmers," Nebraska county agent.
"They will be a help in our instruction and ex-
tension teaching," Dairy Industry Dept., eastern
university.
"The books contain just the information farmers
ask for," Agricultural Engineering Dept., mid-
western agricultural college.
GREAT LAKES STEEL CORPORATION
Slran-Steel Division* Ecorse, Detroit 29, Mich.

S. m".ii=4 tmn
"M3=1


For Our Youth Readers:


State 4-H Winner Tells Value of Training

For "A Career In The Dairy Industry"
William Schuck, Jackson County 4-H member i'ho won the 1953 State 4-H Efficiency Dairy
Production Contest, verifies in the following brief story of his experiences in 4-H dairy projects,
the value of "training" that has been emphasized throughout the five preceding youth articles
which have appeared on this page. William's story follows:

Training To Make The Best Better
"As I look back over my 4-H Club work, I find that there are certain things
that stand out that will be of great benefit to me in the future as I expect to make
dairying my life work. The most important thing that I have learned is that all
animals must be treated with kindness and care. I have found that they respond to
gentleness and regular feeding and watering. I have learned that keeping animals
free of worms by the use of individual pens is very important. I have raised the last
three heifers in that manner.


The county agent has helped us de-
termine the proper fertilization for our
pastures and work out a rotation system
which has proved very profitable. I have
learned how to feed a balanced ration
and I keep additional minerals before my
animals at all times.
I have found that the proper way to
cull my animals is to study the DHIA
reports and with the daily milk records
that I keep. I have culled one animal
based on low milk production and butter-
fat. This animal's name was Betsy.
In addition to these things that I have
learned which will help me financially, I
have found that I derive a great deal of
pleasure and personal satisfaction when
I help other 4-H Club boys prepare their
animals and see them make good show-
ings.
There are other things too numerous
to be included in this report that have
taught me how to make the best better.'.
William Schack, Jackson County 4-H
boy was named state winner of the 1953
4-H Efficiency Dairy Production Contest.
As winner William will receive a plaque
which is provided by Southern Dairies,
Inc., to be awarded at the Annual 4-H
banquet February 22nd in Orlando.
W. W. Glenn, Jackson County Agent,
states that the closest thing to William's
heart is a dairy cow and that he knows
"no one who does as much actual work
in looking after his 4-H animals." Wil-
liam regularly helps his father in the
barn, and if his father is away he can,
and often does, milk and feed the herd
himself. He has grown during the 7 years
of Club work, as well as the size of his
herd. He has been a consistent winner in
the West Florida Dairy Show each fail
and had the Grand Champion Registered
Jersey at the State 4-H Dairy Show in
Orlando in 1950.
Not only is William successful with his
dairy project, but he has been a leader
in his 4-H Club, helping many of the
younger members with their records and
in preparing the animals for show.


'4--~


W- i
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.. m... .
.J ir~


IN THE TOP PICTURE ABOVE, young
Schack is seen at the age of 10 with his
first 4-H Club Dairy Show entry; IN
THE BOTTOM PICTURE, he is seen
showing his grand champion Jersey at
the 1953 State 4-H Dairy Show at Or-
lando.

You grow up the day you have your
first real laugh at yourself.

Usually the talk you hear at Conven-
tions is very much like steer's horns: A
point here and a point there and in be-
tween-a lot of bull.

You can't keep trouble from coming,
but-you needn't give it a chair to sit on.

The measure of a man's character is
what he would do if he knew he would
never be found out.


4 JANUARY & FEBRUARY, 1954


A1111









A Salute...



to the Leadership of



John Henry Logan


County Agent of Pinellas County

This salute is one of a series sponsored by the Dairy Neuws to accord recognition to leaders in
various phases of the development of The Florida Dairy Industry. Names are selected by a
committee of officials of the Florida Dairy Association and the University of Florida.

JOHN HENRY LOGAN admits that his interest in livestock goes back a long
way. He grew up on a West Florida farm and attended the University of Florida
majoring in animal husbandry and horticulture.
Within a few years after graduation in 1925, Mr. Logan, as a county agent, first
in Hernando County and then in Manatee and Pinellas Counties, began promotion
of dairying and development of permanent improved pastures. These projects have
earned him well deserved recognition as one who has made an outstanding contribu-


tion to Florida's dairy industry.
Mr. Logan became Pinellas County
Agent in 1937 and soon afterwards, as
the result of an agricultural survey, he
and H. L. Brown, then State Extension
Dairyman, began to push a program of
improved pastures and better cattle. Cat-
tlemen gave their cooperation and soon
after the Florida Guernsey Cattle Club
was organized Pinellas County was select-
ed as the site for the first Florida Guern-
sey sale. Since that time all State Guern-
sey sales have been held there. The 15th
annual sale was recently completed and
Mr. Logan, secretary of the Florida
Guernsey Cattle Club since 1943, is now
busy with plans for the 1954 sale.
For most of these years Mr. Loguan
has served as a member of the Guernsey
Club's Sales Committee. He has traveled
all over the Southeast, making selections
of cattle from outstanding Guernsey herds
and assisting in their purchase by Florida
farmers, dairymen and 4-H Club boys
and girls. These trips to bring improve-
ment to Florida dairying have carried him
as far afield as Pennsylvania on several
occasions.
The Pinellas County Agricultural of-
fice, under Mr. Logan's leadership, has
been active in promoting DHIA and HIR
testing and artificial breeding of dairy
cattle. Calfhood vaccination has also been
stressed. These efforts have resulted in
a large percentage of dairy cattle in the
county being vaccinated during calfhood.
As Manager of the Pinellas County
Fair, Mr. Logan has featured livestock
shows for adults and 4-H Club and Fu-


ture Farmer members. When the 1954
fair is held, shows, sales and other live-
stock activities will be centered in a new
Youth and Livestock building now being
constructed which will cover 18,000
square feet of space.
Mr. Logan gives credit for the success-
ful development of the livestock and
dairying programs in Pinellas County to
others. What has been accomplished has
been made possible by the splendid co-
operation of the Board of County Com-
missioners and the fine group of progres-
sive people in business in the county, he
declares. He points out that the County
Commissioners were among the first to
purchase registered Guernsey cattle and
to start a purebreed herd at the Pinellas
County Home for the production of milk
and the distribution of offspring to farm-
ers and dairymen.
While Mr. Logan's personal contribu-
tion could never be fully measured, the
results of his leadership will long con-
tinue. Under 4-H Club programs like the
one he conducts, Florida farm boys, as
did he, will continue to take a keen in-
terest in livestock and in turn will make
their own significant contributions to
dairying and related industries in The
Sunshine State.
(The assistance of Sam Burgess, Assistant Edi-
tor for Florida Agricultural Extension Service
in the preparation of the information con-
tained in this article, is gratefully acknowl-
edged. )


JANUARY &


JOHN HENRY LOGAN


STATE PASTURE CONTEST
BULLETIN


1953 REPORTS DUE
Dairymen who entered the 1953 State
Dairy Pasture Contest and others who
still wish to submit a record of your
1953 pasture program for entry in the
contest should do so not later than Feb-
ruary 15.
These are to be made out, signed and
turned in to your county agent. The blue
"record and Report Form" which was
sent all dairymen some time ago is the
proper form to use. These should be
available from your county agent, if you
do not have one.

County and State Awards
All contestants whose pasture program
meets the minimum standard will receive
a "Certificate of Merit". County and
State winners will receive appropriate
awards.
Pasture Essay Contest
4-H and FFA members will receive
first and second place awards of $25.00
and $15.00 in each group for essays on
"The Production and Use of Better Dairy
Pastures". Essays should not be more
than 600 words and will be turned in
to chapter leaders or County Agents by
April 1st.
1954 Pasture Contest
The County and State Dairy Pasture
Contest will continue for the year 1954
and all dairymen are urged to proceed
without delay to the systematic planning
and carrying out of a better dairy pasture
program.

FEBRUA~RY, 1954 0 5



















ABOVE IS SEEN THE ORGANIZATION MEETING OF FLORIDA'S FIRST DAIRY COST
ACCOUNTING GROUP organized in Jacksonville, November 6th. STANDING are John
Hood, Hood's Dairy, St. Petersburg, who presided at the meeting and Miss Marjorie Hugo of
Memphir. Tenn.. representative of the McClain Cort Accounting Service.


FLORIDA DAIRY GROUP FORMED
FOR COST ACCOUNTING SERVICE
A group of nine Florida dairies has
been recently formed for the purpose of
using the E. B. McClain Cost Accounting
and Comparison Service.
Under the plan complete cost account-
ing statistics are provided for each mem-
ber of the group with a comparison to
the average of the group.
The McClain Company, with head-
quarters in Memphis, Tennessee, are
consultants on accounting procedures for
milk and ice cream plants and have for


some years been retained as official ac-
counting consultants to the Milk Indus-
try Foundation.
George Boutwell, of Boutwell Dairy,
Lake Worth, as Chairman of the Florida
Dairy Association, has been instrumental
in encouraging the use of the best ac-
counting procedures.
Dairies participating in the group are:
Hoods Dairy, St. Petersburg; Perfection
and Lee Dairies, Orlando; Dinsmore and
Perret Dairies, Jacksonville; Sunnybrook
Dairy, Tampa; Vero Beach Dairy, Bur-
nett Dairy, Bradenton and Boutwell
Dairy, Lake Worth.


Now
Colored PIN K for

Easy Identification

NOW... In25-lb. Kegs!
DIVERSOL -For Over 25 Years the Dairy Farm's
Leading Bactericide Disinfectant
----------------
Give this coupon to your hauler
Please deliver one 25i keg of DIVERSOL CX
Bactericide Disinfectant for which you are to
deduct $ ___ from my next milk check.
Name ________- ----
Patron No.....
Address -


LkU


Twenty Registered Holstein Heifers which were recently bought by Ross Reynolds & Son in Ontario, Canada.
These fine heifers were brought to Florida by truck and shipped to Carcacas, Venezuela, by plane.

ALL KINDS OF DAIRY CATTLE

FOR SALE

50 Head of Springer Cows on Hand at All Times

TRANSPORTATION FURNISHED FOR DELIVERY TO YOUR FARM

Phone, Write or See


ROSS REYNOLDS & CO.
Phone 6-5958 Plant City, Fla.


6 JANUARY & FEBRUARY, 1954


P












GROW MORE OF YOUR IEfD

d roductiOn within
Step Up you're r It has eXtr won i ot
plow "DC"Case Tract ea oking
PoC power, tfil job on most
ca actne P of every o ld -itch one-
for q u- che' you get agle tractor seat .
uoraa fro or. Constantoe o , .." .j ...
nt edua V locs'
ydrai c for ga soline, LP gas o lw,
tractor ueold h the Case Pas-
Get n W ostures fo ol ..
GtU~ R .nO HarroW. f Doa
t ur inrati.,on d iong :.ino od
-dul nenetrI -- : chopping d IIN.i, inJ
thorough 5 "ding Orl "
S sod for resetdng d
1.1ming ild land- .

,r i., *


TAKE THE PASTURE TO THE COWS


-l


SERVICE WHEN YOU WANT IT


Coastal Motors & Equipment
Belle Glade
Hibbs Tractor Company
Cocoa
Pasco Motors
Dade City
Ray Moore Implement Co.
Fort Myers
Taylor & Munnell Mach.
Works
Fort Pierce
Pounds-Zeiss Tractor Co.
Frostproof
Thomas Equipment Company
High Springs


Florida Tractor & Supply Co.
Hollywood
Dade Tractor Company
Homestead
Pounds Tractor Company
Lakeland
Grantham Chevrolet Company
Live Oak
Andreasen Tractor & Equip-
ment Co.
Marianna
Gerlach Motor Co., Milton
Medlock Tractor Co., Orlando
Beasley Tractor Company
Palatka


Florida Tractor & Supply Co.
Pompano Beach
Pounds-Zeiss Tractor Co.
Sebring
Thompson Tractor & Equip-
ment Co.
Tampa
Cosey Motor Company
Wauchula
Pounds Motor Company
Winter Garden
Pounds Tractor Company
Winter Haven
Buckner Tractor & Equip. Co.
West Palm Beach


JANUARY & FEBRUARY, 1954 0 7


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1 4
_*-, "W



















































ROT AND TERMITES can't live on wood is treated-not just the surface
A L&T's pressure-treated fence posts. -because A L & T uses pressure up
Contact "with damp soil causes un- to 150 pounds per square inch. These
treated or "dipped" posts to decay in top-quality posts are clean, paintable,
a few years. Termites will attack odorless and can't harm livestock or
exposed posts in much of the South- produce.
east. Pine fence posts pressure-treated Here is a folder that tells you how
with A L & T's clean, salt-type pre- A L & T's clean-treated posts can save
servative, however, last many times money on your farm-ask your local
longer than untreated posts. All the distributor for a copy or write to:


American Lumber

and Treating Co.
Graham Bldg., Jacksonville, Fla.
PRODUCERS OF THE ORIGINAL
Protect all the wood-
not only the surface. m an Z
Insist on pressure- PRESSURiE rI ATED


Honors Received In 1953
In Florida Dairy Industry

THEO DATSON, Borden's Dairy, Orlando,
served as a director of International Associa-
tion of Ice Cream Manufacturers.
ALF R. NIELSEN, Alfar Cream, West Palm
Beach, served as a director of Milk Industry
Foundation.
PAUL E. REINHOLD, President, Foremost
Dairies. Jacksonville, served as a director of
International Association of Ice Cream Man-
ufacturers, National Dairy Council and Milk
Industry Foundation.
V. C. JOHNSON, Dinsmore Dairy, Jackson-
ville, was selected "Florida Farmer of the
Year for 1952" by the "Progressive Farmer
Magazine."
WILL NOLAN, JR., Alpine Dairy, Jackson-
ville, was elected President Florida Jersey
Cattle Club.
EARL JOHNSON, Dinsmore Farms, Jackson-
ville, was elected President Florida Guernsey
Cattle Club.
MR. & MRS. WALTER WELKENER, Holly
Hill Dairy, Jacksonville, were awarded
"Premier Exhibitor" Trophy by F.D.A. at
the Florida State Fair.
J. N. McARTHUR, McArthur Jersey Farm
Dairy, Miami, was elected President Miami
Chamber of Commerce and Chairman Advi-
sory Board University of Miami.
JOHN CONE, Cone's Dairy Products, Plant
City, was awarded Florida Guernsey Cattle
Club Trophy for Top Guernsey Producing
Cow in 1952.
WILMER W. BASSETT, Bassett's Dairy,
Monticello, served as President Florida Dairy
Association.
WILMER W. BASSETT and R. L. DRESSEL.
Dressel Dairy Farm, Miami, were appointed
by Governor Dan McCarty Members of Flor-
ida Live Stock Sanitary Board.
E. T. LAY, Executive Director, Florida Dairy
Association, served as President National
Dairy Association Executives' Conference;
Chairman, Southeastern Dist. Milk Founda-
tion Collegiate Dairy Student Awards Com-
mittee; and was named Chairman of 15-
member Advisory Council Florida Indus-
trial Commission.
DR. HOWARD WILKOWSKE, University
of Florida, Department of Dairy Science,
was elected Secretary-Treasurer International
Association Milk and Food Sanitarians at
1952 Annual Convention.
4-H JUDGING TEAMS 1953, won honors at
National Dairy Catttle Congress.
PROFESSOR WALTER KRIENKE, Univer-
sity of Florida, Department of Dairy Science,
announced development of process for use
of fresh orange and other citrus fruits in
manufacture of ice cream.
DR. S. P. MARSHALL, University of Florida,
Department of Dairy Science, was elected
Secretary-Treasurer Southern States Section,
American Dairy Science Association.
HENRY SCHNEIDER, Foremost Dairies, Eus-
tis, served as Chairman of Florida Milk
Commission.
BEN S. WARING, Waring Dairy Farm,
Madison, was appointed producer member
Florida Milk Commission.
JACK TIERNEY, Foremost Dairies, was elect-
ed Vice President Southern Association Ice
Cream Manufacturers.
W. J. BARRITT, Borden's Dairies, Tampa,
served as President Florida Highway Users
Conference.


