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Title: Florida dairy news
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00082035/00018
 Material Information
Title: Florida dairy news
Physical Description: 12 v. : illus. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Dairy Industry Association
Publisher: Cody Publications for Florida Dairy Industry Association.
Place of Publication: Kissimmee Fla
Publication Date: July-August 1953
Frequency: bimonthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Dairying -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Cattle   ( lcsh )
Milk   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-12, no. 1; Nov. 1950-Spring, 1962.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00082035
Volume ID: VID00018
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01386090
issn - 0426-5696

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Advertising
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Main
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Back Cover
        Page 35
        Page 36
Full Text











40































Aa w

. I .











I9 I LIIa~.iA ,.I (* Iu1
.'15






....... .......



































A Spoonful to the Ton!


How would you mix this tiny
amount of antibiotic into a
whole ton of feed?
Scientists with vitamins and antibiotics
have brought wonderful advancements
in growth, health and condition to
calves. Yet these and others are so
powerful that only a few spoonsful are
needed in a whole ton of feed.
But how would you add one table-
spoonful of antibiotic to a whole ton
of feed and be sure it is completely
mixed into every bite a calf or cow
takes?
That was the problem facing Purina
scientists and engineers. They knew our
milling processes could do a thorough
job with other ingredients which are
a:ded in pounds instead of ounces. They
had to be just as sure about the tiny
"miracle ingredients," or your cows and


growing stock couldn't always get full
benefits from them.
Three years ago they set out to solve
the problem. First big discovery was a
test so sensitive that it would show
just one tiny part in 10 million parts
of feed.
Using this secret test, they took thous-
ands of samples at each mixer in each
of our 36 Purina Chow mills. From the
results of these tests, they re-designed
ingredient flows, milling equipment and
mixing procedures. Then they re-tested
and tested again until everything was
right.
The whole process we call PURINA
MICRO-MIXING, and it's still going on
to keep up our mixing quality. It's
another example of the extreme care
Purina goes to, to bring you the dairy-
man's first choice in feeds across the
country-Purina Chows in the Checker-
board bag.


//// / /H\\ ^ --V }


THOUSANDS of SAMPLES have been
tested in the never-ending MICRO-
MIXING process to make better Chows.


NOT

ENOUGH

BOOSTERS


RIGHT
AMOUNT
OF
BOOSTERS


RALSTON PURINA COMPANY


MIAMI


- TAMPA


Miracle boosters can make this
much difference in growth. Purina
Research shows MICRO-MIXING
keeps down variation in amounts.


IPURINA CHOWS are MICRO-MIXED

nnEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE...
l I II I I iI llll illl


III NWSIi A NCE ll'INFE MAKIG














At

your service...

always!


The Canco technical man is a very im-
portant person in your business.
No matter where your plants are lo-
cated, you can rely on him to call
promptly when you need him.
He knows that day after day your
equipment must be free from trouble,
and production must be uniform and
consistent with volume. It is his job to
help you maintain these conditions.
If you do business with Canco, you
know the value of this constant, consci-
entious technical service. If not, isn't it
time you, too, added these superior
services to your own?


Go first to the people who are first!


AMERICAN


CAN


Canco's Paper Milk Container has given tre-
mendous impetus to milk sales for dairies all
across the country-provides housewives with
milk in a sanitary, easy-to-carry, one-way con-
tainer.
Comes in 1-qt., 1-pt., 1/a-qt., /2-pt. sizes.


Good Hourseknping




U. I1


COMPANY


NewYork, Chicago, San Francisco;
Hamilton, Canada


JULY & AUGUST, 1953 3











MAKE WAY FOR G r s s


New and improved pastures cut feed costs


140
"Wl.1'
i-r~*l~q


-~.-J'p P


Big 3-Plow Case Tractor

Case 3-plow Eagle Hitch "DC" Tractor (shown above) Implements for every job
has the power, stamina, and traction needed to turn wild
land into pasture-improve tough, sod-bound soils. Has Case builds tractors in four sizes and implements that do
Constant Hydraulic Control; Constant Power Take-Off; every job on dairy and livestock farms . renovating pas-
one-minute hook-up from tractor seat for Eagle Hitch im- tures, harvesting crops for silage or hay
plements; self-energizing, double-disk brakes; shock-free ... threshing small grains or any other
steering. Moderate-speed engine built for fuel economy. seeds. See your Case dealer today
for catalogs or folders... arrange
Heavy-Duty Disk Harrows for a personal demonstration
Dairymen like the Case "JA" Tandem Disk on your own fields.
Harrow for its all-around effective perform-
ance in preparing seedbeds, and working cover A
crops into stubborn soils. Shown at right with Model
"DC" Tractor.

Service When You Need It


Andreasen Tractor & Equipment Co.,
Marianna
Batey & Kite Tractor Co., Gainesville
Beasley Tractor Company, Palatka
Coastal Motors & Equipment,
Belle Glade
Cosey Motor Company, Wauchula
Dade Tractor Company, Homestead
Florida Tractor & Supply Company,
Pompano Beach


Florida Tractor & Supply Company,
Hollywood
Gerlach Motor Company, Milton
Grantham Chevrolet Company,
Live Oak
Hibbs Tractor Company, Cocoa
Ray Moore Implement Co.,
Fort Myers
Medlock Tractor Company, Orlando
Pasco Motors, Dade City


Pounds Motor Company,
Winter Garden
Pounds Tractor Company,
Winter Haven
Pounds Tractor Co., Lakeland
Pounds-Zeiss Tractor Company,
Frostproof
Pounds-Zeiss Tractor Company,
Sebring
Taylor-Munnell Machine Works, Inc.,
Fort Pierce
Thompson Tractor & Equipment Co.,
Tampa


4 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS









EDITORIALS


What Does Milk Cost?

Information on the "cost" of milk seems very timely in view of the undue
emphasis some give to the "price" of milk, which has increased in Florida by
about 35% less since 1940 than it has for the nation as a whole and much less
than all other major foods.
The following information is quoted from a recent issue of "Manage Maga-
zine" with statistics by the American Economic Foundation.
Milk is one of those things we all have to buy whether we want
to or not.
And as the price has gone up and up, so has the customer's blood
pressure.
It is only fair, therefore, to find out what actually happens to the
average dollar received by America's milk producers.
Is or is not the public getting gouged?
To begin with, we should remember that milk producers, like every
other business, have five basic costs: 1. they must pay for goods and
services bought from others; 2. they must pay for the human energy
of the people on the payroll; 3. they must pay taxes; 4. they must pay
for the wearing out and using up of tools (the assets of the business) ;
5. they must pay for the cost of using the tools (for the use of the
savings that went into the tools).
And all of this money must be collected from the customer who
buys the milk.
With this in mind, let's see what happened to the milk dollar in
1949 (the last year for which figures are available).
These figures cover the operation of 313 companies in 42 states
as reported by the Indiana University Bureau of Business Research.
The average dollar received from the customer was used approxi-
mately as follows:
Cost of Goods and Services Bought from Others
(milk, containers, etc.) ..................------- --- 72c
Cost of Human Energy of Employees
(Payrolls, pensions, etc.) --..- -......... ..-- ----------- 21c
Cost of Taxes............ ---------------------- 2c
Cost of Equipment Wearing Out (Depreciation,
obsolescence, etc.) .---- -------------------- 3c
Cost of Using the Equipment (Profits,
dividends, reserves, etc.) ....------------... ------------ 2c
The 2c represents a profit of about 2/5 of cl per quart of milk sold.
Some dairies, of course, made more than this, and some didn't
make anything.
There is more payroll in this dollar than appears on the surface
because about 50c out of the 72c item went to the farmer for raw milk,
and most of the balance wound up in somebody's payroll.
The 72c item, in fact, is made up entirely of the other four costs
as incurred by all the suppliers.
If it were possible to find out exactly how the 72c was used, we
could express the cost of milk without using the first item, but un-
fortunately, that is not possible.
From these figures, however, each of us can form an opinion as
to the "fairness" of milk prices.


111111


VOL. 3


NO. 3


JULY & AUGUST, 1953
BI-MONTHLY


THE
FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS
E. T. LAY. Editor & Business Manager


Official Publication of
Florida Dairy Association
WILMER W. BASSETT, JR., President
E. T. LAY, Executive Director

Florida Guernsey Cattle Club

Florida Association
of Milk Sanitarians

DIRECTORS
FLORIDA DAIRY ASSOCIATION
Producers
HERMAN BOYD, Miami
Vice Pres. & Chrmn.
"Producers Council"
GEORGE F. JOHNSON, West Palm Beach
D. WAYNE WEBB, Tampa
JOHN SARGEANT, Lakeland
L. B. HULL, Micanopy
BILL GRAHAM, Miami
JOHN T. ADKINSON, Pensacola
IRA BARROW, New Smyrna Beach
J. H. ADAMS, Jacksonville
DONALD LEONARD, Blountstown

Distributors
CLIFF D. WAYNE, Miami
Vice Pres. & Chrmn.
"Distributors Council"
FREEMAN HALES, Opa Locka
HERMAN BURNETT, Bradenton
J. N. MCARTHUR, Miami
H. CODY SKINNER, Jacksonville
JOHN M. HOOD, St. Petersburg
GORDON NIELSEN, West Palm Beach
W. J. BARRITT, JR., Tampa
A. E. (JACK) JOHNSON, Jacksonville
J. F. W. ZIRKLEBACH, Pensacola

Additional Directors
WILMER W. BASSETT, JR., President
Monticello
LARRY J. HODGE, President
"Alligator Club"; Miami
THE FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS is
published bi-monthly by the Florida
Dairy Association, 220 Newnan St.,
Jacksonville, Florida. Subscription price
of $1.00 a year. Entered as second
class mail at the Post Office at Jack-
sonville, Fla., under Act of March 3,
1879, as amended.
Business and Editorial office, 220
Newnan Street, Jacksonville.
Member Florida Press Association
NATIONAL EDITORIAL
ASSOCIATION
ElWWWHEIRM


JULY & AUGUST, 1953 5



























J. P. Boyce
519 E. Giddens, Tampa, Florida
E. E. Fulton
P. O. Box 374, Jacksonville 1, Florida
J. E. Orris
200 N.W. 129th Street, Miami 38, Florida
Geff. Wrenshall
207 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, Florida




More Pasture Doesn't

Cut YOUR Feed Cost...


BETTER

PASTURES DO!


Take a look at your pasture.
Is it a deep rich qreen, fast
growing and palatable? If not,
NACO can help you. Proper
pasture programs produce
higher nutrient value resulting
in less need for supplements.
Your NACO representative is
an expert on fertilization.
NACO can help you produce
milk most economically.


