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 Main
 Back Cover














Title: Florida dairy news
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00082035/00020
 Material Information
Title: Florida dairy news
Physical Description: 12 v. : illus. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Dairy Industry Association
Publisher: Cody Publications for Florida Dairy Industry Association.
Place of Publication: Kissimmee Fla
Publication Date: November-December 1953
Frequency: bimonthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Dairying -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Cattle   ( lcsh )
Milk   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-12, no. 1; Nov. 1950-Spring, 1962.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00082035
Volume ID: VID00020
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01386090
issn - 0426-5696

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Advertising
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Main
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
    Back Cover
        Page 39
        Page 40
Full Text


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CARL RIEKER DAIRY, facksoauile


Reports Herd Condition Improved



Under PURINA PROGRAM


4. MILKING COWS
PEG, an 8 year old req-
itsered Jersey, now
milking, was freshened
on D & F Chow and has
been on the PURINA
feeding program for
the past 3 years. She
produced 10,070 Ibs. of
milk in her last 304
day DHIA testing per-
iod. She is now beinq
fed on PURINA Milk
Chow and Rouqhaqe
according to her produc-
tion.


3. HEIFERS
This fine conditioned
qrade Jersey heifer is
iust over 2 years old
and due to freshen
within 30 days. She
weighs just under 800
Ibs., and like other
heifers in the herd is on
the PURINA Growinq
Heifer feeding program
with pasture.


n '1 .; i


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IL


1

_T11


1. DRY COWS
PRINCESS, a 7 year old
registered Jersey is due
to freshen in about 30
days. Princess freshened
in '49, '50, '51, and had
two calves in '52. Her
production record for
1952 was 8,710 Ibs.
under DHIA testing. She
is now beinq fed on
PURINA D & F Chow,
the dry cow program.



2. CALVES
This 3 months old qrade
Jersey heifer weighs
200 Ibs. She was start-
ed on and is now beinq
fed PURINA "CALF
STARTENA." Her fine
appearance and condi-
tion is typical of qrow-
inq calves of the Rieker
herd.


The Rieker Dairy located in Duval
County just southwest of Jackson-
ville is now milking 60 cows with
an average of 165 gallons of milk
per day. The herd average for the
past year has been 7,164 pounds.


Carl Rieker says that he likes
the results of the PURINA FEEDING
Program which he started three
years ago. "Our herd health has
improved and both cow condition
and production has shown im-
provement over previous results."


RALSTON PURINA COMPANY

MIAMI TAMPA ^PURI
DAIRY
CHOWS

X*."*** X*%*."*" .


*ftM*00












Tell You,

Pardner...




You Can't Beat


IDEAL & FASCO Brands

for Profits

Quality Begets Quality-and Profits! Quality is one -,I t h-
basic elements in successful growing, no matter what
the crop. And quality is what you get in IDEAL Fertilizeri
and FASCO Pesticides.
Wilson & Toomer products begin as quality material"
They are processed under laboratory control method-
in a modern manufacturing plant. Be assured of quality
crops... feed them with IDEAL Fertilizers, kill their enemie-
with FASCO Pesticides-your profit combination.


FASCO Dairy Cattle and Barn Sprays
are the proper medicine for the insect
pests that rob you of dairy profits!
Fasco Malathon 25 WP .... For fly bait.
Fasco Malathon Liquid-50. For dairy
barn spray.
Fasco Lindane Liquid-20. . For dairy
barn spray.
Dairy Cattle Spray. Contains methoxychlor.


Spectacular Fly Control with FASCO Malathon
Results achieved against "resistant" flies have been
amazing. FASCO MALATHON sprays and baits are
effective around dairy barns, hog pens, kennels, poultry
houses and garbage dumps as well as cattle pens and barns.
BAIT FORMULA: Stir 1 lb. of FASCO Malathon 25-WP into
21/ gallons of Blackstrap Molasses. Sugar Syrup, Honey or
Cane Syrup. Spread bait upon 12 x 18 inch pieces of burlap
bagging and lay or hang as many baits as needed for fly
control. Re-bait the burlap after 4 to 10 days as needed.


IDEAL Fertilizers and FASCO Pesticides-Your Profit Combination


WILSON & TOOMER
FERTILIZER COMPANY
and Divisions

FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL SUPPLY COMPANY
Peninsular Fertilizer Works-Tampa Cartledge Fertilizer Company-Cottondale
R A L O F F I C E S J A C K S O N V I L L E, F L O R I DA


NOVEMBER & DECEMBER, 1953


G E N E
GEN


* 3







It's a fact... most cows can produce


20% MORE MILK on Larro SUREMILK


Why Be Satisfied With
Less Milk Than Your
Cows Are Capable
of Giving?
For thirty years, records have been
kept on Larro Research Farm cows.
To these records, production graphs
on cows from other dairy herds have
been added. Thousands of graphs
are now on file.
These graphs show whether or not a
cow is giving all the milk she can.
Most amazing, however, is that these
graphs prove most cows are improp-
erly fed and can actually give up to
20% more milk!
The Larro SUREMILK program cor-
rects this feeding problem. Cows on
SUREMILK or SUREMILK 32 and
grain, milk "to the hilt," because
they get the right amount of body
building and milk producing in-
gredients.
How Does SUREMILK Help?
Well-balanced SUREMILK offers two
big features. First is MSF, the mys-
terious Milk Stimulating Factor,
which causes the sudden milk spurt
when cows are put out on lush
Spring pastures. Modern research
discovered that MSF is also present
in a few other feed ingredients. Be-
cause SUREMILK supplies some of
the best of these ingredients rich in
MSF, milk production gets a daily
lift month in and month out regard-
less of the season or pasture con-
dition.
Larromin, General Mills' exclusive
blend of minerals and trace min-
erals, is another reason why cows on
SUREMILK stay in high milk pro-
duction. Larromin is added to
SUREMILK so that every known
milk-making mineral and trace min-
eral is always present. SUREMILK
with Larromin also makes your
work more simple. No extra mineral
supplements are needed when Larro
SUREMILK or SUREMILK 32 are fed.
Eliminate "Lost Milk Margin"
Why be "penny-wise and pound-
foolish"? Feed your cows Larro
SUREMILK, because SUREMILK stim-
ulates full milk flow and eliminates
"lost milk margins."
SUREMILK also carries a satisfaction
guarantee. If you are not completely
satisfied with SUREMILK, notify
your Larro Dealer or salesman. He'll
arrange to pick up the unused feed
and the full purchase price of the
unused feed will be promptly re-
funded to you. See your Larro
SUREFEED Dealer today.


20
1 LOST MILK MARGIN
10 I 1
Days 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 Doy5
Doys
in milk
The lower line on this graph represents the actual production of a normally good cow during a
year's lactation. The top line indicates the amount of milk she should produce according to her in-
herited ability. The shaded portion of the graph indicates the loss of milk. Tests show that SUREMILK
and SUREMILK 32, when fed according to the Larro program, eliminate this "lost milk margin."


SThree
fj Profitable Tips
by STEVE CARTER
of General Mills

Barn Gutter
Z.: Liquid Valuable
Why waste the valuable source of
fertilizer. Some of my West Coast
friends are piping it into tank
wagons and trucks for field spread-
ing. See if you can't figure a way to
save gutter liquid. It's really very
valuable.
r* *
Never Let Cows In Heat Run With
Herd. Why? Because you'll lose
milk. Cows drop in production on
the day of heat when let run with
the herd. And the rest of the cows
exercise too much, too, and drop in
production also. Keep cows in heat
away from the main herd and milk
production will stay up.


Shavings Mighty Good Bedding.
They soak up more moisture, are
easier to handle than straw and look
better. Cows don't seem to pull
shavings into the gutter as much,
either. If shavings are available, give
them a try. Add phosphate (two
pounds per cow) to the shavings in
the barn and you'll kill barn odors.


Feed Larro SUREMILK 32 With
Grain To Lower Feed Costs
SUREMILK 32 is the dairyman's
answer to lower feed costs. When
fed according to the Larro program,
SUREMILK 32 makes an economical
ration which lets each cow produce
to the very best of her inherited
ability.
Feed SUREMILK 32 with your grains
and let results speak for themselves.

Cows Have A Sweet Tooth!
% Cows, just like your
youngsters, have a
Seen appetite for
sweet feeds. After
hundreds of tests,
S Larro Research
SFarm dairy special-
ists have learned
just how much
sweetening most
cows prefer. And that is the amount
now added to Larro SUREMILK in
the form of molasses. Larro SURE-
MILK is also milled to the exact
coarseness that most cows showed
they like best. You will find your
cows really like Larro SUREMILK.
Try it!
SM-2-53 (Rev.)

Larro

SUREMILK
"Tam-tested"

General Mills
Minneapolis 1, Minnesota


4 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS









EDITORIALS


"A Taste of Freedom"

A dramatic message to the nation's newspapermen was presented by the Ameri-
can Dairy Association September 5 in the widely read Editor and Publisher Magazine.
Using a striking photograph of an aged woman from the Soviet sector clutching
a bottle of milk she had received in the American zone of Germany, the heading
and text of the message read:
"Freedom is like milk: for us who have it in abundance its taste is so common-
place we seldom stop to savor it.
"But the millions without freedom are gnawed by hunger for it, through days
of tyranny and nights of fear. For the lucky few who at last cross some friendly
border, a bottle of milk is more than a luxury. It becomes a precious symbol of
freedom itself.
"The truth is, only those who have lost freedom know how freedom tastes.
"Food is one of our most effective weapons in the world-wide struggle against
tyrnany. Because we in the United States are free to work and produce, we have
food in abundance.
"We are sending food overseas, including large quantities of milk. In every
drop, there's the taste of freedom.
"We dairy farmers of America are proud and glad that our products are helping
strengthen the will to resist oppression, the will to be free. We thank God that our
President knows how to fight with food, with kindness, with charity, as well as with
guns.


Dairy Industry Teamwork For 1954

All segments of the nation's dairy industry are teaming up for a 1954 sales
offensive such as this industry has never seen before. The theme of all recent con-
ventions of the industry's several trade organizations, both national and state, has
been centered on the urgent need for timely advertising, educational and sales pro-
motion efforts on an expert and industry-wide scale.
The recognition of this need is being resolved into action that is long overdue.
Individual dairy and product brands advertising and sales have their place but the
coordinated efforts of the entire industry to carry the complete "dairy foods" story
to consumers has long been needed.
Appropriately enough the 1954 drive to increase consumer appreciation of and
use of dairy foods will be spearheaded by the nation's dairy farmers through the
American Dairy Association. ADA has announced that its 1954 advertising budget
will be practically doubled and will be extended from the usual national magazine
advertising program to include both radio and television and will include both the
Bob Hope and the Bob Crosby T V Shows.
The Milk Industry Foundation and the International Association of Ice Cream
Manufacturers have coordinated their sales and dairy food educational programs with
the ADA and the overall programs planned by these groups is indeed encouraging.
The Milk Foundation has already completed and is now distributing the 1953-54
"Milk Facts Booklet." A new MIF feature will be a six weeks intensive training
conference for sales executives to be held at the University of Wisconsin early in
1954. The IAICM is intensifying and streamlining its Ice Cream Merchandising
Institute.
The Milk and Ice Cream Festival Program sponsored by MIF and IAICM and
the National Dairy Council, which has made great strides in the past two years, is
set up for expansion in 1954 with new hard hitting features especially emphasizing
the tie-in sales of dairy foods and related food products.
The potential of these splendid programs of nation-wide scope could undoubted-
ly be increased with locally and state-wide sponsored programs of industry-wide
sponsorship.


VOL. 3


NO. 5


NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1953
BI-MONTHLY


111111


THE
FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS
E. T. LAY, Editor & Business Manager


Official Publication of
Florida Dairy Association
WILMER W. BASSETT, JR., President
E. T. LAY, Executive Director

Florida Guernsey Cattle Club

Florida Association
of Milk Sanitarians

DIRECTORS
FLORIDA DAIRY ASSOCIATION
Producers
HERMAN BOYD, Miami
Vice Pres. & Chrmn.
"Producers Council"
GEORGE F. JOHNSON, West Palm Beach
D. WAYNE WEBB, Tampa
JOHN SERGEANT, Lakeland
L. B. HULL, Micanopy
BILL GRAHAM, Miami
JOHN T. ADKINSON, Pensacola
IRA BARROW, New Smyrna Beach
J. H. ADAMS, Jacksonville
DONALD LEONARD, Blountstown

Distributors
CLIFF D. WAYNE, Miami
Vice Pres. & Chrmn.
"Distributors Council"
FREEMAN HALES, Opa Locka
HERMAN BURNETT, Bradenton
J. N. McARTHUR, Miami
H. CODY SKINNER, Jacksonville
JOHN M. HOOD, St. Petersburg
GORDON NIELSEN, West Palm Beach
W. J. BARRITT, JR., Tampa
A. E. (JACK) JOHNSON, Jacksonville
J. F. W. ZIRKLEBACH, Pensacola

Additional Directors
WILMER W. BASSETT, JR., President
Monticello
LARRY J. HODGE, President
"Alligator Club"; Miami
THE FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS is
published bi-monthly by the Florida
Dairy Association, 220 Newnan St.,
Jacksonville, Florida. Subscription price
of $1.00 a year. Entered as second
class mail at the Post Office at Jack-
sonville, Fla., under Act of March 3,
1879, as amended.
Business and Editorial office, 220
Newnan Street, Jacksonville.
NATIONAL EDITORIAL

Me r F a Ps ASSOCIATION

Member Florida Press Association


NOVEMBER & DECEMBER, 1953


* 5






















ORDER YOURS TODAY
FROM YOUR QUONSET DEALER


This handbook on loose housing
incorporates latest information
for this popular type of barn.


A2dEikk
[U I ISS*


Complete, well-illustrated refer-
ence for the farmer planning a
stall-type dairy barn.


Here's what agricultural leaders say about
the books:
"We hope you can spare enough copies for
our students," Dairy Husbandry Dept., eastern
agricultural college.
"They will be of real service in our planning
work with farmers," Nebraska county agent.
"They will be a help in our instruction and ex-
tension teaching," Dairy Industry Dept., eastern
university.
"The books contain just the information farmers
ask for," Agricultural Engineering Dept., mid-
western agricultural college.
GREAT LAKES STEEL CORPORATION
Stran-Steel Division Ecorse, Detroit 29, Mich......

mEEE~a~sss.sa


For Our Youth Readers

Fifth and Final Article of a Series on

A Career In The Dairy Industry

NOTE: This series of articles has sought to bring to your attention the large variety of the
opportunities within the dairy industry for ambitious and enterprising young men and women
to find for themselves life time occupations. This installment concludes the survey study of
the dairy industry as a career. VYatch for a neu' series which will begin in Januaiy.
From its basic level of animal agriculture to the manufacture of the many
products of the dairy industry, the myriad of kinds of jobs which challenge the
initiative and demand training and experience for success have meen outlined in the
four articles run on this page during 1953.
Still another field of work is essential to the operation of dairy plants. This
has to do with the sale and distribution of all dairy products and may be extended
to the related field of selling supplies and equipment to dairy farms and dairy plants.
Permanently staffed sales organizations must be maintained in both these areas of
selling.
A fundamental knowledge of the pro- also; vocational guidance courses in your
duct sold is a prerequisite for any suc- college training are directed toward fill-
cessful salesman. So it is only natural ing the needs of positions such as these.
that an opportunity to enter the field of MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION
sales frequently follows experience in the Although success is always a relative
plant. The route salesman is a specific term, many feel that to be an executive
application of such work. Success here is the only ultimate goal of all their
will bring further opportunities if apti- training and experience. Advancement
tude and ambition point the way to a and growth may be toward other fields
broader field of selling or merchandising. of success, and satisfaction can be as
A plant worker may also be the very great in positions of lesser prominence,
one who, knowing the operation and but many still aspire to be the top author-
needs within a dairy, is best suited to ity in whatever level of the industry he
enter the sales staff of a company supply- may find himself. The executive who
ing feed, machinery, containers, chemi- manages a farm or administers a large
cals, and other requirements of dairies. dairy plant is the fellow who takes the
The distribution of dairy products in- responsibility for the successful opera-
cludes the jobs with such titles as traffic tion of the concern of which he is head.
manager, shipping clerks, checker, truck Many intangible qualities of character
driver, and special telephone operator. and personality combine to produce the
Ability to get along with people con- man or the woman who can arrive in
tinues to be one of the prime requisites this top echelon of management. Besides
in these positions because contact with the perseverance and hard work, these include
public can affect public relations in a such things as loyalty, open-mindedness,
very vital way. good behavior, prestige, appearance,
"," C ___ -:L. ^: ^ ..... ..


LABOR RELATIONS
AND PERSONNEL WORK
With such a division of labor as is
illustrated by the discussion of all the
opportunities available in the dairy in-
dustry, it follows that there must be a
job here, too, for someone who is respon-
sible for hiring and firing as well as
training personnel; further, some person
may be needed to supervise labor rela-
tions.
PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT calls
for skill in human relations and person-
ality which will produce harmonious
operations; settling of grievances and
establishment of labor policies are a part
of the duties of the personnel manager,


recognition or aurnorciy, fairness anu a
constant appetite for knowledge and use-
ful information. It goes without saying
that only one of the many will rate this
particular place in each organization of
a multitude of workers.
CONCLUSION
It has not been the intent of this
series of articles to give you an exhaus-
tive study of the work in the dairy in-
dustry. However, it should be evident
from the suggestive discussions given in
them that no matter what your talents
are, you can undoubtedly find an oppor-
tunity in the DAIRY INDUSTRY to ex-
ercise your abilities and even to extend
them to the place where a lifetime career
is yours for the taking.


6 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


i ,






FEDERAL AID IS SOUGHT

h FOR FLOODED DAIRY FARMS

S Col. R. G. Howie as Florida Disaster
Relief Co-ordinator and State Director of
Civil Defense has been working diligent-
ly during the past several weeks in sur-
veying flood disaster conditions which
resulted from Florida's extraordinary Fall
rainy season and in seeking federal aid
to Florida agriculture, livestock, roads,
etc. which suffered heavily in many areas
of the state.
Col. Howie receiv-
ed the active cooper-
ation of Governor
Johns and Senator
George Smathers
who requested Presi-
Sdent Eisenhower to
declare flooded por-
tions of the State as
a disaster area and
to provide such Fed- COL. HOWIE
eral assistance as is
available under such conditions.
., President Eisenhower promptly dis-
patched Col. Harry Brown of Atlanta
as Regional Civil Defense Administra-
tor, to investigate and report the Florida
flood conditions.
Col. Brown, and Col. Howie were
joined by E. T. Lay, secretary of the
Florida Dairy Association, and L. K.
Nicholas, administrator of the Florida
Milk Commission, in conferring with
Governor Johns and other State officials
prior to entering upon the flood survey.
Mr. Lay accompanied Col. Brown and
.? Col. Howie in their tour of the flooded
areas by plane and in a special motor
tour of the Miami agricultural area as
well as in conference with agricultural,
livestock and official representatives of
Dade and Broward counties.
31 Counties Reported
As Flood Disaster Area
The survey report and recommenda-
tions of Col. Howie and Col. Brown
included 31 Florida counties as having
flood conditions which might be en-
7.' titled to aid under Federal Law 875.
This included all counties South of
Ocala and Palatka. This number, how-
;lj ever, was later reduced to 17, leaving
out practically all West Coast counties
from Citrus to Monroe and Central Flor-
ida Counties from Volusia to Polk.
i (Continued on page 29)

SEEN IN THE ADJACENT PICTURE
GROUP ARE samples of the numerous dairy
farms of Dade and Brou'ard Counties which
are seriously flooded. Hundreds of acres of
fine improved pastures will have to be re-
planted. Many animals required to stand con-
tinuously in mud and inater became infected
with hoof-rot and numerous others eating the
flooded grasses uere brought doun with sour
grass sickness.
No attempt has yet been made to estimate
the total flood losses suffered by Florida dairy
farms.