8 JANUARY & FEBRUARY, 1954


TERMITE LEAVE FOR GOOD-
Eating Wolman-Treated boards and posts
Is too tough on our dentures!







































MILK DRINKING TIME-MisJ Rita Dubois, right, regional consumer
marketing specialist with the Federal Agriculture Extension Service,
finds a cooperative subjectt in Mrs. Gladys Kendall, home industries and
marketing specialist in the State Home Demon.tration Office at Florida
State University.


Milk Won't Make You Fat!
Women are the poorest milk drinkers and their teenage
daughters run them a close second, a specialist with the Fed-
eral Agricultural Extension Service told a group of state home
demonstration specialists recently at Florida State University.
"Their husbands and sons do a much better job of drinking
milk," Miss Rita Dubois, a U.S.D.A. consumer marketing spec-
ialist said.
On the university campus to plan a series of training meet-
ings with Florida Home Demonstration Agents in methods of
emphasizing the need of more milk in the diet of the average
consumer, Miss Dubois said the reasons women and girls give
for not drinking milk are fallacy, not facts. The main alibis
offered she said are: "Milk will make me fat. Just children need
it. Milk is too expensive." The training conferences will be held
during the spring months among Home Demonstration Agents
throughout Florida.
Miss Dubois said, "Milk won't make you fat. In fact a glass
of whole milk has fewer calories than a serving of lean beef,
fewer than two buttered biscuits, and only half as many as a
piece of apple pie."
"Milk is needed by adults to keep their bones hard by sup-
plying them with calcium," the specialist said. She explained
how calcium is needed for heart muscles, as well as arm and
leg muscles.
"Also," she added," milk is the best buy for the money in
terms of the food value received. Besides," she said, "on a busy
day a glass of milk will give you a lift in mid morning or after-
noon.
As spokesman for the Federal Agricultural Service, Miss
Dubois is concerned because two-thirds of the national popula-
tion lacks calcium. She advocates the use of a quart of milk daily
per person.


1i*


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MILK HANDLING COSTS

with

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Join the forward looking plant operators
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WRITE FOR COMPLETE BULLETIN



General Mills


2 RIVERSIDE AVENUE
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA

711 W. CASS STREET
MIAMI, FLORIDA


JANUARY & FEBRUARY, 1954 9


77 W. LIVINGSTON ST.
ORLANDO, FLORIDA

7275 N.W. 7th AVENUE
TAMPA, FLORIDA









DAIRY ASSOCIATION ACTIVITIES




Strong Industry Leadership Is Seen

In F.D.A. 1954 Officers and Directors COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN


Membership opinion gathered from over the state since the election six months
ago of the Florida Dairy Association's 23 1954 officers and directors indicates wide-
spread agreement with the choices made at the Association's Annual Meeting and
expectations of a vigorous progressive and fruitful 1954 program under their leader-
ship.
President Herman Boyd, the Association's third producer president since the
combining of the industry in one over-all association in 1946, has come through the
ranks in both his dairy farming success and his constant interest and hard work in
both local and state-wide dairy industry activities.
President Boyd takes office with the
strongest producer membership backing for dairymen and their guests who par-
in the history of the Association. Not ticipate in and attend the dairy show
only is the Association's producer mem- at the State Fair to meet together.
bership well above previous years but At their Tampa meeting, Directors will
the producer members under the new or- complete the naming of all committees
ganization plan have ten directors, which for 1954 and adopt all programs and
is one-half of the Board of Directors. plans for the year including the years'
The new organizational plan referred two outstanding events, the Annual Meet-
to gives the president as chief executive ing already scheduled for May 26-27-28
of the Association two vice-presidents in Daytona Beach and the Annual Dairy
with equal standing who serve as chair- Field Day scheduled for September 16-
men of the Producer's Council and the 17.
Distributors' Council of the Membership.
Producer Vice-President and Chairman of F. D. A. PLANT COMMITTEE
the Producer Members' Council is George APPOINTED FOR 1954
Johnson, veteran producer leader of West The Board of Directors of the Florida
Palm Beach; Distributor Vice-President Dairy Association has named Paul E.
and Chairman of the Distributor Mem- Burner, Superintendent of the Dinsmore
bers' Council is Cliff D. Wayne, South- Dairy Company plant, Jacksonville, as
ern Dairies, Florida Zone Manager. chairman of the organization's 1954
The president will receive additional Plant Processing Committee with the
assistance under another feature of the following additional members:
newly adopted procedures which places JAMES F. BEATTY, JR., Foremost Dairies,
the immediate past president on the Jacksonville; GEORGE BOUTWELL, Bout-
Board of Directors as an ex-officio but well Dairy, Lake Worth; COATES BULL,
Creamery Package Company, Winter Park;
participating member. EMMITT DOZIER, JR., Velda Dairies, Jack-
sonville; E. L. FOUTS, University of Florida.
First Directors MOeeting Gainesville; T. L. PLANT, McArthur Dairy,
rst irecors eetng Miami; CHARLES HAUFLER, Borden Dairy,
In Tampa, February 3 Tallahassee; EMMETT HOOD, Hood's Dairy,
St. Petersburg; WARD LANG, Southern Dar-
The Board of Directors plan a schedule ies, Jacksonville; JOHN N. LEWIS, Southern
of four regular quarterly meetings during Dairies, Miami; SAM McDUGALD, Lee's
the year with special meetings when Dairy, Orlando; HUBERT B. MARTIN, Mil-
ler Machinery & Supply Co., Miami; LEON
called by the president. The first brief MULL, University of Florida, Gainesville;
planning session of the new Board was CODY SKINNER, Skinner's Dairy, Jackson-
held in November when new and old ville; DON STOFFEL, Borden Dairy, Orlan-
Directors held a joint session in Jack- do; CHARLES WILLIAMS, Borden Southern
Co., Jacksonville; CLARENCE WOOD, Land
sonville. O'Sun Creamery, Sarasota; and RICHARD
The first quarterly meeting for 1954 WOOD, Vero Beach Dairy, Vero Beach.
will be held February 3rd and 4th at This committee cooperates closely with
the Tampa Terrace Hotel, Tampa, when the University of Florida Department of
directors will participate in the dairy Dairy Science in planning and sponsor-
show events of the Florida State Fair and ing the Annual Plant Superintendents'
will sponsor a Dairy Industry Dinner at Short Course held each Fall at the Uni-
the Tampa Terrace Hotel the evening of versity of Florida. It is also responsible
February 4th. for the consideration of all Association
This Annual Dairy Dinner event held matters pertaining to dairy science and
for the first time last year with a fine dairy plant processing and operational
attendance provides a splendid occasion problems.


ANNOUNCED FOR 1954
President Herman Boyd and the Board of
Directors of the Florida Dairy Association for
1954 have selected the following standing
committee chairmen to serve for the Calendar
year 1954:
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Chairman,
HERMAN BOYD, Hall and Boyd Dairy
Farm, Miami.
PAST PRESIDENTS' ADVISORY COMMIT-
TEE-Chairman. WILMER BASSETT, JR..
Bassett's Dairy, Monticello.
ADVISORY MEMBERS COMMITTEE -
Chairman, DR. E. L. FOUTS, University of
Florida, Gainesville.
ALLIED TRADES "Alligator Club" COM-
MITTEE-Chairman, F. W. (BILL) DECK-
LAR, Lily Tulip Cup Corp'n, Tampa.
ANNUAL FIELD DAY COMMITTEE -
Chairman L. B. (RED) HULL, Hull Dairy
Farm, Gainesville.
ANNUAL MEETING PROGRAM COMMIT-
TEE-Co-Chairmen, Distributor Vice Presi-
dent, CLIFF WAYNE, Southern Dairies,
Miami; and Producer Vice President, GEO.
JOHNSON, Johnson Dairy Farm, West Palm
Beach.
FINANCE COMMITTEE-Co-Chairmen, W.
J. BARRITT, JR., Borden's Tampa and
JOHN SARGEANT. Sargeant Dairy Farm.
Lakeland.
LADIES AUXILIARY COMMITTEE---Chair-
man, MRS. LEON SELLERS, St. Petersburg.
PUBLIC HEALTH COMMITTEE-Chairman.
man,, BRADY JOHNSTON, Dinsmore
Dairy, Jacksonville.
PLANT PROCESSING COMMITTEE--Chair-
man, PAUL BURNER. Dinsmore Dairy,
Jacksonville.
PLANT COST & ACCOUNTING COMMIT-
TEE-Chairman, GEORGE BOUTWELL.
Boutwell's Dairy. Lake Worth.
VETERINARIAN MEMBERS COMMITTEE
-Chairman, DR. KARL OWENS, D. V.
M., Gainesville.
The membership of the above committee will
be appointed by the Board of Directors at their
February meeting in Tampa.

Additional Committees
The chairmen and members of the follow-
ing additional committees will be named by
the Board at their next meeting February 3rd:
PUBLIC RELATIONS COMMITTEE,
FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS COMMITTEE,
DAIRY HUSBANDRY COMMITTEE, LEG-
ISLATIVE COMMITTEE, MEMBERSHIP
COMMITTEE, MILK PRODUCTION COM-
MITTEE, PASTURE DEVELOPMENT COM-
MITEEE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
COMMITTEE and STANDARDS & REGUL-
ATIONS COMMITTEE.


10 0 JANUARY & FEBRUARY, 1954















ADAMS BASSETT


BARRITT


DECKLAR


HULL


BOUTWELL

BOUTWELL


F. D. A. DIRECTORS AND OFFICERS 1954


(Pictures of Directors Zirkelbach, Tripson,
Adkinson, and McMullen will be carried later.)
President, HERMAN BOYD: Produc-
er V. P., GEORGE F. JOHNSON: Dis-
tributor V. P., CLIFF WAYNE: Treas-
urer, W. J. BARRITT, Jr.; Assistant
Treasurer, WALTER BURTON; Execu-
tive Director, E. T. (ANDY) LAY.
Directors
PRODUCER DIRECTORS: GEORGE
F. JOHNSON, Johnson's Dairy Farm,
West Palm Beach; JOHN SERGEANT,
Sargeant Dairy Farms, Lakeland; L. B.
HULL, Hull's Dairy, Micanopy; BILL
GRAHAM, Graham's Dairy, Hialeah;
JOHN ADKINSON, Adkinson & Mayne
Dairy, Pensacola; IRA BARROW, Bar-
row's Dairy Farm, New Smyrna Beach;
JOHN McMULLEN, McMullen Dairy,
Inc. Clearwater; J. D. FUQUA, Fuqua's
Dairy, Altha; J. H. ADAMS, J. H.
Adams Dairy Farm, Jacksonville; and
WAYNE WEBB, Webb Brothers Dairy
Farm, Tampa.
DISTRIBUTOR DIRECTORS: CLIFF
WAYNE, Southern Dairies, Miami;
HERMAN BURNETT, Burnett's Dairy
Farms, Bradenton; J. N. McARTHUR,
McArthur Jersey Farm Dairy, Miami;
CODY SKINNER, Skinner's Dairy,
Jacksonville; GEORGE BOUTWELL,
Boutwell's Dairy, Lake Worth; CLAUDE
KELLY, Foremost Dairies, Inc., Day-
tona Beach; W. J. BARRITT, JR., Bor-
den's Dairy, Tampa; JOHN TRIPSON,
Vero Beach Dairy, Vero Beach; JOHN
HOOD, Hood's Dairy, St. Petersburg;
and J. F. W. ZIRKELBACH, Polar Ice
Cream Co., Pensacola.
EX-OFFICIO DIRECTORS: HER-
MAN BOYD, President; WILMER
BASSETT, Immediate Past President;
and BILL DECKLAR, Lily-Tulip Cup
Corporation, President Allied Trades Di-
vision.


June Dairy Month

1954 Program Planned
Plans are being made throughout the
dairy industry from the National Dairy
Month Committee down through all
State and Local Dairy Associations and
Dairy Councils for the most extensive
participation in the 1954 "June Dairy
Month Program" since the beginning of
this nation-wide event. The National
Dairy Month Committee which repre-
sents all National and other dairy asso-
ciation groups has adopted as the offi-
cial objectives of the 1954 Dairy Pro-
gram:
(1) To promote a better public un-
derstanding of the dairy industry and
its products
(2) To emphasize the superiority of
dairy foods
(3) To stress the economy of dairy
foods
(4) To stimulate the sale of more
dairy foods.
Florida's state and local Dairy Month
Program Committee are now being form-
ed and will soon be actively planning
the details for Florida's greatest "June
Dairy Month" program.


1 FU
FUQUA


FEBRUARY, 1954 11


BOYD


MCARTHUR


5 .0


GRAHAM


BURNETT


WEBB KELLY



t B1.


SERGEANT HOOD


BARROW


SKINNER


JOHNSON


''


i


JANUARY &






Dairy Association Policies and Program
Adopted by the Board for the Year 1954
President Herman Boyd and the new 1954 Board of Directors of the Florida
Dairy Association have adopted the following general policies and objectives for the
year 1954:
Encourage within the members of the Florida Dairy Industry a greater reali-
zation of "obligation" to our customers and to the community for production of an
adequate supply of the highest possible quality products at the lowest reasonable
prices consistent with good business practices.
Promotion of increased effort to control and prevent disease among Florida
Dairy Herds and secure all possible aid to Dairymen toward this end.
Promotion of increased effort on the part of all Dairymen to produce more
feed and better pastures and strive for more efficiency and economy in feeding prac-
tices and more adequate control of milk production.
Endeavor to arouse the entire Industry of Florida to greater interest and action
in both individual and Industry-wide "Public Information" activities.
Conduct an aggressive membership
extension program throughout the yeat
to secure the interest and active participa- Association Annual Meeting and Con-
tion in both local and statewide dairy as- mention.
sociation programs by all dairymen and Cooperation with the following organ-
dairy plants.co e izations and activities: Florida Public
0 Encourage active individual inter-
est and participation of all those inter- Health Association Annual Meeting;
ested in the future welfare of the Dairy Florida Milk Sanitarians' Annual Meet-
Industry, in the affairs of government. ing and Training Conference; Florida
Special Activities Adopted Dairy Laboratory Technicians' Annual
Publication Bi-monthly of the "Florida Meeting .and Training Conf; Florida
Dairy News" as the official publication Home Economics Association; County
of the Association. Farm Agents' Annual Conference; Flor-
Sponsorship in cooperation wiih the ida Dairy Council Program; Florida
University of Florida Dairy Department Home Demonstration Agents; Florida
of: Annual Dairy Field Day, 2-day pro- Dairy Council Program; Florida Future
gram, at the University of Florida; An- Farmers' Dairy Shows Program; Florida
nual Dairy Herdsmen Short Course at 4-H Club Dairy Shows and Program;
the University of Florida; Annual Dairy Florida School Lunch Supervisors' An-
Plant Operations Short Course at the nual Conference; Florida State Fair Dairy
University of Florida. Show.