NACO FERTILIZER
NACO COMPANY
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
FT. PIERCE, FLORIDA
Manufacturers of Five Star Fertilizers


For Our Youth Readers
Third of a Series of Articles on:

A Career in The Dairy Industry
Note: The general scope of occupational opportunities in the dairy industry and the
basic position of the DAIRY FARMER in our ten billion dollar enterprise have
been discussed in the first two articles of this series. In this article will be con-
sidered more of the jobs in which there is a future for YOU.
If you have definitely decided to be spell your success as an agricultural spec-
a dairy farmer you have already been in- ialist.
terested in the agricultural courses of- Another type of field work is that of
fered in your high school, as well as the SANITARY or HEALTH INSPECTOR.
opportunities for actual experience in Specialized training in a number of dif-
project work supervised by the Future ferent fields may be necessary for these
Farmers and/or the 4-H Club programs. jobs. As a health inspector you might
These projects may have been for you a have to survey a farm in order to de-
proving period, making you certain that termine whether you can approve it as
you do or do not wish to continue with a source of a wholesome supply of milk.
your plans to be a dairy farmer. Once Sanitary engineering is a complete and
your decision is made, your high school specialized field of study in itself and as
course, your club program, your college applied to the dairy industry it can be
program and the many short courses of- the means of keeping in touch with the
fered in the various phases of dairying basic animal agriculture on which our
can all contribute to your success in the country depends. Opportunities in these
years to come. positions are also inviting to many veter-
inarians because their technical knowledge
FIELD WORK is peculiarly adaptable to the work of the
But even if the work and the rewards inspector and can help to make them
of a dairy farm are not your choice, good ones. Constant refreshing of one's
there are many opportunities in the work knowledge of modern regulations as well
of the dairy indust-y that will appeal to as methods of operation will also be re-
you. First, let us suppose that you have quired in this position.
lived on a farm while growing up; you MILK PROCUREMENT
will know and appreciate many of the The variety of jobs within a dairy
things that will contribute to your suc- processing, manufacturing, and distribut-
cess in some other phase of the produce ing plant is so broad that the order in
tion and distribution of milk. For in- which they are considered must be arbi-
stance, the job of FIELDMAN for a trary. However, let us work from the
milk distributor is one in which your outside in.
basic knowledge and experience on a Procurement men are usually those
dairy farm will make your contacts with who are engaged in getting milk, cream,
the farmers whom you will have to con- and condensed milk to the city plants.
tact and advise much more easy and A country processing plant may receive
agreeable and successful, too. Problems milk from farmers, separate, concentrate
about pastures, feeding, milking, breed- or otherwise process the milk before de-
ing, and buildings all come within the livering it to operators situated away
scope of the work of a FIELDMAN and from the rural areas. Managers and as-
a good college course in dairy science sistants are needed for such procurement
from animal husbandry to practical engi- plants. A sort of secondary contact is
neering will be an advantage to you. The kept up with the farmer from whom the
FIELDMAN is charged with the respon- rural plant buys milk but the operation
sibility for keeping the supply of milk is largely within and may be entirely in-
coming into the processor and distributor side the processing plant. Training in
and the plant which employs him as plant operation is now a requirement for
well as the dairy farmer will be looking anyone seeking such employment. This
to him for help. It's a job which will is not to be confused with a large plant
keep you out among the farmers and which prepares milk and its products
the animals but your technical knowledge for distribution but this is a plant which
of modern methods of farming and processes and makes the milk ready for
handling the products of the farm will transportation to the dairy manufacturer.


6 FLORIDA DAIR


Y NEWS






A SALUTE . To the Leadership of

S. L. BROTHERS

County Agent of LaFayette County

Dairies are "popping up" all over Lafayette County in one of the most amazing
stories in the history of Florida's dairy industry. Dairying has brought diversifica-
tion to this general crops county and added to the income of its farmers.

It all started just four years ago-in 1949. At the beginning of that year there
wasn't a dairy in the county, but there was a keen interest in
dairying. Several of the farmers discussed with County Agent
S S. L. Brothers the feasibility of developing dairy farms and a
distributing plant in Mayo.
Brothers and nine farmers toured dairies and distributing
plants in neighboring Jackson County and Brothers discussed
the advantages and disadvantages of dairy operations. The
dairy bug had bitten and on the way back to Mayo, W. C.
Jackson, tobacco farmer, declared his intention to begin a
dairy operation immediately.
BROTHERS He had only 10 acres of land suitable for pastures, no barns,
no cows and no experience when he made his declaration that
hot day in July, 1949. By November of
the same year Jackson had a cow barn
the same year Jackson had a cow barn (The assistance of Jasper N. Joiner, Florida
and 20 Jersey-Guernsey grade milk cows, Agricultural Extension Service, in the prepa-
the help and cooperation of County ration of the information contained in this
Agent Brothers and a lot of determina- article, is gratefully acknowledged.)
tion and faith.


Jackson's faith paid off, for he was
soon marketing his entire milk output
in Lake City. From this point the story
is almost legend, for the dairying idea
began gathering steam.
By July 1950 five more farmers had
built barns, bought cows and entered the
dairy business. A year later-July 1951
-three more farmers had joined the
group and during the next 12 months 17
additional dairies began marketing milk.
In January of this year another farmer
threw his pail in the dairy ring to swell
the total to 27 dairies.
What have been the results of this
phenomenal growth? They are equally
impressive. There are now over 1,000
milk cows and 1,500 acres of improved
pasture in the county. Best of all, dairy-
ing is bringing in almost a quarter mil-
lion dollars annually to Lafayette County.
Brothers says he hasn't promoted dairy-
ing, but he has been standing by with
advice, technical knowledge and a will-
ingness to help. The new dairymen with
no experience behind them, have leaned
heavily on him. Teamwork is providing
the foundation for this farming revolu-
tion.
Prior to 1949 Lafayette County's only
cash crop was tobacco. Every new dairy-
man is an oldtime tobacco man, but the
dairy business is not cutting down on
tobacco acreages. As a matter of fact,
dairying and tobacco farming are compoe-
mentary operations.
At the time when tobacco is being
marketed-June, July and August-milk
is selling at surplus prices. Thus, the


lower milk prices are offset by income
from tobacco. After the tobacco season
is over milk prices are back on fluid
prices. Thereby, farm income is some-
what stabilized.
Labor is no problem, for all the dairies
are family-sized operations averaging
from 30 to 50 milking cows. At pres-
ent one company is buying the entire
county output and picks up milk from
each farm daily.
On their improved pastures the farm-
ers have stuck primarily to Pensacola
Bahia, with Pangola running second. This
past fall, for the first time, two of the
dairymen tried Hubam clover. They had
excellent results and now it looks like a
big year ahead for Hubam and sweet
yellow lupine.
Dairying still hasn't reached the satu-
ration point in the county. Brothers ex-
pects about five more farmers to begin
dairy operations before the year is out.
There might be more, he adds.
Already interested in herd improve-
ment, 25 of Lafayette County's 27 dairy-
men have signed for membership in an
artificial breeding association being or-
ganized jointly by Columbia, Suwannee
and Lafayette counties.
Lafayette's dairymen have a definite
goal in mind. They want to produce
enough milk to be able to sell it all at
surplus prices and still make money. "To
do this," the county agent says, "they
will have to produce all of their feed
and grazing crops," but Brothers firmly
believes this can be done.


A further example
of the progressive-
ness of Lafayette
County's new dairy-
men, as well as the
soundness of the ad-
vice and leadership
of County Agent S.
L. Brothers is the
fact that this group
O'STEEN has already formed
a County Dairy As-
sociation which enjoys the 100% mem-
bership of the dairies of the county and

ida Dairy Association.
Marshall O'Steen of Mayo is the As-
sociation's first president, and so far as
can be learned the Association is the
only local organization of dairies in the
state which has the 100% membership
of the dairies of the area.


The Birth of a Notion
By W. H. Babcock
Two agri-profs whose specialty
Is dairy cattle husbandry
Were talking shop one wintry day.
Enthroned upon two bales of hay.

They talked of this, they talked of that,
Of Babcock test for butterfat,
Of brucellosis, barn hygiene,
Of 'Yellow'-peril' margarine;

And both agreed the final word-
Improvement means-a proven sire.
For all our talk of better feeding.
The answer lies in better breeding.

Then why look elsewhere; why look
higher?
Improvement means-a provensire.
Yes, and each breed has some "good
stuff,"
But never will there be enough.

They pondered this for quite a while;
Then up spoke one with sudden smile:
Is this idea daft, or droll-
'Get offspring by remote control'?

Could we perfect the right technique
We'd have the answer that we seek;
Each proven sire then could boast
A harem spread from coast to coast,

Each cow could find her ideal mate,
Tho' living in a distant state;
And substituting for the stork
Her babe comes air-mail from New York.

Ere long proclaimed to all creation
Was Artificial Insemination;
A mere idea has grown to be
The bull-work of an industry.

Submitted by:
CLARENCE W. REAVES
Fla. State Extension Dairyman


JULY & AUGUST, 1953 7

























SEEN ABOVE AT THE F. D. A. ANNUAL CONVENTION SPEAKERS TABLE ARE, Left to Right: Mr. lap Marchant, F. D. A.
Attorney; Dr. Paul Vickers, State Veterinarian; Sam Noles, Milk Consultant, State Board of Health; Representative Doyle Conner, 1953
Legislature; Dr. Tom Douglas, of M. I. F. speaking; President Wilmer Bassett; F. D. A. Secretary, Andy Lay; C. W. Reaves, State Extension
Dairyman, and John M. Scott, Chief Dairy Supervisor, Department of Agriculture.

ANOTHER RECORD F. D. A. CONVENTION IS HELD


AT MIAMI BEACH
Business and Vacation For Dairy Plant, Farm and Allied
Groups Are Successfully Blended in 26th Annual Meeting
A delightful, profitable and inspiring three days seems to express best the many
remarks we heard as good-byes were said in parting and as many others have talked
over the 1953 Convention of the Florida Dairy Association held June 24-25-26 at
the Hotel Casablanca, Miami Beach.
The Convention was a repeat performance by public demand, being held two
years in succession in the same city and the same hotel and, believe it or not, the
conventioneers cheered loudly for another return to Miami and Miami Beach.
There is no exaggeration in the year to year stories of bigger and better Florida
Dairy Conventions nor is there any secret or magic in the cause for their increasing
interest and success.
Former, twice president of the Florida that they discussed plans for an organized
Association, J. O. Bowen, now an Execu- nursery and directed play program for
tive of Southern Dairies in Washington, them next year.
D. C. who was a guest speaker at the Miami people in general and Miami
Convention remarked that Florida Con- dairymen in particular have the com-
ventions continue to improve because mendable desire and gift for doing
Florida has a growing and wide awake everything in a more generous manner
industry coupled with a strong and ac- than is expected. The wonderful hospi-
tive State Association. talitv and enthusiasm of the Association's


CHANGES IN ATTENDANCE
Two very noticeable and very helpful
trends in the Florida Convention have
developed in recent years. First the
ladies began attending in larger and lar-
ger numbers bringing increased interest
and glamour to the meetings as well as
dancing partners.
Then, this year, the return to the en-
chanting beach front Casablanca with its
beautiful garden and pool inspired the
ladies to bring the children-whole fami-
lies of them. The large number of ladies
and children, added to a naturally friend-
ly group of dairymen, made for a most
homey and enjoyable occasion for the
more than 400 in attendance from all
over Florida and, in fact, from many
other states.
The Ladies' Auxiliary were so in-
spired with the realization that children
were not out of place at a Convention


Miami members in providing for every
need of the Convention was something
to boast about. Smiling and friendly Re-
ception Committees of both ladies and
men were on hand for the earliest Early
Birds to the latest tail-enders.


SEEN BELOW, TOP TO BOTTOM: (1)
Secretary, And) Lay and President Wilmer
Bassett, greet Convention delegates at the
registration desk; (2) At the Allied Trades
registration desk are: Joe Hammond, Member
Alligator Club Secretary, John Manning, and
Alligator Club Vice President. Jim Steu'art.
(3) WIinners of the Convention golf tourna-
ment receive their prizes. Grand champion
Brady Johnston is holding the handsome
trophy awarded to him.