NOVEMBER & DECEMBER, 1953


* 7


i' 1;

r








UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


DAIRY REVIEW


Extension Service Dairy Products Laboratory
Dairy Farm Research Unit Agricultural Experiment Station


Dairy Science Marches On In 1953
By: DR. R. B. BECKER
Dept. of Dairy Science, University of Florida
(First of uto articles reviewing the significant findings in Dairy Science during the past year,
as reported at :he 1953 Annual Meeting of the American Dairy Science Association)
The 1953 Annual Meeting of the American Dairy Science Association was
held at the University of Wisconsin with a record-breaking attendance and program.
The meeting was held in the recently completed Dairy Science
SHall of the University which itself was an outstanding feature.
The original Babcock milk tester and a portrait of Dr. S. M.
Babcock occupied prominent places inside the entrance. There
were 63 technical papers on dairy products, 109 in dairy pro-
duction and 10 in dairy extension in addition to the general
t.. session, committee reports and educational extension exhibits.
Selected excerpts from these numerous reports which should
be of most interest in Florida follow:
A low roughage allowance or pulverized roughage fed to
DR. BECKER dairy cows in Wisconsin reduced the fat content of milk as
much as 1 to 2 percent, and changed the proportion of the
various fatty acids as well. At Purdue,
raw milk held at 40 degrees Fahrenheit attention to feeding and management a
increased in bacterial count significantly lower percentage of bulls leave artificial
in 2 to 4 days. Its acidity increased service because of diseases, foreign bod-
slowly, and rennet coagulation time in- ies (nails, wire, etc. in stomach), im-
creased up to 2 to 3 days and then de- pairment of feet and legs, than of bulls
creased. This has a bearing on holding in general farm herds.
and handling milk under the alternate
day deliveries. Pennsylvania workers Four studies on quality and use of
found slow growth among bacteria sur- frozen semen in artificial breeding indi-
viving in pasteurized milk until tempera- cate that it soon may extend greatly the
tures were above 450 F. use of top quality bulls, and enable se-
S elected matings more widely. Seventeen
Detection of foreign fats in dairy prod- papers dealt with techniques in research
ucts was shown possible by investigators and use of semen and with artificial
in Florida, Illinois, Ohio and Wiscon- breeding.
sin using new analytical methods. W. A. breeding.
Krienke of Florida reported on a more Blackstrap molasses is being fed on
exact technique for the freezing point top of corn silage and cottonseed meal
test of milk, used to measure added to growing heifers at Clemson College,
water as an adulterant. Proteins of milk the maximum rate being 6.2 pounds
were studied chemically in Iowa, Minne- daily per animal.
sota, a New York laboratory, and Wis- Both Virginia and Purdue trials
consin. showed a decline in daily milk produc-
Oxidized flavor of milk was under tion per cow when ground corn cobs
scrutiny at Florida, New York and replaced part of the hay allowance, de-
Pennsylvania, considering the relation of spite increased concentrate offerings.
sunlight, water-soluble ascorbic acid and Ammoniation of several feed products
riboflavin, the sulfur-containing amino are being tested at the Pennsylvania sta-
acid methionine and certain protective tion with promising results. Further tests
salts. are needed before its commercial use.
Need for greater quality control was Cornell workers reported that consump-
observed from the lack of uniformity in tion of pasture grasses could be estimated
79 samples of cottage cheese assembled by a digestive-trial technique known as
from many sources by Iowa State College. the chromogen-ratio method, and timing
collections of representative forage and
The Dairy Production program started fecal samples.
off with a discussion of tenure and Spraying alfalfa with 3.9 ounces of
turnover of dairy bulls. Due to closer aldrin per acre, and harvesting the hay


Milk Sanitarians Group
Plans Spring Conference
The Board of Directors of the Florida
Association of Milk Sanitarians met in
Jacksonville on November 7 to plan the
program for the organizations' tenth an-
nual conference which will be held the
first part of April 1954. L. L. Chaffee,
St. Petersburg, presided at the meeting.
The Milk Laboratory Technicians di-
vision of the Association will have its
annual conference beginning one day
ahead of the Milk Sanitarians sessions.
All meetings will be held on the Univer-
sity of Florida campus at Gainesville.
Local arrangements and planning the pro-
gram will be handled by Dr. H. H. Wil-
kowske, Department of Dairy Science
staff member.
A well-balanced program is planned
to attract milk sanitarians and laborator-
ians as well as the industry personnel.
A highlight of the program will be the
awarding of 10-year Service Citation Cer-
tificates to persons who have been active
in the Association since its founding 10
years ago.

seven days later, the hay was fed safely
to dairy cows. No Aldrin appeared in
the milk. The amount of aldrin was in-
creased by direct addition to the feed.
When 1.0 grams of aldrin was fed to
cows, 2.2 pounds of their body weight,
aldrin was secreted in the milk. One cow
died after the 29th day when receiving
2.2 milligrams of aldrin daily per 2.2
pounds of body weight. Dairy and Ento-
mology bureaus of the United States De-
partment of Agriculture cooperated in
this investigation.
Relation of body form to production
was studied by the Bureau of Dairy In-
dustry and 23 state experiment stations
based on records of 696 Holstein and
Jersey cows. Length of head and certain
measurements indicating size (height of
withers, length of body and body depth)
appeared more indicative of large pro-
duction than did some other body meas-
urements. The Florida station had sup-
plied records of body measurements and
lifetime production of over 50 cows to
this cooperative study.
Pennsylvania workers attribute some
infertility in heifers to be due to death
of embryos within 30 days of conception.
Genital abnormalities appeared to cause
only 13.5 percent of breeding failures
among heifers in this investigation study-
ing 96 "repeat-breding" heifers from
brucellosis-free herds.
To maintain two Nebraska Holstein
herds, the number of heifers needed for
replacements equalled 30 percent of all
calvings.


8 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS







16th Dairy Plant Short Course

Well Attended at State University

About ninety persons representing the Dairy Industry and Allied Trades availed
themselves of the opportunity of hearing about the latest developments in the various
phases of dairy products processing presented by experts in their many fields at the
16th Annual Conference held at the Dairy Products Laboratory on the University of
Florida campus at Gainesville, September 24, 25 and 26. Dr. E. L. Fouts, Head of
the Department of Dairy Science, served as Conference Chairman; Mr. John N.
Lewis was Co-Chairman, representing the Florida Dairy Association's Dairy Plant
Committee. Dr. Leon Mull was in charge of arrangements.
Many complimentary remarks were made as to the quality of the program
which included such outstanding speakers as Mr. George L. Huffman, of Ex-Cell-O
Corporation, Detroit, Michigan, and Mr. Clark N. Comstock, of Owens-Illinois Glass
Company, Toledo, Ohio. These two speakers presented up-to-date information on
containers for the dairy industry, following which the meeting was opened for
general discussion with Mr. Rudy J. Schneider, of Foremost Dairies of Eustis, leading
the discussion.


Mr. Samuel O. Noles, Milk Consultant
for Florida State Board of Health, Jack-
sonville, Florida, spoke on the subject
of Sanitary Aspects of Milk Dispenser
Cans-"Bulk milk dispensing, as we
know it today, is not old. In fact, it is
still practically in its infancy. There are
problems to be overcome, but this same
thing has been true of every worthwhile
development, regardless of its nature.
These problems are not insurmountable.
Through close cooperation of all agencies
concerned-the manufacturer, the pro-
cessor, the regulatory groups these
problems can and will be overcome," Mr.
Noles said.
New methods for detection of Butter-
fat Adulteration were presented by Pro-
fessor W. A. Krienke, and a discussion
and summary of results of investigations
in the Department of Dairy Science
under the supervision of Professor
Krienke were outlined.
A new feature was introduced on the
program this year in the form of an
open forum discussion dealing with
Dairy Plant Production Efficiency Pre-
senting the problems and solutions for
maximum efficiency in the Large Dairy
Plant was Mr. S. J. McInnes, Plant Su-
perintendent of Southern Dairies of
Tampa. Speaking of efficiency in the
medium sized plant was Mr. Don Stoffel,
Plant Superintendent of Borden-Datson
Dairies of Orlando. Last, but not least,
was Mr. Richard "Dick" Wood, Plant
Superintendent of Vero Beach Dairy,
who spoke on efficiency in the small
plant. These three men with an accum-
ulation of many years in dairy plant
superintendency presented a vast amount
of valuable information obtained mainly
in the school of experience.
Other interesting and informative sub-
jects were presented by Dr. H. H. Wil-
kowske, who spoke on "Problems with
Cultured Milk Starters," and by Mr.
Robert H. Pair, of Vanilla Laboratories
of Atlanta, whose presentation of "Va-
nillas for the Industry" was most enter-


training as well as being loaded with
facts and figures.
At the annual banquet on the Univer-
sity of Florida campus, Dr. Frank Good-
win, Professor of Marketing at the Uni-
versity of Florida, acted as Master of
Ceremonies.
A delightful social hour sponsored by
the Allied Trades members of the Florida
Dairy Association, preceded the Annual
Banquet and the entertainment program
was sponsored by the Florida Dairy As-
sociation Plant Operations Committee.
The conference was adjourned follow-
ing the annual ice cream clinic. Dairy
companies which submitted samples for
the clinic are notified of the results by
mail.
Plans for the 17th Annual Dairy
Plant Superintendents Conference in
1954 are already under way.


Registering delegates for the 16th Annual
Dairy Plant Short Course at the Florida Dairy
Laboratory Building are: Seated at the left
,ide of the table. Left to Right; Dr. E. L.
Fouts, Head of U. of F. Dept. of Dairy
Science: Miss Pauline Layne, Dairy Laboratory
Office Secretary: and John Leuis, Chairman
of the Plant Committee, Florida Dairy
Association.

McCarter Dairy Celebrates
15th Year In St. Augustine
Bob and Dave McCarter, partners in
the McCarter Dairy Products Co., cele-
brated their 15th anniversary in the dairy
business of this area on October 15th.
The McCarter Dairy started as distrib-
utors of Sealtest Dairy Products in St.
Augustine 15 years ago with one delivery
truck. Today they operate a fleet of mod-
ern refrigerated trucks and have expand-
ed their operations as far as Daytona
Beach.

American Jersey Cattle Club
Has New Official Magazine
Congratulations to the American Jer-
sey Cattle Club on their fine new official
publication "The Jersey Journal." We
have just received No. 4 of Vol. I of this
new semi-monthly containing over 100
pages, a publication of which American
Jersey Breeders can justly be proud.


The eleven dairymen seen above uwee awarded herd efficiency production diplomas by
the Dairy Herd Improvement Association at the Annual Dinner Meeting of the Dairy Field
Day. To qualify for the award which is sponsored by the National Purebred Dairy Cattle
Association, a herd must produce an average of not less than 350 lbs. of butterfat for the year.
C. W. Reaves. StateExtension Dairyman and D.H.I.A. Supervisor, presented the diplomas.
SHOWN AT THE TIME THEY RECEIVED THEIR DIPLOMAS ARE, Left to Right: CAR-
ROLL L. WARD. JR., Gol'enrod: WALTER WELKENER, Jacksonville: J. J. SMITH, Polk
County Dairy. Barton': CARROLL L. WARD, SR., Winter Park: M. A. SCHACK, Greenw'ood:
A. T. ALVAREZ, Jacksonville; ELBERT CAMMACK. Fairglade lerrey Dairy, Orlando:
WALTER SCHMID. Tallavast: and C. W. REAVES.


NOVEMBER & DECEMBER, 1953


* 9









DAIRY ASSOCIATION ACTIVITIES


11111


F.D.A. Directors Meetings Held

In Gainesville and Jacksonville

Florida Dairy Association Directors Meetings have been held September 9-10
in Gainesville and November 6-7 in Jacksonville.
The Gainesville meeting, which is held each year in connection with the Annual
Dairy Field Day meeting, will be long remembered and cherished by members of the
Board because of their Annual Conference with Dr. Hillis Miller, President of the
University of Florida, which in recent years had come to be a regular annual event.
Little did they realize that their September 10th meeting with Dr. Miller would
be the last.
The Jacksonville Directors meeting in November has been held at this time
for the past several years because of the Georgia-Florida football game. This is the
one meeting of the year to which Directors especially invite their wives.
At this meeting the ladies join the Directors for their Friday night dinner, a
Saturday noon luncheon and the Saturday afternoon annual football game of the
University of Florida and the University of Georgia.
Directors business sessions were held policy of past years in adopting and en-
throughout Friday evening, November forcing minimum prices for milk sold to
6th, and during the morning of Saturday any agency of the armed forces. A repre-
the 7th. sentative of the government had made an
The luncheon was attended by a num- official request sometime ago that the
ber of prominent guests including two Commission discontinue its jurisdiction
guest speakers, State Senator Graham over the price of milk purchased by the
Black of Jasper, and Congressman Char- armed forces and other agencies of the
lie Bennett of Jacksonville. Among the Federal Government.
other guests were Representatives Doyle PRESIDENT W. W. BASSETT
Conner, Starke, and Moody Pierce of COMMENDS F.D.A. DIRECTORS
Palatka; Duval County Home Demonstra-
Pti on Agent, Ms Nell Wells, County In summarizing the years activities to
onFa Agent, GMiss Nl lls of Nassa Directors at their last meeting, Novem-
Farm Agent, Gordon Ellis of Nassau ber 7th, President Bassett expressed the
County and a number of others. belief that the Directors of the Associa-
Among the various actions taken by ele tat
the Board at their Jacksonville meeting tion had probably been called upon to
the Board at ther Jacksonvlle meeting hold more meetings and work harder in
was the adoption of a motion to com- 1953 than in any previous year. The
mend the Florida Milk Commission for 1953 than in any previous year. The
their splendid assistance to the F.D.A. major problems, he said, involved a con-
their splendid assistance to the Federal siderable reorganization of the Associa-
Ssecuring the action of the Federal tion and legislative matters pertaining to
Government which held many dairy areas the dairy industry at the 1953 State
of the state to be a "Flood Disaster' area, Legislature. President Bassett said that
and which is expected to entitle dairy Legislature. President Bassett said that
and which is expected to entitle dairy- he felt that the directors and the mem-
men who prove their need to certain bership of the Association could be very
federal assistance in the purchase of feeds proud of the results which their efforts
and in borrowing money for rehabilita- have obtained during the year.
tion of flooded pastures. In closing the meeting, he expressed
Another important action of this meet- his sincere appreciation to the member-
ing was the adoption of a request to the ship and particularly to the directors and
Florida Milk Commission to continue its ship and particuly to te d s


GOVERNOR APPOINTS DAIRYMAN
MEMBER RACING COMMISSION
Julian Lane, well known dairyman of
Tampa and a former director of the
Florida Dairy Association, was recently
appointed a member and secretary of the
Florida Racing Commission by Acting
Governor Charlie Johns. Lane was Hills-
borough County Campaign Manager for
the late Governor Dan McCarty in his
successful campaign for election in 1952.


cLUommI iiL L1 ie.. IaJULI. LI L11e a on or
splendid cooperation with him as presi-
dent for the past year and a half. In
conclusion, President Bassett asked Pres-
ident-elect Herman Boyd to come for-
ward and officially accept the office of
President, effective January 1st, 1954,
inasmuch as there would probably not
be another directors' meeting before that
date.
Mr. Boyd pledged his best efforts to
lead the Association during the year 1954
and asked for the cooperation of the di-
rectors and the membership.


Acting Governor Johns
Assumed Difficult Task
Members of the Florida dairy industry
who have had an opportunity to confer
with Charlie Johns during the brief and
busy period since he assumed the duties
of the Governor's office have been most
cordially received
and assured of
friendly considera-
tion of any dairy in-
dustry problems
which might require
the attention of the
Governor's Office.
Dairymen of the
agricultural section
of the state from
CHARLIE JOHNS which Governor
Johns comes as well as those who have
known him through his many years in
the State Senate have always found him
to be a staunch friend.
In the difficult task which has fallen
to Charlie Johns as acting governor, the
Florida dairy industry desires to be co-
operative and helpful in any way pos-
sible.

F. D. A. Standing Committees
Named for the Year 1954
President-elect Herman Boyd and di-
rectors for 1954 held a brief planning
session in Jacksonville, Saturday morn-
ing, November 7th, following the regu-
lar quarterly directors' meeting held there
in November 6th and 7th.
Following a discussion of the principal
features of the Association program for
1954, the directors authorized the presi-
dent to prepare nominations for the
membership of the following standing
committees: Executive, Past Presidents'
Advisory, Advisory Members, Allied
Trades "Alligator Club", Annual Field
Day, Annual Meeting Program, Public
Relations, Florida Dairy News, Finance,
Dairy Husbandry, Ladies' Auxiliary, Leg-
islative, Membership, Public Health, Milk
Production, Plant Processing, Plant Cost
and Accounting, Pasture Development,
University of Florida, Standards and
Regulations, Veterinarian Members, and
Milk Commission.

Dairy products may prove to be an
ally to prevent coronary heart diseases,
the No. 1 killer of men over 40 years
of age, according to Zoe E. Anderson,
director of Nutrition Research of the
National Dairy Council.


10 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS







Miami Producer New F.D.A. President

Succeeding Bassett January First

Wm. Herman Boyd, one of Miami's most active and successful dairymen, will
become the third producer president of the Florida Dairy Association, January 1st,
succeeding Wilmer Bassett of Monticello, a producer-distributor who has served for
the last year and one half.
Under an amendment to the Association's Charter and By-Laws adopted at the
1953 Annual Meeting, new officers and directors who are elected at the Annual
Meeting assume their duties on January 1st of the following year.
President-elect Boyd has succeeded in dairying by hard work and a constant
search for new and improved methods of dairy farm practices. He decided early in
his career as a dairyman that friendly cooperation with his fellow dairymen was a
highly important and beneficial part of his program. He has been active in both
local and state dairy association programs for a number of years.


As chairman of the F.D.A. 1953 com-
mittee on pasture development, he has
been instrumental in securing Association
co-sponsorship with the University of
Florida of a state-wide dairy pasture de-
velopment contest. He has also been an
active member of the executive, finance,
membership and legislative committees.
Other officers elected at the June
Annual Meeting for the year 1954 are:
1st Vice-President and Chairman of the
Distributors' Council, Cliff D. Wayne,
Florida Zone Manager, Southern Dairies,
Miami; 2nd Vice-President and Chairman
of the Producers' Council, George John-
son, West Palm Beach producer; Trea-
surer, W. J. Barritt, Jr., Borden Dairy,
Tampa. New Producer Directors are:
J. D. Fuqua, Altha and Jack McMullen,
Clearwater. New Distributor Directors
will be: John Tripson, Vero Beach Dairy,
Vero Beach; George Boutwell, Boutwell's
Dairy, Lake Worth; and Claude Kelly,
Foremost Dairies, Daytona Beach.
The following directors in addition to
the officers mentioned above were re-
elected and remain on the Board: Pro-
ducers-John Sargeant, Lakeland; L. B.
Hull, Micanopy; Bill Graham, Hialeah;


Calendar

4-H And F. F. A.
Dairy Events
Nov. 21 District VII 4-H Area Dairy
Show and Contest-Orlando
Dec. 3-5 Polk County Youth Fair-
Bartow
Dec. 5 Palm Beach County 4-H Dairy
Show-Lake Worth
Jan. 1954 West Coast 4-H & F.F.A.
Dairy Show-Tampa
Jan. 1954 District V 4-H Livestock
Show-Jacksonville
Feb. 2-13 FLORIDA STATE FAIR-
Tampa
(See State Fair Story)
Dairy Week Feb. 2-6
F.F.A. Dairy Show Feb. 2
Parade of Champions-6:00
P.M. eb. 4
Dairy Show Dinner- 7:30
P.M. Feb. 4
Feb. 22-27-State 4-H Dairy Show at
Central Florida Exposition,
Orlando
Judging-Feb. 22


BOYD


WAYNE


John Adkinson, Pensacola; Ira Barrow,
New Smyrna Beach; J. H. Adams, Jack-
sonville; and Wayne Webb, Tampa. Dis-
tributors: Herman Burnett, Burnett's
Dairy Farms, Bradenton; J. N. McArthur,
McArthur's Jersey Dairy, Miami; Cody
Skinner, Skinner's Dairy, Jacksonville;
John Hood, Hood's Dairy, St. Peters-
burg; and J. F. W. Zirkelbach, Polar
Ice Cream Co., Pensacola.
Present directors going off the Board
are: Donald Leonard of Blountstown,
producer and the following distributors:
Freeman Hales, Miami; Gordon Nielsen,
West Palm Beach; Jack Johnson, Jack-
sonville; and Wilmer Bassett who be-
comes an ex-officio member of the Board
as immediate past-president.


