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 Back Cover














Title: Florida dairy news
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00082035/00019
 Material Information
Title: Florida dairy news
Physical Description: 12 v. : illus. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Dairy Industry Association
Publisher: Cody Publications for Florida Dairy Industry Association.
Place of Publication: Kissimmee Fla
Publication Date: September-October 1953
Frequency: bimonthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Dairying -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Cattle   ( lcsh )
Milk   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-12, no. 1; Nov. 1950-Spring, 1962.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00082035
Volume ID: VID00019
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01386090
issn - 0426-5696

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Advertising
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Main
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Back Cover
        Page 35
        Page 36
Full Text

































































Florida's July 4th Jersey Triplets-Once in 100,000



































A Spoonful to the Ton! 'r

growing stock couldn't always get full
How would you mix this tiny benefits from them.
amount of antibiotic into a Three years ago they set out to solve the .
whole ton of feed? problem. First big discovery was a test' \ \ .
.... ... ..... ... . so sensitive that it would show just one .i ..-


aciennists wirn vitamins ana antibiotics
have brought wonderful advancements
in growth, health and condition to
calves. Yet these and others are so
powerful that only a few spoonsful are
needed in a whole ton of feed.
But how would you add one table-
spoonful of antibiotic to a whole ton of
feed and be sure it is completely mixed
into every bite a calf or cow takes?
That was the problem facing Purina
scientists and engineers. They knew our
milling processes could do a thorough
job with other ingredients which are
added in pounds instead of ounces. They
had to be just as sure about the tiny
"miracle ingredients," or your cows and


tiny part in 10 million parts of feed.
Using this secret test, they took thous-
ands of samples at each mixer in each
of our 36 Purina Chow mills. From the
results of these tests, they re-designed
ingredient flows, milling equipment and
mixing procedures. Then they re-tested
and tested again until everything was
right.
The whole process we call PURINA
MICRO-MIXING, and it's still going on
to keep up our mixing quality. It's
another example of the extreme care
Purina goes to, to bring you the dairy-
man's first choice in feeds across the
country-Purina Chows in the Checker-
board bag.


RALSTON PURINA COMPANY


MIAMI


- TAMPA


THOUSANDS of SAMPLES have been
tested in the never-ending MICRO-
MIXING process to make better Chows.


NOT

ENOUGH

BOOSTERS


RIGHT
AMOUNT
OF
BOOSTERS

Miracle boosters can make this
much difference in growth. Purina
Research shows MICRO-MIXING
keeps down variation in amounts.


UI NEWEST N AVI [D MAKEl~U~ ~V4IN !


I PURINA CHOWS are MICRO-MIXED


mmMMMWmWmWmAuMMWWmmmm


e









with DIRECT FARM-TO-DAIRY BULK PICK-UP
Farmer-hauler-dairy-consumer-all benefit when a modern Hell
farm pick-up tank and refrigerated farm storage tanks replace the
back-breaking labor, expense, and investment of 10-gallon can oper-
ations. The farmer can increase his herd without a corresponding cost
increase. Hauling costs are reduced. One pick-up tank can serve
several routes on alternate days. Country and city dairy receiving
rooms are eliminated. Fast farm cooling to below 400, less handling,
and close control in transit, result in higher quality milk.


with HEIL FARM PICK-UP TANKS


The Hell fully insulated, stainless steel service cabinet houses
inlet-outlet valve, reversible or centrifugal pump, sample trays,
ice chest, sanitary hose and couplings. Separate motor cabinet
(see door at left in large photo) keeps all heat from motor or
dirt from electric cable out of service cabinet.


As the pioneer and principal producer of bulk milk
transports, Heil has been building transports for farm
pick-up service since 1941. These experience-backed
"receiving stations on wheels" are making farm pick-
up operations pay off with increasing effectiveness
throughout the country.
Heil farm pick-up tanks are available as truck tanks
in capacities of 1000 to 2500 gallons and trailerized
tanks range from 2500 to 4500 gallons.
Get complete details. Write for illustrated literature
on the farm pick-up story.




General Mills


Hell trallerized farm pick-up transports are designed for large
production farm routes, have similar service cabinets at rear.
Two compartment transports have side-mounted cabinets.


Tampa

Jacksonville


Orlando


Miami


SEPTEMBER & OCTOBER, 1 953


* 3











Tell You,

Pardner ..



You Can't Beat

SF ASCO
Livestock Sprays...

, i FASCO Livestock Sprays are the proper medicine
for the insect pests that rob you of cattle profits.
Flies, mosquitoes, ticks, scab mites, mange mites
all yield to these powerful BHC-DDT sprays in FASCO
formulations which are packed in 5(0 and 5-lb. bags.
If you prefer to mix your ow\n sprays, use FASCO
50% DDT Wettable and FASCO BHC 24-WVP.

Spectacular Fly Control with FASCO Malathon


Be sure to ask your FASCO dealer
about FASCO MALATHON fly sprays
and baits. Results achieved against
"resistant" flies have been amazing.


FASCO MALATHON sprays and baits
are effective around hog pens, kennels.
poultry houses and garbage dumps as
well as cattle pens and barns.


IDEAL Fertilizers and FASCO Pesticides-Your Profit Combination


WILSON & TOOMER
FERTILIZER COMPANY
and Divisions
SFLORIDA AGRICULTURAL SUPPLY COMPANY
Peninsular Fertilizer Works-Tampa Cartledge Fertilizer Company-Cottondale
E N E R A L O F F I C E S J A C K S O N V I L L E, F L O R I DA
* FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


4









EDITORIALS


SOUND POLICIES, OBJECTIVES AND PROGRAM

OF THE FLORIDA DAIRY INDUSTRY

Revealed In F. D. A. President's Report



Examination of the seventeen-page Annual Report of President Wilmer Bassett,
made at the recent Annual Meeting of the Florida Dairy Association in Miami Beach,
reveals the great value of industry-wide organization and activities.

President Bassett, emphasized that the F.D.A. Policies and Program are adopted
through membership meetings, committee recommendations and the organization's
twenty directors. The rapid and sound growth of the Dairy Industry in Florida in
recent years bears witness to the value of cooperative planning and action through the
Industry's State Association.


* To encourage within the membership and the entire industry a greater realization
and sense of "moral obligation" to our consumers and to the community for produc-
tion of the highest possible quality products at the lowest reasonable prices consistent
with good business practices.

* Promotion of increased effort to control and prevent disease among Florida Dairy
Herds and secure all possible aid to Dairymen toward this end. Endorsed program
for enlarging the facilities and staff of the Veterinary Research Department, Univer-
sity of Florida and the establishment of a new Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory.

* Promotion of increased effort on the part of all dairymen to produce more feed
and better pastures and exercise more efficiency and economy in feeding practices and
more adequate control of milk production.

* Endeavor to arouse the entire industry of Florida to greater interest and action
in both individual and Industry-wide "Public Relations" activities.

* SPONSORSHIP IN COOPERATION WITH THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORI-
DA DAIRY DEPARTMENT OF: Annual Dairy Field Day, 2-day program; Annual
Dairy Herdsmen Short Course; and Annual Dairy Plant Operations Short Course, all
held at the University of Florida.

* Association Annual Meeting and Convention.

* COOPERATION AND ASSISTANCE IN THE FOLLOWING PROGRAM
AND ACTIVITIES: Florida Public Health Association Annual Meeting; Florida
Milk Sanitarians' Annual Meeting and Training Conference; Florida Dairy Labora-
tory Technicians' Annual Meeting and Training Conference; County Farm Agents'
Annual Conference; Florida Dairy Council Program; Florida Future Farmers' Dairy
Shows Program; Florida 4-H Club Dairy Shows and Program; Florida School Lunch
Supervisors' Annual Conference; Florida State Fair Dairy Show.

* AFFILIATION AND COOPERATION WITH THE FOLLOWING ORGA-
NIZATIONS: Milk Industry Foundation; National Dairy Council; Florida Agricul-
tural Council; Florida Cattlemen's Association; Florida Cattle Club; Florida Guernsey
Cattle Club; Florida Press Association; Florida State Chamber of Commerce; Florida
Feed Dealers Association; Florida Retail Farm Equipment Association; Southern
Association Ice Cream Manufacturers; Florida Veterinary Medical Association; Na-
tional Conference Dairy Association Executives.


VOL. 3


NO. 4


SEPTEMBER & OCTOBER, 1953
BI-MONTHLY


THE
FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS
E. T. LAY, Editor & Business Manager


Official Publication of
Florida Dairy Association
WILMER W. BASSETT, JR., President
E. T. LAY, Executive Director

Florida Guernsey Cattle Club

Florida Association
of Milk Sanitarians

DIRECTORS
FLORIDA DAIRY ASSOCIATION
Producers
HERMAN BOYD, Miami
Vice Pres. & Chrmn.
"Producers Council"
GEORGE F. JOHNSON, West Palm Beach
D. WAYNE WEBB, Tampa
JOHN SERGEANT, Lakeland
L. B. HULL, Micanopy
BILL GRAHAM, Miami
JOHN T. ADKINSON, Pensacola
IRA BARROW, New Smyrna Beach
J. H. ADAMS, Jacksonville
DONALD LEONARD, Blountstown

Distributors
CLIFF D. WAYNE, Miami
Vice Pres. & Chrmn.
"Distributors Council"
FREEMAN HALES, Opa Locka
HERMAN BURNETT, Bradenton
J. N. McARTHUR, Miami
H. CODY SKINNER, Jacksonville
JOHN M. HOOD, St. Petersburg
GORDON NIELSEN, West Palm Beach
W. J. BARRITT, JR., Tampa
A. E. (JACK) JOHNSON, Jacksonville
J. F. W. ZIRKLEBACH, Pensacola

Additional Directors
WILMER W. BASSETT, JR., President
Monticello
LARRY J. HODGE, President
"Alligator Club"; Miami
THE FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS is
published bi-monthly by the Florida
Dairy Association, 220 Newnan St.,
Jacksonville, Florida. Subscription price
of $1.00 a year. Entered as second
class mail at the Post Office at Jack-
sonville, Fla., under Act of March 3,
1879, as amended.
Business and Editorial office, 220
Newnan Street, Jacksonville.
NATIONAL EDITORIAL
ASSOCIATION

Member Florida Press Association


SEPTEMBER & OCTOBER, 1953 5






















Now
Colored PINK for

Easy Identification

NOW...In 25-lb. Kegs!
DIVERSOL -For Over 25 Years the Dairy Farm's
Leading Bactericide Disinfectant
----------------
Give this coupon to your hauler
Please deliver one 25# keg of DIVERSOL CX
Bactericide Disinfectant for which you are to
deduct $--....from my next milk check.
Name___-------------
Patron No.---------------
Address---___ -




More Pasture Doesn't

Cut YOUR Feed Cost...


BETTER

PASTURES DO!


Take a look at your pasture.
Is it a deep rich qreen, fast
qrowinq and palatable? If not,
NACO can help you. Proper
pasture programs produce
higher nutrient value resulting
in less need for supplements.
Your NACO representative is
an expert on fertilization.
NACO can help you produce
milk most economically.



COMPANY

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
FT. PIERCE, FLORIDA
Manufacturers of Five Star Fertilizers



6 FLORIDA DAI


For Our Youth Readers


Fourth of a Series of Articles on:

A Career in The Dairy Industry

NOTE: The first three articles of this series have dealt with the scope of the dairy industry and
its relation to the economy of the nation; they have then proceeded into a consideration of
various occupations within the industry which offer opportunities for a fine career. Thus far,
the areas of work presented have been on or in contact with the dairy farm and its production
of milk.


The diversity of opportunities con-
nected with the distribution of fluid milk,
the manufacture of milk products and
their sales, as well as with the regulatory
services and research fields is infinite.
Many types of work are a challenge to
all the ambition, intelligence, willingness
to work and ability to get along with
people which you can muster. Among
them you will find ample opportunity for
employment, interesting fields of work,
security, and a chance for advancement
depending only on your training and
ability.
Some plants make a policy of hiring
students during vacation periods in order
to locate future valuable employees. At
the same time the student may be making
the decision as to just which phase of
the complex business of the milk industry
interests him or her the most. Although
many leaders in the industry today may
have come up the hard way, in many
plants now, management consistently hires
only graduates of dairy departments of
technical schools and colleges for many
areas of their work, so preparation is ex-
tremely important. Because there are so
many kinds of work however, various
types of training are applicable.
LABORATORY WORKERS
Considering the jobs which continue
along with handling of milk we come to
the laboratory work done in most pro-
cessing and all manufacturing dairy pro-
ducts plants. This creates jobs for chem-
ists, bacteriologists and technicians.
Analyses are made of milk which is
processed and of ingredients used in mak-
ing all its various products including
cream, butter, condensed milk, cheese,
and ice cream. Fine opportunities are
found in the plant laboratory which works
closely with purchasing, procurement and
manufacturing of milk products. The
whole quality control program makes this
a challenging career.
Research workers in these laboratories


devise new methods and new products.
The ingenuity of an inventor is called
upon in this department of laboratory
work.
PRODUCTION WORKERS
Numerous jobs are provided by the
manufacturing processes which involve
assembling, pasteurizing, homogenizing,
cooling, and packaging of dairy products.
The operation of freezers and novelty-
making equipment calls for MECHANI-
CAL SKILL and exactness. All the de-
vices known to sanitary science must be
utilized, also, to protect the product so
that the consumer may receive it in the
very best condition. Inseparable from the
making of dairy products, therefore, is
the work of a SANITARY EXPERT.
SAFETY DIRECTORS must supervise
the operation of a large plant and this
may be your choice of a career.
ACCOUNTING AND OFFICE
WORKERS
Dairy and ice cream plants require
BOOKKEEPERS, RECORD CLERKS,
CREDIT MANAGERS and COST AC-
COUNTANTS. Graduates of business
colleges are needed and your career with
the dairy industry may be on the basis
of business practices.
If you attend college and specialize in
dairy manufacture, include some business
courses and if you specialize in business
management don't overlook the dairy
manufacturing field when you enter the
business world.


MILK MADE THE DIFFERENCE


RY NEWS


TCIOapi







National Dairy Conventions

In Boston October 25-26

Historic Boston, birthplace of Ameri-
can liberty, will be host to approximately
3000 representatives of the Milk and Ice
Cream Industry when the annual con-
ventions of the Milk Industry Founda-
tion opens there Sunday, October 25th,
and the International Association of Ice
Cream Manufacturers on the 28th for the
first New England convention since 1916.
MIF convention headquarters will be at
the Hotel Sheraton Plaza and the Ice
Cream Convention at the Hotel Statler.
The general sessions of the MIF con-
vention will begin at 9:30 Monday morn-
ing in the Ballroom of the Sheraton
Plaza Hotel under the chairmanship of
President T. D. Lewis. Topics of inter-
est to all milk dealers will be discussed
by leading members of the industry. Wed-
nesday morning and afternoon, the joint
session of the MIF and the International
Association of Ice Cream Manufacturers
will be held in the Ballroom of the
Hotel Statler.
Six technical sessions which constitute
one of the most important features of
the convention, will begin on Monday
afternoon at two o'clock and extend
through Tuesday afternoon. The subjects
to be considered in the six sectional meet-
ings are Laboratory Technique, Milk Sup-
plies, Plant Management, Motor Vehicle
Maintenance and Safety, Accountancy and
Sales and Advertising.
Other presentations which will be
made during the convention are the Agri-
cultural Leadership Awards, which are
made each year to the most outstanding
students of dairy manufacturing from col-
leges throughout North America.
A special Awards Dinner will be held
under the auspices of the American Dairy
Science Association and the Dairy Indus-
tries Supply Association on Tuesday, Oc-
tober 27th at seven p.m. in the Bradford
Hotel. Guests at the dinner will be sen-
ior students from leading agricultural col-
leges who comprise the judging teams
on butter, cheese, ice cream, and milk.
Individual winners and winning teams in
Monday's contest will be announced at
the dinner. The Milk Industry Founda-
tion will, as in the past, present the Milk
Cup and the Milk Medals for profic-
iency in judging.
Joint Annual Banquet
A joint banquet of the Milk Industry
Foundation and the International Associa-
tion of Ice Cream Manufacturers, will be
held on Wednesday evening, October
28th at seven o'clock in the ballroom of
the Statler Hotel headquarters of the Ice
Cream Convention.


Pictured above is a gioup of Americans, appointed by the U. S. Department of State, at-
tending International Dairy Congress at The Hague, Holland. June 1953. Front row, Left to
Right: Dr. F. E. Rice, Evaporated Milk Association, Chicago. H. D. Weihe, U. S. Dept. of
Agriculture, R. E. Hodgson, Chairman of Official Delegation, U. S. Dept. of Agriculture, H. C.
Irelogan, Dept. of Agriculture, Lester Olsen, Milwaukee, R. A. Brand, Secretary of American
Embassy, The Hague. Back row, Left to Right: G. P. Gundlach, Cincinnati. Dr. E. L. Jack.
Univ. of Calif., O. F. Hunziker, LaGrange. Illinois, Benjamin F. Castle, Milk Industry Founda-
tion, Wash., D. C., B. A. C. Ragsdale. Univ. of Missouri, Dr. C. W. England. Washington.
D. C.. T. Kline Hamilton. Columbur. Ohio, A. P. Hawkins, Memphis (man with hat).


Ice Cream Convention
The joint Annual Banquet closes the
Milk Foundation's three-day program and
leads off the Ice Cream Manufacturers
Convention which officially starts with
the joint general session with M.I.F.
Wednesday morning and continues
through Thursday and Friday.
Features of the Ice Cream Convention
program are the joint program session
with the Milk Foundation Wednesday,
the joint Banquet with MIF Wednesday
night, three technical sessions on Mer-
chandising, Accounting and Production to
be held Thursday and Friday, a General
Session and Annual Business Meeting
Friday morning and special meetings of
the Board of Directors.
The Headquarters and all meeting ses-
sions of the Ice Cream Convention will
be at the Hotel Statler.
Elaborate plans for special tours and
entertainment features for the ladies of
both the MIF and Ice Cream Conven-
tions have been announced.
Florida should have its usual quota of
attendance although there will not be as
large a group as when the Dairy Equip-
ment and Supplies Exhibition is held
with the convention.