8 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS























A Dairy Bar was set up and supplied
with free milk and Ice Cream to all Con-
vention delegates and guests throughout
the three days. Transportation, tours,
golf, fishing, an all day Dairy Farm
Tour with a Barbecue Lunch, Dairy
Council displays; special arrangements
with the press, radio and television -
all these and more were the splendid
helps provided for the Convention by
the Miami members.
Two editions of the exclusive "Con-
vention News" Bulletin was fresh off
the mimeograph press of Secretary and
Mrs. Andy Lay on the first and third
days, with pictures of all speakers and
all the lobby gossip and current happen-
ings, which otherwise may never have
been heard about by the busy group.
DIGEST OF PROGRAM
Briefly summarizing the Convention
events, we return to the Early Bird Open
House party put on by President Wilmer
Bassett, Allied Trades President Larry
Hodge and Secretary Andy Lay. This
event, held in a large ocean front pent-
house suite, was a huge success, over-
flowing the normal capacity of the rooms
and closing at a very late hour with the
president and secretary reluctantly calling
time on some of the world's best barber
shop harmony singing in which they
were the leading participants.
Three business sessions were held-
Wednesday afternoon, Thursday morning
and Friday morning. Luncheon Programs
were held Thursday noon following the
Barbecue Lunch and Friday noon at the
Casablanca. The Wednesday night pro-
gram sponsored by the Allied Trades
group from the 6:15 fellowship hour on
the ocean front terrace through the din-
ner floor show and dancing in the
Morocco Room, was featured as a "Coun-
ty Fair Homecoming Party." Dress for
this occasion was varied, from clowns
and show girls to farmers and high-
hatted city-slickers. It was a lot of whole-
some fun.
Dr. E. L. Fouts, University of Florida,
won the "loud shirt" prize. Mr. and
Mrs. Tommy Thomas of West Palm
(Continued on Page 12)


IN THE CONVENTION PICTURES ABOVE, LEFT TO RIGHT ARE: (1) J. 0.
Bowen, Vice President Southern Dairies and former twice president of F. D. A., who came
from Washington to address the meeting.
(2) Cotton Paul, Vice President Foremost Dairies, and former President of F. D. A.
addressing the Convention business session.
(3) Milton Fairman, The Borden Company, New York, addressing the Convention on
"Public Relations" and (4) Dr. Wayne Reitz, Provost for Agriculture, University of Florida,
addressing the closing luncheon session.
Below, are three birdseye views of three busy half day program sessions.


JULY & AUGUST, 1953 9






















OCALA GIRL CHOSEN 953 DAIRY MONTH QUEEN
OCALA GIRL CHOSEN 1953 DAIRY MONTH QUEEN


AT ANNUAL F. D. A. CONVENTION
MISS JANE CLARDY, Ocala ranch and farm girl, won the hearts
as well as the favor of all who saw and heard her as her touching
oration on America and Freedom, gave her the extra points needed to
win a very close contest and the honor of serving as Florida's 1953
Dairy Month Queen. Miss Clardy was selected over five. other Con-
testants from principal Florida cities, any one of whom might have
served as Queen with great credit to the Dairy Industry.


MISS JANICE WADSWORTH of
Miami and MISS CONNIE STEWART
of Jacksonville winning second and third
place honors respectively ranked very
high in the voting, according to the three
out of State judges, with the three re-
maining contestants also very close to
the top.
It was said that the most careful con-
sideration by the judges was necessary in
their voting due to the very close balance
in the popular vote. The vote of the
three judges was given 20% weight in
the decision as against 80%0 of the pop-
ular vote.
Miss Clardy, a graduate of Ocala High
School in June, will enter Florida State
University at Tallahassee this Fall. She
endeared herself to the group with her
simple charm and homey conversational
style as she led her listeners from
thoughts of every day dairy and farming
experiences with which she displayed
considerable familiarity to a scholarly and
yet simple and sincere 12 minute oration
on "The Blessings of American Liberty."
Another of Miss Clardy's talents,
which she could not display is her abil-
ity in horsemanship and riding. This she
- --%


has promised to demonstrate at the An-
nual Dairy Feed Day Meeting at the
University of Florida, September l1th.
MISS JANICE WADSWORTH, win-
ner of second place with her marvellous
exhibition of baton twirling, was a
Majorette and the pride of Miami Edison
High School, where she graduated in
June. Janice is spending her summer va-
cation teaching baton twirling at a Na-
tional training camp for Majorettes and
plans to compete in a National Contest
later in the year.
MISS CONNIE STEWART of Jack-
sonville, winner of third place, displayed
an unusual ability in her toe dancing and
tap dancing as well as very good ability
in singing. Connie graduated with the
highest honors of her class at Landon
High School, and will go to F.S.U. next
year. She and the "Queen," Jane Clardy,
became such good friends during their
stay at Miami Beach that they plan to
room together at F. S. U.
The Judges voted the highest possible
"honorable Mention" to the three other
contestants.
MISS GAIL CARTWRIGHT of Or-


- MIAMI BEACH

lando, possibly the most glamorous of
all the contestants, displayed top ability
in singing and dancing. Gail graduated
from Orlando High School in June.
MISS VERENA FOGEL of Gaines-
ville, showed very marked ability in in-
terpretive dancing. Her demonstrations
of Hawaiian dances, emphasized with
singing and explanations, were very fine.
Verena had been honored during the
week prior to the F.D.A. Convention
with election by the Annual Meeting of
Future Farmers at Daytona Beach, as
F.F.A. State Sweetheart. She will enter
the University of Florida this Fall.
MISS ANN ROBERTS of Tampa was
a freshman at the University of Tampa
the past year. Many believed Miss Rob-
erts to be the most attractive of all the
contestants, but her singing which was
the talent she chose to demonstrate was
not quite as pronounced as the abilities
showed by the other girls. Ann says she
will be back at Tampa University next
year.
MISS MARY BUTLER, pretty and at-
tractive "Queen" of last year and her
equally attractive identical twin, Miss
Mildred Butler who live in Miami, served
as hosts to the visiting contestants and
were greatly admired by the girls as well
as all who had an opportunity to meet
and know them.
Mrs. Cartwright and Mrs. Fogel who
accompanied their daughters Gail and
Verena, Miss Rebecca Daniel, Director






















QUEEN CONTESTANTS FROM SIX FLORIDA CITIES
DISPLAY UNUSUAL, CHARM, BEAUTY AND TALENT


of the Miami Dairy Council and her
Associate Miss Cudworth, acted as chap-
erons for the girls.
The "Queen" received prizes of $100
in cash and a trip to Savannah Beach, for
the Georgia Dairy Association Conven-
tion. She also received a week's stay at
the Hotel Casablanca, Miami Beach at
some future time, and other prizes.
All contestants received an R.C.A.
clock radio and other prizes in addition
to all their expenses incurred in attend-
ance at the Convention.
MR. JACK DEW, of Southern Dairies,
Jacksonville, who as State Dairy Month
Chairman, had charge of the entire Dairy
Month Queen contest, is due a great deal
of credit for the outstanding job which
was done in securing sponsorship for the
selection of the various local "Dairy
Month Queens" and then securing the
local financial support necessary to send
the locally designated "Queens" to par-
ticipate in the State Queen contest.
The three judges, well known, Na-
tional figures of the Dairy Industry, from
Washington, New York and Chicago,
observed that they had never known a
group of similar contestants who dis-
played so much of both beauty and talent.
We believe the entire convention
group considered the "Parade of Talent"
as the contest program was called, the
finest entertainment feature ever present-
ed at a Florida convention.
Advance Miami news stories and pic-
turs .f th. in rus Datir NMi.nth Qucit-
(_.ontcsta .nts and their Par.adc If T l.rnt
.rcared a lidl prcad dilTand ifor their
AippL..ranLc at .i' i clicnts of the i\. ck
IConrinutd on P.I~c i1 i


DAIRY MONTH QUEEN
PICTURES
THE COVER PICTURE Mr. Jack
Dew, Florida 1953 Dairy Month Chair-
man and Master of Ceremonies for the
1953 State Queen Contest, with the
fix contestants and the 1952 Queen.
Seen from left to right are:
Miss Mary Butler, 1952 Queen; Miss
Gail Cartwright. Orlando; Miss Verena
Fogel, Gainesville; Miss Ann Roberts.
Tampa; Miss Jane Clardy, Ocala, the
new Queen; Miss Connie Steuart, Jack-
sonville, who placed third and Miss
Janice Wadsworth, Miami, who was
second.
SEEN ABOVE ACROSS THE
DOUBLE PAGE, LEFT to RIGHT:
(1) Mr. Dew is seen introducing the
contestants as the "Parade of Talent"
uas about to begin.
(2) F.D.A. president Wilmer Bassett
is seen crowning the winner, Miss
Clardy as the retiring Queen Miss But-
ler presents the new Queen with a bou-
quet of roses.
(3) Mr. Jack Parker-Casablanca Man-
ager (right) as he announced to F.D.A.
Secretary Andy Lay, that the hotel of-
fered a week's complimentary stay to
the new Queen and a companion.
(4) The three happy winners-Connie
Stewart (3rd), Jane Clardy the Queen,
and Janice Wadsworth (2nd).
AT THE RIGHT-Top to Bottom, the
three winners are seen exhibiting their
favorite talent: Miss Clardy, horseman-
ship with her favorite cow-pony "Gray
Eagle," Miss Wadsworth leading her
High School band at football parade.
and Miss Stewart at dancing.
AT THE BOTTOM-Left to right:
(1) A portion of the over 400 conven-
tion members who viewed the "Parade
of Talent."
(2) The contest judges count the Votes
.... 1 . ; .. ; r . . .r;


L H.. .; s' ,... , ,' .


K/A


I



























(Continued from Page 9)
Beach won the costume prize for a cou-
ple. The excellent show and dance or-
chestra were by courtesy of the Allied
Trades and were very much enjoyed by
a packed house in the Morocco Room.
LADIES PROGRAM
The Ladies' Auxiliary group spent
most of the day together on Thursday
with a bus tour of the beach, and a visit
to Villa Viscaya and its beautiful gar-
dens and Art Museum. They had lunch
and enjoyed a fashion show at Miami's
"big store" Burdines, and were allowed
time to shop a little before the return
trip. Of course, many of the ladies util-
ized every opportunity to enjoy the Casa-
blanca's modernistic swimming pool and
to soak up the sunshine from lounging
chairs about the deck and terrace. This
was a popular place too for the many
youngsters who accompanied their mamas
to the Convention.
As for the men, on Thursday after-
noon, which was set aside for recreation,
golfers contested, fishermen fished, dairy-
men visited Miami's modern dairy farms,
one milking over 3,500 cows, and many
who were less energetic just loafed out
the afternoon in the complete comfort
of the huge air-conditioned tropical-like
lobby of the hotel.
ANNUAL DINNER
Thursday night was a bit long but de-
lightful, starting off with the reception
and fellowship hour held through cour-
tesy of the Alligator Club members hon-
oring the Florida Dairy Association
Board of Directors. Dinner was again
in the elaborately designed Morocco
Room with an overflow crowd of more
than 400. All was suspense as the time
approached for the Master of Ceremon-
ies, the incomparable Jack Dew, to pre-
sent the "Parade of Talent," the six
Dairy Month Queens representing var-
ious cities of the State who were to com-
pete for the honor of becoming the
1953 Florida State Dairy Month Queen.


As each of these six beautiful and tal-
ented young ladies was presented and
sang, danced, twirled or spoke, it became
evident that the three out-of-state judges
and all present each with one vote were
confronted with a most difficult decision
in choosing one as a winner. It was
said that the group vote was so close
that the final choice had to be made by
the judges. The winner, Miss Jane
Clardy of Ocala, no doubt won the close
decision on her heart touching oration on
Freedom and Americanism and her abun-
dance of personal charm.
BUSINESS SESSIONS
The three business sessions of the
Convention were efficiently and pleas-
antly conducted by President Bassett. The
program was very appropriately opened
with an Annual Inventory of the Prog-
ress and Problems of the Dairy Industry.
The panel of speakers making the in-
ventory included Mr. Tom Douglas, Milk
Industry Foundation, who surveyed the
industry from a national standpoint; John
M. Scott, Chief Dairy Supervisor; Sam
Noles, Milk Consultant of the State
Board of Health; Dr. Paul Vickers, State
Veterinarian; A. R. Nielsen, Distributor;
C. W. Reaves, State Extension Dairyman;
(Continued on Page 13)

IN THE F. D. A. ANNUAL MEETING
PICTURES ABOVE ARE SEEN, LEFT TO
RIGHT:
(1) PreJident Wr'ilmer Bas.set stand (2) Allied
Trades President, Larry Hodge, receiving en-
grated gavels a. a memento of their serving
as president, from Master of Ceremonie. Alf
Nielsen.
(3) C. IV. Reares, Florida State Extension
Dairyman, displays the Emblem of Member-
ship in the "Bell Cot's" of F. D. A. which
had just been presented to him by Alf Niel-
sen. President of the Bell Col's.
(4) Dr. and Mrs. E. L. Fonal, of the
University of Florida Dairy Science Depart-
ment show their enjoyment of the Conven-
tion. Dr. Fours had just won the prize of-
fered at the "County Fair Night" for the
"loudest shirt."