WIM I


,--




i




At

THE GROUP ABOVE are the advance 1954 F.D.A. Annual Meeting Arrangements Committee
as they held a recent all day conference at the Convention Hotel the "Dayton Plaza" at Dayton
Beach. SEATED, LEFT TO RIGHT, ARE: Andy Lay, Mrs. Claude Kelly, Mrs. Mar,orie Lay,
and Atuood Taylor. Borden Manager, Daytona Beach; Standing, same order, Raymond Beville,
Buckeye Dairy, Daytona Beach: Claude Kelly, Foremost Dairies District Manager of Daytona;
Ira Barrow, Producer Director of New Smyrna Beach; and Scott Piersol, Daytona Beach Conven-
tion Bureau Manager.


P

Fe


IRA BARROW


Introducing
YOUR F.D.A. DIRECTORS
IRA BARROW, Producer Member of
the Florida Dairy Association Board of
Directors from New Smyrna Beach in
Volusia County represents on the Board
the producers of the Middle East Coast
and Central Florida. He has been presi-
dent of the Volusia County Producers
Association and also of the county's Arti-
ficial Breeders' Association.
With a milking herd of 200 cows,
which he has developed over a period
of nine years in the operation of his
own dairy, Mr. Barrow admits that the
hours required by his work have caused
him to have to drop out of the Elks and
Lions Clubs and other civic activities in
which he formerly participated.
Ira is a native of Tattnall County,
Georgia, and a member of a large fami-
ly, all of whom now live in Florida with
the exception of one brother who is still
in Georgia. However, Ira has 6 brothers
and 1 sister in this, their adopted state.
His parents are both deceased.
After marrying Mildred Anna Snyder
in Waycross, Georgia in June of 1946,
the Barrows moved to their present lo-
cation near New Smyrna Beach. They
have two children and are members of
the Baptist Church.
Ira first became a Director of F.D.A.
when five additional producers were add-
ed early in 1953. He was re-elected at the
1953 Annual Meeting for the year 1954.
Affiliation and Cooperation with the
following organizations: Milk Industry
Foundation; National Dairy Council;
Southern Assn. Ice Cream Manufactur-
ers; National Industrial Council; Inter-
national Assn. Ice Cream Mfgrs.; Na-
tional Conference Dairy Assn. Execu-
tives; Florida Agricultural Council; Flor-
ida Cattlemen's Association; Florida Jer-
sey Cattle Club; Florida Guernsey Cattle
Club; Florida Press Association; Florida
State Chamber of Commerce; Florida
Feed Dealers Association; Florida Retail
Farm Equipment Association; Florida
Veterinary Medical Association.


12 JANUARY & FEBRUARY, 1954






Daytona Beach Is Selected

For 1954 F. D. A. Convention

Beautiful Beach Front Hotel Has Everything
For a Wonderful Convention and Vacation
The Florida Dairy Association Board of Directors and Annual Convention
Program and Arrangements Committees are pleased to announce to the membership
and to all dairymen, allied trades and others interested in the Florida Dairy Conven-
tion their selection of Daytona Beach and one of Florida's finest beach-front hotels,
the Daytona Plaza, for our 1954 Annual Meeting and Convention.
The Daytona Beach facilities for all
kinds of recreation as well as for the
Convention business meetings are really
outstanding. In addition to being within i)
short walking distance of all the main I 3 lifla tjai
Daytona Beach waterfront attractions, the
Daytona Plaza has its own golf putting
green, a shuffleboard court, both adult
and children's swimming pools, beach
front cabanas, two cool oceanview loung-
ing terraces, air-conditioned dining and
meeting rooms and about 25% of bed-
room air conditioning.
Golf, fishing and boating are avail-
able nearby and the unusual attractions
of Marineland will be included in the
Convention sightseeing tours. In addition
to the attractive rooms available in the
headquarters hotel there will be 20
oceanfront Motel rooms available at the
same rates as the double hotel rooms. This
court under management of the hotel, is
adjacent to the swimming pool and kit-
chenettes are located between each pair
of two rooms.
Our special convention hotel rates are
$6.00 single and $9.00 double. Suite
combinations can be arranged under the
same rate per room. Twin-beded rooms
occupied single will be at the double THE DA YTONA
rate. Extra beds for children will be pro- TH DAYTONA
vided for a slight extra charge.
Reservations may now be made direct and worry
to the hotel manager, Mr. Rush Strayer.


U. S. Dairy Industry Plans
National Spring Conference
The Annual Spring Conference of the
directors and officials of the various
National and State Associations of the
U. S. Dairy industry will be held in
Phoenix, Ariona, March 29-30-31.
The principal sponsors of the meeting
are the Milk Industry Foundation, the In-
ternational Association of Ice Cream
Manufacturers and the National Council
of Dairy Association Executives.
Dairymen Need Spokesman
There are numerous occasions when
the Dairy Industry of Florida must have
a spokesman or a committee of spokes-
men who are both well informed and
capable of speaking for and represent-
ing the whole Dairy Industry. Such repre-
sentation is always available through the
Florida Dairy Association.


MILK MADE THE DIFFERENCE


These pigs were litter-mates.
One had milk, the other had none.



SCoeenHtiokh Hotel


PLAZA HOTEL


Id famous


Daytona Beach


INVITE YOU . ....
...... TO ATTEND

the 19S4 CorenttioH

FLORIDA DAIRY ASSOCIATION

May 26 27 28

MAKE RESERVATIONS TO: Rush Strayer, Manager
DAYTONA PLAZA HOTEL
DAYTONA BEACH, FLORIDA


JANUARY & FEBRUARY, 1954 13






FLORIDA FUTURE FARMERS
Up to 5000 Future Farmers are ex-
pected to participate in the extensive
program planned for F.F.A. day, Febru-
ary 6th, at the Florida State Fair, Tampa.
Starting with registration at the Fair
Grounds at 8:30 A. M., a full day's pro-
gram is scheduled with H. E. Wood,
State Supervisor of Agricultural Educa-
tion, as Chairman and F.F.A. State Presi-
dent Eugene Mixon as Master of Cere-
monies.
Carl D. Brorein, President of the
State Fair Association, will give the
welcoming address to the group at 9:30
A. M., in the grandstand.


S 7 F


STATE FAIR PROGRAM
Thomas D. Bailey, State Superintend-
ent of Public Instruction, and Miss Mar-
celle Petter, State President Future Home
Makers, will address the group.
Commissioner of Agriculture Nathan
Mayo will address the group at 10:50
A. M., and present the awards to the
Grand Champion winners of the live-
stock show.
An abundance of fine entertainment
will be provided by the State Champion
F.F.A. String Band, the Champion Male
Quartette, the Champion Harmonica
Player, and by Hawaiian dancing by Miss
Veren Fogel, 1953 State F.F.A. Sweet-
heart.


FEBRUARY

2-13,1954


SEE MORE IN '54! That's the keynote of this year's Fair. Bigger'
Better! More colorful and exciting than ever with an amazing
variety of new things to do and see.
SEE MORE IN '54! The Annual Florida Electrical Exposition will
introduce many interesting innovations . The Chrysler Corpora-
tion's "New Worlds in Motion," costing more than $1,500,000 will be
a magnificent, new feature . The Grandstand attractions and
thrill shows all different this year will bring some of America's
top entertainers to Tampa . It's Gasparilla's Golden Jubilee Year
- and the Priate Invasion, parades and week of high carnival will
be more spectacular than ever.
SEE MORE IN '54! Plan days of sightseeing at the Fair, and other
days for a fun-packed tour of the Midway and a grandstand view of
the thrilling auto races and stage presentations.


Feb. 4- Parade of Dairy Champions and
awarding of Championship R.b-
bons and Trophies.
Feb. 6 Future Farmers and Future Home-
e. -makers of America with special
grandstand program at 10:00 A.M. Ayrshire
Sale 1:30 P.M.


Feb. 11 Parade of Beef Champions and
e awarding of Championship R.b-
bons and Trophies.
Feb. 12 Bramman Sale at 7:00 P.M.
Feb. 13 4-H Clubs Day wit'% Special
S grandstand program 10:00 A.M.
Flying Farmers Day.


14 JANUARY & FEBRUARY, 1954


THE "MILK SHAKE GIRLS," nickname for
Florida's 1953 4-H Dairy Foods Demonstration
Team, Gail Goodhue, left, and Edith Cameron.


DUVAL COUNTY 4-H GIRLS
WIN DAIRY FOODS AWARD
The 1953 Florida State Championship
in 4-H Club dairy foods demonstration
competition was won by the Duval Coun-
ty team comprised of Gail Goodhue and
Edith Cameron.
Each of the girls received a gold wrist
watch as an award in the annual state-
wide contest in dairy food demonstra-
tion which is sponsored by the State 4-H
organization. The Carnation Milk Com-
pany provided the awards.
The girls received their training under
Miss Pearl Laffitte as Duval County
Home Demonstration Agent who has
recently retired.
As a team the girls have given num-
erous dairy foods demonstrations at var-
ious types of public meetings including
television. 4-H Club officials credit both
girls with having achieved exceptional
4-H records.

FLORIDA STATE FAIR
OFFERS "MORE IN '54"
Following the theme of "See More In
'54" the Florida State Fair has prepared
a larger variety of both educational and
entertainment attractions than ever be-
fore. It will take more than one day to
see it all but pick your days by the
"Calendar" given on this page and try
to see the dairy shows of Jerseys, Guern-
seys and Ayrshires and have fun and
thrills, too.
The Future Farmers and Future Home-
makers have their day on Saturday, Feb-
ruary 6; the following Saturday, Febru-
ary 13, is 4-H Club Day.
Following the Parade of Dairy Cham-
pions on Tuesday, February 4, the Flor-
ida Dairy Association is sponsoring a
Dairy Industry Dinner at Floridan Hotel.
Reservations should be made in advance
to the Florida Dairy Association, 220
Newnan Street, Jacksonville or after you
get to Tampa to E. T. Lay at the Floridan
Hotel.


















Jacksonville 4-H Dairy Show Tops Previous Entry Records


The Annual 4-H Club Livestock and Poultry Show for District V was held
Friday and Saturday, January 15 and 16 with Duval County 4-H members winning
a considerable share of the honors. The Duval County dairy judging team won first
over a group of six teams with St. Johns County team a close second.
Winning top honors in individual dairy judging was Catherine Parisian of
Callahan a member of the Nassau County team which placed third. Russell Lloyd, a
member of the Duval County winning team, won second in the individual judging
event and Harry Stratton, Jr. of Nassau County won third.
First place in dairy showmanship of
all breeds was won by Robert Parisian WINNERS AT THE JACKSONVILLE DIS-
of Nassau County, who was a member of TRICT V, 4-H DAIRY SHOW ARE SEEN
IN THE PICTURES ABOVE AND AT THE
the Florida State 4-H Dairy Judging RIGHT: (1) left to right, Catherine Parisian
Team for 1953. Placing second and third who had the top individual score in dairy judg-
in the showmanship event were Mirriam ing; Bob Bowie, David Findley, Russell Lloyd
Simmons and Gloria Alvarez. Nancy and Al Bowie, all of Dinsmore, who won the
hol, anotr D al Count con- dairy judging team contest for Duval County;
Buckholtz, another Duval County con- (2) Members of the St. Johns County judging
testant from Dinsmore won first place team which placed second; left to right, Bever-
in animal fitting, having her animal in ly Simmons, Wesley Smith, Perry Smith and
the best show condition. Nancy's entry Allen Paceti; (3) Robert Parisian, who won
in the show, a registered heifer, top honors in "showmanship"; (4) Nancy
in the show, a registered Guernsey heifer, Buckholtz, winner of 1st in "fitting," shows
won the reserve championship in the reg- her reserve grand champion Guernsey; (5)
istered Guernsey class. Placing second Laura Cameron and her grand champion
and third in the fitting event were the Guernsey; (6) Beverly Simmons shows her
brother Steve's grand champion Jersey and
two attractive Simmons sisters, Merriam (7) Merriam Simmons shows her brother
and Beverly, of St. Johns County. Mer- Steve's reserve grand champion Jersey. (8)
riam was a member of the State Judging Two of Florida's future 4-H girls who en-
Team for 1953. joyed the show; they are Andy and Marjorie
eam for 1Lay's granddaughters, Lyn and Leslie Wil-
The grand champion registered Guern- liams.
sey was shown by Laura Cameron of
Duval County. Laura acquired this fine total of 51 dairy animals and 18 beef
heifer at the 1953 State Guernsey sale cattle were entered along with 741
at Largo. Steve Simmons of St. Johns chickens, 45 rabbits and 61 dozen eggs.
County showed the grand champion reg- The show which was the first to be
istered Jersey and the reserve Champion. held in the new Duval County Livestock
Steve, now a freshman at the University show pavillion on McDuff Avenue, was
of Florida, was a member of Florida's sponsored by the State Department of
National Champion 4-H dairy judging Agriculture, the Jacksonville Chamber
team of 19.51. Steve's championship en- of Commerce and the Florida Chain Store
try, "Blonde Lad's Doll" has never been Council. Officiating at the show were
beaten in her class in a Florida show. state 4-H Club Agent Woodrow Brown,
She placed second in both the junior and Asst. 4-H Agent Grant Godwin, State
senior divisions at Memphis Dairy Show Extension Dairyman, C. W. Reeves and
a few weeks ago. Steve acquired both the County Agents of the six counties.
these splendid Jerseys from the Welkener A Jersey cow class was provided by
Dairy, Jacksonville. the Alvarez Jersey Farm and a Guernsey
In the grade Guernsey class the grand class by Dinsmore Dairy Farms for use
champion was shown by Al Bowie of in the dairy judging contests.
Dinsmore, and the reserve champion by A guessing contest was held as to a year's
his younger brother, John. milk production of two officially tested
Show Is Biggest And Best cows which were on exhibit. The 100
Duval County Agent Jim Watson said contestants who participated had an error
he considered the show the biggest and variation of from 63 pounds to 500
best since the show began. Almost 200 pounds butterfat. The contest demon-
4-H boys and girls were entered from strated the impossibility of knowing a
six counties including Duval, Nassau, cow's production without keeping syste-
Baker, Clay, St. Johns and Putnam. A natic records.


V 4i~r~uu3 ~


JANUARY & FEBRUARY, 1954


A-


on


* 15






Southern Ice Cream Manufacturers

Enjoy Miami Beach Convention

Another successful Annual Convention of Southern Ice Cream Manufacturers
was enjoyed by a near record attendance December 8-10 at Miami Beach. Tropical
Florida's finest weather and three of Florida's most glamourous beach front hotels
teamed up to charm the ice cream visitors from throughout the South.
Florida's charms of climate and outdoor appeal have a way of sending its conven-
tion guests home with mental relaxation, renewed physical vigor and remembrances
of a pleasant vacation as well as a briefcase full of new business ideas and the many
benefits of old friendship renewals, and business matters discussed and negotiated.
President E. D. Mitchell and Secretary Dave Adams with their program and
arrangements committees provided one of Southern's best convention programs.
In his own address Convention President Mitchell summarized the ice cream
industry's top problems and offered timely and important recommendation for a
sound industry program.