KIRTON DAIRY FARM
SOLD FOR $195,000.00
The E. G. Kirton Dairy Farm of
Boynton Beach, Palm Beach County, was
recently sold to three members of the
Melear family who have operated adjoin-
ing dairy farms to Kirton for many years.
The sale included 600 acres of land, 400
dairy cattle, two homes, two barns, ten-
ant homes and equipment.


STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP, management,
and circulation required by the Act of Congress
of August 24, 1912. as amended by the Acts of
March 3, 1933, and July 2, 1946 (Title 39,
United States Code 233) of Florida Dairy News
published bi-monthly at Jacksonville, Florida, for
October 1, 1953.
1. The names and addresses of the publisher,
editor, managing editor, and business managers
are: Publisher, Florida Dairy Association, 220
Newnan Street, Jacksonville, Florida; Editor and
Business Manager, E. T. Lay, 220 Newnan
Street, Jacksonville, Florida.


Milk Foundation President
Outlines Dairy Objectives

Speaking before members of the Milk
Industry Foundation at the recent 1953
Convention in Boston, T. D. Lewis, Los
Angeles Dairy Executive and retiring
President of the fluid milk industry's
national trade organization, pointed out
the objectives the industry should strive
to achieve. In summing up these objec-
tives, Mr. Lewis enumerated the follow-
ing:
1. Federal milk marketing orders need
to be brought into line with original ob-
jectives of the Agricultural Marketing
Agreement Act of 1937. The Milk In-
dustry Foundation believes that these re-
visions can best be carried out at local
levels by agreement of parties affected
without the time-consuming delays of of-
ficial action from Washington.
2. Distributors must exploit the pub-
lic's interest in minerals, proteins and
Vitamins in order to sell more milk, us-
ing more additives to point up the flavor
and extra nutritional properties which are
in vogue today.
3. We must do a better job of mer-
chandising milk in restaurants, fountains
and all eating places. The habit of drink-
ing a cup of coffee several times a day
is already a national custom. We can
switch the public to milk.

4. Grocers' sales of milk are continu-
ing to grow. Regard grocers as partners
and proper outlets for your brand of
milk, not as competitors. You can have
your home-delivered milk business and
still wholesale volume to stores.

5. Let's be competitive, but let us
learn to take the normal loss of accounts
with the same grace as we take one be-
longing to a competitor. The margin of
profit on milk is so slim that we can't
afford to spend money on non-productive
wrangling.
6. Let's watch developments in the
fresh evaporated milk field, or when the
public decides they will accept dehy-
drated milk which they reconstitute at
home, watch for a revolution in the milk
business.


2. The owner is: Florida Dairy Association.
Inc., 220 Newnan St., Jacksonville. Florida. (Non
Profit Corporation, no capital stock).
3. The known bondholders, mortgages, and
other security holders owning or holding 1 per-
cent or more of total amount of bonds, mort-
gages, or other securities are: None.
E. T. LAY, Business Manager
Sworn to and subscribed before me this 15th
day of July, 1953. CA
L. H. CANOVA
(My commission expires March 15, 19541
(Seal)


NOVEMBER & DECEMBER, 1953


_


* 11










Feb. 2 to Feb. 13
194
11 days--I nights
FL 1TATt F R,
_AL__ aid GASIII LLA ASSI m TIO. HI .L

Major Improvements In Grounds, Buildings

And Program Promise Greater State Fair
Management of the Florida State Fair to be held in Tampa Feb. 2-13, 1954,
has announced that several major changes in the grounds and buildings of the State
Fair grounds together with an improved program are expected to make the 1954
fair the most interesting of any ever held in Florida.
The Dairy Cattle events will include open shows for Jersey, Guernsey and
Ayrshire in addition to the 4-H and F.F.A. shows. The Dairy Show will also include
Brown Swiss, Dutch Belted and Holstein-Friesian.
The parade of Dairy Show Champions which proved so popular at the 1953
fair will be held again following the completion of dairy judging late Thursday,
February 4th.
Following the "Parade of Champions", the Annual Dairy Industry Dinner,
sponsored by the Florida Dairy Association, will be held at the Tampa Terrace Hotel.
The Ayrshire Sale which was a new feature at the Fair last year will be held
at the close of the Dairy Show at 1:20 P.M., Saturday, February 4th.


SILAGE FEEDS IN USE
BY CHIPLEY DAIRYMEN
At least two dairymen of the Chipley
dairy area found their trench silos to be
excellent feed insurance late in October
when the pastures of that section began
to fail. These two were Vernon Kowitz
and Jake White. White is manager of
the Chipley Dairy Farm unit of the
North Florida Agricultural Experiment
Station.
The Experiment Farm silo was filled
with about 170 tons of hegari while the
Kowitz silo was filled with chopped
green corn.
According to White the hegari silage
costs about $6.50 a ton. While the corn
silage has a higher feed value, this is
offset by a higher production of hegari
and the fact that its shorter growing per-
iod makes it possible for it to be planted
and matured after a first crop of oats
or wheat has been harvested.
White feels that the trench silo is the
best answer to the high feed cost prob-
lem among West Florida dairymen.


In addition to the regular premiums
offered by the Fair, entrants in the Dairy
Show will again be competing for the
"Premier Exhibitor Trophy" and the
"Premier Breeder Trophy" offered by
the Florida Dairy Association and the
Florida Grower Magazine, respectively.
Mr. Jim Shee of Largo, Florida, will
be back as superintendent of the Dairy
Show.
LIVESTOCK SHOW SCHEDULE
Dairy Cattle Show Feb. 2- 6
Beef Cattle Show Feb. 8-13
Swine and Poultry Shows Feb. 2-13
JUNIOR LIVESTOCK SHOW
F.F.A. Dairy Show Feb. 2- 6
F.F.A. Beef Show Feb. 8-13
LIVESTOCK JUDGING PROGRAM
Tuesday, Feb. 2
9:00 A.M. F.F.A. Dairy Cattle
9:00 A.M. Brown Swiss, Holstein
and Dutch Belted
9:00 A.M. Ayrshire Open Show
Wednesday, Feb. 3
9:00 A.M. Guernsey Open Show
Thursday, Feb.4
9:00 A.M. Jersey Open Show
6:00 P.M. Parade of Dairy Show
Champions
7:30 P.M. Dairy Show Dinner
Tampa Terrace Hotel
Saturday, Feb. 6
11:30 A.M. F.F.A. State Dairy and
Beef Cattle Judging
HERDSMEN AWARDS
Herdsmen in charge of dairy cattle
exhibits will compete for cash awards of
$40.00 for 1st, $25.00 for 2nd, and
$10.00 for 3rd.


Florida's F. F. A. Dairy Judging Team
Wins Awards In National Contest
Florida's 1953 State Champion F.F.A. dairy judging team seen below with
exception of Bill Lacey, made a very good record in competition with State F.F.A.
teams from throughout the country.
Competing at the 1953 National Dairy Congress in Waterloo, Iowa, in October,
the team won a bronze placque and an Honorable Mention Certificate in recognition
of their judging ability.
Two members of the team, Teddy Kretzschmar and Cliff Causey won bronze
emblems in the individual placings. Cliff Causey received the Silver Emblem in the
individual placings for judging dairy cattle.
On their return trip from Waterloo, the team and their advisor, Mr. H. Quentin
Duff, visited the Lincoln Memorial in Springfield, Illinois; Mammoth Cave, Ken-
tucky; Lookout Mountain, and Ruby Falls, Tennessee; Silver Springs and Bok Tower,
Florida.


4


Seen above is Florida's No. 1-F.F.A. Dairy Judging Team in a final judging practice
session just before leaving for participation in the F.F.A. Show at the National Dairy Cattle
Congress in Waterloo, Iou'a.
LEFT TO RIGHT ARE: H. QUENTIN DUFF, team adviser and instructor of Vocational
Agriculture at Miami Edison High School: CLIFF CAUSEY, JIM BISHOP and TEDDY
KRETZSCHMAR. all of Miami.


12 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS





2nd FLORIDA AYRSHIRE SALE
SCHEDULED AT STATE FAIR
The Florida State Fair and the Ayr-
shire Sales Service of Rutherfordton, N.
C. are again cooperating to hold the
second Florida State Ayrshire Auction
Sale on Saturday, February 6th, at the
close of dairy week at the 1954 Fair.
The 66 animals to be sold will be
those entered in the Ayrshire Show.
Mr. Bill Carpenter, who is in charge
of the sale, has announced that 60 fe-
males and 6 males from some of the
country's best Ayrshire breeders have
been entered in the show and consigned
to the sale.
Two consignors are in Massachusetts,
two in Connecticut, four in New York,
one in Pennsylvania, three in Maryland,
one in Delaware and four in North Caro-
lina.
According to Mr. Carpenter, Ayrshires
are the heaviest producers of 4% milk
and are known for their ruggedness and
long life. Many Ayrshires make their
best records at from eight to thirteen
years of age.
Ayrshire breeders believe their breed-
ing into the average Florida dairy herd
would produce excellent results.

CATTLEMEN'S ASSOCIATION
RE-ELECTS ALL OFFICERS
All officers of the Florida Cattle-
men's Association were re-elected for an-
other year at the organization's recent
Annual Meeting in St. Petersburg.
The principal actions of the Associa-
tion's annual business meeting were the
adoption of resolutions (a) opposing
federal price supports for beef cattle and
(b) urging the U. S. Department of
Agriculture to re-instate the 14 Florida
counties which were first included and
then dropped from the list of 31 coun-
ties classified as "flood disaster area."
Officers of the Association are: presi-
dent, Ben Hill Griffin, Jr., Frostproof;
first vice-president, B. J. Alderman,
Grandin; second vice-president, Jay B.
Starkey, Largo; and secretary, June Glenn,
Kissimmee.

Model Dairy Farm
Planned By Foremost
Foremost Dairies, Inc. has announced
the acquisition of a 1700 acre tract of
Glades County land southeast of Belle
Glade where the company plans to de-
velop a 200-head model dairy farm, and
a milk processing and distributing plant.
Foremost officials recently conferred
with a committee of the Palm Beach
County Agricultural Development Board
concerning the possibility of increasing
the milk supply of the area by interesting
cattlemen in devoting a portion of their
pastures to dairy cattle and milk produc-
tion.


IN MECHANIZED MILKING


"MILKING ROOM TYPE"
S'Installed in a separate
milking room into which
cows ore brought for milk
S... in g only. Cows i
operator to save time and
steps. Elevated stalls eim.
Sr... senate stooping and squat-
e of ing. Mia ks, weighs, conveys
.an"d automatically dis
charges milk. Mechanized
cleaning.


Handle your milk
ite o ... e nin any of 3 ways!

Completely mechanized milking... as provided by
the De Laval Combine Milker... is adaptable to any
type of dairy and offers wide flexibility in planning
and operation. Automatically discharges milk
The "Barn Type" Combine meets every require- into
ment of the dairyman who prefers to milk his cows into standard 40-qt. cans.
in the stanchions... and does not want to build or
use a separate milking room.
The "Milking Room Type" Combine is the choice



ically discharge the milk into cans, farm tank or
over the aerator. And... both types provide mech-
anized "In-Place" cleaning by means of the De Laval
Vacuum Cleaning Method.
De Laval Combine Milkers offer the dairyman a
mechanized milking system virtually custom-made to ...or elevates for discharge
his needs. over surface cooler or aerator.


DE LAVAL COMBINE MILKERS
"FIRST- SINCE 1928"
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POUGHKEEPSIE, N. Y. Name
427 Randolph St., Chicago 6, Illinois I
61 Beale Street, San Francisco 5, Calif. I Towa R.F.D. .tat---

NOVEMBER & DECEMBER, 1953 13






FLORIDA 4-H JERSEYS EXHIBITED AT MEMPHIS

SOUTHEAST NATIONAL JUNIOR DAIRY SHOW


By C. W. REAVES, Slate Extension Dairyman
Florida Jersey breeders who observed the strong Jersey Show in the State 4-H
Dairy Show in Orlando last February Suggested exhibition in a regional or national
junior show. The Mid-South Fair at Memphis announced a "National Junior Dairy
Show" for all breeds. It was officially designated by the American Jersey Cattle Club
as their regional or "Southeast National Junior Jersey Show", along with an Eastern
National Junior Show at Richmond, Virginia.
In the April board of directors' meeting of the Florida Jersey Cattle Club it
was voted to provide $250 towards the expenses of the exhibit and Walter Welkener,
J. K. Stuart, and M. T. Crutchfield were appointed to work with Extension Dairyman
C. W. Reaves in selecting the cattle and making arrangements for sending them to
Memphis. The Florida Dairy Association also contributed to the expenses.
The 4-H members were visited and the show cattle selected on the same trip
over the state on which the State Jersey
Sale cattle were selected in early July.
The Dade County Agricultural De-
partment and W. Paul Simons of St.
Johns County provided trucks at no ex-
pense except for gas and oil. J. K.
Stuart authorized the purchase of green
4-H cow blankets with "Florida" let-
tered in white for loan to the members. .
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Welkener had at-
tractively designed exhibitor cards made
to go over each animal and provided ,,
other materials needed at the show.
Mr. R. K. Price, Dade County Assis-
tant Agent, and Mr. T. W. Sparks, Polk
County Assistant Agent, were in charge
(Continued on next page)


(IN THE ADJACENT PICTURE GROUP
ARE) TOP- The Florida delegation at the
Mid-South Fair. Memphis. Tennessee. with
part of the fourteen Florida 4-H Jerseys
entered in the Southeast National Junior Dany
Show. PRESENT WERE: 4-H Club members
Virginia and Caroline Stuart and James Thorn-
hill of Barton': Warren Alharez, Jacksonville:
Clyde Crutchfield, Marianna: William and
Martin Schack, Greenwood: Merriam Sim-
mons, St. Augustine: Victor Hanson. Dins-
more: Patricia Ellis and Robert Parisian, Calla-
hani. The latter four are members of the
Florida 4-H Dairy Cattle Judging Team which
wal enroute to the National Judging Contest
at Waterloo. Iowa.

OTHERS PRESENT WERE: Walter Wel-
kener and J. K. Stuart. members of Florida
Jersey Cattle Club Exhibit Committee: Mrs.
W. Paul Simmons. Merriam's mother: WI. 1W.
Glenn. Jackson County Agent: R. K. Price
and T. W1. Sparks. Assistant County Agents
in Dade and Polk Counties, respectively: and
C. W. Reaves. Florida Extension Dairyman.



CENTER-Florida's 1953 State 4-H Daitr
Cattle Judging Team. LEFT TO RIGHTs
VICTOR HANSON, Dinsmoie; ROBERT
PARISIAN, Callahan; MERRIAM SIMMONS,
St. Augustine; and PATRICIA ELLIS, Calla-
han. The Jerseys belong to Merriam, her
brother and sister, and were on exhibit in the
Southeast National Junior Jersey Show at the
Mid-South Fair in Memphis. Tennessee. The
team attended the Mid-South Fair enroute to
the National 4-H Dairy Cattle Judging Con-
te t at W'aterloo. Iowa.



BOTTOM-The Florida booth and 4-H Jer-
seys entered in the Southeast National Jersey
Dairy Show at the Mid-South Fair, Memphis.
Tennessee. Attractive Florida 4-H exhibitor
cards are seen over each animal. In the fore-
ground is Florida's 1953 State 4-H Show
Champion, X Standard Ivy Nanette. owned
and shown by IWarren Alvarez. Though thin
from milking over 50 pounds a day, she still
placed in the "Blue Ribbon Group" at this
very strong regional Jersey Show, and had
the highest production record of any cow in
the show.


SHOWN IN THE TWO PICTURES AT
THE RIGHT ARE: TOP: Merriam Simmons
with Steve Simmons' "Blonde Lad's Doll",
which won second in the two-year-old class
in the Southeast National Junior Jersey Show
at Memphis. The next day the cow placed
fourth in the Open Show, going abore the
cow which had beat her in the Junior Show.
The Mid-South Fair staged a national
junior dairy show' of all breeds. The Junior
Jersey Show' was Officially designated the
Southeast National Junior Jersey Show b) the
American Jersey Cattle Club.
BOTTOM: Group of cows in the herd of
Frank McDonald and Son at Princeton. Illi-
nois, one of the highest classified Ayrshire
herds in the nation. One cow had a lifetime
record of over 138,000 pounds of milk and
is still milking heavily. The Florida team did
practice judging on three classes, and looked
over the farm and herd.


14 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


IWIDAi









Florida 4-H Dairy Judging Team

Places 17th In 32 State Contest
A Report of Team's Journey and Experiences
At National Cattle Congress
By ROBERT PARISIAN, Member of the Team
The members of our team who had the privilege and responsibility of represent-
ing the 4-H clubs of Florida in the National 4-H Judging Contest were Merriam
Simons, St. Augustine; Patricia Ellis, Callahan; Victor Hanson and I from Dinsmore.
Our coach was Mr. C. W. Reaves, University of Florida State Extension Dairy-
man, and our chaperon was Mrs. Paul Simmons, Merriam's mother.
Realizing that our team was following the Florida's national champion team of
only two years ago, we all had the feeling that we had a great deal to measure up to
in this year's contest.
Our team had the good fortune to be
able to attend the mid-South Youth Fair and were able to learn new things about
at Memphis, Tennessee, while on our way judging them as they, too, are seen but
to the National Cattle Congress at Water- little in Florida. The county in which
loo, Iowa. One member of our team, these farms were located is said to be
Merriam Simmons, and ten other Florida the Brown Swiss capital of America.
4-H members showed a total of 14 Florida As we traveled further North across
Jerseys in this Fair, which was the South- Illinois we stopped to visit the nationally
eastern Section of the National Junior known Ayrshire herd of Frank McDonald
Jersey Show. We enjoyed this show very & Son. New pointers on Ayrshire judg-
much and the opportunity to see the offi- ing were learned here.
cial pudging of large classes of such fine The 4-H Judging Contest started at
quality animals was very helpful to us. 7:30 A.M. on Monday of our first day
We saw here also the regional Holstein at the National Cattle Congress. From
Show and the Open Guernsey Show and 7:30 until noon we placed ten classes-
Mr. Reaves arranged for us to do practice five classes of cows and five classes of
judging with the Holsteins in the Show. heifers-a heifer and a cow from each of
This was very helpful to us as we had five breeds. We wrote reasons on three
not had an opportunity in Florida to of the cow classes.
judge Holsteins of this class. In the afternoon, we gave two sets of
As we were on our way across the state oral reasons, one on Jerseys and one on
of Illinois, we saw more corn than we Holsteins. We were done with the con-
knew ever existed. Mr. Reaves took us test by four o'clock in the afternoon. At
to visit two Brown Swiss dairy farms six-thirty we went to the Awards Banquet
where we saw the finest of this breed on the grounds where the results of the
contest were announced and the awards
given.
ionl J Florida was sixth on Ayrshires and
ninth on Holsteins and seventeenth in
JERSEYS the contest. There were thirty-one states
IIHOLSTEINS competing, so Florida was about half-
VGURNSEYS way. However, Florida was only 132
points out of first place and 216 points
WN SWISS out of last place, so the contest was pretty
close. While we did not feel elated over
the results, we did not feel badly. All
the state teams were there to try to win.
We worked hard and it was a valuable
experience for each of us. Some good
dairy states like New York, Minnesota,
Illinois, Tennessee and Ohio were below
us in the rating.
We spent two days at the Cattle Con-
gress after our participation in the con-
test. It was a wonderful experience to
see over 2,000 top dairy cattle of the
United States which were exhibited in
the National Shows for Guernseys, Jer-
seys, Holsteins, Ayrshires, and Brown
Swiss.
Our party divided in order to be able
to attend the separate banquets which
were held by the Guernsey and Jersey
breeders. A surprise for all of us was a
(Continued on page 37)


FLORIDA'S 4-H JERSEYS
AT MEMPHIS SHOW
(Continued from preceding page)
of the cattle throughout the Fair. Two
older experienced Club members, War-
ren Alvarez and James Thornhill, were
selected to go and help care for the
cattle.
Fourteen head were taken. They be-
longed to eleven different Club members
located in Dade, Polk, St. Johns, Duval,
and Jackson Counties. Exhibitors were
Teddy Kretzschmar of Miami (two ani-
mals); Virginia and Caroline Stuart, Bar-
tow, (Caroline won tenth in the Open
Show with one of her entries); Steve,
Merriam, and Beverly Simons of St. Au-
gustine (Steve's two-year-old cow placed
second in the Junior Show and fourth
in the Open); Warren, Robin and Gloria
Alvarez, all "Blue Group" animals, Clyde
Crutchfield of Marianna (with a nice
high record cow which had recently
calved and was out of condition); and
William Schack of Greenwood, whose
two-year-old placed eighth in a strong
class.
On Show day, Tuesday, September 29,
a number of the Florida 4-H Club mem-
bers and breeders were present. Every
member present showed his or her own
animal in the ring. Classes were large
and competition keen all the way. No
mediocre animals are brought to this
show. Despite the keen competition,
Florida members received one second
prize, three eighths, three ninths, one
tenth, one fourteenth, three fifteenths,
one sixteenth and one nineteenth, with
two Florida state herds standing sixth
and seventh.
This was a very satisfactory result for
the first time Florida had entered cattle
in an out-of-state junior dairy show. The
cattle looked nice, and they and the
Florida booth attracted much favorable
attention. The agents and Club mem-
bers kept the exhibit in excellent shape
at all times.
One recognition came in the produc-
tion classes in which Florida had two
cows take additional premiums, including
Clyde Crutchfield and Warren Alvarez,
whose cow, X Standard Ivy Nanette, had
the highest production record of any
cow in the Junior Jersey Show. Warren
also won eighth in the Showmanship
Competition.
Due to a fairly liberal per mile trans-
portation allowance by the Mid-South
Fair, the financing was entirely success-
ful. This, with the state herd premiums
and money provided by the sponsors,
met the costs of making the exhibit, so
that the premiums on the individual ani-
mals went to the members to apply on
their personal expenses in connection
fitting the cattle and attending the show.
It was a worthwhile experience for these
enthusiastic future dairymen from the
Sunshine State.