IN THE GROUP OF PICTURES BELOW
ARE. TOP TO BOTTOM:
(1) President and Mrs. Wilmler Bassett in
their "County Fair Night" hats.
(2) Jim and Alice Jennings who have
served as Sergeant at Arms and Chief of Hat
Sales, respectively for Annual Meetings and
Field Day Meetings for many years.
(3) Mist Jo Hollister, Associate Editor.
Southern Dairy products Journal, working
aw'ay at taking notes and pictures, and Dr.
Tom Douglas, Official of Milk Foundation,
Washington. D. C.. one of the Convention
speakers.


12 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


ANOTHER RECORD F. D. A. CONVENTION
IS HELD AT MIAMI BEACH







RECORD DAIRY ASSOCIATION CONVENTION


(Continued from Page 12)
and E. T. Lay, F.D.A. Executive Direc-
tor. The session concluded with a
thought provoking address by Mr. J. 0.
Bowen, Vice-president of Southern
Daires, Washington, D. C. on "Keep
Your Eye on the Goal Not on the
Problem."
The second business session, Thursday
morning, had three splendid speakers
with a packed house. Mr. Milton Fair-
man, National Public Relations Director
of the Borden Dairies, New York, cov-
ered this subject in a fine manner. Dr.
Tom Douglas of the Milk Industry Foun-
dation, Washington, D. C., spoke on
"Sales Efficiency Through Training" and
Cotton Paul, Vice-President of Foremost
Dairies, gave an illustrated talk on Ice
Cream Sales.
FARM TOUR
On the Dairy Farm Tour, the group
was addressed following the barbecue
lunch and at various points on the tour
on "Pasture Production" by Dr. Fred
Boyd, University of Florida Agronomist
at the Ft. Lauderdale Station and Prof.
J. H. Henderson, Agronomist at the Uni-
versity in Gainesville.
Miami dairy farms visited were se-
lected primarily because of their pasture
programs. These were the Dressel Dairy,
the Hall & Boyd Dairy, Graham's Dairy
and the Roselawn Dairy.
Mr. French Koger, Dade County
Health Dept. Chief Dairy Supervisor
who acted as Chairman for the pasture
tour and the barbecue lunch, deserves a
great deal of credit along with the dairy-
men who served with him, for this well
planned and managed tour. The Dairy
News will carry a review of the pastures
seen on this tour in a later issue.
At the third business session Friday
morning, interest was still going strong
when C. W. Reaves showed pictures of
and described the European tour made
in 1952 by him and Florida's National
Championship 4-H Dairy Judging Team.
Dr. E. L. Fouts, Head of the Dairy
Science Department of the University of
Florida gave some enlightening informa-
tion on "What's New in Dairy Science."
Jack Dew, State Dairy Month Chairman,
reviewed the Florida 1953 Dairy Month
activities and Bill Bryant, Johnson and
Johnson Co., showed some movies and
described "Florida's Modern Dairy In-
dustry."
This session concluded with the an-
nual address of the president, the annual
activities and audit report by the Execu-
tive Secretary, the adoption of resolu-
tions and the annual election of officers
and directors.
Hon. Doyle Conner, State Represen-
tative from Starke, Florida, addressed the


Dinner Meeting, Wednesday night giv-
ing highlights of the 1953 Florida Legis-
lature.
At the closing Luncheon Session on
Friday, F. D. A. Dean Alf Nielsen in
his usual fine and inspiring manner pre-
sented the retiring presidents with en-
graved gavels and as president of the
Leadership Order of Bell Cows installed
as a new member of this group, Mr.
Clarence Reaves, Florida State Extension
Dairyman.
With attendance and interest sustained
to the very last, the Convention closed


ROT AND TERMITES can't live on
A L& T's pressure-treated fence posts.
Contact with damp soil causes un-
treated or "dipped" posts to decay in
a few years. Termites will attack
exposed posts in much of the South-
east. Pine fence posts pressure-treated
with A L & T's clean, salt-type pre-
servative, however, last many times
longer than untreated posts. All the


on a note of optimism and inspiration
as Dr. Wayne Reitz, Provost for Agri-
culture, University of Florida, summar-
ized the phenomenal development of
agriculture in the State, including the
dairy industry, weighed our current agri-
cultural conditions and problems, and
commended the Florida Dairy Industry
and its leadership for the outstanding
progress and development which it has
made within the past decade.
Those who have attended know and
all who have not, should be reminded
that you can't afford to miss the Florida
Dairy Association Convention.


wood is treated-not just the surface
-because A L & T uses pressure up
to 150 pounds per square inch. These
top-quality posts are clean, paintable,
odorless and can't harm livestock or
produce.
Here is a folder that tells you how
A L & T's clean-treated posts can save
money on your farm-ask your local
distributor for a copy or write to: >


JULY & AUGUST, 1953 13


American Lumber

and Treating Co.
Graham Bldg., Jacksonville, Fla.
S PRODUCERS OF THE ORIGINAL
Protect all the wood- W
not only the surface. i af iz
Insist on pressure- PRESSURE TREATED
treated posts. Iu


We never thought we'd see the day
When we'd give up the ghost














Buy ?wrm Amy 4ataufgied ORTHO Veaes


ALACHUA, Farmers Hardware Co.
ARCADIA, Smith's X-Cel Feed Store
117 W. Magnolia
BARTOW, Farm & Ranch Supply
335 W. Main St.
BELLE GLADE, Kilgore Seed Co.
BOWLING GREEN
Nicholson Supply
BOYNTON BEACH,
Broward Grain & Supply Co.
BROOKSVILLE,
Williams Feed & Supply
19-23 S. Main St.
CHIEFLAND, Farm Service Store
CHIPLEY, F.R.M. Feed Store
CLEARWATER,
Red Comb Feed Store
1220 S. Ft. Harrison Ave.
COCOA, Farmers Supply Store
DADE CITY,
Madill Building Supply
408-10 N. Seventh Street
Pasco Farm & Ranch Supply
DANIA, Broward Grain & Supply
DAYTONA BEACH,
Volusia Garden Supply
942 Volusia
DE FUNIAK SPRINGS,
Thompson & Hillard Milling Co.
West Florida Farmers Coop.
DELRAY BEACH,
Delray Beach Farm Supply, Inc.
DUNEDIN, Brandeburg Seed Store
FT. LAUDERDALE,
Broward Grain & Supply
FT. MYERS, Kilgore Seed Co.
F. PIERCE, Hector Supply Co.
GAINESVILLE,
B. & G. Farm Supply
1012 S. Main St.
Johnson Brothers, Inc.
111 S. Main
Kilgore Seed Co.
202 S. E. First Ave.

HIGH SPRINGS,
Farm Supply Store
High Springs Seed Store
JASPER,
Farmers Hardware & Supply Co.

JACKSONVILLE,
E. A. Martin Seed Co.
5126 Beaver St.


JAY, Farmers Feed & Supply
KISSIMMEE,
Lou Tarcal Feed & Farm Supply
Corner Main & Vine St.
Kissimmee Feed & Seed
424 Broadway
Tuxedo Feed Store
LAKE CITY,
Wade-Person
301 W. Railroad St.
LAKELAND,
Harrell Feed & Seed Store
224 N. Florida
LAKE WALES,
Yeoman's Feed & Farm Supply
201 Orange Ave.
LIVE OAK,
Farmers Mutual Exchange
Mizzell Produce Co.
3030 Pinue St.
MADISON,
Farmers Mutual Exchange
MALONE, Williams Seed & Feed
MARIANNA,
Powledge Seed & Supply Co.
MAYO,
O. A. Winburn Farm Supply
MELBOURNE, Farm Supply Store

MIAMI,
General Mills, Inc.
7275 N. W. 7th Ave.
Hector Supply Co.
P. 0. Box 1311
Collins Feed & Supply Co.
N. E. 94th St. & FEC Railroad

MILTON, Malone-Griffin, Inc.

NEWBERRY, Rolands Hardware

OCALA.
Kilgore Seed Co.
909 N. Magnolia
Security Feed & Seed Co.
Seminole Stores, Inc.
Ocklawaha-Orange
ORLANDO,
Joseph Bumby Hardware
102 W. Church St.
Check-R-Board
66 W. Washington
Hough's Tuxedo Feed Store
2524 Kuhl Ave.
Palmer Tuxedo Feed Store
906 W. Church
X-Cel Feed Store
205 W. Robinson

PERRY,
Bryant's Feed Store
305 W. Green


PAHOKEE, Kilgore Seed Co.
PALATKA,
Check-R-Board
North First St.
Security Feed & Seed
201 First St.
PALMETTO, Kilgore Seed Co.
PENSACOLA,
Escambia Farmers Supply Co.
2709 N. Palafox St.
F. S. Mellen & Co.
42 E. Garden St.
PLANT CITY, Kilgore Seed Co.
POMPANO BEACH,
Broward Grain & Supply Co.
QUINCY,
Southern Chemical Sales &
Service, S-S Camilla St.
SANFORD,
Kilgore Seed Co.
300 W. First St
SANTE FE,
Sante Fe Trading Post
SEBRING,
Highlands Farm Supply
42 Commerce Street
STUART, Tyson's, Inc.
TALLAHASSEE,
Berry & Johnson Co.
826 W. Gaines St.
Rivers Seed Co.
309 S. Adams Street
TAMPA,
General Mills, Inc.
711 W. Cass Avenue
Jackson Grain Co.
Cass & Ashley St.
Security Mills of Tampa, Inc.
710 Ashley Street
Tuxedo Feed Store
3109 Fourth Ave.

TITUSVILLE, Growers Supply Co.

TRENTON,
Tri-Country Farmers Coop., Inc.
Main Street

VERO BEACH, Kilgore Seed Co.

WAUCHULA,
Davis Feed & Fertilizer
Hardee County Seed & Crate Co.
Kilgore Seed Co.

WEST PALM BEACH,
Kilgore Seed Co.
910 Belvedere Road

WINTER HAVEN,
X-Cel Feed Store
450 Avenue A, S. W.