Excellent Speakers
ROBERT KAZMAYER, author and
expert on international affairs, spoke on
"Things to Watch and Things to Watch
For." He expressed the belief that Russia
is operating the biggest bluff in history.
He urged his listeners to have faith in
America and to quit being lazy politically.
ARTHUR DONOVAN, attorney and
labor relations authority, discussed labor
laws and procedures in dealing with labor
problems. His very sound advice on how
to avoid labor trouble was: (1) Pay a go-
ing wage. (2) Try to have steady work
and some overtime. (3) Maintain an in-
terested, close relationship with employ-
ees. (4) Explain to employees why you
do certain things. (5) Have good work-
ing conditions. (6) Ask for the advice of
employees. (7) Pay for suggestions. (8)
Sponsor plant activities such as bowling
teams, softball teams, etc. (9) Publish a
house organ. (10) Have set policies in
such matters as vacations, sick leave, etc.
(11) Don't play favorites.
Ice Cream Substitutes
GEORGE CLARKE, Executive Secre-
tary of the Texas Dairy Products Associa-
tion, gave a thought provoking report on
the expansion of the manufacture and
consumption of "Mellorine" in Texas
and other areas. Mellorine is an ice cream
substitute made from vegetable fats and
dried milk solids (no butterfat). The
public acceptance and use of this pro-
duct is rapidly expanding, Mr. Clarke
said, and advised ice cream manufactur-
ers to manufacture and sell it along with
regular ice cream so that the product will
be properly standardized, controlled and
marketed.
Florida law does not, at this time,
permit the manufacture of ice cream sub-
stitutes.
BOB NORTH, popular Assistant Man-
ager of the International Association of
Ice Cream Manufacturers, told his recent
tour and survey of ice cream manufactur-


ing in Europe. He emphasized how for-
tunate American ice cream manufacturers
are that ice is generally and officially ac-
cepted in America as a food whereas in
Europe it is considered a luxury.
He also pointed out the necessity for
careful attention to the growing "weight
consciousness" of the average consumer,
and increasing advertising and education-
al programs emphasizing that "ice cream"
is not to be classed with fattening foods.
The program committee made a splen-
did selection in three well known con-
vention inspirational speakers. These
were: DE LOS WALKER who spoke on,
"Forward now to a Better America";
MILLARD BENNET, whose address was
"The Three Golden Keys", and JEFF
WILLIAMS, whose inspiring talk was
titled, "Behind and Beyond Today."
Other Program Features
The always popular "Ice Cream Clinic"
had excellent participation and provided
top notch ice cream quality improvement
information from the South's leading
dairy science colleges. These were Pro-
fessor H. B. Henderson, University of
Georgia; Dr. E. L. Fouts, University of
Florida; Professor H. E. Reed, Univer-
sity of Missouri, and Professor E. H.
Herzer, Mississippi State College.
The excellent convention entertainment
program was sponsored by the Dixie
Flyers, Dairy Supply and Equipment Di-
vision of the Association, headed by
Chairman John Lowry, Savage Arms Cor-
poration.
Florida's Jack Tierney of Foremost
Dairies and Cliff Wayne of Southern
Dairies, were Co-Chairmen of the Gen-
eral Arrangements Committee.
Elected president of Southern for the
coming year was Howard C. Williams of
Cleveland, Mississippi. Ned Dowling of
Turnbull Cone Company, Chattanooga,
Tennessee, was elected Chairman of the
Dixie Flyers.


Tierney Elected V.P.

Ice Cream Mfgrs.
Of the many good things which took
place at the December 8-10 Miami Beach
Convention of the Southern Association
of Ice Cream Manufacturers, Florida
members liked best the election of one
of their most popular dairy executives
as Southern's Vice President.
Mr. Jack Tierney, a Vice President of
Foremost Dairies, who had served as Co-
Chairman of the 1953 program and ar-
rangements committee and as M. C. at the
Annual Banquet program, received a well
deserved promotion in his election as
Vice President.
Tierney, who operates out of the Fore-
most General Office in Jacksonville, is
recognized as one of Foremost's top man-
agement executives. He maintains his
home in Orlando but is usually serving
Foremost as management advisor at one
of their numerous branch plants.


Government Competition
In Ice Cream Business
A spot-check of the industry last year
revealed that in one hundred and sixty-
two geographical locations, Government
installations were making ice cream and
related products which were readily avail-
able from established ice cream compan-
ies.
A spokesman for the Internation Asso-
ciation of Ice Cream Manufacturers ap-
pearing before the Inter-Governmental
Relations Sub-Committee of the House
Government Operations Committee scor-
ed this practice on the basis of waste,
duplication, quality variety, sanitation,
and economy.


16 JANUARY & FEBRUARY, 1954


TIERNEY






Veterinary Committee Feature


Paratyphoid Infection In Calves
By: DR. M. RISTIC
Department of Veterinary Science
Florida Agriculture Experiment Station
The Veterinary Committee of the Association desires to be of service to Florida Dairymen
through discussion in this column of any Dairy Herd problems submitted uhich are of general
interest. Submit your questions to the Editor. FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS. Dr. Karl O'ens of
Gainesville, Chairman of the Committee, u'ill assign the questions to a suitable authority for
appropriate answers.

Q How does paratyphoid infection affect calves ?

A By Dr. M. Ristic, New Member of the Staff, Department
of Veterinary Science, Agricultural Experiment Station, U.
of Florida, Gainesville, Florida:
Paratyphoid is the second, after white scours, most common
infectious disease of young calves.
The bacterial agent called Salmonella enteritidis is found
to be responsible for the infection. The disease was first diag-
DR. RISTIC nosed in Denmark in 1891. In this country paratyphoid infec-
tion was first reported in 1916.
Infection of young animals generally occurs by the mouth when food, milk and
water, contaminated by means of infected discharges of adult animals and/or sick
calves, are taken in. From the digestive tract bacteria reach the blood and lymph
streams and give rise to septicemia in the course of which organisms settle in different
organs of the body. In these organs inflammatory and necrotic changes occur which
may persist after the septicemia has subsided.
The disease begins with loss of appe- involving he lower lobes f th
tilte, rise of body temperature and swell- ns involving the lower lobes o
ing of the joints. These symptoms appear Bteriological examination is necessary
usually at the end of the first week of determine the exact cause of the disease
post-natal life. Diarrhea which may be since the above described lesions may
preceded by constipation is one of the also be caused by other disease producing
most common symptoms, but not always bacteria. Veterinarians frequently use vac-
present. The evacuations are yellowish- cines, autisera, sulphonamides, antibiotics
gray or dirty-gray in color, and have un- and oter s of treatments.
pleasant odor. In chronic cases animals and other forms of treatments.
suffer from dry cough and laboured Prevention is the only reliable method
breathing which is usually associated with of controlling paratyphoid. This can be
achieved by observing and practicing san-
The death rate varies between 25 and itary measures in raising calves. Regular
The death rate varies between 25 and fd w ce a wholesome food
30 percent. In mild cases calf paratyphoid feeding with clean and wholesome food
30 percent. In mild cases calf paratyphoid is imperative for preservation of the
usually terminates in recovery within 5 to is imperative for preservation of the
usually terminates in recovery within 5 to calf's health. During the first few days
8 days, however, in more severe cases following birth, the calf should be fed
recovery may take place 8 to 14 days after colostrum as this first milk is rich in anti-
appearance of the first symptoms. bodies which confer a passive immunity
Post mortem examination reveals most to the calf and protects it against a num-
characteristic lesions in the liver and ber of environmental diseases. After a
spleen. The liver is enlarged and usually few days of feeding on colostrum, the
has a brownish-yellow, orange or dark calf should be given an adequate supply
yellow color. Small necrotic nodules are of whole milk at regular intervals. Irregu-
densely scattered throughout the liver ap- lar and improper feeding are common
pearing like fine grains of sand imbedded causes of gastric disorders and are liable
in the liver tissues. Swelling of the spleen to reduce the calf's resistance to para-
is usually found. In chronic cases there typhoid
is found broncho-pneumonia and adhes- typhoid.


If you really want to get ahead in
your company, associate as much as you
can with those who are on top or are on
their way to the top. Be useful to them,
win their liking, and you'll perform like
cream in a bottle of milk. No matter
how tall the bottle the cream will rise
to the top.
-The Curtis COURIER


Flood Relief Hay Program
Is Now In Operation
A grant of Federal funds has been
made to the State of Florida by the
U. S. Department of Agriculture for the
furnishing of hay at reduced prices to
eligible farmers in the designated emer-
gency feed program counties.
The program which Governor Johns
has placed in charge of Commissioner of
Agriculture Nathan Mayo provides for
payment of half of the cost of the freight
or $10.00 per ton, whichever is the
smaller, on hay shipped into the area
and sold to farmers.
Application for these benefits will be
made to the County Flood Emergency Re-
lief Committee at the County Agents
office. Eligibility requirements are the
same as for feed relief except that needs
for a 60-day period may be approved in-
stead of a 30-day period. Farmers may
secure aid either through a hay dealer or
may order his hay direct. County Agents


Good Government Award
To Pensacola Sanitarian
Mr. B. G. Tennant, director of the
division of sanitation for Escambia
County Health Department was recently
awarded the 1953 "Good Government
Award" by the Pensacola Junior Cham-
ber of Commerce. The award was made
in the field of government in Escambia
County.
Tennant is Vice-President of the State
Sanitarians Association and in addition
to his other duties in sanitation, is in
charge of the milk inspection department
for the county.







SI i. u- r


In the above pictures, top, L. C. Shook, Brad-
enton, left, and L. D. Taylor, DeLand, were
presented first and second efficiency) awards
as DHIA superritors by Jack Den', on behalf
of Southern Dairies, Inc. at the 1953 Annual
Dairy Field Day Banquet at the University of
Florida. BOTTOM. Mr. Dew presents, also
for Southern Dairies. Efficient Production Pla-
ques to Walter Schmid, Sarasota. vtate win-
ner: M. A. Schack, Greenuood. 2nd place
winner; and Elbert Cammack, Fairglade Jersey
Dairy, Orlando, district winner.


JANUARY & FEBRUARY, 1954


* 17





ACTIVITIES REVIEW OF:


Florida's Dairy Councils
Current News of Dairy Council Work in Tampa-St. Petersburg, Miami & Jacksonville

The new section in the Dairy News is established with this issue to bring
timely information of the activities of Florida Dairy Council work. The
material will be supplied by the three Council directors in turn.

Ahe Dairy Council Program Since 1915

A Valuable Dairy Industry Auxilliary,
By: MISS REBECCA DANIEL, Nutritionist-Director
Dairy Council of Dade, Broward and Monroe Counties
The question most often asked the members of Florida's 3 Dairy Council Units,
their 75 affiliated units located in the leading cities throughout the United States and
the National Dairy Council is . . What is the Dairy Council? .... What does it
DO?
In 1915 leaders in the dairy industry, with the assistance of leading health
authorities and nutritionists, organized a program designed to promote national health
through research and education. The organization was given the name of National
Dairy Council and was designed to be non-profit, authoritative and widespread.
Since the founding of the National Dairy Council, 76 local units have been
established from coast to coast. Each one is affiliated with the National Dairy Council.
The purpose and program of each unit parallels that of National Dairy Council, but
concentrates its services within its own community or state.
Dairy Council staffs work closely with
leaders in professional, educational and
consumer fields. In the professional and
are doctors, dentists, nurses, dietitians,
public health units; in the educational
group are the schools, public, private and
parochial, school lunch personnel and .
home economists; in the consumer group, '
such organizations as 4-H Clubs, PTA
groups, Home Demonstration workshops,
YMCA and YWCA, Girl Scouts and Boy
Scouts, church groups and civic organiza-
tions.
Trained Nutritionists Employed
The established policy of the National
Council is that the staff members of local
Councils are qualified to teach nutrition
and are trained to apply the well-written
Dairy Council materials to all phases of
health education. But printed pamphlets
and posters are not the limit in Dairy
Council teaching devices . . Nutrition
is taught through colorful films, educa-
tional exhibits, radio, television, public T .
displays and animal feeding demonstra-
tions. Since no Dairy Council funds are
allocated for paid advertising, all radio,
television and press publicity is received
gratis as a form of public service. The f
newspapers, radio and television stations ,
have been most generous in giving space r \.
and time to Dairy Council projects, and
staff members keep in close touch with
these publicity outlets in order to main- .
tain present friendly relations and assure
cooperation in the future.
Dairymen Are Sponsors
Now who are the sponsors of such
a widespread, yet well concentrated pro-
gram? They are the dairy farmers, pro-
cessors and distributors of milk and milk
products! The National organization also
(Continued on Page 25)


DIRECTORY OF
FLORIDA'S
DAIRY COUNCILS
DAIRY COUNCIL OF JACKSONVILLE
16 East Church Street
Mrs. Arlen Jones, Exec. Director
Mrs. Ann Johnson, Asst. Director

DAIRY COUNCIL OF TAMPA AND
ST. PETERSBURG
102 N. Dale Mabry Tampa
Mrs. America Escuder, Exec. Director

DAIRY COUNCIL OF MIAMI Including
DADE, BROWARD & MONROE
COUNTIES
769 N. W. 18th Terrace Miami
Miss Rebecca Daniel, Exec. Director
Miss Frances Cudworth, Asst. Director


IN THE PICTURE BELOW, TOP: Miami
Dairy Council Director, Miss Rebecca Daniel,
is seen explaining the Dairy council program
to a luncheon meeting of dairy wives. IN THE
BOTTOM PICTURE are the hostesses for the
Miami Dairy Council Holiday Reception for
Home Economists held in December.


18 JANUARY & FEBRUARY,


1954






SOME OF THE RESULTS
OF DAIRY COUNCIL WORK
New and basic reasons why dairy pro-
ducts are needed by all ages discovered
by research.
Participation by National and Local
leaders in promoting greater use of dairy
foods.
Greater public appreciation of the food
value of dairy products and the import-
ance of the dairy industry.
A constant increase in the per capital
consumption of milk and milk products.


MIAMI DAIRY COUNCIL
ENTERTAINS HOME ECONOMISTS
A pre-holiday season party and recep-
tion was held early in December by the
Miami Dairy Council to which all Home
Economists of the area were invited.
The party was held from 4:00 to 6:00
P. M. at the Biscayne Terrace Hotel with
86 guests present.
The object of the party was threefold.
(1) To promote friendship with and
between the home economics teachers and
leaders of the community. (2) To show
how dairy products can be used in holi-
day menus. (3) To demonstrate new
and novel uses for dairy product cartons,
boxes, caps, lids, etc.
Dairy foods in the holiday menu were
demonstrated by serving egg nog and an
attractive array of buffet foods using
milk, cottage cheese and other cheeses,
whipped cream, ice cream, sherbets, etc.
Each guest was given a special assortment
of dairy foods holiday recipes for use in
classrooms, newspapers, radio programs,
etc.
The novel way in which dairy cartons,
caps, and other materials usually dis-
carded can be used for holiday purposes
were shown by presenting a variety of
decorations and gift items made from
milk cartons, caps, etc., ice cream cups
and boxes, soda fountain straws, etc. Di-
rections for making these items in classes
and parts were also furnished.
Six different types of Christmas tree
decorations were also demonstrated with
trees displayed as a part of decoration for
the party.
Miss Marian Cudworth, Assistant Di-
rector of the Miami Council, later dis-
cussed and demonstrated the making and
use of these novel items on both radio
and T.V.
Four attractively gowned young ladies
assisted as hostesses. One of these, Miss
Mary Butler, was State Dairy Month
Queen of 1952. Miss Janice Wadsworth
was Miami's 1953 Dairy Month Queen.
Others were Miss Nina Koger and Miss
Mildred Butler, twin sister of Mary.


The 39th Annual Meeting and Winter
Conference of the National Dairy Coun-
cil is scheduled to meet at the Peabody
Hotel in Memphis January 26-27.
Florida's three Dairy Council unit di-
rectors are expected to attend, as well as
Mr. Paul Reinhold, of Foremost Dairies,
who is a member of the Board of Direc-
tors of the National Council.