NOVEMBER & DECEMBER, 1953


* 15









AYRSHIRES

FLORIDA'S SECOND ANNUAL
STATE FAIR AYRSHIRE SALE
*
Saturday
FEBRUARY 6, 1954
1:00 P.M.-EST


NATHAN MAYO PAVILION
Fair Grounds . Tampa


Following the

OPEN AYRSHIRE SHOW

at the State Fair


WE WILL SELL-
60 Females - 6 Males
* The entire offering will come
from the Ayrshires on exhibit dur-
ing Dairy Cattle Week at the
Fair.
* We consider the prospective
Ayrshire buyer, indeed fortunate
to be able to buy from the show
string of several breeders who
frequent the largest shows in the
country.
* AYRSHIRES ARE ADAPTABLE TO
FLORIDA

* Ayrshire bulls crossed on other
cattle result in remarkable off-
spring.
* Our first sale held during the
1953 Fair was highly successful.
We believe greater things are in
store for us.


Write for Catalog

PLAN TO ATTEND
* *
INVESTIGATE AYRSHIRES

Sale under direction of
BILL CARPENTER'S
AYRSHIRE SALES SERVICE
Rutherfordton, N. C.
ROGER DENNY, Frederick, Md.
Ayrshire Fieldman


"Why Everyone Should Drink Milk"
A $500.00 Prize Wiiinning Essay in June Dairy Month Contest in High School Seniol r Division,
Sponsored by New York State Milk Dealers Association
By: PATRICIA LINDSEY, Binghampton, New York
Just a moment ago, Johnny, the newsboy, had tossed the evening paper on the
front porch. Casually, I walked to the door and brought the copy into the house.
After sitting down in the comfortable armchair, I unfolded the journal. Suddenly,
my eyes centered on the large black headline: Milk Shortage In The United States!
I thought of the fact that this would be one of the greatest misfortunes that the
people of the United States could experience. After all the use of milk as an essential
of life has been practiced ever since the primitive days, and to have a shortage of the
food now would mean a lower percentage of healthy people and might even lead to
the complete ruin of the United States-especially now when we need great man
power. Why both children and adults depend on milk for development of teeth,
growth, to prevent diseases, and to carry on body processes!
We, the people of the United States,
must have this nearly perfect food which
contains: vitamins, proteins, calcium,
phosphorus, and other minerals. Calcium
and phosphorus help the little boy or
girl to grow into well developed men
and women who are the entire future
of the United States. Proteins help a
wound to heal by repairing the body
tissue. For example, take Judy, the little
neighbor girl who was injured by a car.
A leg and four ribs had been broken.
Surely, penicillin and excellent medical
care gave immediate help; but milk built
up the broken bones and tissues.
I have learned from experience that
milk helps to prevent acne, the skin
disease that is most dreaded by young i
adults. Acne can cause one to isolate
himself from the rest of his friends. It
can disfigure one's face, lead into in- s
fiction, and even leave scars. What boy MISS PATRICIA LINDSLEY is seen above
or girl likes to have that happen? as she u'as presented the $500 bond for her
Further back in the past, I can re- ujning Dairy Month Essay by Gover,,or
member my first health class where I Thomas E. Dezwey of Neuw York. on behalf
and my classmates studied about the of the coNe York Daibr Industry. sponsors
essential conditioning to which milk is
always subjected; pasteurization, super- help to fight against any possible short-
vision of bottling by public health offi- age and provide for the continued supply
cials, and the regulated employment of and use of this most essential food for not
those allowed to handle the milk. As a only myself but all citizens of the United
result of these processes milk was the States of America.
cleanest and most inexpensive product
that my parents could purchase as com-
pared to other foods. I can remember HONOR TO INVENTOR
their urging me to drink all of my milk OF ICE CREAM SODA
so that I wouldn't have any dental caries Too many of us partake of many of
which would ruin my teeth and cause the wonderful things of life without
halitosis. stopping to think and be grateful that
Because of the possible milk shortage, someone, somewhere devoted his thoughts
I may not be able to purchase milk in and energies to develop or discover the
so many forms and by-products. It has thing we take for granted.
been convenient to be able to buy milk For instance, who would stop to think
or procure the same properties in the that someone had to originate such an
form of butter, cheese, ice cream, and everyday favorite as the "ice cream
heavy cream. Yes, I will surely miss soda"?
this convenience after using it and taking The Milk Industry Foundation of
it for granted all these years. Just think Washington, D. C. and the International
-no more chocolate milk, buttermilk, Association of Ice Cream Manufacturers
homogenized milk, or Vitamin D milk sent officials all the way to Denver,
that are so easily digested and refreshing Colorado in 1951 to recognize and honor
anytime. a Denver confectionery owner who was
It is important that I appreciate these credited with originating the ice cream
nutritional values of milk so that I can soda in 1871.


16 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS








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smooth operation. Six-point filter sys-
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holds wheels right on course in rough-
sri land. Ask for a demonstration.
You'll find a new experience in power
.ind handling ease with the new "500"
(ase Diesel.







I -^ --.,. :


RENOVATE FOR MORE FEED ...

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penetration, thorough chopping and mixing of sod,
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can be angled by hydraulic control. Does fast, deep work
in heavy cover when teamed with the new Case Diesel
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tractors in less severe conditions.


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NOVEMBER & DECEMBER, 1953


a q


* 17




















1953 ANNUAL DAIRY FIELD DAY


SUCCESS CREDITED TO COOPERATION
Officials of the University of Florida Dairy Department were highly pleased
with the increased dairy industry participation, as well as the overall success of their
Annual Dairy Field Day program which is co-sponsored by the Florida Dairy
Association.
The 1953 meeting, which was the University of Florida's 18th annual training
session for dairymen and herdsmen, was held September 10 and 11, in Gainesville.
The "Field Day" sponsoring committees of the U. of F. Dairy Department and the
Florida Dairy Association, which jointly planned and promoted the program, were
headed by Dr. S. P. Marshall, U. of F. Dairy Department, and Bill Harman Field-
man of Southern Dairies, Jacksonville, as chairman of the Annual Field Day Com-
mittee of the Dairy Association.


President Miller and
V. Pres. Allen Participate
All who attended the Field Day Meet-
ing were greatly impressed with the
presence and friendly interest shown in
the meeting and in the Florida dairy
industry by President Miller's attendance
with Mrs. Miller and Vice-President and
Mrs. Allen at the annual dinner program.
Dr. Allen acted as master of ceremonies
and Dr. Miller was the principal
speaker.
Dr. Miller's recent death has deeply
impressed the leaders of the Florida dairy
* industry with the realization of what a
staunch friend Dr. Miller was and had
been to agriculture in Florida and par-
ticularly of the dairy industry. Great im-
provements were made in the Dairy
Science Department and in the facilities
and operation of the Dairy Experiment
Farm under Dr. Miller's administration
as President of the University.
Program Centered On
Dairy Feed Supplies
With the problem of developing
sources for the home production of more
economical dairy feeds becoming more
and more urgent with Florida dairymen,
and a state-wide dairy pasture improve-
ment and development contest in progress
for the year 1953, the Field Day program


theme of "Fall and Winter Feed Supply"
was most timely and appropriate. The
program of the two-day meeting was di-
vided into four sessions with several
supplementary events. Two conference
program sessions were held Thursday af-
ternoon and Friday morning at the U. of
F. Student Service Center auditorium.
Thursday night was given over to the
always popular and enjoyable Fellowship
Hour at the Hotel Thomas and the
Annual Dinner Program at the Student
Service Center.
From 10:30 Friday morning through
the noon hour was devoted to a field
tour of the University Dairy Research
Farm twelve miles north of the Univer-
sity, where the official program ended
with a picnic lunch.
Dairy Industry Queen Speaks
and Demonstrates Horsemanship
The appearance at the meeting of Miss
Jane Clardy of Ocala, Florida's 1953-54
Dairy Industry Queen was greatly en-
joyed by all. Miss Clardy was first pre-
sented at the annual dinner where her
talk on "The Blessings of Freedom" as
well as her personal charm greatly im-
pressed all who heard her. This oration
had won her 1st place in a State Exchange
Club oratorical contest, as well as her
crown as Dairy Industry Queen.


U


.Am


1T *-r








a


ANNUAL FIELD DAY-PICTURE STORY
Pictures tell a story all their own. The Dairy News is pleased to be able to
supplement the accompanying review of the 1953 Dairy Field Day with this
picture-story.
AT THE TOP OF THE PAGE, LEFT: The Annual Dinner: RIGHT: the F.D.A.
Directors Annual Conference with the late U. of F. President, Dr. Hillis Miller.
PANEL AT LEFT: (1) and (2) Registration of Field Day delegates at the U. of F. and
Hotel Thomas; (3) F.D.A. President Wilmer Bassett speaking in the opening of the meeting
and Dr. J. Wayne Reitz, U. of F. Provost of Agriculture who presided. (4) Speakers at the
1st business session, left to right: Dr. E. L. Fouts; A. B. Sanchez, U. of F. Farm Manager:
Prof. Dix Arnold: Dr. Sidney Marshall, U. of F. Dairy Herd Manager: H. L. Somers. Dr.
R. B. Becker, and Prof. Walter Krienke. (5) STANDING, LEFT TO RIGHT: C. W. Reaver.
Dr. J. M. Myers, Dr. G. K. Davis, Dr. Marshall: seated, 1. to r.: Walter Welkener: C. B.
Bender, N. Y. Specialist in Grassland Farming: and Dr. Becker.
PANEL AT RIGHT: (1) Dr. John Allen, V. Pres. U. of Fla. presiding at the Annual
Dinner; Dr. Miller and Mrs. Allen are seen seated at the speakers' table. (2) Dr. Allen
inspecting the U. of F. dairy herd as Mrs. Allen and Dr. Howard Wilkouski look on. (3)
F.D.A. Ladies' Auxiliary President Mrs. Leon Sellers, St. Petersburg, demonstrates her farming
ability. (4) A group of the dairy women who participated in the Field Day. (5) Mr. and
Mrs. Jim Jennings with one of the popular honor guests, Miss Veiona Fogel, F.F.A. Sweetheart
for 1953 and Gainesville Dairy Month Queen who gave a demonstration of Hawaiian dancing
which she learned in Hawaii.
BOTTOM PANEL: (1) through (5) on left and (1) on right are scenes taken during the
tour and program at the U. of F. Dairy Research Farm. Miss Ida Schmidt of Sarasota. a
graduate of the U. of F. Dairy Dept. is seen demonstrating the huge farm tractor. (2) Dr.
R. B. Becker, Dairy Husbandman, and C. W. Reaves, State Extension Dairyman, escorting Miss
Jane Clardy, State Dairy Industry Queen at the U. of F. Dairy Farm. (3) The Queen makes
good her claim that she knew all about cows. (4) F.D.A. Secy. Andy Lay, and (5) Jack Dew.
show "Nellie" they can really ride.


Annual Dairy Field Day Activities


(Continued from preceding page)
Miss Clardy's exhibition of her un-
usual talents in horsemanship, which was
a feature on the Friday noon program
at the Experiment Farm, proved to be
another star feature of the Field Day.
Jane, accompanied by her father, Mr.
John Clardy, brought her three favorite
horses from the Clardy Ranch at Ocala.
Her riding demonstration was followed
by a demonstration of her right to repre-
sent the dairy industry by proving to Dr.
R. B. Becker, C. W. Reaves, State Ex-
tension Dairyman, and President Wilmer
Bassett, that she could really milk a cow.
A picture of this event will be seen
among those which accompany this
summary.


Special Meetings Aid Field Day
In cooperation with the Field Day
committees, several special dairy groups
arranged meetings to be held in Gaines-
ville at the same time making these
available for participation in the Field
Day Program.
Among these were Directors of the
Florida Dairy Association, who held their
regular quarterly meeting and their an-
nual conference with Dr. Miller and
College of Agriculture officials. Dr.
Miller had been doubly honored by the
Dairy Association having been elected
the Association's first honorary member
(Continued on page 20)


IJ;!I


'.," ~P'


3.
44o-
WE_


F ~.


r






















PICTURE STORY OF ANNUAL FIELD DAY
QUEEN JANE CLARDY, at the age of 18. has won numerous trophies and blue ribbons
in horsemanship in several states. She delighted Field Day delegates while on their tour of
the University Dairy Farm uith a demonstration of Show Horse riding, Rodeo Riding and
Coow Pony Riding. In the TOP PANEL, LEFT TO RIGHT, are seen he; shou' horse. "Chief
Rare" and her rodeo horse, "Gray Eagle."
SIDE PANEL: (1) Jane with her cow pony "Nellie" and her father. (2) State Repre-
sentative and Mrs. Doyle Conner of Starke who were guests of honor at the Annual Dinner.
Doyle wias also a guest speaker at the F.D.A. Annual Meeting in Miami Beach, a few days
before their u'edding. Mrs. Conner uas Doyle's secretary at the 1953 Legislature and wuas
introduced by Association Secy. Andy Lay as "The Sweetheart of the Florida Legislature."
(3) Queen Jane Clardy is seen as she uwas presented for her talk at the annual dinner. (4)
F.F.A. Swieetheart. MISS VERENA FOGEL as she appeared in her native Hawaiian dance
co tume at the Field Day dinner.



Annual Dairy Field Day Activities


(Continued from preceding page)
as well as a member of the F.D.A.
"Order of the Bell Cows". To date,
only nine persons have won membership
in the "Bell Cows" which is the indus-
try's leadership fraternity.
Other group meetings held were the
directors of the Florida Dairy Herd Im-
provement Association and a special
meeting of the Florida Guernsey Cattle
Club.
Presiding at the various sessions were
F.D.A. President Wilmer Bassett, Vice-
Pres. Herman Boyd, Dr. E. L. Fouts,
Head of U. of F. Dairy Science and Dr.
Wayne Reitz, U. of F. Provost for Agri-
culture. Dr. Sidney Marshall served as
general chairman and was assisted by
Bill Harman, chairman of the Annual
Field Day Committee of the Florida
Dairy Association.
Jim Jennings, Representative of Con-
solidated Badger Corporation, was on
hand for his usual post of Sergeant-at-
Arms and Mr. Jack Dew of Southern
Dairies, Jacksonville, was in charge of
the Annual Dinner entertainment and
the presenting of the Queens. Winners
of the attendance prizes which always
add interest to the conference sessions
were: C. C. Swebielius, High Standard
Dairy, DeLand; Donald Plant, Farmers'
Coop Exchange, Pinecastle; C. W. Hauf-
ler, Borden's Farm Representative, Talla-
hassee; L. E. Cunningham, Pinellas
County Asst. Farm Agent, Largo; E. P.
Gulledge, Miller Machinery Co., Jack-
sonville; and Ira Barrow, New Smyrna.


Digest of Feed Discussions
Available on Request
Florida dairymen who were not for-
tunate enough to attend and hear this
splendid Field Day program on "Produc-
tion of Fall and Winter Feeds" may
secure a summary of the information
presented at the meeting upon request to
the "Florida Dairy Association".
The various subjects covered were:
"Survey of Trends in Use of Silage and
Hay", C. W. Reaves, Extension Dairy-
man; "Structures for Preserving Silage",
J. M. Myers, Associate Agricultural En-
gineer; "Grass Silage", C. B. Bender,
Director of Research in Grassland Farm-
ing, The Sperry Corporation, N. Y.; "Sun
Curing Hay from Permanent Pasture for
Stored Roughage Supply", Walter Wel-
kener, Jacksonville; "Production and Use
of Hay on Small Dairy Farms in Lafay-
ette County", S. L. Brothers, Lafayette
County Agent; "Economics of a Sound
Roughage Feeding Program", C. B. Ben-
der; "Use of Non-Protein Nitrogen in
Dairy Rations", Dr. G. K. Davis, Animal
Nutritionist, U. of F.
"Pangola-Clover Pastures for Lactating
Cows", Dr. S. P. Marshall, Associate
Dairy Husbandman; "Pangola-Clover vs.
Coastal Bermuda", H. L. Somers, Herd
Manager, Dairy Research Unit; "Value
of Winter Oats Pasture for Dairy
Cattle", A. B. Sanchez, Farm Manager,
Dairy Research Unit; "Value of Pearl
Millet Pasture for Lactating Cows", P. T.
(Continued on next page)


20 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS






Borden President Discusses
Surplus Dairy Production
Theodore G. Montague, president of
the Borden Company, speaking at the
Annual Conference of Newspaper Food
Editors in Chicago said that "the pres-
ent problem of surplus dairy production
is not the exclusive dilemma of the dairy
farmer, but a national problem involving
all Americans."
Mr. Montague told the editors, "We
must be prepared to pay a price to main-
tain a strong dairy economy that is essen-
tial to our national well-being. We
know that while production can be cut
off by a simple expedient, such as
slaughtering cows, it cannot be rebuilt
for many years. We know that the coun-
try's future growth will require volume
production, and can assume that the Ad-
ministration will eventually work out a
sound policy for a balanced agriculture.
But we also know that until some future
date we shall have surplusses, and a
choice of eating them or throwing them
away.
"The situation has placed the nation's
dairy farmer in an unwelcome situation
which the consuming public can help
solve by increasing consumption. Much
can be done also by the legislators and
farm leaders of the country to help
solve the surplus production problem of
our dairy farmers," he said.