California Spray-Chemical Corporation


P. 0. Box 1231


Fairfield Road


Orlando, Florida


14 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS




















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JULY & AUGUST, 1953 15


0

s) = ae r
MM A








UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


DAIRY REVIEW


Extension Service Dairy Products Laboratory
Dairy Farm Research Unit Agricultural Experiment Station

Low Faf Milk From Jersey Cows
From a talk at Florida Dairy Association Convention. Miami Beach. June 24, 1953
By DR. E. L. FOUTS
Head, Dept. Dairy Science
University of Florida
You probably are all familiar with the too frequent occurrence of low fat milk
in most every part of Florida from time to time for no apparent reason. This
trouble has been called to our attention many times by dairymen and regulatory
agencies but though some efforts have been made we have not been able to put our
finger on the cause; that is, we have not been able to reproduce
the condition experimentally. It has had serious implications
in that it has caused economic losses to dairymen and much
worry to regulatory officials because the books say that such a
condition just doesn't occur normally.
Dr. R. B. Becker, because of some work many years ago, k 1
believed that the condition might be caused by certain types of
feeding programs and as a result of this, some feeding trials I1I
were made at Gainesville in which a group of cows were fed
balanced rations, some of which had low roughage, and others
received hay. The low roughage cows showed a material drop FOUTS
in fat content of the milk, while those cows receiving hay and pasture maintained
the normal percentage of fat in their milk.
By including hay and pasture in the
feed of the affected animals the fat tests Amount of pulp was increased to 1.6
were brought back to normal in a rela- pounds per cwt. There was a gradual
tively short period of time. increase in fat to 5 percent the next 3
Some individual case histories are as weeks.
follows: The cows were put on clover and dal-
Herd feeding conditions at beginning las grass pasture 20 hours per day and
of 1953 trial (January 6). the fat test increased to 6 percent level
Cows were grazing oats during day rapidly.
and had access to corn silage and pan- Cow 356-Cow was kept in dry lot
gola grass during night. and fed citrus-beet pulp mix at rate of
Grain was fed at about one pound of 1.2 pounds per cwt. of cow. Grain was
feed to three pounds of milk. added to meet Morrison standard.
Control cow remained on above feed- She started at approximately 6 percent
ing conditions with exception of pasture fat. A rapid decline to 3.2 percent was
changing to clover and dallas grass and noted in 4 weeks. Then a gradual de-
gradually reducing silage and hay. As dine to 2.6 percent was noted in the
pasture became unlimited, silage and hay next 4 weeks. Levelled off between 2.6
feeding was discontinued and cows were and 2.8 percent in next 2 weeks.
grazing 20 hours per day, which was the When she was changed from pulp to
general herd feeding plan for this sea- hay (clover-dallas grass pasture clip-
son of year. hay (clover-dallas grass pasture clip-
Control cow butterfat tests-Started at pings) 6 pounds per day a rapid increase
an average of 6 percent fat. Varied from to 5.2 in next 2 weeks was noted, then
5.5 percent. At finish of trial in April a gradual increase to 5.7 in next 3 weeks
her milk tested 5.9 percent fat. was noted.
Co' 426 was kept in dry lot and fed There are individual case histories. All
citrus-beet pulp mix at rate of 1.2 pounds cows were in good condition and had
per cwt. of cow and grain was added to unlimited pasture the previous year. In
meet Morrison standard. She started at the month preceding the beginning of
approximately 6 percent (5.6 to 6.3) for this year's test all cows had plenty of
2 weeks. Gradual reduction to 4.5 per- oats grazing during day and silage and
cent next 2 weeks. Gradual reduction to hay ad lib in racks at night.
3.8 percent next 2 weeks. Levelled off Other cows in the experiment showed
between 3.8 percent and 4.2 percent next a similar trend but the extent of the var-
8 weeks. iations was not so pronounced.


DAIRY SHORT COURSES
AND EVENTS AT
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


August 25 27
"DAIRY HERDSMEN SHORT
COURSE"
Open to all dairymen and dairy herds-
men. This program includes both class-
room periods and farm visits to study
dairy herd and feed production prac-
tices.
A fine opportunity to educate a new
herdsman or improve your present herds-
man.
Send advance registration and hotel
reservation notice to Florida Dairy As-
sociation. (See program elsewhere in this
issue).

September 10 11
"DAIRY FIELD DAY PROGRAM"
A popular 2-day program featuring
the best ideas for providing your herd
with a proper "Fall and Winter Feed
Supply."
This top quality program merits the
attendance of every dairyman in the State
of Florida. Its numerous talks, discuss-
ions and demonstrations both at the
Dairy Department of the U. of F. Cam-
pus and at the Dairy Research Farm pro-
vide the latest information from Flor-
ida's best informed Dairy Research and
Science leaders.
Send advance attendance and hotel
reservation notice to Florida Dairy As-
sociation, Jacksonville. (See complete
program elsewhere in this issue.

September 24 25 26
"ANNUAL DAIRY PLANT
OPERATIONS SHORT COURSE"
This 16th Annual Short Course on
Dairy Plant Operations is intended for
Plant Superintendents, Managers, as well
as various plant supervisory employees,
Producer-Distributors and Dairy Supply
and Equipment Dealers.
Special features include a Vanilla Ice
Cream Clinic and attendance at the U.
of F. vs. Ga.-Tech. Football Game.
Send advance attendance and hotel
reservation notice to Florida Dairy As-
sociation, Jacksonville (See complete pro-
gram in next issue of The Dairy News).

The experiments will be repeated again
next year on a project sponsored by Fed-
eral and State Funds, and we believe that
this work may show definitely that feed-
ing practices can be responsible for the
low fat milk.
Professor W. A. Krienke supervised
the analysis of the milk samples.


16 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS







Becker Gets Borden Award For Dairy Cattle Research


HERDSMEN'S SHORT COURSE
SET FOR AUGUST 25-27

The Dairy Extension Department of
the University of Florida has announced
the 1953 Annual Dairy Herdsmen's three
day Short Course will be held August
24-25-26 at the University Dairy Labora-
tory, and the Dairy Farm Research Unit,
Gainesville.
The Florida Dairy Association Com-
mittees on "Milk Production" and "Dairy
Husbandry" cooperate with the Extension
Division and Dairy Science Department
of the University of Florida in planning
and promoting interest and attendance
at this special Herd Management Course.
Program Outlined
AUGUST 25:
8:30 Registration, Dairy Products Lab-
oratory
Dr. E. L. Fouts: Outline of De-
partmental Activities
9:00 Breeding Records in Herd Man-
agement, P. T. Dix Arnold
10:00 Inheritance of Milk Production,
R. B. Becker
Recess
11:00 Production Testing, C. W.
Reaves
1:30 Artificial Breeding, James M.
Wing and S. P. Marshall
3:30 Dairy Calves and Their Care,
H. L. Somers
AUGUST 26:
8:30 Herd Replacements (Calves, and
Losses), P. T. Dix Arnold
10:00 Establishing and Maintaining
Pasture, J. R. Henderson
Recess
11:00 Pasture Management Rotation,
Successions and Quality, A. B.
Sanchez
1:30 Pasture Tour, A. B. Sanchez
3:30 Silage and Hay from Surplus
Pastures, James M. Wing
AUGUST 27:
8:30 Feeding Value of Pastures, S. P.
Marshall
9:45 Costs of and Returns from Pas-
ture, C. W. Reaves
Recess
11:00 Synthetic Proteins in Dairy
Rations, R. B. Becker
1:30 Artificial Curing of Hays, J. M.
Myers


HAVE YOU A SLOGAN?
We like the slogan of the Florida
Power & Light Company.
"Courtesy wins Friends for Florida
and YOU."


Florida Agricultural Experiment Sta-
tion dairy husbandman and professor of
dairy husbandry at the University of
Florida, Dr. R. B. Becker was honored
recently at the annual meeting of the
American Dairy Science Association in
Madison, Wisconsin.
As a result of his outstanding work
on the mineral requirements of cattle and
other research, Dr. Becker received the
51,000 Borden Production Award and
gold medal. With other Florida scien-
tists, he helped discover the cause of the
salt sick malady which had plagued cat-
tle in Florida for many years. This mal-
ady can now be avoided by feeding min-
eral mixture.
Dr. Becker also has conducted re-
search on the use of citrus by products
in feeding dairy cows, as well as work
on the functions and development of the
digestive tract in calves. He was presi-
dent of the American Dairy Science As-
sociation in 1950-51.

UNIVERSITY GRADUATES URGED
TO TAKE PART IN DEMOCRACY
Dr. William T. Sanger, noted medical
educator, advocated a return to demo-
cratic participation at the local level in
his address to the June graduating class
of the University of Florida.
Dr. Sanger, president of the Medical
College of Virginia, said "Only by mak-
ing democracy work from the smallest
community to the largest, from local gov-
ernment to national government, can we
keep ourselves free from the promises
and directives of central authority."
Sanger outlined an eight-point pro-
gram which he said if followed would
make democracy more dynamic and ef-
fective and "better assure its function in
an ever more complex social order."
He urged the graduates to:
1. Possess the deepest abiding convic-
tion that democracy is worthwhile and
must be made to work for all.
2. Possess a philosophy of life that
arises above current materialism, placing
emphasis upon spiritual values.
3. Vote intelligently and accept public
responsibility and public office when the
need arises.
4. Realize that voting and public serv-
ice call for most earnest and devoted
duty.
5. Strive to the uttermost to solve
problems and meet obligations within
our respective communities, looking to
federal and state governments for de-
creasing instead of increasing services.
6. Study and plan effectively to deter-
mine on a defensible basis the policies
and functions of local, state and national
government and their relationship to
each other.


DAIRY PLANT SHORT COURSE
SEPTEMBER 24-25-26

The 16th Annual Dairy Plant Short
Course will be held at the University of
Florida Dairy Products Laboratory Build-
ing, September 24 26 under the co-
sponsorship of the University Depart-
ment of Dairy Science and the "Dis-
tributors Council" of the Florida Dairy
Association.
Dr. Leon Mull of the University Dairy
Science Department heads up the Dairy
Department Staff Committee for plan-
ning and sponsorship of this year's Short
Course and the "Plant Committee" of
the Dairy Association acts for the F.D.A.
Distributors Council in co-sponsoring,
planning and promoting the Course.
Fine Program Planned
This year's program includes many
up-to-the-minute subjects on milk and ice
cream which should be of interest to
everyone connected with milk and milk
products, processing and distribution.
All speakers and discussion leaders are
considered experts in this field of the
Dairy Industry.
Special Features
Special interest features of the pro-
gram are the Vanilla Ice Cream Clinic,
the special fun session of "The Order
of Yellow Dogs" which includes initia-
tion of new members, the always popu-
lar Fellowship Hour and Annual Plant
Short Course Dinner with special enter-
tainment and the Saturday football game
between the University of Florida and
Georgia Tech.
Room Reservations
Those planning to attend are urged to
make hotel reservations early at any of
the following Gainesville hotels and
courts:
Manor Motel, Hil-Top Court and the
Gator Motel.
The Dairy Association will handle res-
ervations for those requesting it.
The complete Short Course program
will be mailed to all Florida Dairy
Plants when complete and will also be
carried in the September "Dairy News."
In the meantime, any inquiries about the
program may be directed to Dr. Leon
Mull, Dairy Department, University of
Florida, Gainesville, or to the Florida
Dairy Association.
7. Use scrupulous care in the exercise
of the functions and relationships be-
tween the various levels of government.
8. Dedicate themselves as college men
and women to governmental leadership,
realizing that if democracy is to serve its
best 'we must develop a better prepared
electorate which recognizes that for every
right under a democratic society there
must always be a corresponding responsi-
bility, otherwise it is easy to sacrifice
freedom for security which the dictator
is always quick to guarantee."


JULY & AUGUST, 1953 17







m m


C-ART I U
A


DAIRY

PRODUCERS AND DISTRIBUTORS
Of Milk, Ice Cream And Other Products
*
DAIRY FRESH PRODUCTS, DIRECT FROM THE FARM
*
Home Delivery In Glass or Paper Containers
*
Locally Owned and Operated
*
Proud To Be A Member Of
"The Florida Dairy Association"


18 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


Em


Miami Hallywood Ft. Lauderdale West Palm Beach


J


b


1111111







URGES 7-POINT PROGRAM
FOR DAIRY FARM EFFICIENCY
Walter Hunnicutt, procurement man-
ager for National Dairy Products Cor-
poration and nationally known authority
on dairy farming, sent a special "June
Dairy Month" message to all Milk Pro-
ducers for National Dairies, which we
believe worthy of the attention of Flor-
ida Dairymen.


HUNNICUTT
to Dairy Farmers:


Mr. Hunnicutt
will be remembered
for his address on
"Green Pastures" at
the 1952 Florida
Dairy Association
Convention in Mi-
ami.
Mr. Hunnicutt's
Dairy Month mes-
sage makes the fol-
lowing suggestions


FREE NEW 30-PAGE DIGEST
ON LIVESTOCK PARASITE CONTROL
In one comprehensive book-livestock
men now have the latest approved, prac-
tical information on control of external
livestock parasites! Published by Califor-
nia Spray-Chemical Corporation, this all
new ORTHO Livestock Digest shows
how it has been proven that livestock
raisers can increase profits by at least
10% through proper sanitation and
pest control measures alone. This 30-page
book is available free from ORTHO
Dealers or by mail from California
Spray-Chemical Corporation.