"Strengthening the Dairy Industry
Through Research and Education" will
be the major theme of the conference.
Subjects to be covered include: Building
Business Through Education, Dairy
Council Educational Program in Action,
Self Help Plan to Expand Markets, Perils
of Misinformation, Nutritional Value of
Fat, and Strengthening the Dairy Indus-
try Through Research and Education.


DAIRY COUNCILS AT WORK is demonstrated in the pictures below by, TOP: MISS AMER-
ICA ESCUDER, Director of Tampa St. Petersburg Council as she explains Dairy Council work
at a Parent-Teachers' Meeting and, BOTTOM: MRS. ARLEN JONES, Director of the Jackson-
ville Council as she explained Dairy Council school materials to a meeting of eighty teachers.


JANUARY & FEBRUARY, 1954


D. C. DIRECTORS ATTEND MEMPHIS CONFERENCE


* 19








GUERNSEY CATTLE CLUB NEWS


Guernsey Annual Meeting
February 4, In Tampa
President Earl Johnson has announced
the Annual Meeting of the Florida
Guernsey Cattle Clunb to be held Thurs-
day, February 4th at the Floridan Hotel,
Tampa. The Annual business meeting
will be held beginning at 10:00 A. M.
and the Annual Luncheon program at
1:00 P. M.
Guest speakers on
the program are Col.
Frank Johnson, Di-
rector of Milk Mar-
keting of Golden
i Guernsey, Inc.; C. J.
(Buddy) J acob s,
new Southeastern Re-
presentative of the
An A.G.C.C. and Dean
JOHNSON Gordon Cairns o f
the College of Agri-
culture, University of Maryland, who will
judge the livestock show at the State
Fair.
In addition to the regular business of
the Annual Meeting, the officers and
directors of the Florida Guernsey Cattle
Club will be elected for the coming year.
Present officials and directors, in addi-
tion to President Earl Johnson, are: W.
A. Boutwell, Sr., Vice President; John
Logan, Pinellas County Agent, Secretary-
Treasurer; and Directors: R. R. Jennings,
Jacksonville; T. Stin Haselton, Eustis; L.
H. Sellers, St. Petersburg; W. P. Wal-
drep, Hollywood; and Dr. Roberto Para-
jon, Havana, Cuba.


REGISTRY TESTS
FLORIDA GUERNSEY
Official Guernsey registry tests are
made under the supervision of the Uni-
versity of Florida and reported to the
AGCC for approval and publication.
Four registered Guernsey cows owned
by Dinsmore Dairy Farms, Dinsmore,
Fla., have completed the following rec-
ords.
DINSMORE MAXMOST HONOR-
IA. a six year-old, produced 12,681
pounds of milk and 677 pounds of but-
terfat. On three times daily milking for
365 days. She is the daughter of the
famous Guernsey sire, Quail Roost Max-
most, that has 128 sons and daughters in
the Performance Register.
DINSMORE NOBLE KIM produced
10,693 pounds of milk and 515 pounds
of butterfat milked three times daily for
365 days as a junior two year-old. "Kim"
is the daughter of the famous Guernsey
sire, Quail Roost Noble Yeoman, that has
one son and 42 daughters in the Per-
formance Register.
DINSMORE MAYROYAL ELVA.
produced 12,645 pounds of milk and 525
pounds of butterfat, starting her record
as junior four year-old. The record was
made on three times daily milking for
365 days.
DINSMORE MAYROYAL FLORI-
DA produced 10,512 pounds of milk and
504 pounds of butterfat milked three
times daily for a ten-month period, as a
senior three year-old.


GUERNSEYS PURCHASED BY FLORIDA BREEDERS
The following purchases of registered young Guernsey sires have been announced
recently by the American Guernsey Cattle Club.


J. MARTIN BROWN, owner Big Oak
Dairy, Plant City, has purchased WETHER-
INGTON FARM SFD'S PAL from Arlen R.
Wetherington, Sydney, Fla. This young bull
is out of the cow, Sargeant Farms Ben's Lil.
and is sired by Bayou Vista Robert's Sydney.
CHRIS JENSEN, Glenhurst Dairy, Ocala,
has just purchased LA VIDA NOBLE PILOT
from T. Stin Haselton, Eustis, Fla. This young
bull is out of the cow, LaVida Jeweller's
Misteltoe, that has once been classified Desir-
able for type, is sired by Riegeldale Emory's
Noble.
THE FOREST LAKE ACADEMY, Mait-
land, has purchased LA VI DA POPPY'S
CROWN PRINCE from Stin Haselton, Eus-
tis, Fla. This richly bred young bull is out
of the well-bred cow, Edisto Farm's Poppy,-
that has a production record of 11,219 pounds
of milk and 588 pounds butterfat made as a
junior two year-old. He is sired by Riegeldale
Emory's Noble.
J. E. BARRINGTON, Live Oak, has pur-
chased DINSMORE FLIRTER from Dinsmore
Dairy Co., Dinsmore, Fla. This richly bred


young bull is out of the well-bred cow, Dins-
more Maxmost Florence, that has once been
classified Desirable for type, and has two
production records of 8,372 pounds of milk
and 430 pounds of butterfat made as a senior
two year-old, and 14,060 pounds of milk and
707 pounds of butterfat made as a six year-
old. He is sired by Foremost May Royalty.
W. E. BRYAN. Palatka, has purchased
DINSMORE JURY KING from Mrs. Eliza-
beth C. Powell, Palatka. This richly bred
young bull is out of the well-bred cow, Dins-
more Maxmost Karla, that has been classified
Very Good for type, and has two production
records of 8,632 pounds of milk and 125
pounds of butterfat made as a senior two
year-old and 10,589 pounds of milk and 505
pounds of butterfat made as a senior three
year-old. He is sired by Dinsmore Juryman.
J. C. LOWE, St. Augustine, has just pur-
chased HANSON'S GOLDEN LAD from W.
B. & E. E. Fox, St. Augustine, Fla. This young
bull is out of the cow, Sunbeam's Golden
Lassie, and is sired by Bodden's Hanson Fred.


JACOBS


JACOBS SUCCEEDS McK. JETER
WITH GUERNSEY GROUP
The American Guernsey Cattle Club
has appointed Cornelius J. Jacobs as their
new field representative for North and
South Carolina, Georgia and Florida fol-
lowing the resignation of J. McK. Jeter
who has held the position for more than
6 years. "Mac" will be running his own
farm of 300 acres and managing another
near his home in Union, S. C.
Mr. Jacobs, a native of Eastern Cen-
tral Alabama, was born and reared on
a dairy farm, showing his own 4-H Club
calves in county, state and district shows.
He was graduated from Five Points High
School before his army service with the
112 Cavalry Regimental Combat Team
and from Alabama Polytechnic Institute
with a degree in Agriculture in 1949.
Majoring in dairy production, Mr. Jacobs
accepted a position immediately upon
graduation as manager of the 200 cow
dairy herd and farm of Avondale Mills,
Inc. in Sylacauga, Alabama.
In December of 1952 he became Assist-
ant Superintendent of the Piedmont Ex-
perimental Substation at Camp Hill, Ala-
bama, as a member of the staff of the
Agricultural College of Alabama Poly-
technic Institute. Guernsey breeders of
Florida and Southeastern states where he
will be serving feel fortunate to have a
man of such excellent training and ex-
perience as their special representative
from the Club.

T. L. COOK, Dinsmore, has purchased
DINSMORE JERRY from Dinsmore Dairy
Co., Dinsmore, Fla. This young bull is out
of the cow, Dinsmore Faymax Delia, that has
once been classified Acceptable for type, and
is sired by Foremost May Royalty.
B. T. CLARK, Lakeland, has purchased
MAGNOLLA GAY LADDIE from A. N.
Tuck, Thomasville, Ga. This young bull is
out of the cow, Magnolia's Bessie Rose, and
is sired by Peer's Majestic Corporal.


.20 JANUARY & FEBRUARY, 1954





GUERNSEY NEWS
Continued

BELOW ARE SEEN THE TWO TOP PRICE
ANIMALS SOLD AT THE 1953 FLORIDA
STATE GUERNSEY SALE AT LARGO,
FLORIDA. IN THE TOP PICTURE is "Moe-
geo Winner's Hightide," which brought the
highest price of $1,000.00. The purchaser was
Dr. Roberto E. Parajon, Hanava, Cuba, left,
who purchased the bull for the Cuban Depart-
ment of Agriculture. The consignor of the
animal was R. A. McLaughlin, Lexington, N.
C., (RIGHT). IN THE LOWER PICTURE.
is shown "Nejasco Phil's Jeanie," the second
highest animal at the sale at 3500,00. She u'ai
purchased by Walter Schmid, 2nd from left,
Guernsey breeder of Sarasota, Florida. The
consignor uas Dr. Grady Coker of Canton,
Ga., (CENTER). ON THE LEFT is Hon.
Nathan Mayo, Florida Commissioner of Agri-
culture.
u~rl


MILK COMMISSION PROCEEDS IN SOUND PUBLIC SERVICE


LETTER TO THE EDITOR

DEAR EDITOR: In view of the conjt-ant
sniping at the Florida Milk Commission by
so called champions of consumers, it seems
to me that someone should set forth the facts
about this body and the position of the dairies
concerning it.
In an effort to comply with the wishes
of those who advocated a change in the
Florida Milk Commission, the late Gov-
ernor Dan McCarty and the 1953 Legis-
lature made some rather drastic changes
in the authority and membership of the
Commission. The critics maintained that


the dairies had too much representation
on the Commission with its three mem-
bers and the consumers too little with
only one member.
So the law was changed, leaving the
industry but 2 members, increasing the
consumer members to three and remov-
ing the administrator as a member. This
gave the consumer a possible balance of
power of 5 to 2, assuming the 2 mem-
bers representing the State Board of
Health and the State Department of
Agriculture would be most likely to
vote with the consumer members on a
controversial question. In addition to this
the Commission was restricted from set-
ting of any further prices on milk pur-
chased by schools and charitable organiza-
tions.
These changes in the law and the mem-
bership of the Commission seem to have
accomplished little in satisfying the critics
of the Commission. Because school milk
prices were not reduced like magic by
the removal of this milk from price con-
trol, the critics have turned their con-
demnation on the dairies.
Dairies answer these complaints with
the information that schools already had
a lower price on milk than private pur-
chasers under the prices formerly set by
the Milk Commission. This was already
the minimum at which milk could be sold
that would return to the dairy the cost
plus a very small profit and for some,
only the cost.
Some one else was recently quoted in
the press as requesting the Governor to
replace on the Commission all three of
the consumer members and the State
Board of Health member. They were
accused of failing to do their duty be-
cause they had not secured a reduction
in milk prices.
I doubt very much if the person who
made this request even knows or has
ever seen these respected citizens who
were selected by the Governor to do this
difficult job and who, in my opinion,
are doing (and without compensation)
an honest, conscientious and efficient job
as members of this Commission.
It is not uncommon that those who
are in possession of the facts and give
their honest and fair consideration will
arrive at a different conclusion than those
who are not interested in the facts. It
seems to me that in spite of all handi-
caps that are constantly thrown in their
way, the Florida Milk Commission pro-
ceeds to render a sound and necessary
public service.
Had it not been for the Florida Milk
Commission, I am confident Florida
could not today be boasting of its top
ranking home milk supply and further-
more, consumers would have been pay-
ing considerably more for their milk
for many years past.
FLORIDA DAIRYMAN


JANUARY & FEBRUARY, 1954 21






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA



DAIRY REVIEW


Extension Service
Dairy Farm Research Unit


Dairy Products Laboratory
Agricultural Experiment Station


III II


Dlairy Science Marches On In 1953
By: DR. R. B. BECKER
Dept. of Dairy Science, University of Florida
(Second of two articles reviewing the significant findings in Dairy Science during the past year,
as reported at the 1953 Annual Meeting of the American Dairy Service Association)
The 1953 Annual Meeting of the American Dairy Science Association was held
at the University of Wisconsin with a record-breaking attendance and program. There
were 63 technical papers on dairy products, 109 in dairy production and 10 in dairy
extension in addition to the general session, committee reports and educational exten-
sion exhibits.
Selected excerpts from these numerous reports which should be of most interest
in Florida follow:
The time of preparing 24 cows, milking them, weighing and recording the milk
at the University of Illinois took 75 minutes with a pipeline milker, as compared with
120 minutes for a conventional 2-unit machine milker.
During two years at the Lewisburg station in Tennessee, irrigation of a mixed
alfalfa-orchard grass-ladino clover pasture increased the cow-days of grazing by 54
percent.
Whether cows drink hard or soft
water made no significant difference in The University of Florida
milk and butterfat production. Average DEPARTMENT OF DAIRY SCIENCE
consumption was 101.5 and 102.1 pounds Schedule of
of water respectively. 1954 Special Events
of water respectively. THE FLORIDA DAIRY INDUSTRY
Continued observation on use of sod- April 13
April 13-16
ium propionate in control of ketosis in 5th Annual
milk cows at Cornell University gave LABORATORIANS SHORT COURSE
favorable results in 26 out of 27 cases. For laboratory personnel from State, coun-
The Minnesota station reported on the ty municipal and commercial laboratories
The Minnesota station reported on the who test dairy products, and for Milk Sani-
effect of different semen diluents on tarians.
revival of frozen bovine semen. Experi- April 14-16
mental freezing of semen was done first 10th Annual
in England; later at American Breeders MILK SANITARIANS CONFERENCE
Service (Wisconsin unit) and Eastern For milk sanitarians, food inspectors, labo-
Iowa Atificial Breeding Association, and ratorians, technicians, public health work-
owa Artificial Breeding Association, and ers, veterinarians, dairy plant operators,
is in extensive field tests now. producers, distributors, quality control per-
Blood typing tests at the Ohio station sonnel, and equipment and supply dealers.
indicate that the female may be fertile in August 10-12
10 percent of mixed bovine twins. This 23rd Annual
verifies previous general results. DAIRY HERDSMEN'S SHORT COURSE
Cornell investigators found that six or dairy herdsmen, herd owners, dairy
Cornell investigators found that six farm helpers, DHIA supervisors, producer-
cows produced more acetic acid in their distributors and milk producers.
rumens when fed mixed hay alone than September 16-17
when fed grain alone. Acetic acid forma- 19th Annual
tion in the rumen is the beginning of DAIRY FIELD DAY & CONFERENCE
butterfat synthesis in the cow. For milk producer-distributors, dairy pro-
cessors, milk producers, veterinarians, herds-
The Minnesota station has investigated men, DHIA workers and equipment and
many nutrient compounds without suc- supply dealers.
cess, to prevent malnourishment and October 14-16
deaths of calves fed only vegetable fats 17th Annual
and hydrogenated vegetable fats in place DAIRY PLANT OPERATORS SHORT
COURSE
of butterfat. Symptoms in the calves not For dairy plant superintendents and assist-
fed some butterfat varied, but included ants, managers, owners, dairy plant em-
approaching anemia, light patchy areas in ployees, producer-distributors, equipment
skeletal muscles, lesions in the heart and and supply dealers.
striated muscles, fatty livers, enlarged Year Around
OPEN HOUSE
flabby hearts and an effect on the heart Visitors are always welcome to visit the
rhythm. They observed that when but- Dairy Products Laboratory and the Dairy
Farm Research Unit.
(Continued on Page 24)


MILK SANITARIANS

PLAN CONFERENCE
The tenth annual conference of the
Florida Association of Milk Sanitarians
is scheduled to begin Wednesday, April
14, at 1:45 P.M., in Gainesville. A high-
light of the session will be the awarding
of Ten-Year Service Citations to several
of the Charter members of the Associa-
tion. Dr. H. H. Wilkowske, in charge of
local arrangements, has arranged an out-
standing program of interesting sanita-
tion topics, which include discussions on
public health, cleaning by circulation,
dairy cattle diseases, bulk milk dispensing,
air agitation of milk, permanent pipe
lines, window screening, tests for sanita-
tion, properties of water, new fungicidal
paints, and sampling from cold wall
tanks.
This meeting immediately follows the
Milk Laboratorians meeting which begins
Tuesday, April 13, at 9:00 A. M. A small
registration fee of $3.00 will entitle a
person to attend either or both meetings,
and also includes a ticket to the Annual
Banquet held on Thursday night. A
social hour and banquet entertainment
will be provided by the Florida Dairy
Association, E. T. Lay, Executive Secre-
tary. All sanitarians who work with dairy
products are urged to attend. Much of
the program also will be of interest to
plant operators, food sanitarians, techni-
cians, laboratorians, public health work-
ers, veterinarians, producers, distributors,
quality control personnel, and equipment
and supply dealers.