DO YOU ADVERTISE?
The codfish lays ten thousand eggs,
The homely hen lays one.
The codfish never cackles
To tell you what she's done.
And so we scorn the codfish,
While the humble hen we prize,
Which only goes to show you
That it pays to ADVERTISE.

FIELD DAY ACTIVITIES
(Continued from preceding page)
Dix Arnold, Associate Dairy Husband-
man; and "Ups and Downs of Fat Tests
Due to Feed", Dr. R. B. Becker, Dairy
Husbandman and W. A. Krienke, Asso-
ciate Dairy Technologist.
Special Guests at Annual Dinner
Honor Guests at the Annual Dinner
in addition to President and Mrs. Miller
and Dr. and Mrs. Allen, were: Dr. C. V.
Noble, Dean of U. of F. College of
Agriculture, and Mrs. Noble; Congress-
man Billie Matthews of Gainesville; Miss
Jane Clardy, reigning Dairy Industry
Queen and her father, Mr. John Clardy,
of Ocala; Miss Verena Fogel, 1953
Dairy Month Queen of Gainesville and
1953 Sweetheart of Florida F.F.A. and
her mother; Woodrow Brown, Florida
State 4-H Club Director; John M. Scott,
Chief Dairy Supervisor, Department of
Agriculture, and Mrs. Scott; and State
Representative Doyle Conner and Mrs.
Conner, of Starke.


Set to


COOL MILK

for

Fifty Years


Mr. David Light, who milks 30 cows on a 220
acre farm near Cochranville, Pa. and uses a
150 gallon Mojonnier Tank to cool his milk,
says, "I like the tank because it's all stainless
steel and I won't have to buy another milk
cooler for at least 50 years. It eases the milk-
ing chore too, and it's reduced my power bill
$5.00 a month. Bacteria counts are down
around 2,000. Bulk Cooler Bulletin 290 free on request.


Moionnier Bros. Co., 4601 W. Ohio St., Chicago 44, III.
Florida Representative
Lee P. Bickenbach
P.O. BOX 2205
LAKELAND, FLA.


NOVEMBER & DECEMBER, 1953


KUDER CITRUS PULP

USED BY FLORIDA DAIRYMEN FOR 17 YEARS

Five Plants To Serve You With


KUDER CITRUS PULP

"BESTEST NATURE-SWEET PULP"


FOR YEAR-ROUND AVAILABILITY AND

TOP-QUALITY PULP,

Ask your feed dealer for KUDER!



Kuder Pulp Sales Co.

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Phone 28112


A
David and LeRoy
Light, LeRoy Light
& Sons Farm,
Cochranville. Pa.


* 21








GUERNSEY CATTLE CLUB NEWS


RECENT REGISTRY TESTS

OF FLORIDA GUERNSEYS


Bull Brings $1,000.00


At 15th Annual

The Florida Guernsey Cattle Club held another successful
Guernsey cattle in the 15th Annual Florida State Auction Sale in I
A North Carolina bull bred by G. S. Coble, Lexington, N.
price of $1,000 among the 51 animals sold. The animal, Mageo
was purchased by Dr. Roberto E. Parajon, Havana, Cuba, fc
Agriculture.
Dr. Parajon also bought twelve cows for his private herd,
$4,335. One of the cows was Rolling Acres Violetta, a four-ye
L. H. Sellers, owner and operator of the Sellers Guernsey Farm,
C. E. Donegan, owner of Donegan's Dairy, Largo, paid the
when he purchased Dinsmore Noble Fawn for $605. The cow
Earl, and Charles Johnson, Dinsmore, Fla.


Pinellas County Agricultural Agent
John Henry Logan stated that the show,
while successful in every way, brought an
average price of $334, which he pointed
out was less than the average price of
last year's show, when the figure was
$392.
Animals were consigned by nine
Guernsey breeders of North Carolina, one
in Kentucky, three in Georgia, four in
South Carolina, and eight in Florida.
Mort Granger of Thomasville was the
auctioneer.
State Commissioner of Agriculture Na-
than Mayo, who spent the entire after-
noon observing the cattle and the sales,
remarked that in his opinion the animals
were not bringing as high a price as
they should.
Some 250 dairymen from all over the
South attended the sale, and all the 51
cattle offered for purchase were bought.


The above picture of
for the 1953 State Guer
held at Largo was taken
editor at a special brea
committee and of the G.
the Annual Dairy Field
LEFT TO RIGHT,
Reaves, U. of F.; John L
Carroll Ward, Lakemon
Schmid, Sarasota; and
Lake Worth.

The total amount
$17,040.


GUERNSEYS PURCHASED BY FLORIDA BREED


Registered Guernsey cattle have been re-
cently purchased by thirteen Florida dairymen
according to announcement of the American
Guernsey Cattle Club, which records all trans-
fers of registered Guernseys.
PURCHASES ANNOUNCED ARE:
THE N. B. WILSON DAIRY, Perry, has
just purchased two young Guernsey sires, Ben-
Bow Ga. Major and Ben-Bow Gpe. Rex, from
Paul H. Bennet, Quitman, Ga. Both are sired
by Green Meads Proclamation.
THE COASTAL DAIRY, Stuart, has just
purchased the young Guernsey sire, Jenwell
Dasher, from Boutwell's Dairy, Inc., Lake
Worth. This richly bred young bull is out
of the well-bred cow, Broad Hill Prudance.
THE COASTAL DAIRY has also purchased
the young Guernsey sire, Attebroc Majesty's
Don from Roger H. Corbetta, Millbrook,
N. Y. This richly-bred young bull is out
of the high-producing cow, Pharos King's
Donetta, that has five times been classified
as Desirable for type, and has two production


records of 13,600 poun
pounds of butterfat, ma
year-old and 16,996 p
1,013 pounds of butter
year-old. He is sired
Majesty.
SAMUEL D. WALLA
purchased the young G
King, from R. L. Dressel
Miami. This young bul
Brays Island Pollyann, a
dike Klimax.
THE GEORGE ATKII
more, has just purchased
sire Bodden's Maxim Ge
Bodden Dairy, Dinsmo
bull is out of the wel
View Ned's Peonie and
New River.
RICHARD KEHN, S
chased the young Guern
T. O. Triumph, from t
Dairy, Sarasota. This y
the well-bred cow, Mara
and is sired by Skyline


Guernsey


22 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


I


The following records of recent official
production tests among Florida Guernsey herds
have been announced by the American Guern-
sey Cattle Club. Official production tests are
made under supervision of the University of
State Sale Florida and reported to the AGCC for ap-
proval and publication.
CARROLL WARD & SON DAIRY, Lake-
sale of registered mont: Lakemont King's Theda has completed
Largo, November 6. an official Advanced Registry record of 9,338
pounds of milk and 467 pounds of Butterfat
C., brought the top on three times daily milking for a ten months
Winner's Hightide, period, starting her record as a senior two-
ir the Ministry of year old.
C. L. BODDEN DAIRY, Dinsmore: Bod-
den's Maxim Belladonna has completed an
at a total price of official Advanced Registry test record of 10,-
ar-old cow sold by 291 pounds of milk and 514 pounds of but-
St. Petersburg. terfat on twice daily milking for a ten-month
period, starting her record as a senior four-
top price for a cow year-old.
was sold by V. C., WALTER SCHMID & SON DAIRY, Sara-
sota: Elector's Daisy produced 9,687 pounds
of milk and 489 pounds of butterfat as a
senior three-year-old and was milked 610
times while on test.
DINSMORE DAIRY FARMS, Dinsmore:
Dinsmore Noble Daylight, a senior four-year-
old, produced 15,556 pounds of milk and 653
pounds of butterfat on three-times-daily milk-
ing for 365 days. Dinsmore Noble Lou,
milked three times daily for 365 days, pro-
duced 12,735 pounds of milk and 530 pounds
of butterfat, as a senior two-year-old.
LAY-LAINE DAIRY, Goldenrod (Carroll
Ward, Jr.): Lakemont Peter's Girl, has com-
pleted an official Advanced Registry record
the Sales Committee of 10,040 pounds of milk and 482 pounds
nsey Cattle Club Sale of butterfat on a three time daily milking for
by the Dairy News a ten-month period, starting her record as
kfast meeting of the a junior two-year-old.
.C.C. members during JOHN RICHARD KELLEY, St. Petersburg,
Day at Gainesville. has just purchased the young Guernsey sire
THEY ARE: C. W. Sultan Viking from C. E. Donegan, Largo.
.ogan, Secy. F.G.C.C.; This young bull is out of the cow, Dinsmore
t, Chairman; Walter Valmax Dairymaid, and is sired by Sierra
IW. A. Boutwell, Sr., Manor Sultan.
THE L. L. GOODE DAIRY, Gainesville,
has just purchased the young Guernsey sire,
of the sale was Dinsmore Anchor, from Dinsmore Dairy
of the sale was Dinsmore. The richly bred young bull is out
of the well-bred cow, Dinsmore Noble Ellen
and Dinsmore Juryman.
JULIAN WEBB, JR., Chipley, has just pur-
ERS chased the young Guernsey sire, May Max
Rudy, from E. Lee Stanton, Shipley. This
young bull is out of the cow, Minnie-Maxford
ds of milk and 784 and is sired by Bayou George Lad's Rudy.
de as a senior four-
ounds of milk and WILLIAM J. MATHESON, Stuart, has just
fat, made as a five- purchased Guernsey sire, Oakhurst Eastern
by Fairlawn Actor's Duke, from John W. Harms, Savannah, Ga.
This young bull is out of the well-bred cow,
CE, Coral Gables, has Oakhurst Eastern Dawn and Pine Manor
uernsey sire, Klimax King's Valor.
I & C. L. Dressel, Jr., MATHESON has also purchased the young
l is out of the cow, Guernsey sire, Oakhurst Valor's Governor,
nd is sired by Klon- from John W. Harms, Savannah, Ga. This
young bull is out of the cow, Oakhurst Palot-
NSON DAIRY, Dins- ta's Gippy and sired by Pine Manor King's
Ithe young Guernsey Valor.
eorge, from the C. L. BEACH & FISHBURN DAIRY, St. Peters-
re. The richly bred burg, has just purchased the young Guernsey
11-bred cow, Belmont sire, Sellers Farm Pet Flame, from L. H. Sel-
d Diana's Maxim of lers, St. Petersburg. This young bull is out
of the cow, Sellers Farm K. Beauty and is
arasota, has just pur- sired by Sellers Farm Impetus.
sey sire, Challenger's VELDA DAIRY FARM, Tallahassee, has
he Harold J. Brooks just purchased the young Guernsey sire, Han-
'oung bull is out of senarea Pharaoh's Victor, from Lawrence D.
dea Preeminent Dolly
Gretta's Challenger. (Continued on next page)







7000 Doctors Sample
Golden Guernsey Milk
Guernsey breeders were on the job
again when they arranged to serve
"Golden Guernsey" at the recent Annual
Meeting of the American Medical As-
sociation in New York. What did the
doctors say about the milk? The Guern-
sey sponsors of the sampling . report
that the common comments heard were:
"excellent" and "Where can I buy milk
like this at home?"

Guernsey Cattle Club Has
3000 Junior Members
The American Guernsey Cattle Club
has announced that 3,000 applications
for membership in the AGCC have been
received from American 4-H and FFA
boys and girls since the new Junior Di-
vision was started in June 1953.

National Dairy Farm Group
Proposes Self Help Plan
Members of the National Milk Pro-
ducers Federation voted November 12th
at their 1953 Annual Meeting in Hous-
ton, Texas to ask Congress to enact a
federal law providing for a National
Self-help and Self-financing plan for sta-
bilizing dairy prices and for handling
surpluses. The proposed plan would be
a substitute for the present government
(90% of Parity) price support program.
Under the proposed law, dairy farm-
ers would regulate their production to
provide adequate supplies of milk and
milk products and assume the losses, if
any, arising from the disposal of excess
production. The plan would involve the
passage of a Federal Dairy Control Law
to be administered by a Board consisting
of dairy farmers to be appointed by the
president.
The board would have the power to
set the level of price supports and to
make purchases of dairy products to
maintain that level. It would be given
broad powers to dispose of those prod-
ucts but could not sell them at less than
the current support prices. Any losses
sustained would be covered by assess-
ments levied by the Board on the milk
or butterfat sold by individual farmers.

GUERNSEY REGISTRY TESTS
(Continued from preceding page)
Hansen, South Valley, N. Y. This richly bred
young bull is out of the well-bred cow, Han-
senarea Salvele, that has a production record
of 11,358 pounds of milk and 507 pounds
of butterfat made as a junior two-year-old.
He is sired by Fra-Mar Pharaoh.
THE PERRET DAIRY, Dinsmore, has just
purchased the young Guernsey sire, Bodden's
Prince Everett, from C. L. Bodden, Dinsmore.
This young bull is out of the well-bred cow,
EX Jane's Nancy and Diana's Maxim of New
River.


and IT IS GOOD!
-mm -

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Get your hands into a bag of Spartan Quality Dairy, and
you'll agree "MAN, WHAT FEED!" You'll see those big,
Crimped Oats ...those Crunchy Pellets (contain fine
materials).., that tasty Beet Pulp and Wheat Bran...
all "cow-flavored" with fine-spray Molasses. Cows love
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--- -- -- "--- -- -


SPARTAN GRAIN & MILL CO.
GRAND CROSSING, FLORIDA
Phroni Jkk.- r,.on ll -1-2277


NOVEMBER & DECEMBER, 1953 23

























FLORIDA'S DAIRY MONTH QUEEN IS HONORED

AT SPECIAL JACKSONVILLE LUNCHEON MEETING

S, -.- JACKSONVILLE'S QUEEN
IS OFFICIAL HOSTESS
MISS JANE CLARDY of Ocala, Flor-
ida's 1953 Dairy Month Queen, was
royally received on the occasion of her
recent official visit to Jacksonville at a
special luncheon given in her honor in
the Rainbow Room at the George Wash-
\ ington Hotel.
The luncheon was sponsored by the
Dairy Month Committee of the Florida
Dairy Association of which Jack Dew
of Southern Dairies of Jacksonville is
Chairman. MISS CONNIE STEWART,
who was Jacksonville's 1953 Dairy
/' Month Queen and third in the State
Dairy Month Queen contest, served as
official hostess for the luncheon.
SEEN IN THE LARGE PICTURE
AT THE TOP OF THE PAGE, LEFT
TO RIGHT: Mrs. Arlen Jones, Director
of the Jacksonville Dairy Council; Miss
Gail Cartwright, Orlando, 1953 Dairy
Month Queen; Miss Stewart, Jacksonville
Queen; Miss Clardy, the Queen; Miss
Francis Layton, Miss Duval County of
1953; Mr. Jack Dew; Mr. Don Perret,
( Jacksonville's 1953 Dairy Month Chair-
man, and E. T. Lay, Executive Secretary
of the Florida Dairy Association.
IN THE PICTURE PANEL AT THE
LEFT ARE: TOP: The Queen, Miss
Clardy, offers a toast to the Florida Dairy
Industry; CENTER: A toast is given the
Queen by Senator Wayne Ripley, right,
and Representative Fletcher Morgan,
both of Jacksonville; BOTTOM: Two of
Florida's top Dairy Industry officials
.take part in honoring the State Queen,
Miss Clardy, center; the Orlando Queen,
Miss Cartwright, left; and the Jackson-
ville Queen, Miss Stewart. THE DAIRY-
MEN ARE, Left: Earl Johnson of Dins-
more Dairy Farms, Jacksonville and Pres-
(Continued on next page)







FLORIDA MILK SANITARIANS
IN NATIONAL ORGANIZATION
OFFICER AND COMMITTEE POSTS
The International Association of Milk
and Food Sanitarians, Inc., with which
the Florida Association of Milk Sanitar-
ians is affiliated, has announced the ap-
pointment of two well-known Florida
men to prominent committees and an-
other as Secretary-Treasurer of the or-
ganization.
Dr. H. H. Rothe, Gainesville, has been
appointed to serve on the nationally im-
portant committee on Communicable Dis-
eases Affecting Man. He has many years
of experience as Dairy Supervisor with
the Dairy Division of the Florida State
Department of Agriculture, which emi-
nently qualifies him for this assignment.
The immediate task of this committee is
the preparation of a reference manual
on disease outbreaks and control.
Mr. W. Howard Brown, Director of
Food and Laboratory Division, Jackson-
ville, has been reappointed to serve on
the Committee on Professional Develop-
ment. He has done outstanding work
on this committee which strives for pro-
fessional improvement and public recog-
nition of the important role of milk and
food sanitarians, whose work deals with
the safeguarding of the milk and food
supply.
Dr. H. H. Wilkowske, Assistant Dairy
Cow Technoligist, Florida Agricultural
Experiment Station, was reelected Secre-
tary-Treasurer of the International group
at the 40th annual meeting held in Lan-
sing, Michigan, in September. An offic-
ial of the Association states that these
appointments demonstrate that the South,
and especially Florida, is taking a leading
part in the development of improved
public health through better sanitation.
JACKSONVILLE QUEEN IS
OFFICIAL HOSTESS
(Continued from preceding page)
ident of the Florida Guernsey Cattle
Club; Will Nolan, Jr., of the Alpine
Dairy, Jacksonville, who is President of
the Florida Jersey Cattle Club.
SPECIAL GUESTS AT THE LUN-
CHEON INCLUDED:
Senator Wayne Ripley; Representative
Fletcher Morgan; Miss Pearl Lafitte,
Duval County Home Demonstration
Agent; Miss Edith Cameron and Miss
Gail Goodhue, 1953 Florida State win-
ners as Dairy Food Demonstration Team;
Miss Margaret Long, Home Demonstra-
tion Supervisor, Duval County Schools;
Miss Marjorie Morrison, Nutrition Con-
sultant, State Board of Health; Miss Pa-
tricia Ellis, Miss Mirriam Simmons, Vic-
tor Hanson and Robert Parisian, who
were memebres of Florida's 1953 4-H
Judging Team.
Also Mr. Fred Ragland, State Board
of Health; Miss Bertha Elliott, Florida
Milk Commission and Mrs. Joy Reese
Coleman of the Jacksonville Journal.


Dr. E. R. Smith Named
Jax Health Officer
The Jacksonville City Commission re-
cently named Dr. E. R. Smith as City
Health Officer to succeed Dr. W. W.
Rogers who retired. Dr. Smith has been
with the Florida State Board of Health
since 1949 as Director of the Division
of Nutrition and Diabetes Control.

Dairyman Is Kiwanis President
Philip S. Parham, Sales Manager of
Borden's Dairy, St. Petersburg, was re-
cently elected president of the St. Peters-
burg Kiwanis Club to take office Jan-
uary 4th.


ROT AND TERMITES can't live on
AL & T's pressure-treated fence posts.
Contact with damp soil causes un-
treated or "dipped" posts to decay in
a few years. Termites will attack
exposed posts in much of the South-
east. Pine fence posts pressure-treated
with A L & T's clean, salt-type pre-
servative, however, last many times
longer than untreated posts. All the


Dr. Fred Thomas, Sarasota

Heads Florida Veterinarians
The Florida Veterinary Medical Asso-
ciation elected Dr. Fred Thomas of Sara-
sota president of the organization for the
coming year at their 1953 Annual Meet-
ing held October 25 in St. Augustine.
Dr. Thomas succeeds Dr. Ronald Jackson
of St. Augustine.
Other officers elected are Dr. Jack
Knowles of Miami, Vice President; Dr.
Bob Knowles of Miami, Secretary; and
Dr. H. L. McGee of Sarasota, Treasurer.


wood is treated-not just the surface
-because A L & T uses pressure up
to 150 pounds per square inch. These
top-quality posts are clean, paintable,
odorless and can't harm livestock or
produce.
Here is a folder that tells you how
A L & T's clean-treated posts can save
money on your farm-ask your local
distributor for a copy or write to:


and Treating Co.
Graham Bldg., Jacksonville, Fla.
PRODUCERS OF
Protect all the wood-
not only the surface. W Ol
Insist on pressure- L ,
treated posts. IU


We've covered miles from here to there
In search of recreation.