AF


GRAND

CHAMPION


"AHLEFELDT" DISTRIBUTOR
FOR SANITATION CHEMICALS
Hans Ahlefeldt who for a number of
years has represented a leading Manufac-
turer of Sanitation Chemicals in Florida,
has announced the formation of his own
chemicals distributing company.
The new company operating as "Helm
Sanitation Chemicals," will have Amelia
City, in the beach suburbs of Fernan-
dina as office headquarters with storage
and distribution from the Union Ter-
minal Warehouse, Jacksonville, Florida.


GREEN MEAD W LILY PAST
... of Green Meadow Farms, Elsie, Michigan.
The greatest milk producing Holstein of all time.
She holds the world's record for milk production
regardless of the times milked per day. Accord-
ing to Duane Green, herd manager at Green
Meadow Farms, "Lily Pabst" is part of a herd
of 350 registered Holsteins. For years Johnson
&Johnson Rapid-Flo FIBRE-BONDED filter disks
have been used exclusively to safeguard the
production of this outstanding champion ...
this fine herd.


"Include these points in your dairy op-
erations and you'll wind up the year a
"Hundred Per Center."
1. Provide enough improved, well-fer-
tilized, legume-grass forage mixtures to
cover the pasture, grass silage and hay
needs of your herd for the whole year.
2. Use a long grassland rotation pro-
gram which includes corn and small
grain to supply the balanced require-
ments of your feeding plan. This will
cut the feed bill down and help build
up the soil.
3. Plan farm work so it can be done
from the tractor seat. These jobs will
cease to be drudgeries if you let your
tractor and other mechanized tools do
your forage harvesting and manure dis-
posal operations.
4. Grass silage can be harvested and
stored economically in a horizontal silo.
It can be built as a self-feeder so the
cattle can have silage free choice, or the
silage can be removed with a tractor fork
for bunker feeding.
5. Plan new equipment and buildings,
or remodel, to save time and labor. Con-
nect the milk house to the milking par-
lor and place the forage bunkers for ease
of feeding.
6. Cows will remain cleaner and use
less bedding with separate resting and
feeding areas. Use a loose housing type
barn. Allow the cows access to the hay
and silage for free choice feeding. They
will readily go from the holding area in-
to the milking parlor for their grain.
7. Last but not least, use proven sires
and D.H.I.A. tested high producing dams
for raising herd replacements. It takes
as much time and money to raise a herd
replacement from a grade bull as it does
from a bull that has proven itself
through its offspring in the past, and the
results are far from equal."


JULY & AUGUST. 1953 19


Maybe you don't own a champion
milk producing cow. But you can
protect your milk production just
the way the owners of champion
cows do-at NO EXTRA COST
-with the world's champion filter
disk.
A recent survey of over 175,000
farmers shows that Rapid-Flo
FIBRE-BONDED filterdisksout-
sell any 4 brands combined by
more than two to one. Users say
Rapid-Flo is "Safer," "More
Reliable," "More Retentive,"


THE GRAND CHAMPION
S FILTER DISK




RAPID-FIO6



"Better Quality," providing an
even more reliable Rapid-Flo
Farm Sediment Check-Up.
Producers who want to avoid
taking chances, can get the extra
protection of Rapid-Flo FIBRE-
BONDED filter disks-at no extra
cost. All Rapid-Flo filter disks are
FIBRE-BONDED-J&J quality
at no increase in price, recom-
mended everywhere to aid quality
milk production. Buy Rapid-Flo
Single-Face or Bonded-Face filter
disks from your favorite supplier.


Milk Producers Indorse...


DAIR F R S D 4








DAIRY ASSOCIATION

ACTIVITIES


MIAMI PRODUCER IS PRESIDENT ELECT
OF FLORIDA DAIRY ASSOCIATION
New Directors and Officers Named to Take Office
January 1, 1954
Herman Boyd, prominent young Miami dairyman was elected at the recent
F. D. A. Annual Meeting, June 26, in Miami Beach, to become president of the
Association for the year 1954.
Mr. Boyd who has served on the Association's Board of Directors for a number
of years, was also elected Producer Vice President for the remainder of 1953, suc-
ceeding Mr. Frank Doub who had requested to be relieved of Active Association
duties at this time.
His active service as a member of the Annual Meeting Committee the past two
years, and his leadership for the past year as chairman of the F. D. A. State Pasture
Development Committee served to bring him into prominence and to favorable con-
sideration for election as the Association's third producer president since the forma-
tion of the present Industry-wide organization in 1946.


All present Officers and Directors of
the Florida Dairy Association who were
due to go out of office on July 1st, ac-
cording to the by-laws of the organiza-
tion since 1947, received an additional
six months term, under an amendment
to the by-laws adopted at the Annual
Meeting.
This continues President Bassett and
others who were not re-elected in their
present posts until January 1, 1954. The
purpose of the change as explained by
the special by-laws committee, was to af-
ford new Officers and Directors who are
usually elected in June more time to or-
ganize their plans, program and commit-
tees for the year in which they serve.
Other new Officers and Directors
elected with Mr. Boyd are: Cliff Wayne,
Southern Dairies State Manager as first
Vice President for distributors; George
Johnson, W. Palm Beach, as 2nd. Vice
President for producers; W. J. Barritt,
Jr, Florida Borden Co. Manager, as
Treasurer, to succeed Mr. J. N. McAr-
thur, Miami; Walter Burton, Jacksonville
was re-elected Assistant Treasurer and E.
T. (Andy) Lay, Executive Director and
Secretary.
New members elected on the Board of
ten producers and ten distributors are:
John Tripson, Vero Beach Dairy to re-
place Freeman Hales, Miami; Claude
Keley, Foremost Dairies, Daytona, to re-
place Jack Johnson, Foremost Jackson-
ville manager; and George Boutwell,
Lake Worth, replacing Gordon Nielsen,
West Palm Beach.
New producer directors elected are:
John McMullen, Clearwater, who will re-
place Herman Boyd as a director when
Boyd becomes president; J. D. Fuqua,


Marianna, who will replace Donald
Leonard, Blountstown; and L. B. Hull,
Gainesville, who replaces Frank Doub of
Jacksonville.
Distributor Directors re-elected are:
Cody Skinner, Jacksonville; John Hood,
St. Petersburg; W. J. Barritt, Jr., Tampa;
Herman Burnett, Bradenton; Fred Zir-
kelbach, Pensacola; J. N. McArthur, Mi-
ami and Cliff Wayne, Miami.
Producer Directors re-elected are:
George Johnson, W. Palm Beach; Bill
Graham, Miami; Wayne Webb, Tampa;
John Sargeant, Lakeland; John Adkin-
son, Pensacola; Ira Barrow, New Smyrna
Beach and J. H. Adams, Jacksonville.

NATIONAL DAIRY CATTLE
CONGRESS
October 3-10 Waterloo, Iowa

INTERNATIONAL DAIRY
SHOW
October 10-17 Chicago

Annual Convention
MILK INDUSTRY
FOUNDATION
October 26-28 Boston, Mass.

Annual Convention
INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIA-
TION OF ICE CREAM
MANUFACTURERS
October 28-30 Boston, Mass.

Annual Convention
SOUTHERN ASSOCIATION OF
ICE CREAM MANUFACTURERS
December 8-10 Miami Beach


BOYD WAYNE


BARRITT


U. S. DAIRY ASSOCIATION
OFFICIALS AND DIRECTORS
CONFER IN CANADA
The 1953 Anual Spring Conference of
Directors, Officials and Executives, Na-
tional and State Associations of the
United States and Canada was held June
18-23 in Montreal, Canada.
This conference which is always one
of the best of those held by the Dairy
Industry includes the Directors and of-
ficials of all National Associations and
the President and Secretary of all State
Associations.
National Associations included are the
Milk Industry Foundation, International
Association of Ice Cream Manufacturers,
American Dairy Association, and Nation-
al Dairy Council.
Subjects prominent on the program
were: Public Relations, Dairy Economics,
Sale of Dairy Products with Related
Foods, Future of Low Fat Dairy Products,
Better Merchandising Methods, Controll-
ing Distribution Costs, Trends in Mer-
chandising Cabinets, Industry Wide Pro-
motions, Selling Through Vending Ma-
chines, Home Milk Delivery vs. Store
Sales, Best Methods for Quality Promo-
tion, Future of the Half Gallon Con-
tainer.
Florida representatives attending were:
Alf Nielsen, Alfar Creamery, West Palm
Beach, and Paul E. Reinhold, Foremost
Dairies, Jacksonville, both Directors of
the Milk Industry and the I.A.I.C.M.
Reinhold is also a Director of the Na-
tional Dairy Council.
Other Floridians attending were Theo
Datson, Borden's, Orlando, representing
the Florida Dairy Association as a Di-
rector of I.A.I.C.M., and Henry Schneid-
er, Schneider's Creamery, Eustis, as
Chairman of the Florida Milk Commis-
sion.


20 FLORIDA DAIRY


NEWS







F. D. A. Milk Producers

Support Mastitis Program

of Live Stock Board
A substantial delegation of producer
members of the Florida Dairy Associa-
tion attended the July 8th meeting of
the Florida Live Stock Board in Tampa,
to oppose proposed changes and reduc-
tions in the Board's budget and program
for Mastitis control and prevention.
A proposal had been submitted to the
Board that the budget for Mastitis con-
trol work be substantially reduced and
that the Mastitis Division's special lab-
oratory work now being done at the
Lakeland headquarters of the Mastitis
program director, be discontinued and
referred to the State Board of Health
laboratories.
The F. D. A. group headed by Pro-
ducer Vice President Herman Boyd, ad-
vised the Live Stock Board that an in-
quiry from F. D. A. producer members
which extend into all dairy areas of the
State, indicate that a large majority of
the dairymen of the State favor con-
tinuing of the present Mastitis program
of the Board, with an increase in the
budget, rather than a reduction.
They also expressed opposition to any
change being made in the present labora-
tory work in Lakeland under the direct
supervision of Dr. A. A. Murray, head
of the Mastitis work of the Board.
F. D. A. members Bill Graham, Mi-
ami; Dr. Charles Foreman, Ft. Lauder-
dale, and Secretary E. T. Lay were spokes-
men for the group which included in
addition to Boyd, Graham and Dr. For-
man, Glenn Datson, T. G. Lee and B.
W. Judge of Orlando; Bob Hall, R. L.
Dressel and John Du Puis, Miami; Jack
McMullen, Wilbur Casey and Paul Hood
of Pinellas County; John Sargeant and
Don Adams, Lakeland; John Tripson,
Vero Beach; Wilmer Bassett, Monticello,
and Julian Lane and Nelson Zambito of
Tampa.
Messages were presented for the F.
D. A. local affiliated Dairy Associations
of Pensacola and Marianna representing
five dairy counties.

LAY HEADS M.I.F. COMMITTEE
The Milk Industry Foundation recent-
ly announced the re-appointment of E. T.
Lay, Executive Director of the Florida
Dairy Association, as chairman of the
M.I.F. Collegiate Awards Committee for
the Southeastern region. The three mem-
ber committee selects a dairy science stu-
dent among those competing from the
colleges of the area who will compete
against the winners of other regions for
national honors and college scholarships.