SOUTH NEEDS MORE DAIRIES
"The Milk Industry Foundation has
just issued some "Milk Facts" which the
South would do well to ponder," says
an editorial in the Orlando Sentinel.
"As great as have been the strides
made in the South in recent years in di-
versified agriculture, in emphasizing the
South's agricultural advantages with its
favorable climate and long growing sea-
son, and even in the development of the
cattle industry, the South still needs more
-and better-milk cows.
"The published figures show that the
1950 U. S. farm milk production
amounted to 56 billion 72 million quarts.
However, the 16 Southern states, which
comprise one-third of the area and con-
tain one-third of the people of the United
States, only produced 13 billion 281 mil-
lion quarts. In other words, instead of
producing its 33 per cent share of the
nation's milk, the South only produced
22 per cent.
"The South could add greatly to its
welfare in every way-by paying more
time and attention to the dairy industry."


SEPTEMBER & OCTOBER, 1953 7







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


DAIRY REVIEW


Dairy Products Laboratory
A ricultural Experiment S n


111111


ayo 111111

/Orange Ice Cream Formulas

Released by University of Florida
BY: WALTER KRIENKE and LEON MULL
Members of the Staff Dairy Science Department
University of Florida
First we wish to call to the attention of ice cream manufacturers who received
or may receive the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station Circular S-60 released in
July and containing the formula for the preparation of Orange Injection Material for
the making of Variegated Orange Ice Cream, that further experiments have led to
certain changes which improve the product.
It has been found that a more satisfactory Orange Injection Material results from
replacing one half of the sucrose indicated in the original formula by a high con-
version type of corn syrup. (Interested ice cream manufacturers may secure the com-
plete report of the studies leading to this change upon request to the U. of F. Dairy
Science Dept.).
The revised formula is as follows:
Formula II Orange Ice Cream

Corn syrup* 49.0 pounds
Pectin (150 grade pure) 2.1 pounds *
Water 17.6 pounds -
Frozen concentrated orange
juice (4-1) 40 quarts
Color 20 ml. ^fL.
*Available through courtesy of Corn Pro-
ducts Sales Company.
It will be noted that the main change
is the replacement of 40 pounds of suc- EDITOR'S NOTE: This article has been
rose by 49 pounds of corn syrup. This furnished the Dairy News upon request
increases the total weight by 9 pounds following the official release in July by
the University of Florida Experiment
which is the water contained in the corn Station of their secret formulas com-
syrup. The amount of pectin is decreased pleted in 1952 for the use of fresh citrus
slightly because the pure pectin was found fruits in the manufacture of ice cream.
to be slightly more effective than the com- The new product was first served pub-
licly to members of the Florida Legis-
mercial preparation used in the first trials. lature at their Jacksonville caucus in Oc-
Cost, however, may be a determining fac- tober, 1952, under the auspices of the
tor in selection of the stabilizer. Florida Dairy Association.
Because of the lower sweetening value The F.D.A. and the U. of F. Dairy
S- Science Department then cooperated in
of the solids in corn syrup the finished bringing the new process to national at-
orange injection material is not so sweet tention by serving orange ice cream at
when using the new formula. This ap- the Annual Convention of the Interna-
pears to be an advantage because some tional Association of Ice Cream Manu-
individuals had indicated that the "suc- facturers in Chicago in November,
individuals had dictated that the 1952. The University only recently de-
rose formula" yielded a finished ice cream cided to make public, for commercial
that was slightly sweeter than they liked use, their exclusive formulas for the
for it to be. product which may be secured upon
request to the University of Florida Ex-
Improved Processing periment Station, Gainesville.
Difficulties experienced when using the The International Association of Ice
sucrose formula" are eliminated when Cream Manufacturers and Florida Citrus
Marketing Organizations are now work-
using Formula II and the batch can be ing o plans for joint national advertis-
finished much more rapidly. ing of products which combine citrus
Citrus Fruit In Ice Cream products and daiy products.
Professors Krienke and Mull have
Fruits and fruit products, both fresh furnished the Dairy News the accom-
and cooked, have been used in flavoring paying story on this new development
which may prove a great boon to both
ice cream from the beginning of commer- citrus and dairy products:
cial ice cream manufacture. The character


Extension Service
Di;*- Fanm Reoearrlc Ulnlit


8 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


of the fruit, however, has been a limiting
factor in the selection of specific fruits
for such use.
Citrus fruits, because of their high acid
content, have not been found suitable as
flavoring materials for ice cream when
used in the conventional manner to give
a homogeneous mixture in the finished
product. The milk proteins become de-
stabilized at the low pH of the citrus
juices and the resulting ice cream loses
some of its desirable properties.
V The flavor compatibility of orange pro-
ducts and of dairy products, however, has
been appreciated for many years. Con-
sumer acceptance of such a combination
has been demonstrated by such arrange-
ments as orange sherbet and vanilla ice
cream in a single cup or package and as
ice cream bricks that consist of two layers
of vanilla ice cream separated by a layer
of orange sherbet.
Injection Flavoring
A revolutionary method of preparing
fruit-flavored ice creams was introduced
in the early 1930's. This consisted of
preparing a puree-type product that was
injected into a semi-frozen stream of ice
cream to form streams or bands of the
flavoring material in a vanilla-flavored
ice-cream. To such ice creams may be
ascribed the term "built-in-sundae." The
consumer receives the pleasant flavor sen-
sation of the fruit only intermittently, for
Sthe predominance in quantity of the ser-
ving is vanilla ice cream. However, the
intensity of the fruit flavor is so great
that the consumer responds with delight-
ful eagerness for many repetitions of the
experience. An additional attribute of
such ice cream is its eye-catching quality.
Color adds greatly to the enjoyment of
foods and certainly tempts the palate of
the onlooker when ice cream of pleasantly
contrasting color arrangements meets the
eye.
The Problem
In considering the several citrus juices
for the injection-type fruit preparation it
was very evident, from a knowledge of
canned and frozen concentrated orange
juices, that heat modification of the deli-
cate citrus flavors was a problem of major
importance because the established process
of preparing the injection purees included
heating of the fruit product. It was ob-
vious, therefore, that another approach
would be essential if the desirable attri-
butes of fresh orange, lemon, lime and
tangerine juices were to become partners
with the recognized qualities of milk con-
stituents in providing a new eating enjoy-
ment that offers the contrasting and stim-
ulating tartness of the citrus products
with the mild vanilla flavor of the ice
cream proper.
(Continued on page 21)







DAIRY PLANT SHORT COURSE

SET FOR SEPTEMBER 24-25-26
Dr. E. L. Fouts, head of the Dept. of Dairy Science, University of Florida ad-
vises that advance plans for the 16th Annual Short Course on Dairy Plant operation,
indicate that one of the finest programs ever offered is in store for those planning
to attend.
The conference and Short Course will be held at the University of Florida Dairy
Products Laboratory Building, September 24-26 under the cosponsorship of the Uni-
versity Department of Dairy Science and the "Distributors Council" of the Florida
Dairy Association.
Dr. Leon Mull of the University Dairy Science Department heads up the Dairy
Department Staff Committee for planning and sponsorship of this year's Short Course
and the "Plant Committee" of the Dairy Association acts for the F. D. A. Distributors
Council in co-sponsoring, planning and promoting the Course.


FINE PROGRAM PLANNED
This year's program includes many
up-to-the-minute subjects on milk and ice
cream which should be of interest to
everyone connected with milk and milk
products, processing and distribution. All
speakers and discussion leaders are con-
sidered experts in this field of the Dairy
Industry.
Mr. John Lewis, Plant Superintendent
of Southern Dairies, Miami, is chairman
of this 20 member committee.
SPECIAL FEATURES
Special interest features of the program
are the Vanilla Ice Cream Clinic, the
special fun session of "The Order of
Yellow Dogs" which includes initiation
of new members, the always popular Fel-
lowship Hour and Annual Plant Short
Course Dinner with special entertainment
and the Saturday football game between
the University of Florida and Georgia
Tech.
ROOM RESERVATIONS
Those planning to attend are urged to
make hotel reservations early at any of
the following Gainesville hotels and
courts:
Manor Motel, Hil-Top Court and the
Gator Motel.
The Dairy Association will handle res-
ervations for those requesting it.

PROGRAM OUTLINED
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24
10:00 Registration-Open House-Dairy
Science Building
12:00 Lunch Period
AFTERNOON SESSION
Chairmen: Emmitt Dozier, Jr., and
Dr. E. L. Fouts
1:30 Welcome-Dr. E. L. Fouts
1:45 Fiber Containers for the Milk Industry
Geo. L. Huffman, Excello Corpn.
2:30 Stretch Period
2:45 Glass Containers for the Milk Indus-
try-Bill Parmalee
3:30 Questions and Discussion-"Glass vs.
Fiber"-Leader-Rudy Schneider
4:15 Yellow Dog Initiation-Pine Stump
Kennel-W. A. Krienke
5:15 Adjourn for dinner
8:30 Informal Discussion-Hotel Thomas-
Leader-John N. Lewis
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25
MORNING SESSION
Co-Chairmen: Chas. R. Williams,
Dr. H. H. Wilkowske
9:30 Problems with Cultured Milk Starters
Dr. H. H. Wilkowske


10:15 Stretch Period
10:30 Sanitary Aspects Milk Dispenser Cans
Sam Noles State Bd. of Health
11:15 Butterfat Adulteration-Prof. W. A.
Krienke
AFTERNOON SESSION
Chairmen: James F. Beatty, Dr. Leon Mull
1:30 Dairy Plant Production Efficiency
(1:30) In the Large Plant-S. J.
McInnes
(1:50) In the Medium Plant-Don
Stoffel
(2:10) In the Small Plant-Dick
Wood
2:30 Open Forum Discussion--Dairy Plant
Production Efficiency"
Moderator-Clarence Wood
3:15 Stretch Period
3:30 New Developments in Variegated Ice
Cream-Prof. W. A. Krienke
4:30 Adjourn
6:15-7:15 Alligator Club "Social Hour"-
Hotel Thomas
7:30 Annual Banquet-Student Service Cen-
ter
Toastmaster-Dr. Frank Goodwin
Entertainment, Courtesy Florida
Dairy Association
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 26
MORNING SESSION
Chairmen: Russell W. Bevan, W. A. Krienke
Chairmen: Russell W. Bevan, W. A. Krienke
9:30 Vanillas for the Industry-Robert H.
Pair
10:30 Vanilla Ice Cream Clinic-Dept. of
Dairy Science Staff
12:00 End of Conference-Adjourn
AFTERNOON
2:30 Football Game-UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA vs Georgia Tech.

REAVES SELECTED JUDGE
FOR EASTERN DAIRY SHOW
C. W. Reaves, Extension Dairyman
with the University of Florida, has been
selected to judge the Eastern Regional
Junior Dairy Show to be held in con-
nection with the Atlantic Rural Exposi-
tion at Richmond, Virginia the last of
September. Seven states wil be repre-
sented in the show. The show includes
three breeds: Jerseys, Guernseys and Hol-
steins. Judging will take place on Sep-
tember 26.

Work: is a golden key that unlocks the
vault of happiness.
Work: is a conscious effort toward some
objective.
Intelligencia: A man who is educated be-
yond his intelligence.


SEPTEMBER &


Schedule of

FALL DAIRY EVENTS


September 24-25-26
DAIRY PLANT SHORT COURSE
University of Florida

September 30
ANNUAL MEETING
FLORIDA JERSEY CATTLE CLUB
Seminole Hotel, Jacksonville

October 1
ANNUAL STATE JERSEY SALE
FLORIDA JERSEY CATTLE CLUB
4-H Pavillion, Jacksonville

October 3-10
NATIONAL
DAIRY CATTLE CONGRESS
Fla. FFA and 4-H Club
Dairy Judging Teams
Competing
Waterloo, Iowa

October 25-28
1953 ANNUAL CONVENTION
MILK INDUSTRY FOUNDATION
Sheraton Plaza Hotel, Boston

October 28-30
1953 ANNUAL CONVENTION
INTERNATIONAL ASSN. OF
ICE CREAM MANUFACTURERS
Sheraton Plaza Hotel, Boston

November 6
ANNUAL
STATE GUERNSEY SALE
FLORIDA
GUERNSEY CATTLE CLUB
Fair Grounds, Largo

November 20-21
WORLD CONGRESS FOR
MILK UTILIZATION
Sponsored by
International Dairy Ind. DRL a
Internat'l Dairy Industry Soc.
Statler Hotel, Washington, D.C.

December 8-10
ANNUAL CONVENTION
SOUTHERN ASSOCIATION OF
ICE CREAM MANUFACTURERS
San Souci Hotel, Miami Beach



OCTOBER, 1953 9







Florida Is Rated Leader 9


In Modern Dairying Methods ,

Following Annual meeting Tour of Miami Daries

By: ILL BRYANT, FIELD SALES MGR.
J(/hnson & Johnson Company-Chicago
Editor's Note: Mr. Bryant prepared this article at the request of the "Dairy Neu's" following
his address and participation in an all day dairy farm and parltmne tour at the Florida Dairy
Association Annual Convention in Miami Beach June 25th.
As an introduction to the Farm Tank Program for handling of milk at the dairy
farm with tank truck pick up (tanker), Florida's flag flies at the top of the mast.
The concentrated grade A milk producing area of Dade and
neighboring counties providing milk for Greater Miami with
their several score of individual tanker trucks for each dairy
farm's daily delivery to the milk plants have set the pattern for
S sanitation and economy for the nation. Other Florida cities are
paralleling this area in their progress and programs.
'- This method, which data gives as perhaps starting on the p
southwest corner of the United States has been quite completely
perfected in the Miami area with a much less number of dairy-
men involved.
BRYANT Florida's pattern, I have with pride and enthusiasm shown
RYANT all over these United States with my amateur color movies.


These showings perhaps have had some
appreciable measure of influence on the
growth of the Farm Tank Program, for
handling, at the farm level, of the na-
tion's milk supply, which in my opinion
ranks 7th in importance among Amer-
ica's great discoveries and inventions
when rated for their service, usefulness
and savings to the masses of American
citizens.
First: Under President George Wash-
ington the necessity ol t inanling an 80
million dollar loan to t'( government
brought into being "The New York Stock
Exchange."
Second: Under President Monroe in
1821 America launched its canal digging
program.
Third: In 1831 during the adminis-
tration of President Jackson, America
saw the first train move by locomotive.
Fourth: In President Grant's second
term the first of America's 47 million
telephones was put into service.
Fifth: President McKinley, in 1900,
saw the beginning of the American auto-
mobile industry which today manufac-
tures over 40 million automobiles an-
nually.
Sixth: In 1905 President Cleveland saw
the coming of the first moving picture.
We now add a SEVENTH (7): 1953
-Dwight Eisenhower is our president.
"The Bulk Farm Tank and Tank Truck
Pick Up for Milk" is with us at the
bottom perhaps for a momentous climb.
The wide opening up of another great,
useful era. Economics is the driving
force. Many leaders say it will be to the
nation as great an advancement as these
six others herewith related. WHY? The
value seems to be first to the quality of
the product. Second, the economics are


declared to be of equal value to the farm-
er and to the Milk HANDLER or
PROCESSOR. Perhaps first in its indi-
vidual establishment to the farmer and
then to the milk plant. It has been my
observation that of the multitude of these
present operations extending now into al-
most every DAIRY STATE, none have
stood still or gone backward. The now
established economic factors plus the
learning by doing are surely the driving
forces.
Neither I personally, nor to my knowl-
edge does the company with whom I am
employed-have one penny invested in
the manufacture of or the distribution
of any farm tank. As a curious individ-
ual and an amateur color picture-making
enthusiast I have visited well over 150
farms with farm bulk tanks in all sec-
tions of these United States and have
filmed with color movies-edited and
prepared for narration-these operations
at some 20 different locations in 12
(Continued on next page)

THE ADJACENT PICTURE group taken of
dairies in the Miami area shows examples of
Florida's modern pipeline milking, cold tall
farm storage and farm to plant tank truck
delivery. They illustrate as seen from top to
bottom, (1) The overhead pipeline milking
system: (2) the cold trall farm milk storage
tank: (3) the direct loading of milk to the
tank truck t'ithoul use of a stoorage tank. tith
milk flowing from the pipeline through the
plate cooler to the tank truck: (4) Another
example of direct loading from milking parlor
pipeline through plate cooler to the stainless
steel tank truck: (5) Loading the tank truck
through overhead pipe from cold wall storage
tank; (6) The tank truck leaving the dairy
farm for the Miami dairy plant: (7) Unload-
ing tank truck at dairy plant through sanitary
pipeline to plant storage tank as laboratory
technician takes a sample of the milk for
testing.


10 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS







FLORIDA IS LEADER
(Continued from preceding page)
states. I kept my ears open to hear-
my eyes open and alert to see. I have
entered into many discussions and asked
many questions. I am continually photo-
graphing in color movies those new ad-
vanced processes and items, which one
set of minds have improved or have done
differently than some one else.
I will therefore try to give you my ob-
servations of the milk tank truck and not
any experience of my own in owning or
operating them.
The three groups directly concerned
with this new development in milk trans-
portation which I have rated so highly
among great American inventions are the
milk consumer, the milk producer and
the milk processor-distributor. How will
the tank truck affect each of these?
From the consumer standpoint, the
quality of milk is perhaps more uniform-
ly maintained, and in terms of flavor and
palatability made more desirable as a bev-
erage and food. The leaders who are
doing it say in time the costs of produc-
tion and handling may have a final price
recognition to the consumer.
From the milk producer standpoint I
will quote fro mthe experience of users
whose production is from 150 gallons to
600 gallons per day pick up. At the
present time the average investment for
a tank of 200 gallon capacity is about
$2,300 completely equipped and in-
stalled. On a 100 gallon tank we be-
lieve that this cost will be between $1,500
and $1,600. This is a substantial invest-
ment and obviously the larger the pro-
duction the less amount per can that has
to be invested. However, if we compare
this investment with other pieces of
equipment that are found on the average
farm today, we definitely feel that a
return on the investment in the tank is
equal to or more than on the investment
of a comparable amount in other labor-
saving devices and, in addition, improves
the quality of the farm's principal cash
crop.
SAVINGS TO MILK PRODUCER
Among the definite savings exper-
ienced by milk producers, using the tank
truck, are the savings in butterfat, in
volume (weights) and in can expense.
They amounted to an estimated saving of
4 cents per hundredweight for volume,
4 cents per hundredweight for butterfat,
and 2 cents per can expense, making a
total saving to the producer of 10 cents
per hundredweight plus any additional
savings that could be passed on to the
producer in the form of decreasing haul-
ing rates which users fully expect can
be a minimum of 5 cents per hundred-
weight, and probably a few cents more,
depending upon the route and if and
when every other day milk collection be-


Feb. 2 to Feb. 15
PLO RITJA STTATE FAIR
19j4
11 days-11 nights

. -an id G SPAlS A ISILL I s NATION. I li


1954 STATE FAIR
PLANS DAIRY EVENTS


held again immediately following the
awarding of the dairy show prizes at the
"Parade of Champions" program.