Set April Short Course
For Milk Laboratorians
The Milk Laboratorians Short Course
will be held in Gainesville, beginning
Tuesday, April 13, with registration at
9:00 A. M. The sessions will be devoted
to the timely topics "The Cryoscope" and
"Total Solids Testing." All aspects re-
lated to these subjects will be thorough-
ly discussed.
All laboratory technicians who do milk
and dairy products testing are urged to
attend as well as plant operators who
wish to learn more about these import-
ant subjects. Further information may be
obtained from Dr. H. H. Wilkowske,
Department of Dairy Science, University
of Florida, Gainesville, who is in charge
of local arrangements. The meeting is
open to anyone who wishes to attend.
Registration is only $3.00 per person,
which includes a ticket to the banquet on
Thursday night held jointly with the
Milk Sanitarians whose meeting immed-
iately follows the Laboratorians begin-
ning Wednesday, April 14, at 1:45 P. M.
at the University of Florida. Registration
fee will entitle anyone to attend either or
both meetings.


22 JANUARY & FEBRU


ARY, 1954





DAIRY STUDENTS RECEIVE ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS U. F. NAMES T. W. SPARKS
AT UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA DAIRY DEPARTMENT ASSISTANT EXTENSION DAIRYMAN


Dr. E. L. Fouts, Head of the Department of Dairy Science, University of Florida,
has announced the winners of two 1953 Achievement Awards which are presented
annually to outstanding dairy students in the Departments of Agriculture and the
Department of Dairy Service at the University.
BORDEN AWARD: An award spon-
sored by the Borden Dairy Company for AWARD: An award sponsored by the
the outstanding Senior student in Agri- Virginia Dare Company for the third
culture who has taken a minimum of two successive year was won by Richard
dairy courses prior to his Senior year, was Thomas of Gainesville, a senior student
won by Courtney P. Stephens, a senior in Dairy Manufacturing.
dairy husbandry student from Fort Pierce, This award is made to the dairy stu-
Florida. dent who has shown the most outstand-
This was the 9th annual presenting of ing achievement in his work in "ice cream
this award, five of which have been won manufacturing". The Virginia Dare
by dairy students. Company has announced continuation of
ICE CREAM MANUFACTURING their sponsorship of this award.


-"" -


THE ADJACENT PICTURES taken in front of the Dairy Science building at the University of
Florida were made on the occasion of the presenting of the 1953 Annual Achievement Awards
to students in dairying and agriculture. TOP: Dr. Leon Mull of the Dairy Science Department
is seen presenting the VIRGINIA DARE AWARD to Richard M. Thomas; BOTTOM: Dr. C.
V. Noble, Dean of the U. F. College of Agriculture is seen presenting the BORDEN CO.
AWARD to Courtney P. Stephens.
On hand at the presentation in addition to members of the Department of Dairy Science staff
were: Dr. John Allen, Acting President U. of F.; Dr. Wayne Reitz, Provost for Agriculture; and
Director Fifield of the Agricultural Station.


The University of Florida has an-
nounced the appointment of Mr. T. W.
Sparks to the new position of Assistant
Extension Dairyman with the University
of Florida Agricultural Extension Service.
Mr. Sparks will work with C. W. Reeves,
Extension Dairyman, in carrying out the
Dairy Extension program in the State.
This program which is operated largely
through the County Agents of the var-
ious counties, includes dairy herd im-
provement work, better sires and arti-
ficial breeding projects, better feed and
pasture development, 4-H Dairy work,
and general education work in dairy ac-
tivities.
The position of Assistant State Exten-
sion Dairymen was created by the 1953
Florida Legislature upon the recommen-
dation and request of the Florida Dairy
Association, the Florida Agricultural
Council and the University of Florida.
Mr. Sparks is well informed through
training and experience in dairy cattle
management. He was reared on a general
farm in northeast Mississippi. Before com-
pleting college, he tested cows for two
years and managed a commercial dairy
farm of 200 acres crop land and 80 cows
for one year. Mr. Sparks spent two years
in the Pacific theater during World War
II. After completing his military service,
he graduated from Mississippi State Col-
lege in January, 1950, with a major in
Dairy Husbandry. Following graduation,
he managed the Plant Lake Dairy Farm
at Aberdeen, Mississippi.
Coming to Florida in January 1951
to manage a purebred dairy herd at Bar-
tow, Florida, he became assistant county
agent in Polk County in the Fall of 1952
where he made an outstanding record
in work with 4-H Dairy members and
adults. Under his leadership, Polk County
had 86 4-H members enrolled in its
Dairy Program during 1953. These mem-
bers owned 128 animals. Sixty-two mem-
beds improved pastures and all 86 pro-
vided minerals and parasite control and
improved feeding methods. The county
won the State 4-H Efficient Dairy Pro-
duction Contest in 1953.
As assistant to C. W. Reeves, Mr.
Sparks will continue to work on all these
phases of the Extension Program.

"Sorry, neighbor, that my hen got
loose and scratched up your garden."
"That's all right, my dog ate your hen."
"Fine! I just ran over your dog."

AS IN LIFE ....
One reason the big apples are always
on top of the basket is the fact that there
are always a lot of little apples holding
them up there.


JANUARY & FEBRUARY, 1954


* 23



































FARM QUALITY

PROGRAM


r Simplified Routine

* Lower Costs

* Lower Counts

* Bigger Milk Checks



New stepped-up cleaning power with dou-
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free, non-irritating, non-caking. Makes all
water soft as rain. Finest alkaline cleaner
yet devised for all milking equipment:
ster, more effective, more economical.


An unbeatable mild organic acid cleaner
for lime and milestone removal and control.
Film disappears like magic. Milking ma-
chines, pails, cans, coolers sparkle with
cleanliness. For alternate use with
Klenzade Kleer-Mor a cleaning combina-
tion favored by dairy farmers the nation
over.


A liquid sodium hypochlorite solution with
powerful yet safe germicidal action. For
years the standard sanitizer on America's
dairy farms. Always clear, uniform, and
now nearly 50% stronger than before
Rinses clear, leaves no sediment. Easy to
measure; economical to use.
For newer quicker safer methods,
adopt the Klenzade Farm Quality
Program the most scientific yet
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I dairy farm cleaning . in daily
use nation-wide.
House IASK YOUR CO-OP OR DEALER

KLENZADE PRODUCTS, INC.
BELOIT, WISCONSIN


DAIRY SCIENCE MARCHES
ON IN 1953
(Conlinued from Page 22)
terfat replaced some or all of the vege-
table oil in the ration, the calves improv-
ed physically in proportion to the butter-
fat in the diet.
Five reports dealt with rumen bacteria,
working mainly with "artificial rumens."
Three fatty acids-acetic, propionic and
butyric acids-were the main products
from breakdown of carbohydrates. The
same types of rumen bacteria were found
in heifers receiving alfalfa hay as in
others fed alfalfa silage.
Careful studies of the manner in which
calcium is taken from the blood and con-
centrated in milk were made at the Uni-
versity of Tennessee, using radioactive
calcium 45.
Iowa workers observed rough hair
coats, dandruff and diarrhea in dairy
calves on rations deficient in three essen-
tial fatty acids-linoleic, linolenic and
arachidonic acids. In most instances the
calves recovered when fats were added
to the diet. Fats and fat-like substances
in blood of calves were studied at North
Carolina.
The requirements of calves for vitamin
B12 is between 20 and 40 millionths of a
gram per kilogram (2.2 pounds) live
weight, according to trials at the Michi-
gan station. (There are 453.6 grams in
a pound.)
Six reports dealt with antibiotics with
calves. Aureomycin did not affect ab-
sorption of the B vitamins. At Oklahoma,
some aureomycin during the first 30 days
favored growth of calves, yet some mild
cases of scours occurred with all groups
of calves. Calves on high hay intakes at
the Ohio station were given cud inocula-
tions weekly to insure rumen microorgan-
isms early in life. Calves receiving Aur-
eomycin gained slightly more, and had
higher glucose contents in the blood than
did the check animals. At Oklahoma,
calves converted feed equally efficiently
whether or not aureomycin was allowed
along with either alfalfa or prairie hay.
Heifers receiving aureomycin up to 2.5
years of age at the Iowa station showed
no advantage from its use after 6 months
of age.
Studies of the "Whiteside" test on milk
at Minnesota showed its use in tracing
down possible cases of mastitis. Aureo-
mycin ointment injected into a test re-
mained at the therapeutic level for 24
hours. Traces of aureomycin remained for
48 hours and of terramycin for 72 hours.
With calves on high intake of leafy
roughage (alfalfa, or mixed hays), ap-
parent digestibility of protein increased
when calves received cud inoculation


(fresh cud taken from a cow) to give a
start with desirable rumen microorgan-
isms. This work was done at the Ohio
station at Wooster.
Using portable calf pens, similar to
those used at Dinsmore Farm (see Fla.
Ext. Bul. 82. 1936), Auburn workers
found calves in pens moved weekly to
clean ground were more thrifty than
calves in permanent individual indoor
pens with small exercise lots.
Sodium metabisulfite at 8 to 101/2
pounds per ton to preserve silage was
used at the Pennsylvania station and at
Beltsville. The preserved silages were
more palatable and nutrients were pre-
served more efficiently in the preserved
silage than in the plain silage made of
legumes and grasses.
The Extension Section considered sub-
jects from the angle of dairy practices
and educational programs. A national
survey found that growing demands for
milk from brucellosis-free herds is speed-
ing eradication efforts by several methods,
mainly test and slaughter, and/or calf-
hood vaccination with strain 19 to sup-
plement testing programs. Branding of
reactors and restricting their movements
between herds confines such spreaders.
Use of the "ring test" on milk is helping
to identify milk supplies from healthy
sources.
In some sections educational television
programs are used to reach producers
and consumers of dairy products.
Grassland farming is expanding
through improved strains of grasses and
legums, fertilization and management,
and use of these crops as pasture, hay
and silage. Irrigation on dairy farms was
discussed as it applied to the northeast-
Utah, and eight western states. It was
recommended that grasses make up 40 to
50 percent of mixed pastures or that
some dry roughage be used to reduce
bloat hazard on irrigated legumes. Sub-
stantial yields of quality pastures resulted
from fertilization and grazing at the
most productive stage.
Local sire committees of artificial breed-
ing cooperatives in Pennsylvania are mak-
ing annual evaluations of older sires,
with examinations of animals and tabu-
lation of their production records under
D.H.I.A. supervision. Desirable qualities
and defects are recorded alike. One co-
operative secured data on 3,500 daugh-
ters and dams over a two-year period.
A Pennsylvania sanitarian recommend-
ed that patience and cooperation be ex-
tended with regard to new methods and
installations such as milking parlors,
pipeline milkers, bulk cooling and stor-
age of milk, tank truck pick-up and in-
place cleaning of equipment. This is in
the interest of continuing improvements
in quality of milk produced.


24 JANUARY & FEBRUARY, 1954





DAIRY COUNCIL PROGRAM
(Continued from Page 18)
includes the manufacturers and jobbers
of dairy equipment and supplies. The
dairy farmer and the dairy plants are
those who directly, through the Dairy
Council program, promote the sale of
your products each year to more than 50
million consumers at the community level.
YOU are sponsors of FREE distribution
of more than 150 different Dairy Council
materials which serve to increase the
sales of milk, butter, ice cream and other
dairy products.
Not the least of the responsibilities
felt by Dairy Council staff members is
the importance of ever keeping the sup-
porting dairy industry members informed
of the Council's activities. This is accom-
plished through monthly newsletters, per-
sonal contacts, Board of Directors meet-
ings, annual meetings, and various state
and local conventions. An example of a
meeting on the local level was a luncheon
given in October by the Miami Council
for wives of the industry members. Not
only were ties of friendship strengthened,
but these women whose husbands are
participating members of the program,
gained a fuller understanding of how
materials are presented and how the pro-
gram operates to promote the increased
sale of Dairy Products in which they are
so vitally interested.
Members are alerted in advance of
special programs or projects planned by
the Dairy Council staffs so that they may
watch for a coming radio or television
program, public display or group demon-
stration. When large programs are car-
ried through, tear sheets of press pub-
licity are often mailed to each member.
FLASH! FLASH! February 1 is Na-
tional Child Dental Health Day. Your
Dairy Council will participate by furn-
ishing displays in public places, dentists'
offices and schools. CALCIUM is neces-
sary for strong teeth. MILK is the best
source of calcium.
There are three Dairy Council units in
Florida . . in Jacksonville, which in-
cludes only Duval County; in Tampa
and St. Petersburg which includes the
Area of Hillsborough and Pinellas Coun-
ties, and in Miami which includes the area
of Dade, Broward and Monroe Counties.
The Jacksonville Council, first to be
organized in Florida, is now 7 years
old. The Tampa Council has been oper-
ating 5 years and the Miami Council
2 years. A directory of the address and
directors of these Councils will be found
elsewhere on this page.
In forthcoming issues this section of
the Dairy News will carry news of var-
ious programs and activities of these
three units, all designed to promote a
better public understanding of the nu-
tritional value and importance of MILK
and Dairy Products in the diet of all
ages.


Wom fee Cale qf le getter

when they're fed on

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GOOD NEWS!

"' EMPLOYMENT '." -..
Elu."8' 51- HELP WANTE'--'F .i. -, a > .


JANUARY & FEBRUARY, 1954 25














Coldes


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ilk



During last summer's scorching hot weather, Majonnier
Bulk Coolers delivered sharp, fast cooling to 360 F.-38' F.
in hundreds of milkhouses the country over. This safe, low
temperature cooling was done soon after the end of the
milking period, with a fraction of the power used by other
methods. When you switch to bulk, choose the Majonnier
Bulk Cooler, field-proven by impartial tests.
Bulletin 290 sent free on request.