ARS. ELSIE REMSEN. Office Secretary of
the Florida Dainl) As.,ociation for the past fire
)ears. is pzre ented a dairy trophy by Past
President Theo Datson on behalf of the As-
sociation's Directors and Membership. as a
remembrance. upon her leaving the emplo)
of the AsCociation. The trophy itar engraved
at follows:
AWARDEDD TO MRS. ELSIE REMSEN.
FIRST PLACE IN TH HEARTS OF OUR
MEMBERS. IN APPRECIATION FOR DE-
VOTED SERVICE. \IILMER BASSETT.
PRESIDENT FLORIDA DAIRY ASSOCIA-
TION."


M. I. F. Sponsors Training

In Milk Merchandising

The Milk Industry Foundation Board
of Directors completed plans at their re-
cent meeting in Montreal, for a "Special
Merchandising Course" in Milk and Milk
products to be held for one week-Sep-
tember 28-October 2 at the University
of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis.
The emphasis in the course will be on
merchandising milk in grocery stores and
other wholesale outlets.
Here are some of the major subjects
to be covered: Packaging for Profit, Dis-
playing Milk and Milk Products for
Maximum Sales, Making the Most of
Point-of-Sale Advertising, Wholesale
Pricing Policy, Increasing Sales of Dairy
Products to Restaurants and Institutions.
Enrollments are limited to representa-
tives of Milk Industry Foundation mem-
ber companies. The class is also limited
to 25 men. Applications are accepted on
a first-come-first-served basis.
The M.I.F. states that men attending
the course will receive the best training
in merchandising that can be provided.
Top merchandisers in the super-market
field, from other food lines, and other
industries, will present their facts and
conclusions, supplementing the Univer-
sity's top-flight staff. The class will also
get the latest tips and techniques on pro-
gressive merchandising-the invaluable


MILK COMMISSION

NEW MEMBERS APPOINTED
Governor McCarty has announced ap-
pointment of three new members of the
Florida Milk Commission.
Mr. Ben Waring, Milk Producer of
Madison, was appointed to succeed L. S.
Sheffield of Jacksonville, who resigned.
Two additional consumer members
were appointed as provided by the
amendments to the Milk Commission
Act, passed by the 1953 State Legisla-
ture.
Appointed to these posts are: C. Ray-
mond Lee, Clearwater, Insurance man
and William Imand, Miami, Plumbers
Union Agent.
At the Organization Meeting of the
Commission held July 22nd at the Com-
mission Office in Jacksonville, Henry
Schneider was re-elected chairman and
John Scott was re-elected Secretary.
The Commission named Robert Casey
of Miami as Attorney for the Com-
mission, to replace two part time attor-
neys who have served for the past four
years.
Under the amendments to the Milk
Commission Law passed by the recent ses-
sion of the Florida Legislature, the mem-
bership of the commission was changed
to drop one dairy member, the "pro-
ducer-distributor," and the Administra-
tor. They were replaced by two addi-
tional consumer members.
The Florida Dairy Association spon-
sored the bill providing these changes
except that only one additional consumer
was provided for. However, when an
amendment to the bill was offered, to
add two more consumers instead of one,
the Dairy Association agreed to it.

know-how of increasing sales in the mod-
ern food store.
The tuition fee payable to Milk In-
dustry Foundation is $125.00 per man
enrolled.
The M.I.F. advises that few openings
remain and any who wish to reserve a
place, must act promptly.



STATE JERSEY SALE
Is Announced
for
October 1
Jacksonville

Auspices

Florida Jersey Cattle Club
Watch for complete announcement
in September issue of the
Dairy News.


JULY & AUGUST, 1953 21







FLORIDA GUERNSEY'S SELL
GUERNSEY CATTLE CLUB NEWS IN $1,000 CLASS AT

QUAIL ROOST SALE


REGISTRY TESTS ANNOUNCED FOR FLORIDA GUERNSEYS

Official production test records for some of Florida's top producing Guernseys
have been recently made public by the American Guernsey Cattle Club.
The American Guernsey Cattle Club is a national organization of more than
50,000 breeders of purebred Guernseys. It records the registration of purebred
Guernseys which trace to the Island of Guernsey, the original home of the breed.
in the English Channel. It also supervises tests of production and, through GOLDEN
GUERNSEY, Inc., supervises the marketing of GOLDEN GUERNSEY MILK.


CARROLL L. WARD & SON DAIRY,
WINTER PARK-Registered Guernsey cow,
LAKEMONT MAXIM'S PET, has completed
an official Advanced Registry record of 9,894
lbs. milk and 517 lbs. b.f. on 3x, 10 months
period, starting her record as a senior 2-yr.
old. LAKEMONT JUDY'S MARTHA, a
registered Guernsey cow, completed an offic-
ial Advanced Registry record of 10,879 lbs.
milk and 536 lbs. b.f. on 3x, 365 days, start-
ing her record as a junior 2-yr. old. DINS-
MORE QUEEN EDNA, registered Guernsey
cow, put 14,816 lbs. milk and 691 lbs. b.f.
into the country's breadbasket, according to
the official Advanced Registry record. "Edna"
was a 7 yr. old and was milked 3 times
daily for 365C days. LAKEMONT JUDY'S
DIMPLE, registered Guernsey cow, has made
a Guernsey state champion record. Her pro-
duction of 12,565 lbs. milk and 698 Ibs. b.f.,
3x, 365 days, is the highest Advanced Reg-
istry record in the state of Florida made by a
senior 2-yr. old. The sire of this cow, Riegel-
dale Emory's Judicator, owned by Carroll L.
Ward, Jr. of Goldenrod, Fla., has 22 daugh-
ters in the Performance Register of The Amer-
ican Guernsey Cattle Club.
The WARD DAIRY also has a registered
Guernsey cow, LAKEMONT PRINCE'S
GERDA, which has completed an official Ad-
vanced Registry record of 10,163 pounds of
milk and 539 pounds of butterfat on three
times daily milking for 365C days, starting
her record as a junior two-year old. "Gerda"
is the daughter of the registered Guernsey
sire, Lakemont Anthony's Prince, that has five
daughters in the Performance Register of the
American Guernsey Cattle Club.
WARD'S DAIRY has made a Guernsey
state champion record with their registered
Guernsey cow, LAKEMONT KING'S BELL.
Her production of 11,068 pounds of milk
and 550 pounds of butterfat is the highest
Advanced Registry record in the state of Flor-
ida made by a senior three-year-old milked
three times daily for a ten-month period. The
sire of this cow, McDonald Farms King Ken,
also owned by the Wards, has 18 daughters
in the Performance Register of The American
Guernsey Cattle Club.
DINSMORE DAIRY CO., DINSMORE-
Registered Guernsey cow, DINSMORE MAY-
ROYAL JEDETTA, has completed an official
Advanced Registry record of 15,070 lbs. milk
and 619 lbs. b.f., 3x, 365C days, starting as
a junior 4-yr. old.
C. L. BODDEN DAIRY, DINSMORE-
Registered Guernsey cow, ALVAREZ EXCEL-
SIOR'S BUTTERCUP, completed an official
Advanced Registry record of 8,678 lbs. milk
and 426 lbs. b.f. on 2x, for a 10-month per-
iod, starting as a junior 4-yr. old.
BODDEN'S DAIRY also has a registered
Guernsey cow, ALLAN MANOR NOBLE
QUEEN, which put 13,295 pounds of milk
and 676 pounds of butterfat into the country's
breadbasket during the past year according to
the official Advanced Registry test. "Queen"
was a junior four-year-old and was milked


twice daily for 365 days. The sire of "Queen"
is Quail Roost Noble Count. One son and
eight daughters of this bull are listed in the
Performance Register of The American Guern-
sey Cattle Club.
ARNOLD & MILDRED L. HIGGINS
DAIRY, LARGO-Registered Guernsey cow,
GIPPY CHIEF'S NANCY, produced 9,328
lbs. milk and 452 lbs. b.f., according to the
official Herd Improvement Registry record.
"Nancy" was a 5-yr. old and was milked 644
times while on test. She is the daughter of
the famous Guernsey sire, Bournedale Double
Chief, that has 48 daughters and one son in
the Performance Register of The American
Guernsey Cattle Club.
C. E. DONEGAN DAIRY, LARGO, has
made a Guernsey state champion record with
a registered Guernsey cow, KENNERSLEY
IDA. Her production of 12,129 pounds of
milk and 666 pounds of butterfat is the high-
est Herd Improvement Registry record for a
five-year old in the State of Florida. "Ida"
was milked 746 times while on test. The
sire of this cow, Blakeford Confident, owned
by Eugene M. and Esther P. Callis, Church
Hill, Maryland, has one son and 27 daughters
in the Performance Register of The American
Guernsey Cattle Club.
L. H. SELLERS DAIRY, ST. PETERS-
BURG, has a registered Guernsey cow, AP-
PIN'S SUNSHINE FAITH, which has com-
pleted an official Advanced Registry record of
13.979 lbs. milk and 653 lbs. b.f., 3x, 365-
days, as a 6-yr. old.
The American Guernsey Cattle Club an-
nounces the election of Land O'Sun Milk
Company, Inc., Miami Beach, Florida, to mem-
bership. They have a herd of registered
Guernsey cows on their farm.


Among the fourteen cows selling for
$1,000 or more at the May 4 Quail
Roost Sale, were two well-known cows
from Florida. One was Dinsmore May-
royal Vern belonging to Patricia Ellis of
Callahan, who raised the cow in her 4-H
Club program, and the other was Dins-
more Mayroyal Pina from Dinsmore
Farms, Jacksonville.
The average sale price of $891.86 for
the 43 animals offered was slightly
lower than last year but the animals of-
fered were an exceptionally fine group,
well fitted and nicely presented. The
sales list did not reveal that any of the
cows were sold to Florida dairymen.
Fourteen head sold for $1,000 or
more, three for $2,000 or over, and two
at $4,000 or over. The choice offerings
went to 29 buyers in 10 different states.
The top price animal was "Blair's Rest
Lady Linda, bred by John D. Blair
Farms, Richwood, Va., which brought
$4,100. The purchaser was E. B. Hens-
lee, Kingston Springs, Tennessee.
Second high animal was Queen's Prin-
ces of Mills River, a fresh four-year old,
selling for $4,000 to John S. Ames,
North Easton, Mass.

Columbia County dairymen have or-
ganized a County Dairy Association with
officers as follows: President, Buck
Berks; Vice president, Dewey Bullard;
Second vice president, Warren Tyre; Sec-
retary, Floyd Crawford; Treasurer, Caro-
line Wiesenthaler.

Ridge Dairies of Frostproof has sold
its processing and distribution division
to Borden's with State headquarters in
Tampa.


Above are Members of the Florida Livestock Board as seen at their first meeting following
their appointment under the new Livestock Board Law passed by the 1953 Legislature. Seated,
left to right: E. M. VanLandingham, Cattleman, Belle Glade; Roscoe Bass. Cattleman, Avon
Park; Henry O. Partin, Cattleman, Kissimmee; Chairman J. B. Starkey, Cattleman, Largo:
Vice-Chairman R. L. Dressel, Dairyman, Miami; Wilmer Bassett, Dairyman, Monticello; Alton
Belote, Poultryman, Jacksonville. Standing, left to right: Carl Zillman, Swine Producer,
Earleton; Frank Moody, Cattleman, Plant City.