J. C. Huskisson, manager of the Flor- The Ayrshire Sale, which was a feature
ida State Fair has announced that plans of the Fair for the first time last year
are being made for a bigger and better will be repeated this year at 1:30 P.M.,
Dairy and Live Stock Show at the 1954 Saturday, February 6.
State Fair scheduled to be held February Fair officials have announced that ev-
2-13 at the Tampa State Fair Grounds ~Fair officials have announced that sev-
2-13 at the Tampa State Fair Grounds.
There will be three (3) open dairy eral major changes are planned in the
shows for Ayrshire, Jersey and Guernsey. Fair Ground Buildings which are expect-
The "Parade of Champions" will be fea- ed to contribute to the improvement of
tured again during Dairy Week, on the Live Stock Shows.
Thursday, February 4th at 6:00 P.M. Ef-
forts will be made to make this an even Dairies interested in the plans for the
more elaborate event than last year. Dairy Show may secure advance informa-
The Dairy Industry Dinner sponsored tion by writing Mr. J. C. Huskisson,
by the Florida Dairy Association will be Mgr., Florida State Fair, Tampa, Florida.


comes the standardized practice.
Further on the farmer's side of the
economics of the tank truck one user
states that: "Present milk-handling meth-
ods are unsanitary, time consuming and
otherwise inefficient when compared with
bulk handling methods, since the new
method is a step toward streamlining
the whole operation." Milk tends to cling
to the tin-lined 10-gallon cans now in
use, but the stainless steel storage tank
sheds all the milk it contains and this
results in a saving on waste. Where bulk
tanks are in use they have saved 13 cents
on each 100 pounds of milk taken from
the cow. This means that if a farmer
produces 500 pounds of milk a day, his
daily saving is 65 cents. He goes on to
say: "It also makes it possible for the
farmer to sell his milk before it leaves
the farm because it is measured and
tested for butterfat before it is hauled
away. These tests are made under the
farmer's eyes, as are also the sediment
tests drawn, one pint from off the bottom
of the tank."
From the standpoint of the milk pro-
cessor the experience which I have gath-
ered from many users indicates that they
do not believe that milk plants will make
any substantial savings through this op-
eration until all 40-quart cans are elimi-
nated in the individual plant. Before this
time and during dual operation, it is be-
lieved there will be some plant savings,
where it is currently necessary to cool
incoming milk prior to its pasteurization;
also there will be some saving in out-of-
pocket expense, particularly where the
receiving of milk is presently done on
an overtime basis. I have heard officials


of large milk organizations speak of the
savings after complete turnover to the
tank truck in cleaning and sterilizing
needs, and the elimination of receiving
the room as now known.
One prominent processor states: "From
our four years of experience, however,
we know that further refinements will
further help to expand this type of oper-
ation."
Another plant manager reports that:
"Use of the tank truck reduces the
amount of refrigeration required at the
plant due to the fact that milk is received
cold and can be pumped direct to stor-
age tanks. (No milk cans to buy, rent
or sell.) Plants having all farm tanks
can eliminate the receiving room its
equipment, its labor, cleaning materials
and upkeep. This can amount to from
8 to 20 cents per 100 pounds of milk
received. The farm tanks seem to make
the problem so much easier that in a
large portion of the cases we find the
producers increasing their herds, thus
making the plant's procurement problems
easier.
We are finding many smaller milk
companies quickly going 100% to the
tank truck operation. The Los Angeles
area is now 100% farm tank operation.
The states of Washington, Oregon, Wis-
consin, Maryland, Connecticut, and per-
haps others have published regulations
for Farm Bulk Tanks. The triple "A"
Standards Committee of our industry have
given serious, thoughtful attention to the
subject. The United States Department
of Weights and Measures under date of
February 20, 1953, have published a ten-
tative code for Farm Milk Tanks.


SEPTEMBER & OCTOBER, 1953 11









W ru Wni W Iry r u
BY J. R. HENDERSON, AGRONOMIST
Agricultural Extension Service, University of Florida
(First of a series of articles on Florida Dairy Pasture development to be run in cooperation
itrih the State Dairy Pasture Improvement Contest)
GRASS VARIETIES. LIMING, FERTILIZATION AND SEEDING FOR
SUMMER. WINTER AND TEMPORARY PASTURES AND HAY CROPS
Now is the time to begin making plans for management of pastures so as to
increase the winter feed supply. In making plans the individual dairyman should
keep in mind not only his needs for feed but also the possibilities for growing the
pasture plants on his farm. He may need not only to manage his summer grass pas-
tures so as to provide winter grazing and to grow winter legumes wherever possible,
but also to plant temporary grazing crops where it is indicated that these can be
grown and will be needed. Factors that must be considered include varieties, liming,
fertilization, seeding and irrigation.
Suminer Grasses
On dairy farms where all or most of the grazing is provided by summer grasses,
grown alone, the quantity and quality of forage may be improved considerably by
fall fertilization. The exact kind of fertilizer that should be applied will depend
somewhat upon the kind of fertilizer that was used during the earlier part of grazing
season. If a complete fertilizer, such as 8-8-8, was used in the spring, an application


of a nitrogen material or of a nitrogen-
potash topdresser may suffice. On the
other hand if only nitrogen was used in
the spring, a complete fertilizer should
be applied in the fall. The N-P-K ratio
for the year should range between 2-1-2
for Pangola grass and 4-1-2 for most of
the other grasses. The amount of nitro-
gen applied in fertilizer chosen should
range from 32 to 48 lbs. per acre, de-
pending upon the amount of grazing that
is expected to be needed. This applica-
tion may be made any time during Sep-
tember in the northern part of Florida
and any time up through October in the
central and southern parts of the State.
Such an application will result in growth
of high quality forage until frost occurs
and during periods of favorable weather
throughout the winter.
Winter Legumes
Winter legumes grown in combination
with summer grasses not only provide
good grazing during the late winter and
early spring but also store nitrogen in
the soil for use by the grasses during the
summer. Several varieties of winter leg-
umes have been found to be suitable for
use in Florida. Varieties should be se-
lected on the basis of soil conditions on
the farm.
LOUISIANA WHITE is one of the
most productive clovers that can be used
in Florida. It has a long grazing season
and, under favorable moisture conditions
and with adequate fertilization, many
plants may live through the summer.
Louisiana White is a prolific seeder and
will reseed in subsequent years following
the establishment of a good stand that
has been allowed to produce seed. LAD-
INO, a giant white clover, has been used
successfully in all parts of the state. It
grows vigorously when well fertilized but
is a poor seeder under length-of-day
conditions that exist in Florida. With


inadequate fertilization or under adverse
weather conditions it may die out during
the summer. As a result, stands may not
be maintained without reseeding. Both
Louisiana White and Ladino require an
abundant supply of soil moisture and will
stand flooding for short periods. If rain-
fall is inadequate or poorly distributed
irrigation may be found profitable.
CRIMSON CLOVER, both common
and reseeding types, have been used suc-
cesfully on the medium to heavy well-
drained soils in the area west of Madison.
Some successful plantings have been made
in other parts of the state. However,
Crimson clover is regarded as being poor-
ly suited for use in peninsular Florida,
as the soils in that section of the state
are either too wet or too dry. Its graz-
ing season is not as long as that of
Louisiana white clover and Ladino but it
comes into production earlier.
White Sweet Clover
Two varieties of the annual WHITE
SWEET CLOVER HUBAM and
FLORANA-have been used successful-
ly in all parts of Florida. Annual white
sweet clover is more widely adapted than


By: C. W. Reaves, Director

As the Dairy News goes to press a to-
tal of 41 dairies have entered the con-
test from 17 counties. Palm Beach is way
out in front with the largest number of
entrants.
7 More entries are needed before the
$50.00 prize can be drawn from the first
50 entrants.
This is a fair showing and more than
some of the Committee had expected but
to me this small number is disappointing.
At least one of our largest dairy counties
does not yet have a single entrant in this
worthwhile project.
Please send in your entry forms to
your county agent or to the F.D.A. Pas-
ture Committee. It is not too late to
enter the contest. In fact you may enter
your 1953 pasture program in the contest
right up to December 31. The judging
and awards will be based on your over-all
1953 pasture program.
Each individual entrant will be scored
and certificates of merit will be award-
ed all whose program merits it. Winners
will be selected for each county as well
as for the State at large, based on the
best over-all pasture improvement pro-
gram over the previous year. Reports are
not to be made out until January 1954.
either Louisiana White or Crimson clover.
It prefers moist soils but will not stand
flooding. It will grow on well drained
sandy soils but stands on such soils may
be damaged if the rainfall is inadequate
during the early stages of growth. Once
established, annual white sweet clover will
withstand very dry conditions because of
its deep root system.
Red Clover
Several varieties of KENLAND RED
CLOVER have been tested in Florida.
Of those tested to date, Kenland seems
to be best adapted for use under our
conditions. It grows fairly well wherever
Crimson or Louisiana White clovers can
be grown. However, it will not stand as
much flooding as will Louisiana White.
When properly managed, it has a longer
grazing season than any of the other
clovers grown widely in Florida. It is
a poor seeder under our conditions and
annual reseeding is generally necessary
for maintenance of a stand although some
plants will live through the summer.
Sweet Yellow Lupine
During recent years considerable inter-
est has developed in white-seeded Sweet
Yellow Lupine as a grazing crop for the
well drained sandy soils in central and
northern Florida. In those sections of the
State, lupine will grow on almost any
well drained soil that has been properly
(Continued on next page)


12 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


' Management Of


Pastures State Pasture Contest
C,, Wi:, ,, ..n,.. Ir., i I2 d ETIN






r
PASTURES FOR
WINTER FEED
(Con/inued from preceding page)
fertilized. It will nco withstand flooding.
Living and Fertilizing
Any of the legumes listed above may
be planted on established sods of summer
grasses. The grass should be closely
grazed prior to seeding. Most of these
legumes listed do best if soil pH values
are in the neighborhood of 6.5. How-
ever, it is not necessary that the pH be
maintained at such a level if the calcium
supply in the soil equals or exceeds 1200
pounds per acre. In general, soils that
have not been limed will require one to
two tons of ground limestone per acre to
bring the pH value up to 6.5. One ton
of limestone would supply approximately
800 pounds of calcium.
When legumes are seeded on grass
sods that have been limed and well fer-
tilized for two or more years an 0-10-20
or 0-8-24 fertilizer, applied in the fall at
the rate of 500 pounds per acre, should
supply adequate quantities of phosphorus
and potash for good growth during the
first part of the grazing season. On most
soils, especially those that are sandy, an
additional application of potash in Feb-
ruary or early March to clovers is not
only desirable but is necessary if develop-
ment of potash deficiency is to be pre-
vented. The additional potash may be
supplied by an application of 100 pounds
of muriate of potash or 300 pounds of
0-10-20 or 0-8-24 per acre.
Legumes planted on newly established
grass sods should be fertilized in the fall
with 0-14-14 and in February or March
with 0-10-20 or 0-8-24, at the rates sug-
gested above.
Minor elements are required for good
growth of clover on some soils in central
and southern Florida. If need for minor
elements is suspected they should be ap-
plied at planting time at the following
rates, in pounds per acre: copper sul-
fate, 15 to 20; manganese sulfate, 15 to
20; zinc sulfate, 10; and borax, 5 to 10.
Seeding
Seeding should be done during Oc-
tober or in early November for best re-
sults, but may be done as late as De-
cember 15. Late seedings usually pro-
duce only small amounts of forage. It
is important that soil moisture conditions
at the time of seeding be favorable for
germination and growth. Good moisture
conditions not only favor establishment
of the stand but also tend to protect the
inoculant which must be applied to the
seed or to the soil to establish the nitro-
gen fixing bacteria in the nodules on the
roots of the plant.
(Continued on page 24)


BULK COOLERS

include advanced design features which insure
superior cooling with compressor operation at
lowest possible power cost. Also, Mojonnier Bulk
Coolers are of all stainless steel construction, in-
cluding outer
shell, to insure
long life, easy
cleaning and
good appear-
ance over the
years. Made
in 12 sizes
from 60 to
New Bullefin 290 free upon request. 1500 gallons.
Mojonnier Bros. Co., 4601 W. Ohio St., Chicago 44. III.
Florida Representative
%Lee P. Bickenbach
P.O. BOX 2205
T_ LAKELAND. FLA.


SEPTEMBER & OCTOBER, 1 953 13














" uwrom 4Ay dn4thred ORT HO 0eales


ALACHUA, Farmers Hardware Co.
ARCADIA, Smith's X-Cel Feed Store
117 W. Magnolia
BARTOW, Farm & Ranch Supply
335 W. Main St.
BELLE GLADE, Kilgore Seed Co.
BOWLING GREEN
Nicholson Supply
BOYNTON BEACH,
Broward Grain & Supply Co.
BROOKSVILLE,
Williams Feed & Supply
19-23 S. Main St.
CHIEFLAND, Farm Service Store
CHIPLEY, F.R.M. Feed Store
CLEARWATER,
Red Comb Feed Store
1220 S. Ft. Harrison Ave.
COCOA, Farmers Supply Store
DADE CITY,
Madill Building Supply
408-10 N. Seventh Street
Pasco Farm & Ranch Supply
DANIA, Broward Grain & Supply
DAYTONA BEACH,
Volusia Garden Supply
942 Volusia
DE FUNIAK SPRINGS,
Thompson & Hillard Milling Co.
West Florida Farmers Coop.
DELRAY BEACH,
Delray Beach Farm Supply, Inc.
DUNEDIN, Brandeburg Seed Store
FT. LAUDERDALE,
Broward Grain & Supply
FT. MYERS, Kilgore Seed Co.
F. PIERCE, Hector Supply Co.
GAINESVILLE,
B. & G. Farm Supply
1012 S. Main St.
Johnson Brothers, Inc.
111 S. Main
Kilgore Seed Co.
202 S. E. First Ave.

HIGH SPRINGS,
Farm Supply Store
High Springs Seed Store
JASPER,
Farmers Hardware & Supply Co.

JACKSONVILLE,
E. A. Martin Seed Co.
5126 Beaver St.


JAY, Farmers Feed & Supply
KISSIMMEE,
Lou Tarcal Feed & Farm Supply
Corner Main & Vine St.
Kissimmee Feed & Seed
424 Broadway
Tuxedo Feed Store
LAKE CITY,
Wade-Person
301 W. Railroad St.
LAKELAND,
Harrell Feed & Seed Store
224 N. Florida
LAKE WALES,
Yeoman's Feed & Farm Supply
201 Orange Ave.
LIVE OAK,
Farmers Mutual Exchange
Mizzell Produce Co.
3030 Pinue St.
MADISON,
Farmers Mutual Exchange
MALONE, Williams Seed & Feed
MARIANNA,
Powledge Seed & Supply Co.
MAYO,
O. A. Winburn Farm Supply
MELBOURNE, Farm Supply Store

MIAMI,
General Mills, Inc.
7275 N. W. 7th Ave.
Hector Supply Co.
P. 0. Box 1311
Collins Feed & Supply Co.
N. E. 94th St. & FEC Railroad

MILTON, Malone-Griffin, Inc.

NEWBERRY, Rolands Hardware

OCALA.
Kilgore Seed Co.
909 N. Magnolia
Security Feed & Seed Co.
Seminole Stores, Inc.
Ocklawaha-Orange
ORLANDO,
Joseph Bumby Hardware
102 W. Church St.
Check-R-Board
66 W. Washington
Hough's Tuxedo Feed Store
2524 Kuhl Ave.
Palmer Tuxedo Feed Store
906 W. Church
X-Cel Feed Store
205 W. Robinson

PERRY,
Bryant's Feed Store
305 W. Green


PAHOKEE, Kilgore Seed Co.
PALATKA,
Check-R-Board
North First St.
Security Feed & Seed
201 First St.
PALMETTO, Kilgore Seed Co.
PENSACOLA,
Escambia Farmers Supply Co.
2709 N. Palafox St.
F. S. Mellen & Co.
42 E. Garden St.
PLANT CITY, Kilgore Seed Co.
POMPANO BEACH,
Broward Grain & Supply Co.
QUINCY,
Southern Chemical Sales &
Service, S-S Camilla St.
SANFORD,
Kilgore Seed Co.
300 W. First St
SANTE FE,
Sante Fe Trading Post
SEBRING,
Highlands Farm Supply
42 Commerce Street
STUART, Tyson's, Inc.
TALLAHASSEE,
Berry & Johnson Co.
826 W. Gaines St.
Rivers Seed Co.
309 S. Adams Street
TAMPA,
General Mills, Inc.
711 W. Cass Avenue
Jackson Grain Co.
Cass & Ashley St.
Security Mills of Tampa, Inc.
710 Ashley Street
Tuxedo Feed Store
3109 Fourth Ave.

TITUSVILLE, Growers Supply Co.

TRENTON,
Tri-Country Farmers Coop., Inc.
Main Street

VERO BEACH, Kilgore Seed Co.

WAUCHULA,
Davis Feed & Fertilizer
Hardee County Seed & Crate Co.
Kilgore Seed Co.

WEST PALM BEACH,
Kilgore Seed Co.
910 Belvedere Road

WINTER HAVEN,
X-Cel Feed Store
450 Avenue A, S. W.