MEMBER COUNTY
William Schack Jackson
Dick Salter Santa Rosa
William Schack Jackson
Erny Sellers Leon
Leslie Goff Suuanee
Donald G. Hanson Duval
Harold McGee Marion
Fred Wilden Orange
James Thornhill Polk
George Gordon Dade


POLK WINS COUNTY PLAQUE
Polk County was selected as carrying
out the best over-all 4-H dairy program,
followed closely by Orange County.
Others, in order, were Dade, Duval, Palm
Beach and Gadsden Counties.
Polk County had 86 4-H Club mem-
bers enrolled with dairy projects this
year, eighty of whom completed their
project. These members had 128 animals,
of which 79 were registered. Sixty-two
4-H members had improved pastures, and
all members provided shelters, minerals
and parasite control measures for their
animals. All 4-H animals were tested
for brucellosis and tuberculosis. Polk
County won the Area Dairy Contest. The
1953 Polk County dairy program was
directed by Thomas W. Sparks and Earl
Kelly, Assistant County Agents, under
the general direction of W. P. Hayman,
Polk County Agent.
William Schack has developed his 4-H
dairy project from one grade heifer in
1946 to four cows and four heifers, all
registered, in 1953. He added one or two
a year and has paid for all the animals
himself, except the original grade heifer
given him by his father when he was 10
years old and first joined the 4-H Club.
MILLET FOR WINTER PASTURE
"Value of Pearl Millet Pasture for
Dairy Cattle" is the title of Bulletin 527,
available from the Agricultural Experi-
ment Station, Gainesville, Florida. Your
county agent will tell you how well it is
suited to your soil.

Every day 62,000 babies are born. That
means that thousands of new customers
are soon going to be in the market for
your goods.

If we don't stand for something, we'll
fall for anything.


26 JANUARY & FEBRUARY, 1954


DISTRICT
State Winner
District I
District 2
District 3
District 4
District 5
District 6
District 7
District 8
District 10


Sun


4-H Winners In 1953
Dairy Production Contest
Nine of the ten 4-H districts of the
State participated in the 4-H Efficient
Dairy Production Contest in 1953. The
Contest was carried out by the Agricul-
tural Extension Service through the
County Agents in the various counties.
Awards were provided by the National
Dairy Production Corporation through
Southern Dairies, Inc.
District winners announced by the of-
fice of the State Extension Dairyman
were as follows:






STATE 4-H DAIRY SHOW
PLANS ARE ANNOUNCED
The Seventh Annual State 4-H Dairy
Show will be held in connection with the
Central Florida Exposition in Orlando,
February 22-27. The official judging and
all 4-H dairy contests will take place on
Monday, February 22, which will be a
big day for the 4-H members who come
from all sections of the state to compete
with each other in this annual climax to
the year's 4-H dairy work. The State 4-H
Dairy Show provides a place for the best
4-H cattle from each district to be brought
together and compete for state honors.
Eight district 4-H dairy shows have been
held over the state during the past
months. This year's show will be the
largest in number of animals exhibited
and in the number of other events held
in connection with the State 4-H Show.
Approximately 140 animals will be
exhibited. Twenty-five county teams are
expected to compete in the judging con-
test, which serves as the elimination con-
test for the Final Contest in June to
select the four members to represent Flor-
ida in the National Contest at Waterloo
on October 4. Contests in Fitting and
Showing and in Best County Groups will
be held. Awards in the various 1953 4-H
Dairy Programs will also be made at the
4-H Dairy Banquet provided by the
Central Florida Exposition the evening
of Show Day, including the State 4-H
Efficient Dairy Production Contest and
the Production Record Contest.
NEW SHOW BARN & SHOW RING
The Central Florida Exposition has
erected an additional 4-H Dairy Show
Barn and Show-ring to take care of the
expanding show. Premiums are also be-
ing increased by the Central Florida Ex-
position, making a total of $2,500, of
which the State Department of Agricul-
ture provides $500.
Champions will be selected in both the
registered and grade division of each
dairy breed. Competition in all events
is expected to be keen as the 4-H young-
sters vie for top State honors in the
State 4-H Show.
Thumb Nail Sketch
Of Dairy Farming
Ben S. Waring, well known dairy far-
mer of Madison, Florida, and producer-
member of the Florida Milk Commis-
sion, recently gave a "telegram length
story" of dairy farming in his area to
a panel on Community Resources Use.
The abbreviated report was quoted as
follows: "Only one place for farmers to
sell milk. Must develop pastures. County
soils different from that in pasture grass
experiment areas. Dairy barns must com-
ply with sanitary codes and there is no
statewide code. Costs money to get into
dairy business and takes hard work.
Dairymen must figure on working seven
days a week and may just as well throw
away his Sunday suit."


CONSULT US FOR


YOUR EQUIPMENT NEEDS




SALES & SERVICE


INTERNATIONAL TRUCKS


FARMALL TRACTORS


MACHINES & EQUIPMENT




UUINN B. BARTON

Jacksonville, Florida P. 0. Box 372


JANUARY & FEBRUARY, 1954 27


HIGH IN T. D. N.*
*Total Digestible Nutrients
Example Comparison Percentages:
CITRUS PULP 75.0; BEET PULP 67.8; SNAPPED
CORN 67.8
The Proven Feed for

HIGHER MILK PRODUCTION
Dried Florida Citrus Pulp is a long-established carbohydrate feed of proven value as a milk
producer. High in total digestible nutrients (TDN), sugars, fat and minerals, citrus pulp is
progressively palatable, does not affect milk flavor and is easy to feed and store.
CUTS FEED COSTS! Thousands of successful dairymen are now using
citurs pulp up to 40% of dairy rations replacing more expensive
feed with excellent results! You can too!

&-


Tampa, Florida


___ P. O. Box 403, Dept. D
Write for FREE literature











Buy ORTHO Livestock Pest Controls



From Your Nearest Dealer Listed Below:


CHIEFLAND
Farm Service Store, Inc.

DANIA
Broward Grain & Supply
118 N. Park Street

DE FUNIAK SPRINGS
Thompson-Hillard Milling Co.

DELRAY BEACH
Delray Beach Farm Supply, Inc.

FT. LAUDERDALE
Broward Grain & Supply
106-108 W. Broward Ave.

FORT MYERS
Kilgore Seed Co.
Anderson Ave.

GAINESVILLE
Kilgore Seed Co.
202 S.E. 1st Ave.
B & G Farm Supply
1012 Main Street, S.
Johnson Brothers
227 W. Main St.

JASPER
Farmers Hardware & Supply
P. O. Box 348

MADISON
Farmers Mutual Exchange
400 S. Shelby St.
Ivey's Farm Feed Store
314 S. Range Street

MAYO
Garden's Farm Supply
P.O. Box 148


MIAMI
General Mills, Inc.
7275 N.W. 7th Ave.
Hector Supply Co.
235 S. Miami Ave.
Collins Feed & Supply Co.
9407 W. Railroad Ave.

OCALA
Kilgore Seed Company
909 N. Magnolia

PERRY
Bryant's Feed Store
305 W. Green Street
Seminole Stores, Inc.
Orange & Ocklawaha


PALMETTO
Kilgore Seed Company
710 13th St.

QUINCY
R. E. Blitch, Jr.
719 W. Jefferson St.
Southern Chemical Sales & Service
P. O. Box #3

SANFORD
Kilgore Seed Store
300 West 1st.

TALLAHASSEE
Rivers Seed Co.
309 S. Adams St.


WAUCHULA
Kilgore Seed Co.
Main and 7th Street

WEST PALM BEACH
The Kilgore Seed Co.
910 Belvedere Road.


28 JANUARY & FEBRUARY, 1954

























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es in Weight and Production-
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nation on how ORTHO products protect your
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JANUARY & FEBRUARY, 1954 0 29








DAIRY NEWS DIGEST


Members of the Dairy Industry throughout the State are invited to please
send to the "Florida Dairy News" all news about dairies, dairying and the
good people uho devote their time, talents and money to this great industry.
-The Editor.


Madison County Producers
Form Local Association
Twelve dairymen of Madison County
are the charter members of a recently
organized producers' association in that
area. They will meet each month to dis-
cuss production, marketing and important
management practices. They have already
established a fund for advertising to pro-
mote better producer-consumer relations
as well as a better understanding of the
nutritional value of milk and its increased
use.
J. B. Sale is president; C. A. Coody,
vice-president; O. R. Hammrick, Madi-
son County Farm Agent, Secretary-Treas-
urer. The twelve dairies in this North
Florida County are producing about one-
half million gallons of milk annually as
a part of Tallahassee milk shed.

Milk Commission Order
Drops Dairy Store Limit
Following a recent public hearing in
Miami concerning dairy owned and op-
erated "dairy stores", the Florida Milk
Commission repealed a former order
which limited a dairy to the operation of
only one dairy store. A dairy may now
secure a license for as many stores as
he desires.
Dairy Dept. Tops Groceries
A study of 390 markets in 45 states
by a super market research panel has dis-
closed that the highest average sales per
square foot in any of the four main
departments, is in the dairy department.


Milk And Ice Cream
Festivals Planned
Two growing and valuable special sales
promotional programs in the American
Dairy Industry are the Milk and "Ice
Cream Festival" programs. The "Milk
Festival" program is carried on the month
of "May" and the "Ice Cream Festival"
from June 15 to September 15.
The Unique features of the program is
the active participation with Dairy In-
dustry of the manufacturers and distribu-
tors of the principal "related foods" to
the "dairy Foods".
The experience of the first two years
has proven this combination of specialists
in food marketing to hold great possibili-
ties. Both the advertising and marketing
programs of the related foods groups par-
ticipating are combined. The National
magazine advertising of the program will
be featured in LOOK and LIFE Maga-
zines and the Bob Crosby and Bob Hope
Radio and TV programs.
New Perfection Co-Op
Building In Sanford
The merging of the Spencer Harden
and C. W. Baker dairies with Perfection
Cooperative Dairies has resulted in the
opening of a new building for a distribu-
tion branch of the Company in Sanford.
Wauchula Dairy Sold To Borden
Borden's Dairy has purchased the Har-
dee County routes of the Sam Lee Dairy
at Wauchula. The dairy farm operation
will be continued by the owners. Wauchu-
la produced milk will be processed in
Tampa.


Jacksonville's "June Dairy Month" Committee are seen above in a recent luncheon conference
held for preliminary planning for Jacksonville's 1953 "June Dairy Month Program." The Jack-
sonville Dairy Council and the Florida Dairy Association Dairy Month Committee jointly spon-
rored the conference.


ORLANDO DEVELOPMENT
GETS LEE DAIRY FARM
The long familiar Lee Dairy property
on Colonial Avenue, between the Orlando
business district and the city's busy air-
port is undergoing a most remarkable
change. A new Central Plaza Shopping
Center is to be built here, twenty acres
of the original eighty-acre dairy farm
which have been sold to New York de-
velopers who are backing the project.
Tom G. Lee, well-known Florida dairy-
man, will continue to operate as usual
with most of his milk production moved
to a 2,000 acre farm acquired for the
dairy a few years ago in the Conway sec-
tion. The excitement caused by the real
estate transaction stemmed from the fact
that the sale of the property at $10,000
an acre represented a 799 per cent profit
on the price paid for it in 1899 by Tom
Lee's father who established the dairy.
EXCELLENT RECORD IS MADE
BY MANATEE COUNTY DAIRIES
Manatee County dairies, with 24 pro-
ducers and 2 processing plants, have met
the milk supply demands of a community
which has tripled its population in the
past six years and in doing so grown
into a multi-million dollar business. The
overall rating of the 26 dairies in the
recent sanitation survey was 95.47 per
cent whereas a spokesman for the State
Board of Health stated that 90 per cent
is an excellent score.
The County started an artificial breed-
ing program three years ago and a num-
ber of the dairies participate in the DHIA
program of cost and production analysis.
The dairies employ 150 persons in direct
production, operate 60 or more delivery
cars and trucks and annually turn out
$735,000 of milk at wholesale prices.
In December, the dairies were featured
in a special section of the Bradenton
Herald. The educational value of such
publicity cannot be over-estimated and
the cooperation of the dairies and the
allied trades in subscribing the advertis-
ing necessary to make an edition possible
is highly commendable.
Welkener Dairy, Jacksonville,
Receives High Jersey Award
An eighth Constructive Breeder award
was recently conferred to Walter Wel-
kener of Jacksonville by the American
Guernsey Cattle Club.
The Co;istructive Breeder Award is
one of the highest recognition which a
Jersey breeder may attain for carrying
out a well-balanced program of herd im-
provement and breed promotion. Last
year only 47 breeders met the qualifica-
tions for the award.
The Welkener Dairy owned by Mr.
and Mrs. Walter Welkener also won the
top Dairy Cattle Show Awards at the
1953 Florida State Fair. These were the
Premier Exhibitor and Premier Breeder
Awards.


30 JANUARY & FEBRUARY, 1954




KLENZADE'S DR. HASKELL
NOW RESIDES IN FLORIDA
Dr. Wm. H. Haskell, sanitation con-
sultant with the Klenzade Products Cor-
poration, who has appeared as a speaker
in both the Florida Dairy Association
and Florida Milk Sanitarians Annual
Meetings, has moved his home to Fern-
andina Beach, Florida.
Before becoming
associated with the
the Klenzade Com-
pany, Dr. Haskell, a
graduate of Veterin-
ary medicine from
the University of
Pennsylvania, w as
for many years Sen-
ior Milk and Food
Sanitarian for the U.
HASKELL S. Public Health Ser-
vice.
Dr. Haskell is the author of many
articles on sanitation methods as well as
technical literature on sanitation. While
living in Florida Dr. Haskell will con-
tinue his duties with the Klenzade Com-
pany and will be available for consultl-
tion on various phases of sanitation.


CALENDAR
4-H and F.F.A.
Dairy Events

January 9 Tampa
FLORIDA WEST COAST 4-H AND F.F.A.
SHOW
January 15-16 Jacksonville
DISTRICT 4-H LIVESTOCK SHOW
January 21-24 Miami
DADE COUNTY YOUTH FAIR
January 23 Miami
DISTRICT 4-H DAIRY SHOW
January 26 Palmetto
MANATEE COUNTY 4-H DAIRY SHOW
February 2-13 Tampa
FLORIDA STATE FAIR
Feb. 2........ Ayrshire Judging
Feb. 2 .......FFA Dairy Cattle Judging
Feb. 3 ........ Guernsey Judging
Feb. 4........Jersey Judging
Feb. 4 ......Fla. Guernsey Cattle Club An.
nual Meeting
Feb. 4 ....... Parade of Champions at Live-
stock Arena
Feb. 4 ....Dairy Banquet at Tampa Ter-
race Hotel
February 22 Orlando
CENTRAL FLOR'DA EXPOSITION
STATE 4-H DAIRY SHOW
4-H Judging Showmanship and Fitting
Contests
4-H Dairy Banquet


and IT IS GOOD!


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JANUARY & FEBRUARY, 1954 31


A::


I


I


I

















F.D.A. Group Entertains Public Health Association


Editor's Column...


tNEWS & VIEWS


Dairy News Celebrates
Third Birthday
Vol. 4, No. 1 will be seen at the top
of the official masthead of this issue of
the Florida Dairy News.
While three years is not a long period
of time in terms of the youngster in our
home or for many of the tried and proven
dairy farms and dairy plants which the
Dairy News undertakes indirectly to re-
present, we are inclined to the feeling
that its beginning and development
through these three years is more com-
parable to the maturing three year olds of
our dairy herds as they approach full
development.
The ambitions of the sponsors of the
Dairy News for the development of a
publication which might be the spokes-
man for and the collection and dissemin-
ation of information about and of interest
to the Florida dairy industry has been
fairly well realized.
The editor desires to express his own
appreciation as well as that of the Ad-
visory Committee and the D.D.A. Board
of Directors to the numerous individuals
and organizations whose active coopera-
tion has made possible the news and
editorial material for the Dairy News
and to the many advertising sponsors
whose interest has made the publication
financially possible.
The Dairy News is 100% owned and
controlled by the Florida Dairy Associa-
tion and its affiliated groups who have
adopted it as official publication. It was
stated in the editorial column of Vol. 1,
No. 1 that the publication was dedicated
to "the furnishing of information to the
Florida dairy industry".
We begin our fourth year with a re-
newed dedication to this objective and
with the hope of further growth and
development.