THE ORIGINAL
anized
ASSURE jlEAiTED
ASt
nre r


But pressure-treated boards and posts
Mean nothing but starvation.



,2\\7 II


NOVEMBER & DECEMBER, 1953


American Lumber _
I AI TI'I ~ -


RUDOLPH ROT AND TOMMY TERMITE HAVE VACATION BLUES-


* 25







Two Lucky Palm Beach Dairymen


DISTRICT 4-H DAIRY SHOW


Win Pasture Enrollment Prizes & CONTEST HELD IN QUINCY


By C. W. REAVES
Extension Dairyman and Director Pasture Contest
Two handsome "Esquire Clock-Radios" offered by the Pasture Committee of
the Florida Dairy Association as enrollment prizes among the first 50 to enroll in
the State Pasture Contest were both won by Palm Beach County dairymen.
The winners were Curtis H. Hathcock, Hathcock Dairy, Lake Worth and R. M.
Goolsby, Goolsby Dairy, Lake Park.
Palm Beach County held a favored position in the drawing with 16 dairymen
enrolled among the first 50 in the State Contest.
The lucky names were drawn in the sale ring at the Annual Jersey Cattle Club
sale held in Jacksonville, October 1st. Mrs. W. J. Nolan, Jr., wife of the President


of the F. J. C. C. drew the names with
Association holding the hat.
Still Time To Enlist
In 1953 Contest
All dairymen are urged to sign up in
the Florida Better Dairy Pasture pro-
gram. The dairy pasture program is one
of the major Extension dairy projects in
the State for the coming year. The re-
cent high water which damaged pastures
in many areas has shown again the great
values of good pasture to profitable milk
production.
Making a record of practices followed,
costs of pastures and results for the cur-
rent year is a good way to plan for
better pastures in future years. Your coun-
tyagent has entry blanks and record
sheets for the 1953 Florida Better Dairy
Pasture program. Sign an entry blank
now and turn in the records on your
1953 pasture to your County Agent right
after the first of the year. A certificate
will be presented every dairyman who
scores as much as 75 per cent on his
pasture and forage program. Awards will
also be made to county and state winners.
Should you desire forms to aid you
arrive at your costs of providing pasture,
they may be secured by writing the Ex-
tension Dairyman at the University of
Florida. Keeping a record of costs of
pasture production and of the results se-
cured will enable you to better evaluate
the returns which you get for the in-
vestments in pasture. Also, efforts of
the dairy industry in providing as much
of the feed as possible through pasture
is good public relations from the stand-
point of showing the consuming public
that Florida dairymen are striving to use
efficient methods of milk production.
70 Now Entered
From 30 Counties
Seventy progressive dairymen from thirty
different counties have now officially en-
tered the 1953 State Dairy Pasture Contest.
These are as follows: ALACHUA, Harvey
B. Brown; BAY, Don Mowat; BROWARD,
R. G. Goolsby, A. F. McDavid; CALHOUN,
J. D. Fuqua, M. W. Eldridge, Donald Leon-
ard; CITRUS, M. A. Smith; COLUMBIA,
Floyd Crawford, C. M. Burks, Bennett Wat-
tles; DADE, Herman Boyd and Bob Hall,
Harriet Wilson, W. A. Graham; DUVAL,


Andy Lay, Secretary of the Florida Dairy


Walter Welkener; GADSDEN, W. L. Ford,
Frank DeBord; GLADES, F. D. Yaun;
GULF, E. C. Harden, Jr.; HENRY, W. V.
Bixby; HILLSBOROUGH, Julian Lane;
JACKSON, M. A. Schack, M. T. Crutchfield;
JEFFERSON, Wilmer Bassett; LAFAYETTE,
C. O. Shiver, L. C. Jackson, Marshall O'Steen,
R. A. Jackson, Bishop Jackson, 0. J. Van-
Landingham, J. L. Prine, R. R. Sapp, Delmar
Sapp; LAKE, Stin Haselton; MADISON, Ben
L. Waring; MANATEE, Val Massey; MAR-
TIN,W. J. Matheson; ORANGE, Bryan W.
Judge, Jr., Carroll L. Ward, Jr.; PALM
BEACH, Lloyd Benson, E. F. Froelich, R. M.
Goolsby, H. C. Hunt, George F. Johnson,
Dudley Kirton, E. G. Kirton, W. H. Kirton,
Earl Jensen, 0. C. Knuth, Curtis Hathcock,
L. V. Minear, J. Ford Rousseau, C. Stanley
Weaver, Marcus Weaver, V. E. Woodard,
W. P. Porter; PINELLAS, W. J. Casey;
POLK, Jacob G. Smith, Fletcher Gardner;
SARASOTA, E. V. Coleman, Cy Bispham;
ST. JOHNS, W. aul Simmons; SUWANNEE,
W. H. Goff; TAYLOR, Ira Landry; UNION,
I. B. Harrison; WASHINGTON, C. W. En-
finger, Lee Stanton, Roland Cope, Vernon
Kowitz, Glen Rooks, But Peterman.


Jerseys From Tennessee

R. A. Shearin, operator of the Hill-
top Dairy, Trenton, recently added 12
head of Tennessee Jersey cows to his
herd. Shearin also recently purchased
a purebred Guernsey bull. The Hilltop
Dairy produces about 140 gallons of milk
a day with 40 cows which is better than
the average of Florida milk production.


A 4-H Dairy Contest, which scores
the Club members not only on their pro-
ject animals but also on the improvement
made, the fitting and showmanship of
the animal, and the record book, has just
been completed in the six counties of
4-H District No. III in North Florida.
County shows and contests were held in
each of the six counties, namely: Madi-
son, Taylor, Jefferson, Leon, Gadsden
and Jackson.
The five members with the highest
over-all scores on the above points repre-
sented their county in the district contest
in competition with a like number of
members similarly selected from the other
counties.
The contest is sponsored by the Sears
Roebuck Foundation through the Talla-
hassee Sears Store, the State Department
of Agriculture, and other local sponsors.
The area contest was held in connection
with the Gadsden County Tobacco Festi-
val and Fair on October 15, 16 and 17.
A judging contest was the first order
of the day when the top ranking county
members came together on October 15,
the first day of the Fair. It was won by
Leon County's team, composed of Steve
Roberts, John Lauder, C. C. Sellers, Jr.,
and Jim Roberts, who made a total score
of 479 out of a possible 600 points.
Lloyd Rhoden and W. O. Wittle are
county agent and assistant county agent
respectively of this team.
Jackson County was a close runner-up,
with a team composed of Martin and
Charles Schack, Billy Joe Allen and Mil-
ton Pittman, with Jefferson County a
close third.
The high individual in the contest was
Mary Ann Godbold, of Tallahassee.
A Loving Cup is provided by Sears
Roebuck for the county with the highest
collective score of its five representatives
in the District Contest, judged on the
points mentioned above. This coveted
honor was won by Madison County. O.
R. Hamrick, Jr., county agent, has carried
out a very effective and fundamental
type of 4-H Dairy program in Madison
County during the year. Some twenty
dairy animals were purchased from Ten-
nessee in January in a cooperative pur-
chase with other North Florida counties.
These, along with other animals, gave a
large 4-H Dairy Club membership. The
members carried out a sound, practical
program of raising out dairy animals
under Mr. Hamrick's guidance and
supervision.
The members which represented Madi-
son County in the Area Contest were
Alvin Henderson, Edward Almand, Ar-
chie and Lonnie Davis and Joe Davis.
(Continued on next page)


26 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS





DISTRICT 4-H SHOW
(Continued from preceding page)
Jefferson, Leon and Gadsden counties
followed Madison in the order named.
High individual scorers were Ernest Sel-
lers of Leon County with 91.8%; Martin
Schack of Jackson County with 91.4%;
and Anna Lois Clark, Gadsden County,
with 90.2%.
The highest score given on an animal
was given on the Junior Yearling Jersey
heifer, shown by Martin Schack of Jack-
son County.
The judges of the various items were
as follows: Record Books, state 4-H
Boys' Club Agent W. W. Brown; Show-
manship, District Agricultural Agent W.
J. Platt, Jr.; Fitting, M. C. Futch of
Florida State University's Dairy Depart-
ment; Animals, Extension Dairyman C.
W. Reaves. W. W. Brown was in charge
of the judging contest. Agents in charge
of their respective county's exhibits also
helped with the contest. Those were A.
G. Driggers and Bernard H. Clark,
County Agent and Assistant County
Agent of Gadsden County; W. W.
Glenn, Jackson County; Albert H. Odom,
Jefferson County; Lloyd Rhoden and W.
O. Whittle, county agent and assistant
county agent of Leon County; O. R.
Hamrick, Jr., Madison County; and S.
C. Kierce, Taylor County.

Belser Foremost Distributor
In DeFuniak Springs Area
M. N. Belser has been appointed Fore-
most Milk Distributor for DeFuniak
Springs, Florida. Belser has been with
Foremost for the past four years in Co-
lumbus, Georgia and Chipley, Florida.


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NOVEMBER & DECEMBER, 1953


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Is New AJCC Member
The C. C. Sellers Dairy, breeder of
registered Jersey cattle at Tallahassee, has
been named a member of the American
Jersey Cattle Club according to an an-
nouncement from the AJCC headquarters
in Columbus, Ohio.
The American Jersey Cattle Club is
America's oldest dairy breed organiza-
tion. It was organized in 1868 to keep
pedigree records of Jersey cattle and to
improve and promote the Jersey breed.


SHere's Why

its w

FLORIDA

SFavorite Fertilizer
S FOR MORE THAN 20 YEARS Florida Fav-
orite Fertilizer, Inc. has produced ferti- l h
lizers to the specific requirements of
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and Florida crops, this know-how brings
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S.. COMMERCIAL MIXED FERTILIZERS AND UNPROCESSED FE
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23 Years of Progress
In Fertilizer Business

From its beginning in 1930 as a local
operation with a production of 5,000
tons of commercial fertilizer, Florida
Favorite Fertilizer, Inc., increased its
volume to 45,000 tons for the 1952-53
market season. The Lakeland manufac-
turing firm came under new manage-
ment December 1, 1946, when the pres-
ent corporation was formed. Operations
of the company are under the direction
of W. H. Stuart, president; J. K. Stuart,
vice-president; M. A. Cook, secretary-
treasurer; E. F. Murray, general manager;
J. E. Palmer, plant superintendent and
Paul S. Keith, office manager.
Florida Favorite Fertilizer, Inc., specia-
lizes in commercial fertilizers and un-
processed fertilizer material for all varie-
ties of field crops, pasture grasses and
citrus groves. General manager Murray
said a feature of the firm's facilities is
the formulation of fertilizer mixtures
geared to actual requirements of individu-
al consumers. "Our years of experience
with Florida soils and Florida crops
places us in a position to produce specific
types of fertilizer for definite require-
ments," Murray explained.
Complete field service, with major
portion of deliveries effected by a fleet of
15 truck and trailer units direct to point
of consumption, is described as another
Florida Favorite Fertilizer feature. This
delivery service is coordinated with
users' spreading requirements for time-
saving efficiency.
Field service personnel includes G. D.
Bishop, R. M. Marler, Jr., and Earl Mc-
Bride for the Lakeland area; Walter
Burt, Brooksville; E. B. Mann, Clermont;
J. W. and E. B. Hadley, Bradenton.
With executive offices and factory lo-
cated in Lakeland, Florida Favorite Ferti-
lizer, Inc., markets its products through-
out central and south Florida.


28 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


"-


The above picture of the North Florida Dairy Tech Club iti their October meeting indicates
the continued interest which this new organization within the dairy industry has maintained
since its formation about a year ago. Monthly dinner meetings of the group are held.
C_ C Sellpr l Dnirv


-I






Large Dairy Cattle Shipment
To Land O'Sun Dairy Miami
On October 16th the Land O'Sun
Dairy, Miami and Miami Beach, received
one of the largest shipments of dairy
cattle ever brought into the state at one
time. The herd of 213 Holsteins came
from Wausau, Wisconsin, and were said
to have been the largest single shipment
of dairy cattle ever shipped from the
town.

FEDERAL FLOOD AID SOUGHT
(Continued from page 7)
After consideration of further infor-
mation, five central Florida counties have
been strongly recommended by the Flor-
ida State Committee to be included in
the disaster area. These were heavily pas-
tured live stock counties of Volusia,
Orange, Sumter, Osceola and Polk.
Flood Aid Available
Aid to farmers and livestock owners
under the federal disaster relief act (P.
L. 875) is in the form of low interest
(3%) loans for repairing the damage
of heavy rainfall, winds and floods.
These loans are available for the purchase
of livestock, for reseeding and fertiliz-
ing pastures, replacing equipment, build-
ings, etc.
Livestock feeds are made available at
greatly reduced prices through the Unit-
ed States Department of Agriculture pro-
gram which takes feed from stocks of
commodity credit corporation storehouses.
Hay Program Approved
Flood relief to livestock owners through
reduced hay costs was approved by U.S.
D.A. officials at a meeting with Gover-
nor Johns, representatives of the State
Flood Relief Committee and representa-
tives of the Dairy Industry held in the
Governor's office Friday, December 4th.
L. K. Nicholas, Jr., Administrator of the
Florida Milk Commission, and E. T. Lay,
Director of the Florida Dairy Association,
represented the dairy industry.
The program approved and which will
be operative within a few days provides
for re-imbursement to livestock owners
who qualify with their county commit-
tee, of 50% of the transportation cost
on hay purchased or $10.00 per ton,
whichever is the smaller amount. If
transportation companies approve a U.S.
D.A. request to grant a 50% reduction
in rates for floor-relief hay, as they have
done in the case of drought relief, the
savings on hay will be about one-fourth
more. U.S.D.A. spokesmen were optimis-
tic about approval for this additional aid.
Where To Apply
All information as to what aid is
available and how to proceed to apply
for it should be in the hands of all
county farm agents in counties included
in the disaster area.


Through the Years
it has been our pleasure
to play host to the

FLORIDA DAIRY INDUSTRY
We take this opportunity to extend to one and all

R lery tRerry Christmas
And a Bright and Successful 1954.



THE KLOEPPEL HOTELS
ROBERT KLOEPPEL, President
ROBERT KLOEPPEL, JR., V. P. and Gen'l Mgr.


HOTEL MAYFLOWER
Jacksonville


NEW HOTEL JEFFERSON
Jacksonville


HOTEL GEORGE WASHINGTON
JACKSONVILLE


HOTEL PENNSYLVANIA
West Palm Beach


HOTEL GEORGE WASHINGTON
West Palm Beach


IL '


The Manufacturers and Distributors of



Great Dane Trailers



Salute the



Florida Dairy Industry


With Best Wishes for Another Successful Year


great


SAVANNAH, GEORGIA


NOVEMBER & DECEMBER, 1953


-


I I


* 29


Ss;T

















Jersey Breeders Hold Annual Sale

And Annual Meeting In Jacksonville

The 13th Annual Florida Jersey Cattle Club Sale and 1953 Annual Meeting
were held in Jacksonville, September 30th and October 1st. This was the first time
the Annual Sale has been held in Jacksonville. County Agent Jim Watson says the
new Duval County 4-H Club Show building and Livestock pavilion can be credited
with bringing the sale to Jacksonville. The Jersey Sale was the first event to be held
in the new building.
Forty-nine registered Jersey heifers, cows and bulls from the best Jersey herds
of the Southeast were sold for a total of $12,095.00. Three animals brought the top
price of $400, and one for $390, one for $360 and one for $350. The average price
of $248.87 was considered verygood considering the large number of young animals
which were consigned.
The largest purchases were made by Wallace Stevens, Ft. Lauderdale (10);
J. K. Stuart, Bartow (6); Leonard Hooks, Jacksonville (6); Warren Hawkins, St.
Clodc (5), and Dr. O. E. Harrell, Jacksonville (4).


The sale committee was composed of
Walter Welkener, Jacksonville, Chair-
man; C. W. Reaves, State Extension
Dairyman, U. of F.; J. K. Stuart, Bar-
tow; M. T. Crutchfield, Marianna; and
Lloyd Warren. Lawrence Gardiner was
announcer and Tom McCord, auctioneer
for the sale.

BEST-GROOMED TROPHY
Mrs. Walter Welkener of the Holly
Hilly Dairy, Jacksonville, and the only
woman to compete, won the J.C.C.
Trophy for having the best fitted animal
in the sale.


ANNUAL JERSEY CATTLE CLUB SALE
PICTURES ON THIS PAGE, ALL TAKEN
AT THE SALE EXCEPT NO. 3. TOP
PANEL, (1) Hugh Adams, prominent Duval
County dairyman and President of the Jack-
sonville Dairy Council, his daughter and
Arthur Thien, also a well known Duval
County dairyman. (2) 1. J. Pemberton, owner
Clay County Farms, wearing hat, Sam Wuhl,
Mrs. Pemberton, left, their daughter Alicia.
Mrs. Harvey Smith. (3) Mr. and Mrs. Carl
Rieker, newly married Duval County Dairy
couple at the J. C. C. Annual Banquet. (4)
M. T. Crutchfield and M. A. Schack, promi-
nent dairymen of Marianna. (5) DuPont
Magill and Ben Skinner, Jr., Duval County
Jersey breeders.

PANEL AT LEFT: (1) Officers of the
F.J.C.C. all re-elected are; L. to R.: A.
T. Alvarez, Vice-Pres.; William Nolan, Jr.,
Pres.; and Fred Baetzman, Secy. (2) Dr. R.
B. Becker, U. of F., presents F.J.C.C. Annual
production award trophy to Mr. and Mrs.
Walter Welkener, Holly Hilly Dairy, lack-
sonville. (3) Duval County Agent Jim Wat-
son receives a "Model Jersey" from president
Wm. Nolan, Jr. (4) Dr. Sidney Marshall,
U. of F., presents the F.J.C.C. trophy for the
best fitted animal at the sale to Mrs. Walter
Welkener. (5) Paul Thornhill, Winter Haven.


ANNUAL MEETING HELD


The Annual Business Beeting of the
Florida Jersey Cattle Club was held dur-
ing the afternoon of September 30th and
the Annual Banquet, the evening of the
same date, both at the Hotel Seminole.
About 75 members and guests attended
the Annual Banquet which was marked
with the usual good fellowship and little
speech making. Honored guests were
Dr. R. B. Becker, Dr. Sidney Marshall
and Prof. P. T. Dix Arnold of the Dairy
Department, University of Florida; for-
mer Duval County Farm Agent Albert
Lawton; and Duval County Commission-
ers Joe Hammond, Joe Burnett and J. B.
Mallard, who had made the new 4-H
Club Pavalion building available for the
Sale.
The F.J.C.C. Annual Award for the
highest producing registered Jersey under
H.I.R. Test for 1952 was presented to
the D. & B. School Dairy, St. Augustine.
The Annual Award to the Jersey herd
with the highest average production went
to the Holly Hill Dairy, Jacksonville,
whose 61-cow herd made an average
record of 8,946 lbs. of milk-5.4%-
479 lbs. butterfat, under H.I.R. test for
1952.

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS ELECTED

Officers and Directors of the F.J.C.C.
elected at the Annual Meeting were an-
nounced and installed at the Annual Ban-
quet. Directors are :Wm. Nolan, Jr.,
A. T. Alvarez, Brightman Skinner, Wal-
ter Welkener, Dr. R. B. Becker, J. J.

(Continued on next page)


1 Y

; *.. -





1I*F



-4 i


&


JERSEY REGISTRY TESTS ANNOUNCED FOR FLORIDA


The American Jersey Cattle Club has re-
cently announced the following official regis-
try tests in Florida registered Jersey herds.
The AJCC states that all records uere made
under the superivsion of the University of
Florida and reported to the AJCC for ap-
proval and publication.
The individual ratings of Excellent, Very
Good, Good Plus, Good, Fair, and Poor are
given to Jersey animals according to the ex-
cellence of the breed type. The numerical
rating of 83.15% is the average for all ani-
mals classified in the Jersey breed.