California Spray-Chemical Corporation


P. O. Box 1231


Fairvilla Road


Orlando, Florida


14 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS



















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SEPTEMBER & OCTOBER, 1953


* 15








Florida State 4-H Dairy Team

To Compete In National Show

Florida will be represented in the National 4-H Dairy Cattle Judging Contest
at Waterloo, Iowa on October 5 by Robert Parisian and Patricia Ellis of Nassau
County, Victor Hanson of Duval and Merriam Simmons of St. Johns County. The
expenses of the trip are being provided by the Florida Dairy Association, The Florida
Times-Union, the state Jersey and Guernsey Cattle Clubs, and the State Department
of Agriculture. Previous Florida teams have made excellent records in this contest
giving evidence of the excellent training
and supervision which Florida's 4-H SEND FLORIDA JUNIOR DAIRYMEN
Dairy project members are receiving from
their county agent leaders and the state's TO DAIRY CATTLE CONGRESS
popular and efficient U. of Fla. Exten- F a D o t
sion Dairyman, Mr. C. W. Reaves. Florda Dairy organizations, the State
It will be remembered that the 1951 Department of Agriculture and others
team won the National 4-H Dairy Judg- who participate in sending the States top
ing Championship and the honor of rep- 4-H and F.F.A. dairy project winners
resenting the United States at the Inter- to see and participate in the National
national Dairy Show in England. Dairy Cattle Congress each year are thus
The 1952 Florida team likewise gave wisely preparing the young people for the
a good account of themselves, winning responsibilities of leadership in the Dairy
recognition as a team and one of the industry of future years.
members placing high in individual The 1951 4-H Judging Team came
judging, home with the National Championship
The four 1953 team members were se- and both 4-H and F.F.A. teams from
elected at the State 4-H Dairy Judging Florida which have participated in the
Contest held on June 17 in Jackson- past have given very good accounts of
ville. They have received additional themselves.
training from their county agents and C. The National Dairy Cattle Congress is
W. Reaves, Extension Dairyman with the truly the dairyman's national exposition.
University of Florida. They will leave In 1949, in 1950 and again in 1952 every
on September 28 to observe the Regional state in the Union, plus Canada was rep-
Junior Dairy Show and the Mid-South resented in this great annual event. Every
Fair Open Dairy Show at Memphis. En- year additional events with national parti-
route from Memphis to Waterloo, some cipation are added, further strengthening
large herds will be visited for further the scope of this Internationally famous
practice judging. C. W. Reaves will ac- exposition.
company the team as coach. At Mem- The National Dairy Cattle Congress
phis, the team will see the Florida 4-H will have again in 1953, as in the past,
Cattle entered in the Regional Junior all five of the official national dairy cattle
Dairy Show in which Merriam Simmons, breed shows-the Ayrshire, the Brown
a team member, will show her Jersey Swiss, the senior and junior Guernsey, the
heifer. The National judging contest will Holstein and the Jersey. Each show has
be held in connection with the National been so designated by its national breed
Dairy Cattle Congress. organization and is being wholeheartedly


The "Big Three" Judging Contests
The National Dairy Cattle Congress
serves as hosts to the National Inter-
collegiate, Official National Future Far-
mers of America and Official National
4-H dairy cattle judging contests. The
national F.F.A. dairy products judging
contest is also held at this exposition.
Some thirty different state teams compete
regularly in the Intercollegiate and 4-H
contests, and more than thirty-five partici-
pate regularly in the F.F.A. contests. Too,
there is the National DHIA Supervisors
dairy cattle judging contest, the National
Invitational Dairy Demonstration Pro-
gram, and the National Invitational Dairy
Utensil Cleaning Contest. It is in such
competitive event as these contests that
the future dairy leaders of the nation are
proven.


supported by its national office. The
breeder members of these organizations
bring their purple and blue ribbon win-
ners from other shows in which they have
participated to this, "the final court of
appeal".
Those who attend the 1953 Cattle Con-
gress which is scheduled for October 3rd
through the 10th will see over 2,000 of
the nation's finest dairy cattle on exhibit
the full eight days in the twelve block-
long dairy cattle barns, and daily in the
mammoth Hippodrome.


LONG RANGE AGRICULTURE
The U. S. Department of Agriculture,
says, "by 1975 milk production will have
to be increased to more than 140 billion
pounds.


Seen above is Florida's 1953 State 4-H Dairy
Judging Team which will compete with the
state 4-H Teams from other states at the Na-
tional Dairy Cattle Congress in Waterloo,
Iowa early in October. Team members, left
to right, are: Victor Hanson, Duval County;
Merriam Simmons, St. Johns County; Patricia
Ellis and Robert Parisian, Nassau County. The
cow is Patricia's 4-H Champion Guer:nsey
which she raised and recently sold at the fa-
mous Qail Rojrt Guernsey Scle in North Caro-
lina for over $1,000.



FALL SCHEDULE
4-H DAIRY SHOWS
AND EVENTS

SEPT. 5 Leon County 4-H Dairy
Show-Tallahassee
SEPT. 19 Madison County 4-H Dairy
Show-Madison
SEPT. 19 Jefferson County 4-H Dairy
Show-Monticello
SEPT. 19 Gadsden County 4-H Dairy
Show-Quincy
SEPT. 19 Jackson County 4-H Dairy
Show-Marianna
SEPT. 26 Taylor County 4-H Dairy
Show-Perry
SEPT. 25 to OCT. 3 Mid-South Junior
Dairy Show-- Memphis
(Florida 4-H Club en-
tries)
OCT. 15 N. Florida District 4-H
Dairy Show-Quincy
OCT. 19-25 Interstate Fair and Dis-
trict I 4-H Show-Pensa-
cola
OCT. 21-22 Ocala Area Junior Live-
stock Show-Ocala
OCT. 21-24 N.E. Florida Livestock
Show-Callahan
OCT. 31 Orange County 4-H Dariy
Show-Orlando
OCT. 31 Volusia County 4-H Dairy
Show-DeLand
NOV. 3-7 Jackson County Fair -
Marianna
NOV. 7 Lake County 4-H Dairy
Show-Eustis
NOV. 7 Osceola Count 4-H Dairy
Show
NOV. 7 Brevard County 4-H Dairy
Show-Cocoa
NOV. 17 Polk County 4-H Dairy
Show-Bartow
NOV. 21 District VII 4-H Dairy
Show-Orlando


16 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS

























S19


t ti_;


SEEN ABOVE ARE MEMBERS of Florida's
State F.F.A. Dairy Judging team, representing
the Miami Edison High School Chapter and
145 other Florida F.F.A. Chapters, who will
compete in National F.F.A. Dairy Cattle Judg-
ing at the National Dairy Cattle Congress,
Waterloo, Iowa, in October. Left to right are:
Jim Bishop, Teddy Kretzchmar; the team ad-
viser, H. Quentin Duff: and Clifford Causey.

4-H CATTLE TO EXHIBIT
AT MID-SOUTH JERSEY SHOW
The Florida Jersey Cattle Club and in-
dividuals interested in 4-H Club work
are making it possible for Florida to be
represented in the Regional Junior Jersey
Show to be held in connection with the
Mid-South Fair at Memphis September
25 to October 3. The top 4-H Jerseys
in the state have been selected by a Com-
mittee of Florida Jersey Cattle Club
members and C. W. Reaves, Florida Ex-
tension Dairyman, to represent the state
at Memphis. In addition to financial aid
by the Florida Jersey Cattle Club, a num-
ber of individuals are giving assistance
in providing trucks and in other ways
to enable the cattle to be exhibited.
Fifteen head belonging to eleven out-
standing 4-H Dairy Club members from
Dade, Polk, St. Johns, Duval and Jack-
son counties will be exhibited. Attractive
signs, exhibitor cards and "FLORIDA"
cow blankets in 4-H colors will add to
the attractiveness of these outstanding
4-H animals and help publicize the pro-
gressive dairy industry of Florida.

"Everyone is 'ignorant' except on dif-
ferent subjects."
-Will Rogers.


Advertise In The
FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


DAIRY
SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT




TAMPA ORLAN DO
TAMPA ORLANDO


ROT AND TERMITES can't live on
A L & T's pressure-treated fence posts.
Contact with damp soil causes un-
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a few years. Termites will attack
exposed posts in much of the South-
east. Pine fence posts pressure-treated
with A L & T's clean, salt-type pre-
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longer than untreated posts. All the


wood is treated-not just the surface
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to 150 pounds per square inch. These
top-quality posts are clean, paintable,
odorless and can't harm livestock or
produce.
Here is a folder that tells you how
A L & T's clean-treated posts can save
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Graham Bldg., Jacksonville, Fla.
PRODUCERS OF THE ORIGINAL
Protect all the wood-- W olm an
not only the surface. W O l n
Insist on pressure- PRssuRE IiFEArED
treated posts.

RUDOLPH ROT AND TOMMY TERMITE LEAVE FOR GOOD-
Our bags are packed, our tickets bought, Eating Wolman-Treated boards and
We're off on new adventures. Is too tough on our dentures!


SEPTEMBER & OCTOBER, 1 9 5 3 17

















A-.


7th Annual West Florida Dairy Show
121 Entries Double Previous Shows
Marianna 4-H Member Exhibits Grand Champion of the Show
By: C. W. Reaves, State Extension Dairyman
Dairymen and future dairymen of the 14-county Northwest Florida area, from
Tallahassee to Pensacola, entered 121 dairy animals at the 7th Annual West Florida
Dairy Show held in Chipley August 13th practically doubling the number of entries
of any previous show.
Although the Show almost doubled previous years in size, there was no loss of
quality. A tabulation shows 62 in the Blue Ribbon Group, 30 in the Red Ribbon
Group and 29 in the White Ribbon Group, a total of 121 in all.
A major addition to the show was the greatly enlarged Open Dairy Show which
was sponsored by the three large milk companies in the area, Foremost Dairies,
Southern Dairies and Borden Dairies. A total of 24 animals were shown in the Open
Show, 59 in the 4-H Show and 38 in the FFA Show.
Other innovations which added to the participation this year were the "New"
and "Old" County Groups established in order to encourage new counties to partici-
pate. That this was a success was indicated by the fact that there were four counties
represented in the New County Group competing for the "County Group" honors.
Likewise, grade classes were provided growing dairy industry. Mr. Mayo an-
with prize winners and champions in this nounced with much satisfaction to the
division, thus eliminating the necessity of group who have devoted much time and
grade cows showing against registered expense in development of both the West
animals. Florida dairy industry and the show, that
the State Department of Agriculture, as
The show's two judges, Dr. R. B. a result of the increased interest dis-
Becker and Dr. S. P. Marshall, dairy ex- played by the area in the show, would
perts of the University of Florida, termed construct a new "show pavillion" for the
the show the largest and best ever held. housing of future shows. This, he said,
Commissioner of Agriculture, Nathan would be ready for the 1954 show.
Mayo, who was on hand as a guest Senator Olin Shivers of Chipley, vet-
speaker discussed the event as "a truly eran supporter of the show, spoke brief-
encouraging picture for West Florida's ly to thank Commissioner Mayo for his


decision to provide a pavilion for the
show. He also thanked on behalf of
the sponsoring groups, committees and
officials of the show, all who had assist-
ed and participated in making the show
the fine success that it was.
4-H Member Exhibits Grand
Champion Animal
Clyde Crutchfield, 18-year-old 4-H
member and son of Mr. and Mrs. M. T.
Crutchfield of Marianna, took top honors
in the show with a four-year-old reg-
istered Jersey. Clyde has won many top
4-H awards and will exhibit his prize
animal at the Southeastern regional show
in Memphis, Tenn., this fall. He was
grand champion grade winner at the last
state contest and was a member of the
1952 State Champion 4-H Judging Team.
Earl Crutchfield, Marianna 4-H entry
and younger brother of Clyde, won the
"fitting trophy" for the best groomed
animal in the show, and George Ford,
FFA entry of Quincy, won the trophy
for the best job of showmanship.
Although the show was not set up for
a reserve champion winner, Miss Lyn
Fitzpatrick, Jackson County, ran a close
second in the competition for top show
honors.
Awards fudging Trophies
The Florida Dairy Association judging
trophies in all three divisions were award-
ed by E. T. Lay, Executive Director of
the Association, as follows:






















First in FFA Team Judging went to
the Holmes County team comprised of:
Carthel Hodges, Mahlon Register and
Jack Faircloth, all of Bonifay. D. E.
Treadwell is the Chapter leader. The
Bonifay team scored 783 out of a pos-
sible 1200 points. The Bristol team
placed second and Havana, third.
First in 4-H Team Judging went to
the Leon County team at Tallahassee.
Members of the team are: Ernest Sel-
lers, Mary Ann Godbold, Pleas Strick-
land and Don Herold. The team leader
is W. D. Whittle, County Agricultural
Agent. The team scored 535 out of a
possible 750 points.
The second place 4-H judging team
was also a Leon County team. A Jack-
son County team placed third.
First Place in the Open Show Judging,
which was on an individual basis, went
to M. A. Schack, Jersey Breeder of
Greenwood. M. C. Fitzpatrick placed
second and M. T. Crutchfield third. The
winners received engraved trophies of the
Florida Dairy Association.
Winners In Adult Shou'
J. D. Fuqua of Altha displayed the
grand champion in the adult division,
while M. A. Schack won the adult judg-
ing contest as stated above.
Among the blue ribbon winners in the
adult division were: Julian Webb, Sr.,
J. P. Sellers, C. W. Enfinger (two en-
tries), and Lee Stanton, all of Washing-


ton; C. C. Sclr-rs L,-n ir .., Lntrlrsl
M. A. Schack \\ ( I ip.iar,,.k i rhrk-.
entries), both I.t l.r.ks.n A \\ I -rJ
and J. D. Fuqua. (ailhiun
Winner i: -i H 1.i)....
Winners ot -.iH .-lub .r-'._up. lirt
through third iplau. .ir a.s tllo\s
4-H Division, grade Guernsey (six to
twelve months) Clyde Hood of Wash-
ington, Billy Boling of Okaloosa, and
Jerry Senterfitt of Okaloosa; (12 to 18
months) Ray Gibbs of Escambia, Jimmy
Davis of Jackson. Registered Guernseys,
Lynn Fitzpatrick, Jackson, won in all
three age classes.
4-H Division, grade Jerseys, (six to
12 months) Edward Strickland, D. W.
Bell and Pleas Strickland, all of Leon
County; (12 to 18 months) Martin
Schack of Jackson, Earle Crutchfield of
Jackson, and Kenneth Hood of Wash-
ington.
(Continued on page 30)

BOTTOM PANEL, left to right: Grand Cham-
pion of the West Florida Dairy Show was a
four year-old Jersey entered by Clyde Crutch-
field of Magnolia in Jackson County. First to
congratulate the winner was Congressman Bob
Sikes of Crestview who was here to make the
principal address; chief judging team for Fu-
ture Farmers were, 1. to r., Carthel Hodge.
Mahlon Register, Jack Faircloth and D. E.
Treadwell, chapter instructor, all of Bonifay:
top 4-H judging team was from Leon County.
TV. O. Whittle. Leon County Agent, is seen
congratulating, 1. to r.. Ernest Sellers. Mar


Ann Godbold, Pleas Strickland and Don Her-
old.
WINNERS AND PARTICIPANTS in the
1953 West Florida Dairy Show at Chipley
are shoun in the panels at the top and bottom
of this page. TOP PANEL, left to right:
Lyn Fitzpatrick of Jackson County shows her
4-H Guernsey heifer entry which was unof-
ficially designated reserve Grand Champion of
the Show; Earl Crutchfield, left, 4-H member
from Jackson County, shows his Jersey heifer
which was judged the Show's best fitted ani-
mal, and George Ford of Quincy F. F. A.
Chapter who won the top award for "show-
manship"; in the third picture is shown the
Jackson County "best County group," left to
right, the grand champion of the show shown
by Clyde CVrutchfield, Martin Schack, and
Wm. Schack; (all three animals were prize
winning Jerseys); George Ford of Gadsden
County shows his registered Jersey cow which
won first in her class division in the 4th pic-
ture; fifth, Julian Webb, Washington County,
and his Blue Ribbon F.F.A. Jr. Yearling
Guernsey entry; the outstanding family team
was composed of William 16, Charles 13, and
Martin Schack 11, of Greenwood. William has
taken part in the past 7 West Fla. Dairy
Shows, Charles the last 3, and Martin the last
2. All have honors to their credit, including
grand champion of Show last year for William
and first place calf for Martin. This year Wil-
liam won 3 blue ribbons. Charles took one.
and Martin captured 5.