Goodwill is the one and only asset that
competition can't undersell or destroy.


In the picture panel above can be seen the
Public Health Committee of the Florida Dairy
Association in action. Members of the Com-
mittee and F.D.A. Secretary Andy Lay pro-
vided the 400 delegates to the recent Annual
Conference of the Florida Public Health As-
rociation with a reception and entertainment
program in the Palm Room at the Tampa Ter-


E. T. LAY

Executive
Director
and
Editor


Nati
National Survey Shows


One Third Cent A Quart
Is Dairy Milk Profit
Dairies make only a third of a penny
on each quart of milk delivered to your
home. This is the finding recently an-
nounced by Director George W. Starr of
the bureau of business research at In-
diana University after surveying the 1952
business of 342 dairy firms in 250 cities
in 43 of the 48 states, Hawaii and the
District of Columbia.
Milk company profit margin last year
dropped to the lowest point since the
first survey of the industry was made in
1941 by Harvard University. The 1952
survey was the fourth made by the Indi-
ana University bureau of research.
Sales of the 342 companies totalled
nearly a billion and a half dollars. For
each dollar of sales the companies re-
ceived an operating profit of 1.44 cents.
The remainder of the dollar paid by the
consumer was divided as follows: mater-
ial costs, which is mostly the cost of the
milk produced by the farmer and deliver-
ed to the company plant, 62.48 cents;
employees' wages and salaries, 19.88;
delivery, plant and office expense, and
advertising, 5.76; taxes, licenses, insur-
ance and depreciation, 4.22; bottles and
containers, 5.05, and miscellaneous ex-
pense, 1.17 cents.
United We Stand
An active organization such as the
"Florida Dairy Association" can usually
prevent the adoption of unnecessary, im-
practical and unfair proposals affecting


race Hotel Tampa. In the pictures, President
Angus Laird of the Public Health Association
group; (2) Andy Lay is seen speaking to the
Convention group conveying the best wishes
of the Dairy Industry; pictures (3), (4) and
(5) give a glimpse of the large group as they
enjoyed the milk and ice cream bars and en-
tertainment.

the Industry which are advocated from
time to time by usually well meaning
sponsors who do not, however, realize
the far reaching effects of such proposals.

Florida Milk Production
Drops 9% Per Cow In 1953
The average daily milk production per
cow among 33 representative Florida
Commercial Dairies dropped from 2.53
gallons per day in December 1952 to
2.30 gallons per day in December 1953,
or a reduction of 9%.
The report is the result of a survey
made by the U. S. Department of Agri-
culture office at Orlando, Florida and the
Dairy Division of the Florida State De-
partment of Agriculture.
The survey disclosed a similar loss
of production in non-commercial farm
cows (1 to 4 cows) with an average
daily production per cow of 1.79 gallons
for December 1952 as against 1.64 gal-
lons for December 1953.

Dairyman Should Check
Farm Gas Tax Refunds
Farmers who use any considerable
amount of gas in running their farm
equipment will find it worth while to
consult their county agents regarding the
agricultural gas tax refund program. Be-
gin now to keep records for the year.

Florida's Summer Tourists
"Florida's summer tourist business will
some day exceed its winter business" is
the prediction made by Harold Colee,
Executive Vice-President of the Florida
State Chamber of Commerce in a recent
address before the Florida State Health
Association.

Milk consumption in the United States
would mount 48% if an adequate nutri-
tional level of consumption was estab-
lished.


32 0 JANUARY & FEBRUARY, 1954







m MII~lw m


Em


DAIRY


PRODUCERS AND DISTRIBUTORS
Of Milk, Ice Cream And Other Products
*
DAIRY FRESH PRODUCTS, DIRECT FROM THE FARM
*
Home Delivery In Glass or Paper Containers

Locally Owned and Operated
*
Proud To Be A Member Of
"The Florida Dairy Association"


Ii Ni

* p
-owwrow-e *


Miami Hollywood Ft. Lauderdale


'4~ ,,,,~.IU 8. IUL~ mr ~JJIO~~ )P~i~ aPJYT ao mUoI
~t""L~""II~1
:1J~L~i~~per
--~-
I.IWLI
-*-~-
-~ 1..


* West Palm Beach


JANUARY & FEBRUARY, 1954 0 33


F


C ARTtiUF

awr


1 'I














ADAMS PACKING ASSN., INC.
Citrus Pulp, Citrus Meal, Citrus Molasses
lim Coates, Sales Mgr., By-Products Division
Auburndale, Fla. Phone 8-7061

CHARLES DENNERY, INC.
New Orleans
Ice Cream Coating, Fruits and Flavors
Ira Stone 1026 E. Walnut St.
Ph. Mutual 5-3284
LAKEIAND, FLA.

GENERAL MILLS, INC.
Dairy Equipment and Supplies
Joln W. Manning, Phone 48-1703
2515 Galiano St. Coral Gables, Fla.

GULF PAPER COMPANY, INC.
Ire Cream (Linerless) Cartons,
Butter Cartons
J. H. McVoy
50 E. Magnolia St. Pensacola, Fla.

a DOUGLAS J. HEADFORD
FLA. REPRESENTATIVE
Green Spot Orangeade Concentratte
IKrim-Ko Chocolate Flavorings
616 Jessamine Ave. Phone 2-0148
Daytona Beach, Fla.

HELM SANITATION CHEMICALS
HANS B. AHLEFELDT
Phone 3-5721
Union Terminal Warehouse
Jacksonville, Fla.

JIM JENNINGS
MFRS. REPRESENTATIVE
Morning Glory Low Fat Milk Solids
The Vernon Company Specialty Advertising
Route 9, Box 356 Jacksonville, Fla.

ROBERT A. JOHNSON CO.
Dairy Chocolate & Cocoa Products
J. L. Hanmmons


916 S. Rome Ave.


Tampa, Fla.


KIECKHEFER CONTAINER CO.
Pure-Pak Paper Milk Bottles
R.I. E.. ans M. A. Knowles
Phone 6-1334
4700 Pearl St. Jacksonville, Fla.

NASH-KELVINATOR CORPN.
ICE CREAM CABINETS
Win. C. Mayfield
Howell House Suite 202 Atlanta, Ga.

NATIONAL PECTIN PRODUCTS CO.
Ice Cream Stabilizers & Emulsifiers
Pectin Stabilizers for Ices, Slerbets & Fruits
J. C. Head, Phone Norfolk, Va. 63-3939
RFD No. 1, Box 48, Bayside, Va.

NEWTH-MORRIS BOX CORPN.
Ice Creamn, Popsicle, and
Miscellaneous Packers
Phone: 3-9779
Box 3254, Station "F"
Jacksonville, Fla.

PENN SALT MANUFACTURING
CO.
BK Powder Cleaners Acids
Bottle Alkalies
JOE FOSS
788 Waring Road Memphis, Tenn.


195 4 /ehe aI

The Allied Trades Membership Com-
mittee and Bill Decklar, President of the
Alligator Club of the Florida Dairy As-
sociation, are very much pleased to be
able to announce at this early date the
receipt of 1954 Membership Renewals
from the following Allied Trades Mem-
bers:

Adams Packing Association, Inc.
Amco Feed Stores, Orlando
Auburndale Sales Co.
Batavia Body Company
Broward Grain & Supply Co.
Dari-Tech Products Corp'n.
Diamond Alkali Company
Dixie Cup Company
Equip Co. Inc.
Florida Citrus Canners Coop.
Florida Feed Mills
The Fischman Company
Germantown Mfg. Company
Groff G.M.C. Trucks, Inc.
Gulf Paper Co.
Hackney Bros. Body Co.
Howard Feed Mills
Irwin Grain Company
Jackson Grain Company
Johnson & Johnson
Kieckhefer Container Company
Klenzade Products, Inc.
Kuder Pulp Sales Co.
Lakeland Cash Feed Co., Inc.
Liberty Glass Company
Lily-Tulip Cup Corp'n.
S. H. Mahoney Extract Co.
Meyer-Blanke Company
David Michael & Company
P. C. Martino Company
Miller-Lenfesty Supply Company
Miller Machinery & Supply, Miami
Morris Paper Mills
Murphy Body Works, Inc.
National Pectin Products Co.
Owen-Illinois Glass Co.
Paul-Lewis Laboratories, Inc.
Pure Carbonic, Inc.
Ralston-Purina Co., Tampa
The Rodar Company
Security Feed & Seed Co., Miami
Spartan Grain & Mill Co.
Vanilla Laboratories, Inc.
Warner-Jenkinson Mfg. Co.
Watson-Scott Company
Williamson Feed Mills


OWENS-ILLINOIS GLASS CO.
Duraglass Milk Bottles
C. W. Parmalee C. N. Comstock
1102 Barnett Bldg. Jax. 2, Fla.
Phone 3-6134 5


Special Card Ad Directory
FLORIDA DAIRY ASSOCIATION

ALLIED TRADES MEMBERS


34 JANUARY & FEBRUARY, 1954


S. H. MAHONEY EXTRACT CO.
Vanilla Products
D. C. Mulligan, Florida Representative
221 E. Cullerton Rd. Chicago 16, Ill.

PAUL-LEWIS LABORATORIES, INC.
Lactivase-For the Prevention of oxidized flavor
in bottled milk, ice cream, storage creaml
FIAVOR-PAK FOODS, INC., Miami, JFla.
MILLER MACHINERY & SUPPLY COMPANY
Miami and Jacksonville, Fla.

RIVERSIDE MANUFACTURING
COMPANY
MOULTRIE, GEORGIA
Masterbilt Uniforms
James M. Stewart Dave Freeman

STANDARD PACKAGING CORPN.
Tamlper Proof Seals F- flexible Vacuum
Packages Liner Materials
Iarry Hodge
1121 duPont Bldg. Miami, Fla.

THATCHER GLASS MFG. CO., INC.
WV. 1'. LOVI., Florida Relpresentative
3221 Pinehurst Pl. Charlotte 7, N.C.


UNIVERSAL MILKING MACHINE
DIVISION
Pail-less (Pipe line) Milking Machines
R. D. Archer--actory Rep.-'h. 84-7467
1100 N.E. 134 St. No. Miami, Fla.




Classified Advertising
BATE FOR ALL CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING IS 10c PER WORD


POSITION WANTED

AS DIRECTOR OF QUALITY ('c)NTROL,
fluid milk plant, by man with 25 years ex-
perience, farm management, falmi inspection
and laboratory operation. Formal training ill
dairy .manufacturing and bacteriology. Em-
ployed in quality control but have valid reason
to make change. Reply to Box No. 12, 220
Newnan Street, Jacksonville, Fla,

FOR SALE

BE I'ROGRESSIVE THRU COOPERATION
Investigate the advantages of selling your feed
bags thru:
TIE DAIRY BAG COMPANY
Operated by the management of
THE MIAMI DAIRY EQUIPMENT EXCH.
769 N.W. 18th Terrace
Miami 36, Fla. Phone 2-7188
"ATTENTION DAIRYMEN"
I handle the best young Tennessee Cows and
heifers to lie found. A fine selection on hand
at all times.
I deliver top cows all over Florida.
AV. C. TINSLEY, JR.
Box 93 TLafayette, Alabama Phone 6431

One USED PURE-PAK FILLER SEALER.
Model LT-20, with Rotary Accumulating Table:
GUARANTEED TO BE' IN EXCELLENT
CONDITION. GENERAL MILLS, INC., 711

RANCH EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES-CATTLE
WATERING TANKS. Ten-foot steel rein-
forced Concrete. 2'., feet wide. $60,.00, delivered,
$50.00 your truck. Four foot wide tanks, $80.00
and $70.00. (lrlando Concrete Specialties. Box
6122, Station 6, Orlando, Florida. Phone 3-4111.







GOLDEN GUERNSEY PRODUCERS AT DINSMORE


THAT AVERAGED 4'/2 GALLONS FOR 365 DAYS


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Dinsmore Majectic Dayla........................ 14014-610-Jr3-365
Dinsmore Majestic Forsythia.................1 3234-564-Sr3-365
Dinsmore Majestic Georgella ( Pdg) 16400-697-5yr-365
Dinsmore Majestic Gilda....................... 1 8343-787-5yr-365
Dinsmore Majestic Marionette............ 13521-493-Sr4-365C
Dinsmore Majestic Phyllis...................... 16283-740-5yr-365
Dinsmore Maxmost Florence ...............1 4060-707-6yr-365
Dinsmore Maxmost Gail ....................... 14872-720-6yr-365
Dinsmore Maxmost Phyllis..................... 13411-598-Sr4-365C
Dinsmore Maxmost Rubella .............. 14951-621-5yr-365


Dinsmore Maxmost Vesta.................. 13292-665-Sr4-365C
Dinsmore Mayroyal Irene ..................... 13090-561-Jr4-365
Dinsmore Mayroyal Jedetta.............1....15070-619-Jr4-365C
Dinsmore Mayroyal Margy ............ 13596-585-Jr4-365
Dinsmore Mayroyal Winnie(Pndg) 14660-659-5yr-365C
Dinsmore Medico Prissy................ ..... 15002-747-7yr-365
Dinsmore Noble Daylight .....................1 5556-653-Sr4-365
Dinsmore Queen Florie ........................... 13606-521-5yr-365C
Dinsmore Queen Gertrude.................... 15346-562-Sr4-365
Dinsmore Queen Hilda .................... 13190-549-Jr3-365
Dinsmore Queen Lettie ........................... 13654-616-Jr4-365
Dinsmore Queen Seneca (Pending) 14327-576-Sr4-365C
Dinsmore Royal Buttercup ..................... 13135-520-Sr3-365
Dinsmore Royal Justine.......................... 13837-624-5yr-365C
Dinsmore Royal Willow........................... 14284-611-5yr-365C
Dinsmore Valmax Blossom..................... 14414-616-6yr-365
Gayoso Victor's Dairymaid (Pndg') 13300-660-5yr-365C
Mapleton's Maxim Connie (Pendg) 13600-620-5yr-365C


TEN REPRESENTATIVE MEMBERS OF THE DINSMORE HERD


If You Herds Needs Improving


SELECT


Dinsmore Guernseys


FEDERAL ACCREDITED 57790

Dinsmore Farms


J. B. LANOUX, Herdsman
10 miles north of Jacksonville
Near U. S. 1


EARL A. JOHNSON CHARLES F. JOHNSON


NEGATIVE TO BANG'S

Dinsmore, Florida
BRADY S. JOHNSTON


V. C. JOHNSON























CHEVROLET
La ALL-METAL
STATION
WAGON


2nd1MW/Zt FREEZER CHEST
3rfdAIM CHOICE OF ELECTRIC OR GAS RANGE
4?I)M$ CHOICE OF ELECTRIC OR GAS REFRIGERATOR

Ovet /60 of4^ b/w4e Puzesd
When you follow the Security Feeding Program, you can get increased
livability, greater production . and you can become eligible for one of these
valuable prizes!
Security's chick-to-chick Feeding Program provides vigor and livability for the
starting period . develops your pullets into rugged layers . helps you get
high, sustained egg production and more fertile eggs in the breeding flock.
So see your Security dealer today and enter this great contest. The best
livability record wins. You can win in increased egg profits-and you may win
a prize
GET FULL CONTEST DETAILS AT YOUR
SECURITY DEALERS TODAY OR WRITE


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