W. J. NOLAN, ALPINE DAIRY, Jack-
sonville-Xenia Nancy, a registered Jersey
cow, has been rated a Tested Dam for having
three offspring with official production
records. The three tested projeny may be
either three tested daughters, or three tested
sons, or any combination thereof totaling
three.
THE W. J. NOLAN DAIRY, Jackson-
ville-197 Animals of the Nolan Dairy were
recently classified by AJCC for type, showing
6 Excellent, 75 Very Good, 9? Good Plus,
and 22 Good, making an average score of
84.16%.
B. W. JUDGE DAIRY, Orlando-Regis-
tered Jersey cow Fancy Eva recently completed
a 305-day Herd Improvement Registry pro-
duction record of 8,938 lbs. of milk contain-
ing 457 lbs. of butterfat at the age of 2
years and 4 months.


JERSEY SALE
(Continued from preceding page)
Smith, Carlos Griggs, Frank DeBord, M.
T. Crutchfield, J. Minear, and C. C.
Sellers. Win. Nolan, Jr., president; A.
T. Alvarez, vice-president; and Fred
Baetzman, secretary, were all reelected.
Jim Watson, Duval County Farm
Agent, who acted as chairman of arrange-
ments for the sale as well as master of
ceremonies for the annual banquet, was
presented with an official American Jer-
sey Cattle Club desk model of the typical
Jersey cow.

PURCHASERS AT JERSEY SALE

Those making purchases at the sale,
other than those mentioned above, were:
M. T. Crutchfield, Altha; A. O. Martin,
Apopka; C. L. Massey, Pavo, Ga.; F. D.
Magill, Grand Crossing; D. A. Sails,
Clearwater; R. E. Gordon, Jacksonville;
J. F. Braun, Jacksonville; M. A. Schack,
Greenwood; Mowat Dairy, Lynn Haven;
Hal Adams, Jacksonville; C. C. Sellers,
Tallahassee; and Clay County Farms,
Middleburg.


POLK COUNTY DAIRY, Bartow-Regis-
tered cow Basil Jester Design recently com-
pleted a Herd Improvement Registry produc-
tion record of 10,508 lbs. of milk containing
558 lbs. of butterfat at the age of 6 years
and 6 months.
SKINNER'S MEADOWBROOK FARMS,
Jacksonville-was recently classified for breed
type, rating thirty-three animals Very Good,
33 Good Plus and 6 Good. The herd showed
an average score of 84.38% on 72 animals.
WELKENER'S HOLLY HILL DAIRY,
Jacksonville-Sybil Pompey Trixy, a registered
Jersey cow at the age of 4 years and 2 months
completed a production record of 4,531 quarts
of milk in 305 days.
WELKENER'S HOLLY HILL DAIRY-
Also had four registered Jersey cows to com-
plete production records which entitle them
to special recognition from the American Jer-
sey Cattle Club. Observer Design Ramona,
the high producing animal of the group, had
a mature record of 13,804 lbs. of milk con-
taining 642 lbs. of butterfat at the age of 9
years and 1 month. The other cows all ex-
ceeded 550 lbs. butterfat on a twice-daily-
milking, 305-day mature equivalent basis.
WELKENER'S HOLLY HILL DAIRY-
Also has a registered Jersey cow, X. Standard
Ivy Elaine, which has been rated a Tested
Dam by AJCC. The cow's projeny averaged
7,583 lbs. milk with 451 lbs. butterfat, on a
twice-daily-milking, 305-day mature equivalent
basis.
THE WELKENER HERD of 92 animals
were recently classified for type rating 16
Excellent, 52 Very Good, 21 Good Plus, and
3 Good. The average numerical rating is
86.94%.
THE WELKENER DAIRY has also re-
ceived an eighth GOLD STAR HERD
AWARD after completing another year on
Official Herd Improvement testing. The Gold
Star recognition is for unusually high produc-
tion over a four-year period. Last year Wel-
kener's 72 cows had an average production of
8,362 lbs. milk containing 451 lbs. butterfat.
Over the past four years Welkener has had
an average of 60 cows in the herd producing
8,883 lbs. of milk containing 481 lbs. butter-
fat apiece.
TOP-Left to Right: (1) Will Nolan,
Jr., Pres. F.J.C.C., and Bertha Nolan Mor-
gan, Office Manager of Alpine Dairy Co.
(2) C. L. Massey with heifer loaded for
journey to Pavo, Georgia. (3) J. K. Stuart,
Bartow. (51 1. J. Smith, Polk County Farm,
Barto'. (6) Carlos Griggs, Summerfield Dairy.

PANEL AT RIGHT: (1) A partial view of
Duval County new 4-H Club Livestock and
Show Pavalion and Jerseys awaiting their turn
in the auction ring. (2) A view of the auction
ring with the sale in progress. (3) Record
clerks for the Sale: Dorothy Alford, Dr. R. B.
Becker and Prof. Dix Arnold, both of the
U. of F. Dairy Department. (4) The lunch
counter in the corner of the Sale Pavilion and
ladies of the Hogan Home Demonstration
Club who provided it. (5) Lawrence Gardi-
ner, announcer, left, and Tom McCord, auc-
tioneer of the Sile.


J
-


b W





.~r I


i







1953 NATIONAL CONVENTIONS

TOP ATTENDANCE RECORD
Boston proved to be a popular convention site for the 1953 (46th) Annual
Conventions of the Milk Industry Foundation and the (48th) International Asso-
ciation of Ice Cream Manufacturers Annual Convention held October 26-30. Both
organizations reported the largest attendance on record for a non-equipment
exhibition year.
The 1954 conventions will return to Atlantic City and will include the giant
dairy supplies and equipment exhibition sponsored every other year by the National
Dairy Industry Supply Association.
The Florida Dairy Industry had its usual quota in attendance. Alf Nielsen,
President, Alfar Creamery, West Palm Beach and Paul E. Reinhold, President, Fore-
most Dairies, participated in the Directors' meetings of the Milk Foundation, while
Reinhold and Theo Datson, Manager, Borden's, Orlando, attended the Directors'
sessions of I.A.I.C.M.
The heart of these two fast moving nicians and executives.
and hard working conventions, which Among the outstanding addresses on
use identical program plans, are the the two programs were those of Mr.
technical sessions with which the meet- Ernest Baughman of the Federal Reserve
ings are divided, although the joint Bank of Chicago on "The Economic Po-
session of the two organizations, which sition of the Dairy Industry Today and
occupies one full day of the program, Tomorrow," and of Mr. John H. Davis,
and the joint annual banquet are always Assistant U. S. Secretary of Agriculture.
very outstanding in interest and enthusi- Mr. Baughman pictured the American
asm with powerful and important ad- dairy industry as being on sound eco-
dresses by nationally recognized leaders. nomic footing in spite of the present de-
The so-called technical or laboratory ses- dine in butter consumption and pre-
sions covering the whole field of milk dicted a sound future because of the basic
and ice cream operation problems supply nature of dairy products in the human
to the delegate who is seeking informa- diet and the constantly increasing popu-
tion, the experience and views of the lation and increased need for these
nation's most successful dairy plant tech- products.


ANDY LAY, Executive Director of the
Florida Dairy Association, receives a hearty
greeting as he registered for the International
Association of Ice Cream Manufacturers Con-
vention at the Hotel Statler. Boston.

Mr. Davis predicted the gradual de-
velopment of a sounder agricultural
economy in the country as a whole and
improved governmental agricultural poli-
cies and programs.
The preview of the 1954 "Milk and
Ice Cream Festival" sales promotion pro-
gram, as presented by the hard hitting
spokesmen for the three national spon-
soring associations, was an eye-opener
and a real challenge to all who heard it,
and who wish to keep up with the sales
promotion procession.


32 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


Increase Milk Production


...The ECONOMICAL WAY!


"It's cheaper to feed out of a fertilizer bag than a feed bag". Yes,
rich green pastures are the secret of increasing milk production to meet
the demands of today's market! See your NACO representative .. he's
an expert on fertilization and can help you keep your pasture a green,
fast-growing and palatable one! Turn to NACO to help you produce
more milk the economical way!




NA O FERTILIZER COMPANY


Jacksonville, Florida Ft. Pierce, Florida

MANUFACTURERS OF FIVE STAR FERTILIZERS








THE

FLORIDA DAIRY ASSOCIATION

ANNOUNCES
ADDITIONAL 1953 MEMBERSHIP DUES RECEIVED


(First list published in July-Auqust issue)


Adams, C. R., Dairy
Anderson, H. D., Dairy
Bayside Farms Dairy
Bassett Dairies
Beacon Farms Dairy
Big Oak Dairy, Plant City
Bishop, V. E., Dairy
Beach Park Dairy
Click, D. C., Dairy
Coble Dairy Products, Inc
Coody, C. A., Dairy
Fennell's Dairy
Goff, W. H., Dairy
Gustafson's Dairy
Green Valley Dairy
Hammond, A. L., Dairy
Hammond, W. L., Dairy
Harmony Hill Farm Dairy
Hathcock, C. H., Dairy
Hillsboro Dairy, Inc.
Hadden, J. M., Dairy
Hull, L. B., Dairy
Holbrook, J. T., Dairy
Kirton, Dudley, Dairy
L. & L. Dairy
Lakeview Dairy
McAteer, S. R., Dairy
Mora, E. M., Dairy
McClellan, H. F., Dairy
Nesbon Dairy
Odom, Leroy, Dairy
Owens, Thos., Dairy
Parramore's Dairy
Peacock, Drew, Dairy
Penn, I. L., Dairy
Pipkin, R. O., Dairy
Sheffield, Leslie, Dairy
Stebbins, E. L., Dairy
Swiss Dairy
Sunnybrook Creamery
Southern Dairies,
Jacksonville
Southern Dairies,
Tampa & St. Pete
Southern Dairies, Miami
Southern Dairies, W.P.B.
Sorenson, Hans, Dairy
Spooner, E. E., Dairy
St. Andrews Bay Dairy
Stacey, Ralph, Dairy
Stephens, M. A., Dairy
Steele, B. R., Dairy
Stewart's Dairy
Stone, Ben & Son Dairy
Sunnybrook Dairy No. 1
Sunnybrook Dairy No. 2
Sunnybrook Dairy, Inc.
Stuckey, W. A., Dairy
Sunday, E. C. & A. E.,
Sunday, E. V., Dairy
Sunset Dairy
Superior Ice Cream
Stinson, Chester, Dairy
Tarte, M. W., Dairy


Thien, A. B., Dairy
Thomas, W. B., Dairy
Thornhill, Norlee, Dairy
Tower Dairy
Trail Dairy
Tucker, S. T., Dairy
Taylor, J. S., Dairy
Thomas, C. W., Dairy
Turner, Bert, Dairy
.Tyre, Warren G., Dairy
Tyson, J. H., Dairy
Urban, Fred, Dairy
Valrico Dairy
Van Landingham, J. C.,
Dairy
Van Pelt, J. L., Dairy
Velda Dairy Products
SVelda Dairy Farm
Vernon, Don, Dairy
Vero Beach Dairy
Vernon, Wm., Dairy
Vidak, Walter, Dairy
Vucovich, Clinton, Dairy
Walden, J. E., Dairy
Walters, E. M., Dairy
Ward, E. C., Dairy
Wells, C. J. Stock Farm
Wakefield, W. H., Dairy
Waters, W. T., Dairy
Welch, Dorothy, Dairy
White, W. R., Dairy
Wiederkehr, Hans, Jr.,
Welles, W. G., Dairy
Waters, W. D., Dairy
Wharff-Downs Dairy
White Belt Dairy
Whitehurst Dairy
Whitfield Bros. Dairy
Whitfield, Wilson, Dairy
Wickersham, G. R., Dairy
Wilson, J. P., Dairy
Wimmer, John W., Dairy
Williams, D. L., Dairy
Wiggins, W. C., Dairy
Williamson, Bert, Dairy
Wise, Macon, Dairy
Wise, Frank, Dairy
Woodbery Dairy
Wooten, J. E., Dairy
York, D. W., Dairy
ADDITIONAL ALLIED
TRADES
Batavia Body Company
Clinton Foods, Inc.
Dari-Tech Products Corp.
Diamond Alkali Chemical Co.
Diversey Corporation
Germantown Mfg. Co.
Groff G.M.C. Trucks, Inc.
Helm Sanitation Chemicals
Howard Feed Mills
John H. Mulholland Co.
Pasco Packing Co.
The Rodar Company
C. F. Sauer Co.
Smith-Lee Co., Inc.


SORI


I A eW


For speCie
Ilearest 0



Removes mill
Cleans equipment
Lowers bacteria
Deodoriz

Reduces labor-
milk, fat and scu
Thermodurics (h

Saves money-
lower than the p

More pleasant
and non-chafing
cows' teats. Deod

Increases efficie
cause hardening
ber equipment. A
IT. M.'S REG. U. 5. PAT. OFF ORTHO


11V





I introduc
RTHO De




stone
thorough
a count
es

time one
m off-an
eat-resists

the cost c
products it

to use. P
to the hb
lorizes as

ncy of mi
or corrosi
actually le


SCIENTIFIC PEST CONTROL


WISI I

0 *



toVfY offer see YOU-
alet or write direct

-SM
















replaces.

proven to be non-irritating
ends of the operator and
on on eith-er me tal or
--












-fThe ORTHO-SAN formulause it getshe
d kills bacteria-especially
ant bacteria)-all at once!

mf using ORTHO-SAN is
replaces.

roven to be non-irritating
hands of the operator and
it sanitizes.

Iking machines. Does not
on on either metal or rub-
ngthens life of equipment.


The ORTHO-SAN formula is the
result of over 1500 field experi-
ments. Test ORTHO-SAN to your
own satisfaction and you'll
never be without it!
CALIFORNIA
SPRAY-CHEMICAL Corp.
P. O. Box 1231
ORLANDO, FLORIDA


NOVEMBER & DECEMBER, 1953 33










































ALL THIS
AND SAVE
MONEY,TOO!
0 hdewd.." t a
S.fld-0
"IH
SW". ft., hI

* Ii.4.a.Iy....d.tq
W t9m. Ilk, a k.if.

pdI 6. 11d
.1 .1m~ .P.I
I El- .d Wd.l. d.,
.Wd d-I.
U lp. sap NIka.ta
*6Il
5 FULL~lh
POUNDSI

'THI ECOOMY


Order Diversey

PEPTEX
from your Hauler
Tomorrow Morning
FOR SURE


THE DIVERaEY CORPORATION
J. P. Boyce
519 E. Giddens, Tampa, Florida
E. E. Fulton
P. O. Box 374, Jacksonville 1, Florida
J. E. Orris
200 N.W. 129th Street, Miami 38, Florida
G. Wrenshall
3207 Riverside Ave., Jacksonville, Florida


NEWS

DIGEST


6 DIVCO
MODELS
SPECIALLY ENGINEERED
for
MILK DELIVERY
since 1927
THE TIME TESTED TRUCK
FAMOUS
for LONG LIFE
and LOW COST
OPERATION




PARTS AND SERVICE
Assured at

Groff G. M. C. Trucks,
Inc.
1838 W. Beaver, Jacksonville
Phone 4-2361


DIVCO NOW PRODUCING
REFRIGERATED MILK TRUCKS

A rapidly increasing trend toward use
of insulated and refrigerated home de-
livery milk route trucks is an important
step forward in providing American fam-
ilies with wholesome pure milk. The
Divco Corporation, Detroit manufactur-
ers of the famous Divco route trucks,
now announce production of a complete
line of these trucks in the 115 in. wheel-
base and the 1271/2 in. wheelbase models.
These are now available with insulated
bodies only, and also equipped with a
34 horsepower compressor mounted in
the truck, or couplings for use of am-
monia. The compressor is designed for
plugging into the plant power line, while
the ammonia system requires ample cen-
tral refrigeration capacity, with suffic-
ient parking facilities for connecting the
ammonia lines. The trucks are loaded
during the evening, the compressor, or
ammonia placed in operation and by
morning the holdover plates in the cold
chamber have brought the temperature
down to the desired point where the
load is maintained at health protecting
levels all during daytime delivery to cus-
tomer's homes. These models are now
on Divco's regular production schedules,
the company reports.
John Pierce, factory representative for
Divco Corporation, is proud to announce
the recent appointment of the following
Florida dealers: Groff GMC Trucks,
Inc., Jacksonville; Equipco, Inc., Miami
and Tampa; and Acme Auto Service,
Orlando.


Dairy Advertising Campaign
Aimed At Adult Consumers

Lester J. Will, manager of the Amer-
ican Dairy Association, Chicago, declared
in a recent address at a dairy confer-
ence that there is conclusive evidence
that the new advertising program of ADA
will substantially change the nation's milk
drinking habits.
As a result of trial advertising pro-
grams conducted last summer, a new
campaign slanted at adults will soon get
under way. Mr. Wills stated that the
test campaign indicated that adults, who
constitute more than 65% of the popula-
tion, offer a great potential for increased
sales.


34 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


BROCHURE EXPLAINS
LO-TEMP EVAPORATION

A new, colorful brochure containing
full details of its internationally known
LO-Temp Evaporator has just been re-
leased by Mojonnier Bros. Co., Chicago.
It features a full-color diagrammatic flow
chart showing the complete indirect ther-
mo-compression or secondary recompress-
ion evaporation process, and discusses its
application to concentration of milk at
low temperatures. A copy may be ob-
tained by writing for Bulletin 300, Mo-
jonnier Bros. Co., 4601 W. Ohio Street,
Chicago 44, Illinois.


NEW OAKITE HANDBOOK
ON DAIRY CLEANING

"What to Use for Dairy Cleaning" is
the title of a new, completely revised
handbook on dairy sanitation recently
published by Oakite Products, Inc., manu-
facturers of specialized cleaning and
allied materials.
This compact, well illustrated, 28-page
booklet discusses such recent develop-
ments as in-place cleaning and hot spray
cleaning. It describes such new equip-
ment as the Oakite Rotary Sprayer, which,
placed on the tank floor or suspended
from the tank dome, delivers cleaning
spray under pressure through six care-
fully positioned nozzles on a rotating
head-and the Oakite Foam Unit, which
converts truckwashing solution into a
lather and delivers it to the truck sur-
faces through a long-handled gun.
The handbook also discusses methods
of cleaning processing equipment, remov-
ing milkstone, sanitizing equipment, etc.
Copies of the booklet are available with-
out charge by request on your company
letterhead to Oakite Products, Inc., 1230
Rector Street, New York 6, N. Y.













Florida Dairy Association
ALLIED TRADE MEMBERS
Special Advertising Section

ADAMS PACKING ASSN., INC.
Citrus Pulp, Citrus Meal, Citrus Molasses
Jim Coates, Sales Mgr., By-Products Div.
Auburndale, Fla. Phone 8-7061

AMICA-BURNETT CHEM. &
SUPPLY CO.
Dairy Equipment and Supplies
Phone 4-5606
P. O. Box 2328, Jacksonville, Fla.

CHARLES DENNERY, INC.
New Orleans
Ice Cream Coating, Fruits and Flavors
Ira Stone-602 W. Belmar St.
LAKELAND, FLA.

DIAMOND ALKALI COMPANY
Dairy Cleaner & Alkali
Florida Distributors:
Miller Machinery & Supply, Jax.
Industrial Chem. & Supply Co.,
Tampa

GENERAL MILLS, INC.
Dairy Equipment and Supplies
John W. Manning, Phone 48-1703
2515 Galiano St. Coral Gables, Fla.

GULF PAPER COMPANY, INC.
Ice Cream (Linerless) Cartons,
Butter Cartons
J. H. McVoy
50 E. Magnolia St., Pensacola, Fla.

DOUGLAS J. HEADFORD
FLA. REPRESENTATIVE
Green Spot Orangeade Concentrate
Krim-Ko Chocolate Flavorings
616 Jessamine Ave.-Phone 2-0148
Daytona Beach, Fla.