Letter To The Editor


By: Alf R. Nielsen


School Milk Prices and Newspaper Editorials

DITOR'S NOTE: Mr. Nielsen is recognized in his own community of West Palm Beach as an
outstanding civic and youth leader. He is recognized by his fellow dairy men as "Dean of the
Florida Dairy Industry" and an outstanding national leader by the entire Dairy Industry. He
holds the distinction of being the first graduate of the College of Agriculture, University of
Florida, in dairying. He has served for many years as Chairman of the University of Florida
Committee for the Florida Dairy Industry.
Editorials in the August 14th, 1953 Tampa Tribune, and August 15th, 1953
Florida Times-Union have commended the action of the 1953 Florida Legislature and
the recent ruling of the Attorney General, Richard Ervin, wherein the Florida Milk
Commission cannot fix prices at any level on milk sold to schools and charitable
institutions.
These editorials imply that the above mentioned action of the Legislature and
possible further expansion of the elimination of price fixing of the Florida Milk
Commission will automatically reduce the price of milk to consumers.
One might ask the question, whether these newspapers in their subscription and
advertising rates, can show as little increase in the cost of their services and product
as the dairy industry in the cost of their products to consumers ?
The question might also be asked, what product purchased and sold in school
cafeterias has increased as little in price as milk has? About the only item the various
cafeterias purchase that has shown as small an increase in price is orange juice.
The dairy industry uses a large amount of various grains that are blended to
make up very essential dairy feed. All of these grains are supported by the National
Government so that a minimum price is maintained. This has kept the cost of dairy
feeds artificially high in spite of surplus production throughout the nation.
The ever increasing cost of labor, which is important in producing good, safe
milk, and which also makes everything that a dairyman uses cost more, is continually
developing more and more problems for the dairy industry in keeping the cost of
milk reasonable to consumers.
Just why newspapers, editorial writers and a small segment of our population
insists upon asking an industry like the dairy industry to provide milk at a loss to
their children and unfortunates in charitable institutions, is beyond the comprehension
of the men and women that produce the milk, process and distribute this most
important food.
Using the same argument as do the people that continually insist upon lower and
lower prices for milk, certainly the dairy industry as taxpayers supporting the public
schools and other institutions would be justified in asking the school teachers, ad-
ministrators of the school system and various charitable institutions to work for the
same wages and salaries that they received before World War II.
The dairy industry of the State of Florida can be proud of the fact that milk
has only increased 42.2% since 1939. What other product used in everyday living
can show such a small increase in cost?
It might be well to call to the attention of these editorial writers and the Legis-
lature of the State of Florida, the fact that there is no marketing area of consequence
within the boundaries of the United States that is not under a milk regulatory agency
of the Federal Government or some form of State Milk control. These agencies in
these various marketing areas set the prices of milk for various grades produced.
Dairymen of the State of Florida have problems peculiar to Florida and the
semi-tropical climate in which milk is produced. The industry as a whole believes
that the closer home we have regulatory agencies the better rules and regulations can
be promulgated to fit conditions peculiar to the various sections of the State of Florida.
For that reason, the industry of the State of Florida has insisted upon their own
regulatory agency within the State; and furthermore, it must be emphasized that the
cost of administering the agency is borne entirely by the dairy industry itself.
Yes indeed, the growing and expanding dairy industry of the State of Florida is
justified in being proud of the fact that in co-operation with the Florida Milk Com-
mission, it has been successful in keeping the price of milk as low as they have,
keeping in mind always having high quality, safe milk.
Compare our 42.2% increase over 1939 with the average throughout the United
States where Federal Control operates, of 86% increase.
The dairy industry of the State of Florida, in co-operation with the Milk Com-
mission supplies milk to school cafeterias and charitable institutions at a discount of
1/2c per 1/2 pint of milk. Very little, if any profit is made by the dairy industry as a
(Continued on page 34)


WHY EVERYONE
SHOULD DRINK MILK

(A $500.00 Prize-Winning Essay in June
Dairy Month Contest, sponsored by New York
State Milk Dealers' Association)
By: ELLEN STEPANIAN,
9th Grade, Elmira, N. Y.
"The world into which I was born was
little concerned over the Armenian massa-
cres committed by the Turks in 1895, and
even less disposed to realize the effects
on the people or the wanton destruction
of the fields and cattle. But to one Ar-
menian, now living in Elmira, this war
was all too real. He well remembers how
his family fought to save their cows, be-
cause their one objective was to maintain
the life of their small son.
It is amazing how this small boy lived
through the Turkish massacre, but even
more amazing that he survived the long
years of famine which followed.
Since the family was fortunate enough
to save a few cows, they lived on milk
and milk products for over ten years. For
breakfast the small boy would have a dish
of yogurt. At lunch time a few pieces of
cheese and bread with a glass of yogurt,
was very welcome. Cottage cheese with
bread and a glass of milk served as his
dinner.
This same routine of meals was broken
up about once or twice every five years
when a cow was too old to produce any
more milk or had a broken leg and had
to be killed; then they would eat the
meat from the cow.
From personal experience, I know what
has happened to this boy because he is
my father.
To this day my father has been to the
dentist only once to have his teeth fixed;
he has never had a serious illness. His
nails are as strong as iron. He is very
active in various sports, and he has missed
only a few days of work during his whole
life.
As a pupil in American schools, I have
learned how my father could live through
those ten years on milk and milk products.
Milk sugar and fat are among the most
valuable of all our "body fuels" because
they are readily absorbed by our tissues
to give us heat and energy. The protein
is a muscle builder, and it also keeps the
body in repair. The mineral salts-especi-
ally phosphorus and calcium-help the
body make sturdy bones. Our richest
source of calcium comes from milk.
Thus I know from my own personal
experience that milk is a necessity of life
and that many people will be deprived
of the good health which makes possible
good living unless they drink plenty of
milk."


20 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS







ORANGE ICE CREAM
(Continued from page 8)
In considering the individual ingredi-
ents that are necessary to give proper
consistency to the injection-type f r u it
preparation there appeared to be an al-
ternate approach. The obvious question-
why not combine some of the ingredients
and give them the necessary heat treat-
ment prior to the addition of the citrus
juices? Early trials confirmed such a sup-
position to be feasible.
Arriving at Formula
Final formula selection was made from
among a few of the preparations after
injection into ice cream and subsequent
hardening of the finished ice cream.
Taken into consideration were dipping
characteristics, appearance of the dipped
portion before, during and after slight
melting, and palate response to flavor
compatibility.
Other Citrus Fruits
The frozen lemon, lime and tangerine
products available on the local market
have been processed into the respective ice
cream injection materials. When replac-
ing the orange concentrate in the formula,
two of them resulted in finished prepara-
tions that were understabilized. A similar
condition prevailed when frozen concen-
trated grape juice was used. This condi-
tion required a slight change in the for-
mula whereby the stabilizer content was
increased by about 15 percent. Such
differences are to be expected and the
necessary modifications in the formula
must be made if uniformity of product
is to be obtained.
Other Fruits
This process is suitable for the prepara-
tion of injection-type materials of all
fresh fruits by using the juice or the
puree of the fruit. Fruit juices or puree
having pronounced flavors may be used
as "single strength" products, while those
of low flavor intensity may be concen-
trated or they may be fortified with the
respective pure fruit concentrated flavor
or essence.
Use in Ice Cream
These injection-type fruit products may
be used at the rate of 15 to 20 percent
by weight of the finished ice cream, de-
pending upon the composition of the ice
cream mix. Standards for composition of
fruit ice creams will determine the maxi-
mum amount to be used.
If the ice cream mix is prepared of
butterfat-containing dairy products not
highly colored the resulting ice cream will
provide a more desirable color contrast
for the brightly colored fruit preparations.
Summnar)y
The method described is unique in
that the true fresh flavors of fruits are
retained in the finished products. The use
of colloids and sweeteners in preparing


injection-type products is not new, but
the use of the fresh fruit juices and/or
purees in the manner outlined makes
possible the production of certain new
fruit preparations as injection-type flavor-
ing materials for ice cream.
Storing the Material
No more specific data are available on
the keeping quality of the injection ma-
terial. It is safe to store at 350 to 400 F.
for 12 to 16 hours, and perhaps slightly
longer if the material goes into storage
at 300 F. or lower (it will not be frozen
at 300 F.). Keep in the hardening room
if longer storage is necessary.
Sales Opportunity
Sales of the variegated orange ice
cream on the campus of the University
of Florida have been running at about 9


to 10 per cent of all ice cream sold. No
publicity or point of sales displays have
been used.
It would appear that the ice cream
manufacturers in Florida should be ready
for the winter tourists by offering the
variegated orange ice cream. Orange
growers and processors of the frozen con-
centrate should unite with them in a
sound promotion campaign.
Make it from the very best Florida
grown oranges and promote it to the
fullest. A good impression now will be
the very best "salesman" in "Yankee Ter-
ritory" later. Our ambassadors, the tour-
ists, can do much to put variegated orange
ice cream in regular demand as a fruit
ice cream. They will if they like it, and
they will like it if it is properly made."


SEPTEMBER & OCTOBER, 1 9 5 3 21


DAIRYMEN...





Juit try THIIiK

what your



FARM or DAIRY


f' Wou1d be like










0








FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY









JERSEY CATTLE CLUB NEWS

The American Jersey Cattle Club recently announced the following reports on
official registry tests made in the herds of several of Florida's well known Jersey
breeders. All records were made under supervision of the University of Florida and
reported to the American Jersey Cattle Club, which has its national headquarters in
Columbus, Ohio, for official approval and publication.
According to the A.J.C.C., the Jersey breed has more officially classified animals
than any other dairy breed. The classification program was started in 1932.
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA EXPERI- American Jersey Cattle Club.
MENT STATION FARM AT GAINESVILLE The high producing animal in the group
-The herd of registered Jerseys owned by the was Standard Signal Ballerina with a mature
Station was recently classified for breed type record of 13,651 Ibs. milk containing 761 lbs.
by Prof. H. P. Ewalt of Oregon State College, butterfat. The other cows all exceeded 550
an official classifier of The American Jersey lbs. butterfat on a twice-daily-milking, 305-day
Cattle Club. mature equivalent basis.


IMPROVE GRASSLANDS TO
SAVE MILK DOLLARS
As a rule, pastures are the most neg-
lected acres on a farm. Many so-called
pastures are merely exercise lots. Good
land seeded to suitable pasture grasses
and legumes will return as much as if
seeded to most other crops and at a great
saving in labor, for the cows do the har-
vesting.
Pastures and meadows respond well to
fertilizer and should be kept producing
at maximum capacity, for they furnish
the foundation for the most economical
ration for dairy cows.


The animals in the herd were given indi-
vidual ratings based on a comparison with the
Jersey breed's official score card, which allots
100 points for the ideal Jersey animal. The
above herd now has an average score of
80.17% on 118 animals. The breed's average
is 83.15%.
Nineteen animals are rated Very Good, 49
Good Plus, 26 Good, and 25 Fair.
POLK COUNTY OWNED DAIRY, BAR-
TOW-Sparkling Fillpail Boots, a registered
Jersey cow of this herd recently completed
a production record of 4,651 quarts milk con-
taining enough butterfat to churn 667 pounds
butter.
In 306 days on official Herd Improvement
Registry test this cow produced 10,001 lbs.
,ilk with 556 lbs. butterfat at the age of 6
years and 7 months.
CHARLES HENLEY DAIRY, JACKSON-
VILLE-Oxford Actor Pansy, a registered Jer-
sey cow of this dairy, has been rated a Tested
Dam by The American Jersey Cattle Club, for
having three offspring with official production
records.
The cow's progeny averaged 9,073 lbs. milk
with 492 lbs. butterfat, on a twice-daily-milk-
ing, 305-day mature equivalent basis.
PENNOCK PLANTATION DAIRY, JUPI-
TER-Onyx Standard Royal, a registered Jer-
sey bull, bred and owned by this dairy, has
been qualified as a Tested Sire.
Ten tested daughters of Onyx Standard
Royal produced an average of 10,413 lbs. milk
containing 505 lbs. butterfat on a twice-daily-
milking, 305-day mature equivalent basis,
which is more than two times the butterfat
production of the "average" dairy cow in the
United States.
Ten of his daughters have been classified for
type by an official classifier of the Club. They
attained an average score of 84.50 per cent as
compared to the breed average of 83.15 per
cent.
WELKENER HOLLY HILL D A I RY,
JACKSONVILLE Three registered Jersey
cows of this dairy have won outstanding milk
and butterfat production records on official
Register of Merit.
Standard Signal Ballerina produced 14,859
lbs. milk and 825 lbs. butterfat in 365 days
on two-times-a-day milking and won the Flori-
da junior 4-year-old milk and butterfat cham-
pionship for Jersey cows.
Sybil Pompey Ruby produced 18,633 lbs.
milk and 848 lbs. butterfat in 365 days on two-
a-day milking for the Florida 7-year-old milk
state championship for the Jersey breed.
Observer Sultan Trudy received the Silver
Medal Certificate award. She produced 9,960
lbs. milk containing 544 lbs. butterfat at the
age of 2 years and 2 months.
WELKENER HOLLY HILL D A I R Y,
JACKSONVILLE-Six registered Jersey cows
of this dairy have recently completed records
on Herd Improvement Registry test which en-
titles them to special recognition from The

22 FLORIDA DAIRY


STANDARD


DESIGN


ATTEND THE



FLORIDA JERSEY CATTLE CLUB


13th ANNUAL

STATE SALE

Thursday, Ootober 1, 1953 12:30 P.M., E.S.T.
Jacksonville, Florida

4-H CLUB LIVESTOCK BUILDING
1st and McDuff Streets, Off Highway No. 90


0


AN EXCEPTIONAL GROUP OF

50 TOP JERSEYS

30 Cows-FRESH and HEAVY SPRINGERS
13 Bred Heifers-Mostly FALL FRESHENING
4 Heifer Calves-Future Farmer and 4-H Club
Show Prospects
3 Bulls-Of Proven Ancestry


ANNUAL MEETING AND BANQUET

SEPTEMBER, 30, 1953

AT SALE HEADQUARTERS
HOTEL SEMINOLE, JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
For Cataloque and Banquet Reservations:
Write: F. E. Baetzman, Secretary
Court House, Orlando, Florida


LAURENCE GARDINER, Pedigrees


DRACONIS


SYBIL


NEWS


TOM McCORD, Auctioneer


OBSERVER


JESTER






State Jersey Sale Set
In Jacksonville October I
The Florida Jersey Cattle Club has
scheduled both their 14th Annual State
Jersey Sale and the organization's 1953
Annual Meeting to be held in Jackson-
ville September 30th and October 1st.
, Mr. William Nolan, Jr., of Alpine
Dairy Farm, Jacksonville, and President
of the State Jersey Cattle Club has an-
nounced the Annual Meeting of the As-
sociation to be held Wednesday, Septem-
ber 30th, 1:00 P.M., at the Hotel Semi-


nole which will be headquarters for the
two-day event.
The Jersey Sale will be held Thursday,
October 1st, at the new Duval County
4-H Club Show Pavillion on McDuff
Avenue starting at 12:30 P.M.
The sale committee headed by Walter
Welkener, another prominent Du val
County Jersey breeder, states that the com-
mittee has selected an outstanding array
of Jerseys for the sale consisting of 43
heavy springer cows and bred heifers, 4
unbred heifers and 3 bulls.
The Annual Business Meeting of the
Florida Jersey Cattle Club to be held Sep-


tember 30th at 1:00 P.M. will be fol-
lowed by the organization's Annual ban-
quet at 7:00 P.M. at the Seminole Hotel.
Fred Baetzman of Orlando, County
Agent and Secretary of the F. J. C. C.,
who is in charge of the Annual banquet
program, has announced that the new Jer-
sey film "More Profit Per Acre" will be
shown, several trophies will be awarded
and a special guest speaker will be heard.
Duval County Agricultural Agent, Jim
Wastson, is in general charge of local
arrangements for the sale and will serve
as toastmaster for the Annual Banquet
Program.


Cover Picture
Story


Florida's Jersey Triplets
Get Widespread Attention
On July 4, triplet calves were born on
the farm of M. A. Schack of Greenwood,
Florida, two heifers and one bull. The
calves are reported normal and doing well
in every respect. The young dam of the
triplets is a two year old registered Jer-
sey cow, Observing Mona Ruby, 1844713.
She is doing well, producing approxi-
mately 30 pounds of milk daily on HIR
Test.
The triplets were the center of attrac-
tion when their owner placed them on
exhibit for their first public appearance
August 13th at the West Florida Dairy
Show, Chipley, Florida.
The American Jersey Cattle Club, tak-
ing note of the unusual event, has re-
quested pictures and complete data on
the youngsters. The rarity of triplets in
cattle is indicated by figures given in
Gilmor's book, Dairy Cattle Breeding,
which shows only 56 sets of triplets out
of a total of 201,044 births or one set
of triplets in every 3,590 births.
However, a national television news-
caster in reporting the recent birth of
Holstein triplets in Ohio stated that trip-
lets occur only once in 100,000 cases.
The American Jersey Cattle Club has ad-
vised that they have no accurate data on
the matter.
The Schack Dairy triplets are consid-
ered more a rarity than usual, both as
coming from a registered Jersey dam and
as artificially bred animals. The sire is
owned by the American Breeder's Serv-
ice at Asheville, N. C. The Schack trip-
lets hold the further distinction of being
the first artificially sired calves born in
Jackson County.


OUR CONSIGNMENT TO:


THE FLORIDA JERSEY CATTLE CLUB

13th ANNUAL

STATE SALE
Thursday, October 1, 1953 12:30 P.M. E.S.T.
4-H CLUB LIVESTOCK BUILDING, JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA

3 COWS:
SYBIL POMPEY ROSALIE 1721157, Classified Very Good.
Born: March 1, 1949. Calfhood Vaccinated. Fresh and Selling Open.
A daughter of MONOLO SYBIL POMPEY 435238 Senior Superior
Gold and Silver Medal Sire.
X. STANDARD IVY EMILIE 1768190, Classified Very Good.
Born: April 30, 1950. Calfhood Vaccinated. Fresh and Selling Open.
A daughter of BILTMORE IVY BUTTERKING 451141, Senior Superior
Silver Medal Sire.
X. STANDARD GLEN IVY 1872634 Born: June 2, 1951.
Calfhood Vaccinated. Will be bred by Sale Date. A daughter of BILTMORE
IVY BUTTERKING 451141, Senior Superior Silver Medal Sire.
2 BULLS:
OBSERVER ONYX LIEUTENANT 548321
Calfhood Vaccinated. A son of OBSERVER TREVA EMPEROR 500458, Ex-
cellent. Daughters now on Test, first 7 to finish test average 8296 Milk
5.5% 455 Fat. 10 Classified daughters average 85.00%.
Dam: Observer Treva Lelia 1649288, V. G. Gold and Silver Medal
TON OF GOLD cow.
TEFFIA JESTER BASIL STAN 548317 Born: August 8, 1953.
Calfhood Vaccinated. A son of TEFFIA'S ROYAL BASILEUS 519177 with
16 daughters in herd, first due to calve in September.
Dam: Observer Design Prudence 1768204 Silver Medal daughter of
OBSERVER DESIGN KING ONYX 415663, Senior Superior, Gold and Silver
Medal Sire.



HOLLY HILL FARM
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Welkener


Rt. 3, Box 612
Jacksonville, Florida


Gold Star Herd
Constructive Breeder 7X


Herd T. B. & Bangs Accredited


SEPTEMBER & OCTOBER, 1 953


_I


* 23






FLORIDA JERSEYS ARE CHAMPION MILK PRODUCERS

Champion 7 year old cow has High Record
Sybil Pompey Ruby 1522757 became the Florida State Class Milk Champion in
the 7-year old 365 day twice daily milking division, upon completing June 1953 a
record of 18,633 pounds Milk 4.5% 848 pounds Fat in 365 Days at 7-2 of Age.
This record is not Ruby's first high record as she has milked in previous years
is follows-
Days Age Milk % Fat Fat 2x Milking Medal Award
305 2-2 9632 4.94 476 305 Days Silver Medal
365 3-2 14154 4.60 648 365 Days
365 4-11 16996 4.70 791 365 Days Gold & Silver Medals
305 6-1 14698 4.80 711 305 Days Gold Medal & Ton of Gold
365 7-2 18633 4.50 848 365 Days


1705 74113 3474
Ruby has been Officially rated Very
Good for type. She weighs approximately
950 lbs. During her last lactation Ruby
averaged 51 lbs. of milk a day (24
quarts). She reached a peak of 93 lbs.
of milk a day. Her high month was April
1952 with 2415 Ibs. of milk. She was on
good Florida clover pasture, all of the
home cured hay she wanted to eat and
approximately 25 lbs. of a mixture of
grain and citrus pulp a day.
While making these high records Ruby
has dropped 7 calves, twice having twin
calves. A son, X. Standard Ivy Rex, is
herd sire at Sunshine Farms, Merced, Cali-
fornia, owned by Mr. E. E. Greenough.
Mr. Greenough has shipped some heifers
to Japan who were bred to Rex, and Ruby
now has some granddaughters in Japan.
Another son Obeserver Design Sybil Rex
is herd sire at Alvarez Jersey Farm, Jack-
sonville, Fla. Her last calf, a daughter,
is at Holly Hill Farm.
Ruby is a daughter of Monolo Sybil
Pompey 435238, V. G. Senior Superior,
Gold & Silver Medal Sire with 32 tested
daughters averaging 10,416 lbs. of milk
5.2%, and Signal Debutante Ruth 1338-
467, Very Good, who is a real milk pro-
ducer in her own right, having milked a
total of 112,463 lbs. of Milk and 5,359
lbs. Fat in 3042 Days, starting at 2 years
of age. Her last record made at 10-2 of


age is 15,997 lbs. Milk 4.6% 733 lbs.
Fat, twice daily milking, which gave her
the honor of being the Florida State Class
Milk Champion in the 10 year old, 365
Day Division.
Both of these great milk cows are now
dry and due to calve in September and
October. They are owned by Mr. and
Mrs. Walter Welkener, Holly Hill Farm,
Jacksonville, Florida. These cows have
been on Production Test all of their lives.
These Tests are supervised by Officials of
the University of Florida in cooperation
with The American Jersey Cattle Club.
Jerseys in Florida produce large quan-
tities of quality milk to meet the ever
increasing demand of our growing popu-
lation. Florida Dairymen are proving,
thru Production Testing, that the Jersey
cow is true to her slogan: "MORE COW
TO MILK-LESS COW TO FEED."


Classified Advertising
RATE FOR ALL CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING IS 10c PER WORD

flax ti a, U rufl'4,a ourr~-t$Aitf


FOR SALE
"ATTENTION DAIRYMEN"
I handle the best young Tennessee Cows and
heifers to be found. A fine selection on hand at
all times.
I deliver top cows all over Florida.
W. C. TINSLEY, JR.
Box 93 Lafayette, Alabama Phone 6431
PINKING SHEARS
Only $1.95 postpaid. Chromium plated, precision
made. Manufacturer's Christmas overstock. Guar-
anteed $7.95 value or money refunded. Order by
mail. Lincoln Surplus Sales, 529 Main St.,
Evanston 36, Illinois.


RUUCiHj EQlUIPMEnT SUPPLIES-CAITLE
WATERING TANKS. Ten-foot steel reinforced
Concrete, 2% Feet wide. $60.00, delivered, $50.00
your truck. Four foot wide tanks, $80.00 and
$70.00. Orlando Concrete Specialties. Box 6122,
Station 6. Orlando, Florida. Phone 3-4111.

BE PROGRESSIVE THRU COOPERATION
Investigate the advantages of selling your feed
bags Thru;
THE DAIRY BAG COMPANY
Operated by the management of
THE MIAMI DAIRY EQUIPMENT EXCH.
769 N. W. 18th Terrace
Miami 36, Fla. Phone 2-7188


Management Of Pastures
For Winter Dairy Feeds
(Continued from page 13)

Inoculation should be carried out care-
fully. It is generally recommended that
the inoculant for clovers be applied at
five times and that for lupines at twice
the rates recommended on the containers.
The inoculated seed should be protected
against sunlight and planted immediately.
Under favorable moisture conditions
clover may be seeded directly on the
closely grazed sod without covering them
with soil. However, it is generally good
practice to scarify the sod lightly with a
disk and plant the seed using a culti-
packer with seeding attachment. If a
cultipacker is not available the seed may
be sown with a whirlwind seeder and
covered with a log roller. Sweet lupines
should be seeded with a grain drill or
with a special seeder which will place
the seed one to two inches below the
surface of the soil.
Many farmers prefer to use a small
amount of nitrogen in their clover ferti-
lizers. It is generally felt that nitrogen
in clover will tend to stimulate the grasses
to the detriment of the legumes. This
drawback to application of nitrogen to
clovers can be partially offset if grazing
of the grass is continued after fertiliza-
tion and the cattle are removed as soon
as damage to the new clover seedlings
becomes apparent. If some nitrogen in the
clover fertilizer is desired it is recom-
mended that 3-12-12, 3-10-20 or 3-8-24
be substituted respectively for 0-14-14,
0-10-20, or 0-8-24.
Temporary Grazing
Temporary grazing crops are counted
upon heavily in the central and northern
parts of the state for part of the winter
grazing. They may be used in the south-
ern part of the state if suitable soils are
available and flooding can be prevented.
Crops used include oats, rye, wheat, rye
grass, and rescue grass. In planting such
temporary grazing crops, choice of varie-
ties, fertilization and seeding rates, dates
and methods should receive attention.
Several varieties of oats are suitable
for use in Florida. Of these, Southland
is most popular at the present time. This
variety produces more early growth than
any of the other varieties in common use.
However, it is subject to attack by some
of the newer races of crown rust and is
often severely damaged by culm rot. For
this reason it may be desirable to use
some other variety. Floriland, which is
quite similar to Southland as regards the
period of maximum growth, probably has
the highest degree of rust resistance of
any variety of oats available to Florida
farmers. It is a good forage producer
but it has poor grain quality. Victor-
(Continued next page)


24 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS






Management Of Pastures
For Winter Dairy Feed
(Continued from page 24)
grain 48-93 is more cold resistant than
other varieties of oats commonly used in
Florida. It produces more forage during
the cool months of January and Febru-
ary than does Floriland and Southland.
It is subject to damage by Victoria blight
and certain races of rust. However, Vic-
toria blight has not been a serious dis-
ease in Florida for the last three years.
Wheat, of which two varieties-Coast-
al and Coker 47-27-have been found
adapted to Florida, has come into gen-
eral use in some areas. Wheat, like Vic-
torgrain oats is winter hardy and will
furnish considerable amounts of forage
during the cold part of the winter.
Florida Black rye is an excellent forage
producer. When planted early it will
produce as much forage as any of the
other small grains used for winter graz-
ing.
Rye grass is a good forage producer
but most of its growth occurs during
March at which time grazing may be fur-
nished by winter legumes. Rescue grass
has received considerable attention in
Florida. On the basis of the limited in-
formation available it appears that rescue
grass is inferior to the other temporary
grazing crops.
Organic Soils
All of the above suggestions apply to
mineral soils only. The production of
winter grazing crops on organic soils is
an entirely different proposition. Tall
fescue grass is considered to be one of
the best winter grasses for organic soils.
Summary
The program outlined above includes
fall fertilization of summer grasses to
produce forage for use during the early
part of the winter season, the production
of winter legumes for use during late
winter and through the spring season,
the use of temporary grazing crops to
fill in the slack period between the sum-
mer grasses and winter legumes, and the
production of alfalfa hay for use as a
supplement to the grazing crops and
grain feeds.
By choosing practices based on their
needs and on the soil and other condi-
tions on their farms the dairymen of
Florida can make considerable progress
in the improvement of their winter feed
production programs.
Additional information can be obtained
from your county agent or from the fol-
lowing bulletins of the Florida Agricul-
tural Experiment Stations, Gainesville,
Florida:
No. 484-Grass Pastures in Central
Florida
No. 515-Maintaining Fertility in
Mineral Soils under Permanent Pasture
No. 517-Winter Clovers in Central
Florida


ONE-MAN DAIRY OPERATION


0 117 i I i.
MILKING ROOM TYPE. From cow to cans or
refrigerated farm tank, the De Laval Combine
installed in a separate milking room does the
entire job. It also eliminates stooping, squat-
ting and walking from cow to cow.


BARN TYPE. Installed along the stanchions
in the dairy barn, the De Laval Combine milks
and conveys the milk to the milk house, saving
all carrying and pouring. Ideal for the man
who does not want a separate milking room.


4 *f


MECHANIZED INDIVIDUAL FEEDING.
Milking stalls, available for use with De Laval
Combines, measure and deliver the exact
amount of grain desired for each cow.


.I .:. .
I rf
a' ib


MECHANIZED "IN-PLACE" CLEANING.
Regardless of where it is installed, the
De Laval Combine can be quickly, easily and
thoroughly washed and sanitized by the
De Laval "In-Place" Vacuum Cleaning Method.


One-man dairy operation *. now
a practical reality ... today! The
De Laval Combine Milker com-
pletely mechanizes the milking
operation whether installed in the
dairy barn or separate milking
room. It milks, weighs individual
co\\ production, if desired, filters,
and conveys the milk to cans or
farm tank. After milking, the De
La\al Combine is washed and
sanitized by De Laval "In-Place"
Vacuum Cleaning... a completely
mechanized method.





















Individual graining of each cow,
in precise quantities, is also fully
mechanized at the milking stall.
Thus, step by step, De Laval has
completely mechanized the entire
milking operation so that today
with the average size herd, one man
can easily handle the entire job.
The hard work, heavy lifting, miles
of walking, and high labor costs
have been eliminated. The result
is easier, pleasanter, more profit-
able dairying. In addition, closer
attention to milking, handling, and
feeding each cow is made possible.


DE LAVAL COMBINE MILKERS
"FIRST- SINCE 1928"
----------- ----I
THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR CO., DEPT. 39-v
Poughkeepsie, New York
Please send me interesting new printed matter on
e/ De Laval Combine Milkers

THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR COMPANY ND.T FN,,- ,,.i. -F L''T' LPREF
POUGHKEEPSIE, N. Y. Name
427 Randolph St., Chicago 6, Illinois I
61 Beale Street, San Francisco 5, Calif. I Ton R F.D.1 tat1 l -
LSR & O- ----- -------C, 3 2--
SEPTEMBER & OCTOBER, 1 9 5 3 25



















C


Above are the officers of the Chipola Artificial Breeders Association at their August 12th
Meeting in Marianna. They are, left to right: Lee Stanton, President; O. T. Burgess, Vice-
president; Reuben Moss, Mgr. and Technician; and Woodrou' Glenn, Secretary and County
Farm Agent.


THE TWO PICTURES ABOVE were taken at the August 12th monthly meeting of the
Chipola Dairy Association at Marianna by the Dairy News editor. This meeting was said by
its secretary, Woodrow Glenn, who is Washington County's Farm Agent, to be one of the best
yet held by this group formed early in 1953 for the dairymen and dairies of Washington. Cal-
houn, Holmes and Jackson Counties.
THE TOP PICUTRE shows the meeting in session listening to a report of E. T. Lay,
Secretary of the Florida Dairy Association.
IN THE LOWER PICTURE, front row, left to right, are Donald Leonard, Blountstown
representative of the group on the Board of the Florida Dairy Association; J. D. Fuqua, Altha,
President of the group and 1954 Director-elect for the State Association; Dr. R. B. Becker,
University of Florida Dairy Department, who was a guest speaker; Woodrow Brown, Florida
4-H Club Director. Back row, left to right, E. H. Finlayson, President Florida Farm Bureau;
W. W. Glenn, Washington County Agent, and Dr. S. P. Marshall, Dairy Department of the
University of Florida, who was also a guest speaker.


CHIPOLA BREEDERS GROUP
HAS SPLENDID RECORD
The Chipola Artificial Breeders As-
sociation still less than one year old, is
considered one of the fastest growing and
most successful of Florida's several local
Artificial Breeders organizations. The
group now has over 50 members in four
counties; Jackson, Washington, Calhoun
and Holmes. Officials report that the
Association is on a sound financial basis
and has bred about 1,000 cows during its
first ten months of operation.
One of the unique records held by the
group is the birth of registered Jersey
triplets to one of the first cows bred.
These also have the distinction of being
the first artificially bred calves to be born
in Jackson County. M. A. Schack of
Greenwood is the proud owner of the
triplets.


PRIZE NOTES TO MILK MAN
Dear Charlie:
I saw the picture in the paper of where
your son is back from the war in France.
Please ask him if he ran across my boy,
Walter. You remember him-the red-
head that always wanted to ride on your
wagon.

Dear Milkman:
If you see the baker on the way, please
tell him not to leave any bread. If it's
raining, please put our newspaper inside
the screen door on the porch.

Dear Milkman:
My car is stalled. My husband is out
of town. Will you please ring my bell
and wake me up and give my car a push
so it will start.

Dear Milkman:
My back door is open. Please put
milk in refrigerator. Get money out of
cup in dresser and leave change on kit-
chen table in pennies because we want
to play Penny Ante.

COUNTRY-WISE CITY COUSIN
The pretty young thing from the city
was visiting her country cousin, who was
showing her around the farm. He was
much impressed with the young lady and
secretly wanted to steal a kiss, but was
too bashful to try.
They were leaning on a pasture fence
watching a cow with her young calf. The
cow began licking the calf's face, and
this gave the country cousin what he
though was a brilliant idea. Turning to
the girl, he said, "My, how I'd like to
do that."
Replying quickly she said, "Well, go
ahead, it's your cow."


26 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS







Largest Dairy Group Attend

University Course for Herdsmen

Studies Feature Herd Replacements and Pasture Development

The Dairy Herdsmen's Short Course, an annual event sponsored jointly by the
University of Florida and the Florida Dairy Industry Association was held in
Gainesville August 25-27.
Attendance was greater than in previous years with herdsmen and owners
coming from most parts of peninsular Florida and from as widely separated areas
as Tallahassee, Jacksonville, Miami and Ft. Myers. Visiting livestock owners from
Cuba and Bolivia also were present.
Dr. E. L. Fouts, Head of the Dairy Science Department welcomed the group
and outlined the work of the University in Dairy research and training.
In general, two subjects were featured. These were "Breeding and Development
of home raised Replacements" and "Pastures and their Utilization."
Extension Dairyman, C. W. Reaves explained numerous production testing pro-
grams that are available to dairymen and the many advantages of knowing the pro-
ducing ability of each cow as well as of the entire herd. Dr. R. B. Becker then pointed
out the fundamentals of inheritance of milk production and how records can be used
in establishing families of high producing cows.
The importance of detailed breeding oats, millet and alyce clover had feed re-
records and systematic checking of the placement values of $112.00, $117.00
herd to keep them reproducing regularly and $72.00 per acre respectively at cost
was presented by Prof. P. T. Dix Arnold. of production of $35.00, $45.00 and
The average cow has less than four calves $28.00.
in her lifetime so that natural increase in Farm Manager A. B. Sanchez discussed
herd size is rather slow considering sex necessity for rotation in an intensive graz-
ratio of calves and death losses. ing program and stressed proper fertility
At the Dairy Research Unit, Herds- and management to get a succession of
man H. L. Somers went into the detailed quality forage in both permanent and
feeding, care and management of calves temporary pastures. In the afternoon he
so as to maintain growth rates at normal conducted the group to various pastures
or above, and to keep losses at a mini- at the Dairy Research Unit and pointed
mum. out good management practices.
Dr. J. M. Wing and Dr. S. P. Mar- Mr. Reaves used D.H.I.A. records to
shall conducted a demonstration and in- show costs and returns from pasture.
formal clinic of artificial insemination Three widely separated dairymen who
and reproductive functions and failures had large, medium and small herds re-
often encountered in dairy herds, snectivelv. produced nutrients on pasture


PASTURES EMPHASIZED
Extension Agronomist J. R. Henderson
started the Pasture phase of the short
course with a discussion of soil character-
istics desirable for pasture development
and the fertility requirements for the im-
proved grasses and legumes. He also re-
ported that pasture specialists are recom-
mending somewhat higher applications of
fertilizers than formerly and that legumes
and pangola grass especially respond to
frequent potash applications. Spring, win-
ter, summer and fall nitrogen applications
extended and increase all grass pasture
growth. Irrigation is playing a very im-
portant part in an intensive pasture pro-
gram.
Dr. Marshall reported on pasture work
at the Dairy Research unit and pointed
out that returns from pasture were de-
pendent upon Quantity, Quality and con-
plete utilization of herbage produced.
With pangola and white dutch clover,
feed replacement values varied from
$290.00 to $375.00 per acre with cost of
production ranging from $63.00 to
$75.00 per acre. Temporary pastures of


,
at an average cost of 11/2c per pound
when the cheapest source of purchased
nutrients was 4c per lb. These dairymen
spent from $14.00 to $30.00 per acre on
pastures and from these, and calculations
at other farms, an annual charge per cow
for pasture of $27.00 appears to be fair
to both cow and dairyman.
HAY AND GRASS SILAGE
METHODS
During the peak of pasture season
more grass and clover are produced than
the cows can consume. Dr. J. M. Wing
discussed the utilization of this excess
herbage in terms of silage and hay. In-
expensive types of horizontal and stack
silos and equipment for harvest and stor-
age of grass silage was presented. A
moving picture showing grass silage har-
vesting methods in other states added
greatly to the program. Prof. J. M.
Myers of the Agricultural Engineering
Department gave a talk on artificial cur-
ing of hays and the types of structures
and equipment needed for successful
barn drying of pasture and hay crops.
He took the group to the Experiment Sta-


Campbell Named
State Veterinarian

Dr. Clarence W. Campbell was named
State Veterinarian by the Florida Live
Stock Board at their
August meeting to
succeed Dr. Paul
Vickers. Dr. Camp-
Sbell served for a
number of years as
assistant to former
S t a t e Veterinarian
Dr. J. V. Knapp,
h and following Dr.
DR. CAMPBELL Knapp's death served
as acting State Veter-
inarian until the appointment of Dr.
Vickers.
tion hay drier located on the farm for a
detailed examination of building and
equipment.
In a discussion of synthetic proteins,
Dr. Becker reviewed the work concerned
with the substitution of urea for proteins
in dairy rations. He stressed the neces-
sity for keeping below the 3 per cent
limit in mixed feeds to avoid the possi-
bility of toxicity.
One informal evening session was
held. Slides of color pictures of cows
and pastures were shown by Dr. Wing,
Mr. Reaves and Mr. Harvey Page of
Wilson and Toomer Fertilizer Co. which
furnished a basis for discussion. Follow-
ing the pictures, various stories and ex-
periences were exchanged while enjoying
milk and ice cream furnished by the Dairy
Products Laboratory.



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SEPTEMBER & OCTOBER, 1 9 5 3 27







Editor's Column . .