HELM SANITATION CHEMICALS
HANS B. AHLEFELDT
Phone 3-5721
Union Terminal Warehouse
Jacksonville, Fla.

JIM JENNINGS
MFRS. REPRESENTATIVE
Morning Glory Low Fat Milk Solids
The Vernon Company-Specialty Advertising
Route 9, Box 356, Jacksonville, Fla.

ROBERT A. JOHNSTON CO.
Dairy Chocolate & Cocoa Products
J. L. Hammons
916 S. Rome Ave., Tampa, Fla.

KIECKHEFER CONTAINER CO.
Pure-Pak Paper Milk Bottles
R. J. Evans-M. A. Knowles
Phone 6-1334
4700 Pearl St., Jacksonville, Fla.


WHEN THINGS GO WRONG


WHEN THINGS GO WRONG,
as they sometimes will,
When the road you're trudging
seems all up hill,
When the funds are low and
the debts are high,
And you want to smile,
but you have to sigh,
when care is pressing you
down a bit,
Rest, if you must,
But don't you quit.

Life is queer with its
twists and turns,
As everyone of us
sometimes learns,
And many a failure turns about
When he might have won
had he stuck it out;
So don't give up,
though the pace seems slow-
For you may succeed
with another blow.

Often the goal is nearer than
It seems to a faint
and faltering man,
Often the struggler
has given up,
When he might have captured
the victor's cup.
And he learned too late,
when the night slipped down
How close he was to the
golden crown.

Success is failure
turned inside out-
The silver tint of the
clouds of doubt-
And you never can tell
how close you are,
It may be near
when it seems afar;
So stick to the fight
when you're hardest hit-
It's when things seem worst
that you mustn't quit.


PROMOTES FRENCH ICE CREAM

Foremost Dairies, Inc., Jacksonville, is
launching an extensive advertising and
promotional campaign to introduce its
new French Ice Cream pint package.
Maurice Clifford, Sales Manager for
Foremost, says the campaign will employ
newspaper, radio and magazine adver-
tising, as well as point of sale displays
and other media.


NOVEMBER &


Florida Dairy Association
ALLIED TRADE MEMBERS
Special Advertising Section

S. H. MAHONEY EXTRACT CO.
Vanilla Products
D. C. Mulligan, Florida Representative
221 E. Cullerton Rd., Chicago 16, 11.

NASH-KELVINATOR CORPN.
ICE CREAM CABINETS
Wm. C. Mayfield
Howell House--Suite 202-Atlanta, Ga.

NATIONAL PECTIN PRODUCTS Co.
Ice Cream Stabilizers & Emulsifiers
Pectin Stabilizers for Ices, Sherbets & Fruits
J.C. Head, Phone Norfolk, Va. 63-3939
RFD No. 1, Box 48, Bayside, Va.

NEWTH-MORRIS BOX CORPN.
Ice Cream, Popsicle, and
Miscellaneous Packers
Phone: 3-9779
Box 3254, Station "F"
Jacksonville, Fla.

OWENS-ILLINOIS GLASS CO.
Duraglass Milk Bottles
C. W. Parmalee C. N. Comstock
1102 Barnett Bldg., Jax. 2, Fla.
Phone 3-6134 5

PAUL-LEWIS LABORATORIES, Inc.
Lactivase-For the Prevention of oxidized
flavor in bottled milk, ice cream,
storage cream
FLAVOR-PAK FOODS, INC., Miami, Fla.
MILLER MACHINERY & SUPPLY COMPANY
Miami and Jacksonville, Fla.

PENN SALT MANUFACTURING
CO.
BK Powder Cleaners Acids
Bottle Alkalies
JOE FOSS
799 Waring Road-Memphis, Tenn.

RIVERSIDE MANUFACTURING
COMPANY
MOULTRIE, GEORGIA
Masterbilt Uniforms
James M. Stewart Dave Freeman

STANDARD PACKAGING CORPN.
Tamper Proof Seals-Flexible Vacuum
Packages-Liner Materials
Larry Hodge
1121 duPont Bldg., Miami, Fla.

THATCHER GLASS MFG. CO., INC.
Glass Milk Containers
W. T. LOVE, Florida Representative
3221 Pinehurst PI.-Charlotte 7, N.C.

UNIVERSAL MILKING MACHINE
DIVISION
Pail-less (Pipe line) Milking Machines
R. D. Archer-Factory Rep.-Ph. 84-7467
1100 N.E. 134 St., No. Miami, Fla.


DECEMBER, 1953 35






Southern Ice Cream Manufacturers

Meet In Miami Beach December 8-10

The 39th Annual Convention of the Southern Association of Ice Cream Manu-
facturers will be held in Miami Beach, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, Decem-
ber 8-9-10. The 1952 convention was in New Orleans.
This gives Florida Ice Cream Manufacturers an opportunity to attend and
secure the benefits of this outstanding convention at a minimum of expense and
time from their plants.
E. D. Mitchell of Biltmore Farms Dairy, North Carolina, and President of the
Association says: "The Convention program should be one of the finest the organi-
zation has ever had."

Cliff Wayne, Florida Zone Manager, Southern Dairies, and
Jack Tierney, Foremost Dairies, as co-charman of the Entertain-
ment Committee, promise "you will not be disappointed in the
entertainment."
Convention hotels are the San Souci, the Saxony and the
Sea Isle, three of the finest on Miami Beach and adjoining
each other on the ocean front.

WAYNE The San Souci, in the center, is Convention Headquarters.
WAYNE


Registration starts Tuesday morning at
8:00 o'clock. The first business session
starts at 9:15. Busi-
ness sessions will ber
held during the
mornings only with
opening time ad-
vanced to 9 : 30
A.M., on Wednes-
day and Thursday.
Alf Nielsen, Presi-
dent of Alfar Cream-
NIELSEN ery, West Palm
Beach, and a former
president of Southern, will give Florida's
official welcome to the Convention.

Program Outline
SPECIAL SPEAKERS ON TUES-
DAYS PROGRAM ARE: (1) ROBERT
KAZMAYER, world traveler, author and
expert on international affairs. (2) AR-
THUR DONOVAN, attorney and au-
thority on management-labor relations.
(3) GEORGE CLARKE, Executive Sec-
retary, Texas Dairy Products Institute.
Mr. Clarke will discuss "Mellorine."
Texas leads the nation in the manufac-
ture of "Mellorine" as a substitute for
"ice cream."
THE WEDNESDAY MORNING
PROGRAM presents four speakers, all
of whom are leaders in their fields and
whose addresses every one attending the
convention will want to hear. They are:
DeLoss Walker, industrial lecturer, edi-
tor and businessman; Millard Bennett,
well-known sales educator; Robert North
of the International Association of Ice
cream Manufacturers, and Jeff Williams,
Oklahoma humorist.
THURSDAY MORNING'S PRO-
GRAM includes the Annual Business
Meeting of the Association and the "Ice
Cream Clinic."


The Entertainment Program
The Entertainment features are not
complete but the following schedule will
serve as a guide to those planning to
attend:
TUESDAY AFTERNOON, DECEM-
BER 8-A luncheon for the ladies fol-
lowed by a fashion show. This will be
held in the Crystal Room of the Sans
Souci Hotel and special attention is being
given to see that the girls are presented
something out of the ordinary, both in
the matter of food at their luncheon and
the extremely high quality of the fashion
show.
TUESDAY NIGHT, DECEMBER 8
-The President's Dinner will be held
from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Art Giles and
his orchestra will supply the music dur-
ing dinner and for the Entertainment that
follows, including dancing until mid-
night.
WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON, DE-
CEMBER 9-A bus trip is planned for
the ladies to fabulous Villa Viscaya.
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9-The
Dixie Flyers' Reception will be held from
5:45 until 7:15 p.m.
WEDNESDAY NIGHT, DECEM-
BER 9-This is to be Havana Night
with a full and varied program of enter-
tainment. Dancing until midnight will
follow.


NASSAU COUNTY FAIR
HAS 4-H DAIRY SHOW
Nancy Buchholtz, a Dinsmore 4-H
girl, took top honors in the Nassau Coun-
ty 4-H Dairy Show when her registered
Guernsey cow won the Grand Champion
4-H Guernsey Award and her own abil-
ity won the Showmanship Loving Cup
given by the Fernandina Kiwanis Club.
Victor Hanson, also of Dinsmore, won
second place in Showmanship and Al
Bowie, third place.
Nassau County Agent Gordon Ellis
reported that the dairy show this year
had a good representation of Guernseys
and Jerseys from both Duval and Nassau
Counties. Most of the dairy exhibits
were from 4-H boys and girls with an
increased interest over last year, he said.
In the FFA Livestock judging contest
were teams from Taylor and Sanderson
in Baker County, Baldwin, Duval Coun-
ty and Hilliard and Callahan of Nassau
County. The Hilliard Senior FFA Team
won first place and the Hilliard Junior
FFA Team won 2nd place, with the
Baldwin team taking third.
In the 4-H livestock judging contest,
1st place was the Dinsmore 4-H Club
Team, 2nd place was the Callahan Team
and 3rd place was the Yulee team. On
the winning team were Al Bowie, Rus-
sell Lloyd, David Findley, and Bob
Bowie.
WINNERS OF DAIRY EVENTS
Bob Bowie of Dinsmore showed the
Reserve Grand Champion 4-H animal
while Al Bowie showed the Grand Cham-
pion Grade Guernsey.
In the adult Guernsey division, the
Dinsmore Dairy made a clean sweep of
all classes including the Grand Champion
Award which went to "Dinsmore Noble
Fawn" and the Reserve Champion Award
won by "Dinsmore Mayroyal Dinah."
In the 4-H Jersey division, Robbin
Alvarez of Garden City won the Grand
Champion Award with his registered Jer-
sey heifer. Tommy Prater of Callahan
showed the Reserve Grand Champion.
The Grand Champion 4-H Grade Jer-
sey was shown by Harry Stratton, Jr.
of Callahan. In the adult division for
Jerseys, Warren Alvarez of Garden City
won the Grand Champion Award and
David Page of Yulee received the Re-
serve Grand Champion Award.


36 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


DAIRY
SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT


I TAA OR IP


TAMPA ORLANDO





4-H Dairy Judging Team
(Continued from page 15)
request to take part in a radio interview.
In this we told about our Florida dairy
cattle and of Florida's fine winter climate.
A giant parade of all champion cattle of
the Show was another interesting sight
and this finished our visit at the National
Cattle Congress.
We had a wonderful return trip via
Wisconsin, Chicago, Indiana, Kentucky
and Tennessee, where the last thrill of a
14-day trip was a visit to the top of Look-
out Mountain. The other members of our
team and Mr. Reaves have asked that I
express for the group our sincerest ap-
preciation to those who sponsored our
trip and our taking part in the National
4-H Contest. Our thanks to these spon-
sors: the Florida Dairy Association, the
Florida Times Union, the Florida Guern-
sey Cattle Club, the Florida Jersey Cattle
Club, and the State Department of
Agriculture.


4-H & Adult Dairy Shows
Held at Pensacola Fair
The Pensacola Inter-State Fair had a
nice exhibit of both dairy and beef cattle
in the new concrete-block dairy show
barn during the week of October 19-24.
Dairy classes were judged by Extension
Dairyman C. W. Reeves on October 20.
The Barrineau Park team, composed of
Ernest Settle, Burley White, and Jack
Shelby, won first in the team competition.
Rab Gibbs of Pine Forest exhibited
the Champion 4-H Guernsey. Travis
King of McDavid exhibited the reserve
Champion 4-H Guernsey.
The Junior Dairy Showmanship Con-
test was won by Ray Gibbs, followed by
Gordon Floyd of Barrineau Park. Floyd
exhibited the best fitted animal in the
4-H division.
J. L. Van Pelt, Pensacola, took the
grand championships in both the male
and female divisions of the Open Dairy
Show.
Dr. J. R. Love, Escambia County live-
stock specialist, was superintendent of the
show, with Henry P. Davis, assistant
county agent of Escambia County, in
charge of 4-H exhibits. W. W. Brown,
state boys' 4-H club agent, was in charge
of the Junior Dairy Cattle Judging Con-
test, which attracted nine teams.

3 Sets of Twins-
SCan You Top This?
Willie Gaines, a producer-distributor
of Fernandina has advised the Dairy
News that his small herd of 40 grade
Jersey cows has produced three sets of
twin Calves in 1953. Who can match
this?


WRITE ... WIRE ... PHONE


RP. Co.
P.O. Box 439
Lakeland, Fla.


L )



















MO0 LE NNET


taint the

recommended
leaels of
VIT-A-WA' S
Potented Spe-
ially Processed
MINtRAL-
VITAMIN base
-and has been D &
ap.reod y SUPPLEMENT
the Dept. e
Contr ofl.
V .:-WAY.. gcHE RD
IT-A Ca~964L


NOVEMBER & DECEMBER, 1953


* 37






Editor's Column . .


NEWS &VIEWS:

DAIRY PRODUCT SUBSTITUTES
CALLED AN ECONOMIC MENACE
Charles W. Holman, manager o0 the
National Milk Producers Federation,
speaking at the organization's recent an-
nual convention in Houston, Texas, de-
clared that "a new scourge on the dairy
horizon threatens to become a serious
economic menace to the welfare of both
consumers and dairy farmers."
The reference was made concerning
the extension of the use of vegetable oils
in ice cream and frozen desserts. Holman
pointed out that 12%/ of the genuine
ice cream utilization has been taken away
by this competition.

Emphasizes Consumer Education
As Need On Dairy Products
Speaking at the joint annual conven-
tion of the Milk Industry Foundation
and the International Association of Ice
Cream Manufacturers in Boston, Miss
Bertha Hughes, well-known New Eng-
land health educator and Director of the
Educational Department of H. P. Hood
and Sons Dairy, Boston, stressed the im-
portance of consumer education in the
building of milk sales and predicted that
it will play even a greater role in win-
ning increased markets for dairy products
in the years ahead.
During her talk Miss Hughes de-
scribed how the Hood Educational De-
partment carries on its work in schools,
colleges, women's clubs, and other adult
groups, including those of the medical
and dental professions.

Connecticut Dairy
Moving To Florida
We have heard of dairymen moving
to the State of Florida and taking up
their chosen profession again, but we
haven't before heard of a dairyman
bringing his dairy herd with him.
This, however, is just what Paul Cleve-
land and his son Ben, who operated a
successful dairy in Connecticut during
most of the life of the elder Cleveland,
are planning to do.
According to Pinellas County Farm
Agent, John Logan, who also is Secre-
tary of the Florida Guernsey Cattle Club,
the Cleveland family has purchased a
tract of 1224 acres of North Pinellas
County land for $110,000.00 which they
plan to develop into a modern dairy and
beef cattle farm.
The Clevelands say they intend to
move their complete dairy herd of 300
Guernseys from Connecticut to the Tar-
pon Springs location.


Southern Dairies, Tampa
Wins Fleet Safety Award
On November 12th the driver sales-
men of Southern Dairies Tampa plant
were presented with a National Safety
Council and Milk Industry Foundation
first place award plaque for their top
safety record during the last years na-
tional safety contest period which ended
July 1, 1953.
The Southern Dairies fleet drove more
than 175,000 miles with only one charg-
able accident during the one year per-
iod covered by the contest. Dairy fleets
of like size and operating mileage
throughout the United States and Canada
were entered in the contest.
George Heine, manager of the South-
ern Dairies Tampa plant, said that the
company has promoted a safety program
for the past 17 years.


Rotarians Hear Dairyman
Lloyd Benson, prominent Palm Beach
County dairyman was a guest speaker at
a recent meeting of the Boynton Beach
Rotary Club. Benson is the son of the
late Harry Benson who was for many
years chairman of the Florida Milk Com-
mission.

STATE DAIRY SUPERVISOR
BOOSTS FLORIDA MILK
Florida's Chief Dairy Supervisor, John
M. Scott, has recently devised a new way
to boost consumption of the State's home
milk and ice cream supply.
The Florida outline map seen below
with reminders to "drink more Florida
milk" and "eat more Florida ice cream"
has recently been added to the envelopes
of Mr. Scott's office. This is a splendid
idea which Mr. Scott has started and it
is certainly deserving of the commenda-
tion of the Florida dairy industry.


Florida Dairy Executive
On New York TV Show

What would you say if you were sud-
denly asked to talk on a nation-wide TV
broadcast? Curry Bassett, manager of the
Borden's Bassett Dairy, Tallahassee, re-
cently had this experience while in New
York City on his way back from the
National Dairy Conventions in Boston.
While passing down the street at 8:15
A.M., Curry was unexpectedly called into
a side-walk interview by the Dave Garo-
way TV program. The program was
broadcast in Florida through WMBR-TV
in Jacksonville.
Curry was asked what he would do if
he were elected Mayor of New York in
the election being held on that date. His
tactful reply was-"New York is a won-
derful town."

Free Film Available On
International Dairy Show
Dairy cattle breeders will be interested
in a 12 minute sound film of the First
International Dairy Show, held in Chi-
cago October 10 to 17. The film will
be sent free on request to International
Dairy Show, Union Stock Yards, Chi-
cago 9. It depicts high-lights in the
judging of the 6 breeds of cattle that
were featured by record entries at the
initial show.
197,000 visitors attended the show for
the week to see the nation's top purebred
herds from 27 states, Ontario and Que-
bec.

State Veterinary Official
Rates Florida Milk High
Dr. A. A. McMurray as director of
the Mastitis Control Division of the
Florida Live Stock Board sees and knows
a great deal of the operation and condi-
tion of Florida dairy farms and the milk


they produce. In a recent report to the
Board, Dr. McMurray had the following
to say about the quality of milk in Flor-
ida:
"Since April 5, 1927, I have worked
with dairymen in the States of New Jer-
sey, Delaware, Maryland, West Virginia,
Pennsylvania, Ohio, Illinois, Missouri,
and Florida in giving aid and assistance
in maintaining healthy udders in their
herds. Since September 1, 1948, I have
been director of the Mastitis Control Di-
vision of the State Live Stock Sanitary
Board of the State of Florida. In this
capacity I have been very close to the
dairy herds of this state. I wish to say
sincerely and without fear of contradic-
tion, the dairymen of Florida are pro-
ducing a higher quality of milk than the
d, dairymen of any state in which I have
-** worked."


38 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS







DOES YOUR HERD SIRE HAVE


DAUGHTERS LIKE THESE?


DINSMORE MAYROYAL JEDETTA DINSMORE MAYROYAL WINNIE
10960-482-Sr2-365 10409-488-Jr2-365C
15070-619-Jr4-365C 12754-589-Sr3-365
Grand Champion and 1st Best Udder, Classified EXCELLENT '51
Florida State Fair, 1952 Member 1st Get of Sire, Florida State
Classified EXCELLENT '53 Fair, 1952
Dam: Dinsmore Royal Jedetta Dam: Dinsmore Royal Winnie


DINSMORE MAYROYAL VERN DINSMORE MAYROYAL MARGY
12751-617-Jr3-365 11319-458-Jr3-365C
Sold to Patricia Ann Ellis, Callahan, Fla. 13596-585-Jr4-365
Grand Champion Fla. State 4-H Guern- Classified VERY GOOD '53
sey Show, 1951, 1952 and 1953. 1st 2nd 3-year-old, Florida State Fair, 1952.
3-year-old and 2nd Best Udder, Fla. Dam: Butler Island Fayroyal Marqy
State Fair, 1952. Resold in 1953 Quail
Roost Sale for $1025.
Dam: Dinsmore Maxmost Verna
THE ABOVE ARE ALL DAUGHTERS OF FOREMOST MAY ROYALTY
If you want a Herd Sire prepotent for daughters like these


THEN SELECT


Dinsmore Guernseys
FEDERAL ACCREDITED 57790 J. B. LANOUX, Herdsman NEGATIVE TO BANG'S
D mF* m 10 miles north of Jacksonville
Dinsmore Farms Near . 1 Dinsmore, Florida
V. C. JOHNSON EARL A. JOHNSON CHARLES F. JOHNSON BRADY S. JOHNSTON













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874




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