NEWS & VIEWS

"BREAD AND MILK" PRICES
September 7th releases announce that
the Bakery industry finds it necessary to
increase the price of bread because of the
increased cost of producing a loaf of
bread.
It is not difficult to believe that bread
production costs have continued to rise.
However, it is difficult for us to under-
stand why some of the public and some
newspaper writers fail to understand that
the costs of producing "milk" and the
cost of processing and delivering milk
have continued to rise since the begin-
ning of price rises for all other foods and
most every other necessity of life.
Bread manufacturers list among their
latest increased costs: the price of flour,
lard, milk, freight rates, packaging paper
and materials and bakery equipment.
The Florida Dairy industry could enu-
merate many comparable milk production
and processing cost increases. The con-
sumer cannot reasonably expect and we
are convinced that they do not expect
either the bakeries or the dairies to pro-
duce and furnish to them any product
below cost or at a price which does not
provide a reasonable profit.
This includes school bread, school milk
and all other school or other institutional
supplies.

Finds Dairies Not Guilty
Of Veterinarian's Charges
Following claims made by former State
Veterinarian Dr. Paul Vickers, upon his
dismissal by the Live Stock Sanitary Board
to the effect that Florida's milk supply
was sub-standard, State officials appropri-
ately suggested to the Dairy Industry of-
ficials that the charges should be carefully
investigated. The Dairy Industry spokes-
man stated that the dairy industry denied
the claims that had been made and that
such an investigation would not only be
welcomed but that the results should be
made public.
Reports have now been submitted to
the Governor of the latest official inspec-
tion records of Florida's approximately
1,400 milk producing dairy farms by the
the Commmissioner of Agriculture who is
responsible under the Florida Milk and
Milk Products Law for maintaining the
standards of Dairies and Dairy products,
and by the State Board of Health, which
is responsible for the health standards of
milk and milk products.
These reports have not yet been re-
leased by the Governor, but we are pri-
vileged to announce that the net result
of the reports give Florida's milk supply
a "top rating" for sanitation and quality.
More on this later.


Above are members of the enlarged Florida Milk Commission pictured at their organiza-
tion meeting July 22nd at the Commission's Jacksonville offices. STANDING, LEFT TO
RIGHT: Robert Casey, Miami, newly appointed attorney for the Commission; Fred Ragland,
State Board of Health member; C. Raymond Lee, Clearwater Insurance man and William
Imand, Miami Plumbers' Union Agent, the two new consumer members; S. Ben Waring.
Madison, newly appointed milk producer member.
SEATED, LEFT TO RIGHT: L. K. Nicholas, Jr., Administrator; John M. Scott. State
Department of Agriculture member, who was reflected secretary, and Henry Schneider. Eustis
Dairy Products Distributor, who was reelected Chairman of the Commission.


ON MILK PRICES
According to figures released by the
U. S. Dept. of Agriculture early in 1953,
milk has increased in price less than other
foods. For instance, this report indicates
that if the price of milk had increased as
much as coffee, the price of milk would
be about 90c a quart. As compared to
sugar increases, milk would be 38c a
quart; with flour, 48c a quart; with pork,
49c a quart; with bananas, 54c a quart;
with salmon, 60c a quart; and with
steaks, 50c a quart.

MILK VS. CIGARETTES
Prices do seem high for almost every-
thing we buy as compared to pre-war
prices. But how many consumers stop
to consider what they are getting for the
price they pay?
American consumers are said to be
spending more of their dollars for ciga-
rettes than they are for milk. The price
of a package of cigarettes and a quart of
milk are about the same. Yet the quart
of milk is two pounds of Nature's most
nearly perfect food, 100% digestible
with no waste, while the cigarettes go
up in smoke. How about that?

ON LEGALIZING IMITATIONS
Alabama has legalized the manufacture
and sale of "Mellorine," a combination
of vegetable fat and milk solids, as an
"imitation ice cream."
After looking over the field in Florida
for this type of State Legislation, the
sponsors decided not to bring the pro-
posal before the 1953 Florida Legisla-
ture.


DAIRY INDUSTRY INCREASES
MILK SALES PROMOTION
The Dairy Industry is moving into big-
time national promotion of dairy prod-
ucts. The American Dairy Association (a
100% producer-financed group) is plan-
ning a nation-wide Television Show fea-
turing "Milk and Ice Cream" during the
Fall and Winter. Under stepped up pro-
motional plans the Dairy Industry will
be spending about 1/20th of 1% of its
dollar sales volume on advertising and
sales promotion.

COWS OFF GEORGIA HIGHWAYS
23 South Georgia Counties recently fol-
lowed Florida's exmaple in voting to bar
livestock from state highways. Having
been on the receiving end of a damaging
collision with a Georgia steer some time
ago, requiring a 100-mile touring job into
Jacksonville, I can appreciate how happy
the above action must make a great many
travelers.
New'swueek magazine of July 13, com-
menting on the surprise action, says that
the succers of the local option voting,
can not as some claim, be attributed to
psychology and a cunning campaign by
those who wanted livestock off of the
highways, but a near tragedy from a night
collision with a seramy bull by one of the
campaign leads who was opposing the
law.
After escaping from the accident with
his life and that of a si-year-old son,
Newsweek says: "The campaigner went
out the following day and began an in-
tensive campaign for the fencing Ial'.
which again demonstrates that experience
is a good teacher."


28 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS






GOVERNOR REAPPOINTS NICHOLAS
MILK COMMISSION ADMINISTRATOR
Governor McCarty announced July
22nd the reappointment of L. K. Nicho-
las, Jr., of Miami and Jacksonville, to
his fourth consecutive term as administra-
tor of the Florida Milk Commission.
Mr. Nicholas was first appointed by
Governor Holland after serving as a
deputy administrator. His long and suc-
cessful service as Executive head of the
Milk Commission, considered one of the
most difficult administrative positions of
the State's various agencies, is a tribute to
Mr. Nicholas' ability.
During his service as administrator, he
has served as secretary, vice-president and
president of the National Conference of
Milk Commission Administrators. His
advice and assistance was sought on a
number of occasions during the food
shortage years of the war by the officials
of the National regulatory agencies.
Mr. Nicholas' official residence is in
Miami where his wife and three lovely
daughters reside, but his duties as admin-
istrator keep him in the Jacksonville
headquarters of the Commission a large
part of the time.

Milk Nationally Advertised
Watch for National Advertising of
Milk and Dairy Products in the Septem-
ber "Better Homes and Gardens" and the
October "McCalls Magazine." These ads
complete the special series of "1953 Milk
and Ice Cream Festival" advertisements
sponsored by the American Dairy As-
sociation, which is a 100% producer fi-
nanced group. Previous ads appeared in
the March "Ladies Home Journal," the
April "Better Homes and Gardens," the
"Ladies Home Journal" and "Look Mag-
azine" for May and "Better Homes and
Gardens" for June.


John D. Fuqua, Calhoun County Dairy-
man at Altha recently elected to the Board
of Directors of the Florida Dairy Associa-
tion, to take office in January 1954, has
been renamed member of the National
Farm Loan Association Stockholders Com-
mittee of the Federal Land Bank of Co-
lumbia. He has served as a director of
the Marianna N.F.L.A. for many years.
Mr. Fuqua is also president of the Chi-
pola Dairy Association which includes
dairies in Jackson, Washington, Holmes
and Calhoun counties.


Oscar Harrison, former County Agent
in Washington County, will move to a
similar position in Walton County accord-
ing to announcement early in July. Mit-
chell Wilkins retired at the same time
after serving 25 years as County Agent
of Walton County.


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SEPTEMBER & OCTOBER, 1 953


* 29








7th Annual West Florida Dairy Show
(Continued from page 19)


(18 to 24 months) Earl Crutchfield,
Billy Joe Allen of Jackson, and Robert
Cushing of Washington, third.
(over 24 months) Jack Ford of Gads-
den, and grand champion 4-H grade
Jersey; Joe Rustin, Washington, third
place, Registered Jerseys (six to 12
months) Ernest Sellers of Leon; (12 to
18 months) William Schack, first, Mar-
tin Schack, both of Jackson; Mary Ann
Godbold, Leonu.
Senior Heifers
(18 to 24 months) Martin Schack and
Roy Yates, Washington; (over 24
months) Clyde Crutchfield, Ernest Sel-
lers and William Schack.
4-H Division, grade Holstein, (six to
12 months) Huston Joyner of Leon,
first and champion, Johnnie Scruggs of
Leon, and Gordon Vanney of Escambia,
second and third place.
Winners in FFA Division
FFA Winners, for champions and re-
serve champions, were Jack Faircloth,
champion Guernsey, of Holmes Coun-
ty, Jimmy Register, reserve champion
Guernsey, of Jackson County, Bobby Ray
Durden, Jersey champion, of Gadsden
County, and Wayne Chance, reserve
champion, of Washington County.
FFA, grade Guernsey (six to 12
months) Jimmy Register of Jackson,
Henry Nichols, and James Hall, both of
Calhoun; junior yearlings, Julian Webb,
Edison Justice, both of Washington, and
Joe Clark, Jackson.
Senior heifers, Jack Faircloth of
Holmes, Joe Hatcher of Washington, and
Eugene Kirkland, Washington.
FFA grade Guernsey, (six to 12
months) Wayne Chance of Washington,
Edgar Gay of Jackson, and Bobby Ray
Durden of Gadsden; (junior yearlings)
Allen Griffin, Kenneth Cook and Bobby
Padgett, all of Washington; (senior
heifers) Bobby Ray Durden and Gene
Cobb of Washington, and Joe Register,
Jackson.

SEEN IN THE ADJOINING PANEL are
the following participants in the 1953 West
Florida Dairy Show: Top to bottom, C. V.
Enfinger, Washington County, u'ith his grand
champion grade Jersey in the adult division;
M. A. Schack, Jackson County, showing his
grand champion registered Jersey in the adult
division; J. E. (Red) Davis, Washington
County Farm Agent who uas General Man-
ager of the Show, and Woodrow Glenn, Jack-
son County Agent who served as Master of
Ceremonies; Two prominent visitors at the
Show, left, John M. Scott, chief dairy super-
visor, State Department of Agriculture and
former Senator Olin Shiners of Chipley, one
of the prime promoters of the West Florida
Show; West Florida's popular U. S. Con-
gressman Bob Sikes of Crestview addressing
the large group attending the Show.


FFA cows, Kenneth Cook, Harold An-
derson and Harlon Washingham, all of
Washington County.
Holstein calves, Joe Register, and Mark
Saunders, Jr., both of Leon County; jun-
ior yearlings, Earl Williams, Jackson, and
Joe Register.
Registered Jerseys, George Ford, Gads-
den, won first in both the senior and
cow classes. Julian Webb, Jr., won first
with the registered Jersey senior heifer
in this class.
The success of the Show was due to
the efforts of the many 4-H and FFA
members and dairy farmers who pre-
pared their cattle for the Show and
brought them to Chipley and exhibited
them. The financial sponsorship of the
above mentioned milk companies, the
State Department of Agriculture, the City
of Chipley and Washington County, and
the Chipley Kiwanis Club, was a very
necessary part of the Show. The com-
bined efforts of the local people and
of the County Agents and vocational agri-
culture teachers throughout West Florida,
the milk plant field men and many oth-
ers have made this Show one of the
larger and better shows in the state.
Cash prizes totaling $1500.00 were
awarded. Trophies provided by the Flor-
ida Dairy Association, the Florida Times-
Union, and the Florida Bank at Chip-
ley gave special recognition for top judg-
ing, fitting, and showmanship perform-
ance.
The Show was managed by Washing-
ton County Farm Agent J. E. Davis and
Woodrow Glenn, Jackson County Agent,
served as Master of Ceremonies.
All events were judged by Dr. R. B.
Becker and Dr. Sydney Marshall, both of
the University of Florida School of Dairy
Husbandry.


30 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS








Florida Dairy Association
ALLIED TRADE MEMBERS
Special Advertising Section

ADAMS PACKING ASSN., INC.
Citrus Pulp, Citrus Meal, Citrus Molasses
Jim Coates, Sales Mgr., By-Products Div.


Auburndale, Fla.


Phone 8-7061


AMICA-BURNETT CHEM. &
SUPPLY CO.
Dairy Equipment and Supplies
Phone 4-5606
P. O. Box 2328, Jacksonville, Fla.

CHARLES DENNERY, INC.
New Orleans
Ice Cream Coating, Fruits and Flavors
Ira Stone-602 W. Belmar St.
LAKELAND, FLA.

DIAMOND ALKALI COMPANY
Dairy Cleaner & Alkali
Florida Distributors:
Miller Machinery & Supply, Jax.
Industrial Chem. & Supply Co.,
Tampa

GENERAL MILLS, INC.
Dairy Equipment and Supplies
John W. Manning, Phone 9-4586
1601 Congress Bldg. Miami

GULF PAPER COMPANY, INC.
Ice Cream (Linerless) Cartons,
Butter Cartons
J. H. McVoy
50 E. Magnolia St., Pensacola, Fla.

DOUGLAS J. HEADFORD
FLA. REPRESENTATIVE
Green Spot Orangeade Concentrate
Krim-Ko Chocolate Flavorings
616 Jessamine Ave.-Phone 2-0148
Daytona Beach, Fla.

HELM SANITATION CHEMICALS
HANS B. AHLEFELDT
Phone 3-5721
Union Terminal Warehouse
Jacksonville, Fla.

JIM JENNINGS
MFRS. REPRESENTATIVE
The Vernon Company Specialty Advertising
Morning Glory Milk Powder
Route 9, Box 356, Jacksonville, Fla.

JIFFY MANUFACTURING CO.
Insulated Bags and Liners
Southern Representative-William Romaine
Box 5463, 5 Pts. Sta., Columbia, S. C.

ROBERT A. JOHNSTON CO.
Dairy Chocolate & Cocoa Products
J. L. Hammons
916 S. Rome Ave., Tampa, Fla.

KIECKHEFER CONTAINER CO.
Pure-Pak Paper Milk Bottles
R. J. Evans M. A. Knowles
Phone 6-1334
4700 Pearl St., Jacksonville, Fla.


Milk Man Saves Child

In Unusual Accident

The following story of heroism on
the part of a Jacksonville Milk Man
was related in the Jacksonville morning
paper, The Florida Times-Union, on
September 8:
Charles Skaff, 27, of the Skaff and
Sons Dairy, Jacksonville, was peacefully
delivering milk on Sunday morning pre-
ceding Labor Day, when he heard a
mother's screams for help a half block
away. Abandoning his milk truck in the
middle of the street, Milkman Skaff
rushed to the home of Mrs. D. L. Blan-
ton, where he found Mrs. Blanton and a
neighbor frantically working with a 14-
month-old child, Steve Blanton, who was
suffocating from a lollypop which he had
acidently gotten lodged in his throat.
After finding that the usual first aid
method of holding the child upside down
and slapping the back and chest were of
no avail, Skaff, seeing the child already
turning blue from suffocation, decided
upon an unusual effort to save him.
He held Steve tight in his arms and
pressed his mouth against the child's-
and sucked. In half a minute the candy
was drawn out. The child began to
breathe again.
Skaff handed the boy to Mrs. Hanks,
the neighbor, then turned his rescue ef-
forts to Mrs. Blanton, who had fallen
into a faint on the floor. He carried her
into the house and stood by until she
revived.
Then Skaff went back to work, de-
livering milk, with the thanks of Mrs.
Blanton and Mrs. Hanks ringing in his
ears. Skaff acted pretty modest about
the whole thing in discussing the incident
later. "I have three kids of my own,"
he said, "and when I saw that boy turning
blue I knew right away what the matter
was. Kids are always getting things
caught in their throats." Then he added,
"But this is the first time I ever had to
act like a suction pump."


Lacy A. Gaston has resigned his posi-
tion as Florida Sales Representative for
Stein, Hall & Co., Inc., New York. Prior
to moving to Florida four years ago, Mr.
Hall represented Stein, Hall & Co. in
North and South Carolina and Tennessee.
He is now associated with Melman, Inc.
and The Edgar Company of Miami and
will represent them in central and west
Florida.

INQUISITIVE 10-YEAR-OLD
Boy: Dad, I want to ask you a ques-
tion.
Dad: Son, why don't you go ask your
mother ?
Boy: I don't want to know that much
about it.


Florida Dairy Association
ALLIED TRADE MEMBERS
Special Advertising Section

S. H. MAHONEY EXTRACT CO.
Vanilla Products
D. C. Mulligan, Florida Representative
221 E. Cullerton Rd., Chicago 16, Ill.

MEYER-BLANKE COMPANY
Dairy, Ice Cream Equipment
and Supplies
Phone 6-1366
2701 Dauphin St., Mobile, Ala.

NASH-KELVINATOR CORPN.
ICE CREAM CABINETS
Wm. C. Mayfield
Howell House--Suite 202-Atlanta, Ga.

NATIONAL PECTIN PRODUCTS Co.
Ice Cream Stabilizers & Emulsifiers
Pectin Stabilizers for Ices, Sherbets & Fruits
J. C. Head, Phone Norfolk, Va. 2-8385
RFD No. 1, Box 48, Bayside, Va.

NEWTH-MORRIS BOX CORPN.
Ice Cream, Popsicle, and
Miscellaneous Packers
Phone: 3-9779
Box 3254, Station "F"
Jacksonville, Fla.

OWENS-ILLINOIS GLASS CO.
Duraglass Milk Bottles
C. W. Parmalee C. N. Comstock
1102 Barnett Bldg., Jax. 2, Fla.
Phone 3-6134 5

PAUL-LEWIS LABORATORIES, Inc.
Lactivase-For the Prevention of oxidized
flavor in bottled milk, ice cream,
storage cream
Also Rennet Extract-Sir Sirloin, Inc.
765 N. W. 54th St., Miami 37, Fla.

PENN SALT MANUFACTURING
CO.
BK Powder Cleaners Acids
Bottle Alkalies
JOE FOSS
799 Waring Road-Memphis, Tenn.

RIVERSIDE MANUFACTURING
CO.-MOULTRIE, GA.
Masterbilt Uniforms
James M. Stewart Phone 3-3287
306 Lakeview Ave., Apt. 406, Orlando

STANDARD PACKAGING CORPN.
Tamper Proof Seals-Flexible Vacuum
Packages-Liner Materials
Larry Hodge
1121 duPont Bldg., Miami, Fla.

THATCHER GLASS MFG. CO., INC.
Glass Milk Containers
W. T. LOVE, Florida Representative
3221 Pinehurst PI.-Charlotte 7, N.C.

UNIVERSAL MILKING MACHINE
DIVISION
Pail-less (Pipe line) Milking Machines
R. D. Archer-Factory Rep.-Ph. 84-7467
1100 N.E. 134 St., No. Miami, Fla.


SEPTEMBER & OCTOBER, 1 953 31








GUERNSEY CATTLE CLUB NEWS


GUERNSEY REGISTRY TESTS ARE ANNOUNCED

Official production and classification test records for some of Florida's top pro-
ducing Guernseys have been recently made public by the American Guernsey Cattle
Club. All Florida records are supervised by the University of Florida and reported
to the A. G. C. Club for official approval.
The American Guernsey Cattle Club is a national organization of more than 50,000 breeders
of purebred Guernseys. It records the registration of purebred Guernseys which trace to the
Island of Guernsey, the original home of the breed, in the English Channel. It also supervises
tests of production and, through GOLDEN GUERNSEY, Inc., supervises the marketing of
GOLDEN GUERNSEY MILK.
CARROLL WARD & SON DAIRY, WIN-
TER PARK-Lakemont Judy's Hilda, a reg-
istered Guernsey cow, owned by this dairy ANNUAL GUERNSEY SALE
has completed an official Advanced Registry
record of 8658 pounds of milk and 468 pounds AT LARGO NOVEMBER 6
of butterfat on three times daily milking for
a ten-month period, starting her record as a
senior two-year-old. J. H. Logan, Secretary of the Florida
"Hilda" is the daughter of the outstanding Guernsey Cattle Club and Pinellas County
Guernsey sire, Riegeldale Emory's Judicator, Farm Agent at Largo, Florida, has an-
that has 23 daughters in the Performance Reg- nounced approximately 60 head of some
ister of The American Guernsey Cattle Club. of the Southeasts finest guernseys con-
J. H. CONE DAIRY, PLANT CITY- signed to the 15th Annual State Guernsey
Cone's Cavalier Joy, a registered Guernsey Cattle Club Sale to be held November 6th
cow, owned by this dairy, has completed an
official Advanced Registry record of 10,917 in Largo, Florida.
pounds of milk and 534 pounds of butterfat The animals consigned include heavy
on twice daily milking for a ten-month per- springers, fresh cows and bred heifers
iod, starting her record as a five-year-old. from registered Guernsey herds of
"Joy" is the daughter of the registered Guern-
sey sire, Riegeldale Emory's Cavalier, that has Georgia, North and South Carolina and
nine daughters in the Performance Register of Florida.
The American Guernsey Cattle Club. Carrol Ward, Sr., well known central
DINSMORE DAIRY FARMS, JACKSON- Florida breeder at Orlando headed the
VILLE-Beaver Creek Adonis Clara, a reg- sales committee which also included R.
istered Guernsey cow of this dairy, has com- R. Jennings and Charles Johnson of Jack-
pleted a production record of 12,628 pounds
of milk and 633 pounds of butter fat. "Clara" sonville; J. McK. Jeter, Representative
was a junior four-year-old and was milked of the American Guernsey Cattle Club;
three times daily for 365 days. C. W. Reaves, Florida Extension Dairy-
The sire of "Clara" is Riegeldale Con- man, W. P. Waldrep, Ft. Lauderdale,
queror's Adonis. Twenty-nine daughters of Walter Schmid, Sarasota and ohn Logan,
this bull are listed in the Performance Reg-
ister of The American Guernsey Cattle Club. Largo.
Dinsmore Faymax Joe Anne, a registered Auctioneer for the sale will be Mort
Guernsey cow, also of Dinsmore Farms, has Granger of Thompsonville, Connecticut,
completed an official Advanced Registry rec- whose specialty is selling registered
ord of 11,045 pounds of milk and 509 pounds Guernseys.
of butterfat on three times daily milking for
365 days, starting her record as a junior two Earl Johnson of the Dinsmore Dairy,
year-old. Farms, Jacksonville is president of the
"Anne" is the daughter of the famous Florida Guernsey Cattle Club which is
Guernsey sire, Fayroyal's Maxim, that has 53 sponsor of the sale to be held in the
sons and daughters in the Performance Reg- County Fair Grounds at Largo, begin-
ister of The American Guernsey Cattle Club. ning at 1:00 P.M. November 6th.
Dinsmore Queen Hilda, a registered Guern-
sey cow, also owned by Dinsmore Dairy
Farms, has completed an official Advanced
Registry record of 13,190 pounds of milk and
549 pounds of butterfat on there times daily
milking for 365 days, starting her record as a
junior three year-old.
"Hilda" is the daughter of the outstanding
Guernsey sire, Ruayne King's Majesty, that
has one son and forty-three daughters in the
Performance Register of The American Guern- GREENER
sey Cattle Club. PASURES
Dinsmore Garfield Virgilia, a registered
Guernsey cow, also of the Dinsmore Dairy
Farms, has completed an official production
record of 14,723 pounds of milk and 657
pounds of butterfat.
The sire of "Virgilia" is Dinsmore Gar-
field. 66 sons and daughters of this bull are
listed in the Performance Register of The i,1
American Guernsey Cattle Club.


FLORIDA GUERNSEY GRAM
The Florida Guernsey Cattle Club is-
sued on August 1st the first of a series
of bulletins which is very appropriately
called the "Guernsey-Gram'.
Among the personal news items about
Florida Guernsey folks we note the fol-
lowing:
C. E. Donegan of Largo is recovering
from a recent stroke. He is showing more
interest than ever in good Guernseys and
is planning to dispose of all of his grade
cattle and replace them with purebreds.
A. S. Lawton, formerly County Agent
of Duval County, is now employed by
Dinsmore Dairies as Consultant. He had
a long and successful career in Duval
County and did outstanding work with
improved pastures and dairy cattle.
W. A. Boutwell, Sr., of Lake Worth
is almost completely recovered from a
serious operation this spring. He and
his fine family are vacationing at their
summer home in Cashiers, North Carolina.
Paul Hood, Production Manager of
Hood's Dairy, St. Petersburg, has under-
gone a major operation recently and is
now vacationing and convalescing in the
Adirondacks of New York State.
Mr. J. McK. Jeter, Southeastern Field
Representative, and R. D. Stewart, Asst.
Secretary Treasurer of the American
Guernsey Cattle Club, paid Florida an of-
ficial visit during the week of August 17.

GUERNSEYS PURCHASED
The American Guernsey Cattle Club
has announced recent purchases of out-
standing Guernseys by ten Florida Guern-
sey breeders. Purchases reported are:
E. L. REAGAN DAIRY, PINELLAS PARK
-Has just purchased the young Guernsey
sire, Sargeant Farms Ben's Jet, from J. B. &
J. C. Sargeant, Jr., Lakeland, Florida.
This young bull is out of the cow Mulhoc-
away Butterfat's Jetta, that has once been
classified Desirable for type, and is sired by
Riegeldale Ben's Baronet.
ELLA MALLORY DAIRY, JACKSON-
VILLE-Has just purchased the young Guern-
sey sire, Bodden's Maxim Dodsworth, from
C. L. Bodden, Dinsmore, Florida.
This richly bred young bull is out of the
well-bred cow, Herbener Dodsworth Everflo,
that has once been classified Very Good for
type, and has two production records of 9,130
pounds of milk, and 467 pounds of butterfat,
made as a junior four-year-old, and 9,335
pounds of milk, and 472 pounds of butterfat,
made as a five-year-old in the Herd Improve-
ment Register. He is sired by Diana's Maxim
of New River.
VELDA DAIRY FARMS, TALLAHASSEE
-Has just purcha-ed the young Jersey sire,
Maegeo Leader's Claremont, from George S.
Coble, Lexington, N. C.
This richly bred young bull is out of the
well-bred cow, Ideal's Claremont's Emily, that
h-s two production records of 13,446 pounds
of milk, and 617 pounds of hbtterfat, made as
a junior three-year-old, and 14,541 pounds of
milk, a-d 667 pounds of butterfat. made as a
senior four-year-old. He is sired by Norhern
F. Leader.
(Continued on page 34)


32 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS









The Fifteenth Annual


FLORIDA GUERNSEY SALE
Sponsored by the
FLORIDA GUERNSEY CATTLE CLUB
Sale to be held at Pinellas County Fairgrounds, Largo, Florida


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 6 ,1953 1:00 P.M.
Approximately 60 Animals Including 3 Bulls
A LARGE NUMBER OF COWS AND HEIFERS BRED TO FRESHEN
ABOUT SALE TIME.


All Dairymen are cordially invited to attend this Sale of
purebred Guernsey cattle at Public Auction. Approximately
60 head from 31 outstanding breeders in Georgia, North
and South Carolina, Kentucky and Florida.



SALES COMMITTEE
OF
FLORIDA GUERNSEY CATTLE CLUB
CARROLL L. WARD, SR., Winter Park, Chairman
C. W. REAVES, Gainesville CHARLES JOHNSON, Dinsmore
R. R. JENNINGS, Jacksonville W. P. WALDREP, Hollywood
J. McK. JETER, Union, South Carolina WALTER SCHMID, Sarasota
J. H. LOGAN, Clearwater
AUCTIONEER
MORT GRANGER, Thompsonville, Connecticut
FOR FREE CATALOG AFTER OCTOBER 15th WRITE TO:
J. H. LOGAN, Secretary-Treasurer, Florida Guernsey Cattle Club,
Largo, Florida

"Attend Sale for Pleasure, Profit and Progress of Dairy Industry"


SEPTEMBER & OCTOBER, 1 953 33








GUERNSEY PURCHASES

(Continued from page 28)
COASTAL DAIRY, STUART-Has just
purchased two young Guernsey sires, from F.
T. Bedford, Greens Farms, Conn., and Mrs.
Ethel Payne, Millerton, N. Y.
The richly bred young bull, Nyala Coastal
King, is out of the well-bred cow, Nyala's
Supreme Clover, that has once been classified
Very Good for type, and has two production
records of 12,037 pounds of milk, and 678
pounds of butterfat, made as a junior two-
year-old, and 14,313 pounds of milk, and 747
pounds of butterfat, made as a senior four-
year old.
The richly bred young bull Silver Mt. Im-
perial's Prince, is out of the well-bred cow,
Priscilla of Willow Brook, that has once been
classified Excellent for type, and has a pro-
duction record of 12,581 pounds of milk, and
568 pounds of butterfat, made as a seven-
year-old, in the Herd Improvement Register.
JACK GAY DAIRY, LARGO-Has just
purchased the young Guernsey sire, Sellers
Farm Le Fearless, from L. H. Sellers, St.
Petersburg, Fla.
This young bull is out of the cow Priva-
teer's Actor's Lula, that has once been classi-
fied Acceptable for type, and is sired by Mc-
Donald Farms Le Oberlin.
L. V. LEWIS DAIRY, LOVETT-Has just
purchased the young Guernsey sire, Ben-Bow
Abg. Lovett, from Paul H. Bennet, Quitman,
Georgia.
This richly bred young bull is out of the
well-bred cow, Ben-Bow GC. Clair, that has
once been classified Desirable for type, and
has a production record of 8,718 pounds of
milk and 412 pounds of butterfat, made as a
junior two-year-old. He is sired by Pecan
Hill's McAbraham.
A. B. THEN DAIRY, JACKSONVILLE-
Has just purchased the young Guernsey sire,
Bodden's Lucky Duke, from Raymond R. Jen-
nings, Jacksonville, Fla.
This richly bred young bull is out of the
well-bred cow, Bodden's Azalea Beauty Girl,
that has once been classified Desirable for
type, and has production records of 12,646
pounds of milk and 581 pounds of butterfat,
made as a senior three-year-old, and 14,587
pounds of milk and 585 pounds of butterfat,
made as a five-year-old. He is sired by Bod-
den's Maxim Royal Prince.
R. L. KOON DAIRY, MAYO-Has just
purchased the young Guernsey sire, Laveah
Brilliant, from Raymond Tillman Jennings,
Jacksonville, Fla.
This young bull is out of the cow Belmont
View Brilliant's Belle and is sired by Dins-
more Mac.
VERO BEACH DAIRY-Has just purchase
twd young Guernsey sires, from Boutwell's
Dairy, Inc., Lake Worth, Fla.
The richly bred young bull, Jenwell Flash,
is out of the well-bred cow Lanandy Lincoln
Louise and has a production record of 11,490
pounds of milk, and 478 pounds of butterfat,
made as a senior four-year-old.
The richly bred young bull, Jenwell Fear-
less, is out of the well-bred cow Pennbrook
Nassau's Hera, and has two production records
of 9,393 pounds of milk, and 435 pounds of
butterfat, made as a senior-two-year-old, and
9,553 pounds of milk, and 411 pounds of but-
terfat, made as a junior four-year-old.
"Flash" and "Fearless" are both sired by
Klondike Raider's Merry Boy.
THE SUNDAY DAIRY, MUSCOGEE -
Has just purchased the young Guernsey sire
Jameva Barrister's Royal Jim, from James Au-
brey Crawford, Pensacola, Florida.
This young bull is out of the cow Gold
Branch ZMFA Doly Evelyn, and is sired by
Klondike Raider's Barrister.


SEEN ABOVE ARE FIVE GUERNSEY COWS OF DINSMORE FARMS, JACKSON-
VILLE, RATED "EXCELLENT" BY THE AMERICAN GUERNSEY CATTLE CLUB. LEFT
TO RIGHT:
DINSMORE MAXMOST HONORIA, 12456 milk-682 fat-Jr. 4 yr old, is a daughter
of Quail Roost Marmost who has over 100 daughters with Advanced Register records.
DINSMORE MAYROYAL JEDETTA, 15070 milk-619 fat-Jr 4 yr old is a daughter
of Foremost May Royalty. Jedetta was the Grand Champion, best uddered cowu, and a member
of the 1st prize get-of-sire at the Florida State Fair in 1952.
MAPLETON'S MAXIM CONNIE, on test now has 8640 milk and 390 fat in 173 days.
She is a daughter of Clear Springs Lucky King and was purchased in the 1949 Quail Roost Sale
as a springing heifer.
DINSMORE MAYROYAL WILLOW, on test now has 8549 milk and 388 fat in 222 days.
She is another daughter of Foremost May Royalty who has over 100 daughters in the Dinsmore
Farms Herd.
DINSMORE NOBLE MAYFLOWER, 11282 milk-508 fit-Sr 2 yr old is a daughter
of Quail Roost Noble Yeoman and the $10,000 cow, Dinsmore Royal Maay sold in the 1949
Quail Roost Sale.


School Milk Prices and Newspaper Editorials

(Continued from page 18)

whole with such a discount. What other industries, such as the meat industry, flour
and baking industry, or any other industry supplying products to school cafeterias
can show such consideration ?
The action on the part of the Legislature during the session of 1953 wherein
they eliminated the authority of the Florida Milk Commission to set prices on milk
purchased at the farm, and eliminated the authority of the Milk Commission to set
minimum prices for it to school cafeterias and charitable institutions can become the
means whereby the school children and unfortunate people in charitable institutions
can become the "dumping ground" for "distress" or low quality milk.
It is doubtful that any reputable dairy concern or group of farmers will sell milk
below cost to these institutions. The profits obtainable cannot justify such a policy.
Of necessity, the quality of milk must be in keeping with the price obtained for it.
People generally get what they pay for. Certainly the people of Florida want to be
sure that the milk their children drink in school cafeterias is safe and of good quality.
They cannot be sure of the quality if it is sold at less than it costs to produce, process
and distribute.
Florida is growing in population from month to month and year to year, and
adequate supply of good, wholesome, safe milk must be available to this increasing
population if we are going to continue to grow and expand as a State.
Florida has made great progress in its dairy industry. Florida must continue to
expand and progress in this essential industry.
With all the regulations emanating from Washington by way of artificially
holding prices up on all grains that go into dairy feeds so essential to good dairy
production; with ever increasing wages of every segment of our national economy;
with increasing freight rates and other transportation; the increasing cost of trucks,
farm machinery and everything a dairyman uses in the production of milk, and the
increasing cost of labor in the production, processing and distribution of milk, it is
highly essential that Florida as a whole sees to it that a regulatory agency such as
the Florida Milk Commission be fostered and maintained. The Dairy Industry, in
co-operation with the Florida Milk Commission can assure the people of the State of
Florida an orderly market for a safe, high quality milk at the very lowest cost possible
consistent with the conditions under which the industry must operate."


34 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS









A LOT






Sire:
CESOR NOBLE
MAXIM
30 AR Daughters .
13 AR Sons z:'
7 Excellent


OF BULL






. ..Dam:
QUAIL ROOST
BRIGHT MAID
13337-649-FF
3AR Daughters
2AR Sons


QUAIL ROOST NOBLE YEOMAN


TWO DAUGHTERS CONSIGNED TO FLORIDA SALE


Largo, Florida

1. DINSMORE NOBLE FAWN
Born June 12, 1949
Should furnish AR record just
before sale of approximately-
11500 # milk & 600 # fat as a Jr. 3 yr. old.
Due to calve November 14, 1953 to
service of Dinsmore Meadow King
Dam: Dinsmore Maxim's Fawn
16021-857-8 yrs-365


- -November 6

2. DINSMORE NOBLE ROSY
Born August 30, 1950
Should be another "milk wagon"
ready to start "paying off" as soon
as she arrives at new owner's Farm.
Due to calve November 8, 1953 to
service of Dinsmore Meadow King
Dam: Dinsmore Valmax Roselle
12461-513-5 yrs-365C


The daughters of Quail Roost Noble Yeoman really milk-several as 2 yr. olds have milked between
45 and 49 Ibs. per day and one hit 70 Ibs. (GOLDEN GUERNSEY MILK) as a 4 yr. old. We have
reserved two sons for service in our own herd. A number are already in Florida Pure Bred and
Grade herds. We have one top son for sale now out of a cow with almost 15,000 Ibs. milk.

Write for a copy of our picture folder and a list of young bulls for sale-THEN SELECT


Dinsmore


FEDERAL ACCREDITED 57790


J. B. LANOUX


Guernseys
SHerdsman NEGATIVE TO BANG'S


10 miles north of Jacksonville
Near U. S. 1


EARI A JOHNSON CHARLES F. Jo


Dinsmore, Florida
HNSON BRADY S. JOHNSTON


Dinsmore Farms


V. C. JOHNSON





00 00 000000000000












ASK THE COWS
WHO KNOW...

Progressive dairymen know that in order to obtain maximum net
profit from their dairy herd, it is necessary to obtain maximum produc-
tion from every cow. They also know that feeding is an important
factor in obtaining top production from every
cow. SECURITY DAIRY FEEDS are de-
signed to help dairymen obtain maximum
production.
Ask your cows-let them prove to you the SECURI
advantages of feeding SECURITY. l DAIRY


V




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