22 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS






FLORIDA GUERNSEY BREEDERS
ADD TO REGISTERED HERDS
The American Guernsey Cattle Club
has announced recent purchases of out-
standing Guernseys by seven Florida
Guernsey breeders. According to the na-
tional Guernsey organization, the Guern-
sey dairy family is increasing faster than
any other dairy breed. The A.G.C.C.
says that the average cow in the United
States produces only about one-half as
much as the average purebred Guernsey
on official test.
FLORIDA GUERNSEY PURCHASES
REPORTED ARE.
CARROLL WARD & SON, WINTER
PARK-Purchased the young Guernsey sire,
COKER BUTTER-FAT LUCKY NOBLE
from Coker's Pedigreed Seed Co., Hartsville,
S. C. This richly bred young bull is out of
the good cow, Clear View No-Max Cecelia,
that has once been classified Excellent for
type, and has a production record of 9,266
lbs. of milk and 450 lbs. b.f. made as a
junior 2-yr. old. He is sired by Coker King
William.
DR. C. W. BAKER, SANFORD-Purchased
the young Guernsey sire, LAVIDA BRIGHT
BOY, from T. Stin Haselton, Eustis, Fla.
This young bull is out of the good cow,
LaVida leweller's Beauty, that has once been
classified Desirable for type and is sired by
Woodacres Bright Meteor.
LOGAN & DONEGAN, LARGO Pur-
chased the young Guernsey sire, CONE'S
ROSCOE DALE, from J. H. Cone, Plant City,
Fla. This young bull is out of the cow,
Riegeldale Emory's Cavalier, and is sired by
Cone's Cavalier Roscoe.
STEWART'S DAIRY, INC., HOLLY-
WOOD-Purchased young Guernsey sire,
JENWELL VALIANT SIOUX, from Bout-
well's Dairy, Inc., Lake Worth, Fla. This
young bull is out of the cow, Peerless Sioux
Elve, and is sired by Klondike Premost Val-
iant.
LAND O'SUN MILK CO., INC., MIAMI
BEACH-Purchased young Guernsey sire,
CLEAR SPRINGS LEADER'S CHIEF, from
A. L. Brown, Concord, N. C. This richly
bred young bull is out of the good cow,
Clear Springs' Queen Heiress, that has once
been classified Desirable for type and has a
production record of 12.332 lbs. milk and 698
Ibs. b.f. made as a junior 2-yr. old. He is
sired by Coldsoring's Noble's Leader.
LAND O'SUN DAIRY has also just pur-
chased the young Guernsey sire, MARGEO
WINNER'S BAXTER, from George S. Coble,
Rougemont, N. C. This richly bred young
bull is out of the well-bred cow, Hillside
Maxim P. Barbara, that has two production
records of 12,267 pounds of milk and 577
pounds of butterfat, made as a junior three-
year old, and 14,201 pounds of milk and 656
pounds of butterfat, made as a five-year-old.
He is sired by Curtiss Candy Winner.
R. R. JENNINGS DAIRY, JACKSON-
VILLE, has just purchased the young Guern-
sey sire, QUAIL ROOST PROUD PRINCE,
from George Watts Hill, Rougemont. N. C.
This richly bred young bull is out of the good
cow, Quail Roost Rex Princess, that has once
been classified Good Plus for type, and has
a production record of 14,346 pounds of milk
and 693 pounds of butterfat made as a seven
year old. He is sired by Chicona Pablo.
ELMO CARROLL DAIRY, WESTVILLE,
has just purchased the young Guernsey sire,
BAYOU GEORGE LAD'S RUBY, from E.
Lee Stanton, Chiplev, Fla. This young bull
is out of the cow, Bvnum's Moon Beam and
is sired by Bayou George Ideal's First Lad.
(Continued on Page 24)


SBulk Milk


Whether it's bucket milking or pipeline
milking, a Mojonnier Bulk Cooler in the
milkhouse spells less labor, rapid cooling
and high quality milk. Mojonnier Bulk
Coolers are the last word in quality
construction. For example, outside
shells are stainless steel for easy
cleaning, long life and good appear-
ance. Made in ten sizes beginning with
60 gallons. Bulletin 240 "The Bulk
Cooling Story" sent free on request.

MOJONNIER BROS. CO., 4601 WEST


300 Gallon Mojonnier Bulk Cooler on Norman
Stevenson Farm, Iowa City, Iowa

OHIO STREET, CHICAGO 44, ILLINOIS

Florida Representative
Lee P. Bickenbach
P.O. BOX 2205
LAKELAND, FLA.


JULY & AUGUST,


1 9 53 9 23


























Allied Trade Members


1953


1953


Florida Dairy Association, Inc.

The F.D.A. Membership Committee is pleased to acknowledge the prompt payment
of 1953 membership dues by the following:


Allied Dairy Products, Inc. Gulf Paper Co.
Adams Packing Association, Inc.
American Paper Goods Co. Hackney Bros. Body Co.
American Seal Kap Corporation Hector Supply Co.
Amica-Burnett Chem. &
Supply Co.
Amco Feed Stores, Orlando W. M. Igou, Inc.
Anheuser-Busch, Inc. International Paper Co.
Auburndale Sales Co. Irwin Grai Co.


Balch Flavor Co.
Broward Grain & Supply Co.
Byars-Forgy, Inc.

California Spray-Chem. Corpn.
Certified Products Co.
Peter Cooper Corporation
Creamery Package Mfg. Co.

Chas. Dennery, Inc.
Crown Cork & Seal Co.
Dairypak, Inc.
De-Raef Corporation
Dixie Cup Co.
Doughnut Corporation of
America
The Dixson Co.
Eskimo Pie Corp.
Equip. Co. Inc.
Ex-Cell-O Corporation
Fla. Citrus Canners Cooperative
Florida Feed Mills
Fla. Juice, Inc.
W. L. Filbert, Inc.
The Fischman Co.
Foote & Jenks, Inc.
General Mills, Jax.
General Mills, Miami
General Mills, Tampa


Jackson Grain Co.
James Jennings Brokerage Co.
Johnson & Johnson
Robt. A. Johnston Co.
Kelco Company
Kieckhefer Container Co.
Klenzade, Inc.
Krim-Ko Corporation
Kuder Pulp Sales Co.
Lakeland Cash Feed Co.
Lenfesty Supply Co.
Lily-Tulip Cup Corpn.
Liberty Glass Co.
Limpert Brothers, Inc.
Liquid Carbonic, Inc.
Joe Lowe Corporation
S. H. Mahoney Extract Co.
The Mathieson Chem. Corpn.
Marathon Corporation
Meyer-Blanke Co.
Geo. J. Meyer Mfg. Co.
David Michael & Co.
Martino, P. C., Co.
Miller Mach. & Supply Co., Jax.
Miller Mach. & Supply Co.,
Miami
Mojonnier Brothers Co.
Morris Paper Mills
J. N. Morrison, Distributor
Murphy Body Works, Inc.


Nash-Kelvinator Corpn.
National Pectin Products Co.
Newth-Morris Box Co.

Owens-Illinois Glass Co.

Paul-Lewis Laboratories, Inc.
Pennsylvania Salt Co.
Pure Carbonic Inc.
C. M. Pitt & Sons Co.
The Pfaudler Co.

Ralston Purina Co., Miami
Ralston Purina Co., Tampa
Reddi-Wip Co. of Fla.
Rex Extract Co.
Riverside Manufacturing Co.
Savage Arms Corporation
Schaefer, Inc.
Sealright Corporation
Security Mills of Tampa, Inc.
Security Feed & Seed Co.,
Miami
Spartan Grain & Mill Co.
Standard Packaging Corpn.
Thatcher Glass Mfg. Co., Inc.

Universal Milking Machine Co.

Vanilla Laboratories
Virginia-Carolina Chem. Corpn.

Warner-Jenkinson Mfg. Co.
Watson-Scott Company
Wholesale Brokerage Co.
William Romaine
Williamson Feed Mills
Wyandotte Chemicals Corpn.
The Zipp Mfg. Co.


As cooperating Associate Members of the Florida Association, the above firms are
entitled to the friendly consideration of the Dairy Members and to the usual
privileges and services of the Association.


STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP, management,
and circulation required by the Act of Congress
of August 24, 1912, as amended by the Acts of
March 3, 1933, and July 2, 1946 (Title 39,
United States Code 233) of Florida Dairy News
published bi-monthly at Jacksonville, Florida, for
October 1, 1953.
1. The names and addresses of the publisher,
editor, managing editor, and business managers
are: Publisher, Florida Dairy Association, 220
Newnan Street, Jacksonville, Florida; Editor and
Business Manager, E. T. Lay, 220 Newnan
Street, Jacksonville, Florida.
2. The owner is: Florida Dairy Association,


Inc., 220 Newnan St., Jacksonville, Florida. (Non
Profit Corporation, no capital stock).
3. The known bondholders, mortgages, and
other security holders owning or holding 1 per-
cent or more of total amount of bonds, mort-
gages, or other securities are: None.
E. T. LAY, Business Manager
Sworn to and subscribed before me this 15th
day of July, 1953.
L. H. CANOVA
(My commission expires March 15. 1154)
(S~al)


DAIRY

SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT







TAMPA ORLANDO


24 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


Schack's Dairy, Greenwood Has

Jersey Triplets

M. A. Schack, prominent northwest
Florida Jersey breeder at Greenwood, has
announced the arrival on July 4th of
Jersey triplets. The calves, two heifers
and a bull, as well as the mama cow are
reported in perfect condition.
No statistics are immediately available
on the rarity of the birth of triplets in
the Jersey world but the American Jer-
sey Cattle Club reports that the birth of
twins is as rare as one-half of 1% of
calvings. Triplets are probably as rare as
1 case in 500.
To make this event even more of a
rarity, Mr. Schack advises that the calves
were the first arrivals in Jackson County
under a new artificial breeding program
started in the area less than a year ago.
The sire of the calves is a registered
Jersey bull owned by the American
Breeders Service at Asheville, N. C. The
DAIRY NEWS will carry a picture of
the calves in the next issue.


Guernsey News
(Continued from Page 23)
CHARLES TYNDALL DAIRY, WEST
PALM BEACH, has just purchased the young
Guernsey sire, JENWELL ACME, from Bout-
well's Dairy, Inc., Lake Worth, Florida. This
young bull is out of the cow, Greystone Al-
berta and is sired by Klondike Raider's Merry
Boy.
FLORIDA BAPTIST CHILDREN'S HOME,
Lakeland-Purchased young Guernsey sire,
MAEGEO WINNER'S PAT, from George S.
Coble, Lexington, N. C. This richly bred
young bull is out of the good cow, Lang-
valley Belinda, that has a production record
of 14,616 lbs. milk containing 607 lbs. b.f.,
made as a 7-yr. old. He is sired by Curtiss
Candy Winner.
J. L. VAN PELT, PENSACOLA Pur-
chased the young Guernsey sire, J. D. BUT-
TERFAT PRINCE, from G. P. Grout, Talco,
Texas. This young bull is out of the cow.
North's Butterfat Del and is sired by Meadow
Lodge Kinsman.
C. S. COBLE VELDA DAIRY, TALLA-
HASSEE, has just purchased the young Guern-
sey sire, MAEGEO ELECTOR CHARLES.
from George S. Coble, Rougemont, N. C.
This richly bred young bull is out of the
high-producing cow, Ultra Queen of High-
way, that has two production records of 10,-
830 pounds of milk and 512 pounds of but-
terfat, made as a six-year-old in the Herd
Improvement Register, and 14,829 pounds of
milk and 820 pounds of butterfat, made as a
seven-year-old. He is sired by Dunwalke Elec-
tor.
Coble has also purchased the young Guern-
sey sire, MAEGEO VALOROUS EDD, from
George S. Coble, Rougemont, N. C. This
richly bred young bull is out of the well-
bred cow, Ideal's Champ's Fanny, that has
two production records of 10,384 pounds of
milk and 521 pounds of butterfat, made as a
junior three-year-old, and 10,810 pounds of
milk and 536 pounds of butterfat, made as a
junior four-year-old. He is sired by Quail
Roost King Valorous.
FRED MORRISON DAIRY, WAUCHULA,
has just purchased the young Guernsey sire,
MERIGOLD'S IS AND PRINCE, from H'ir-
old G. Harris, Lake Placid. Florida. This
Young bull is o':t of the cow Shantz's Butter-
cup and is sired b, Ludlo's Dreaming Prince.


- Y









Annual Dairy Field Day Program
Features Pasture and Feed Production
Florida's 18th Annual Dairy Field Day Program has been very appropriately
planned to feature the importance and latest developments in dairy pasture and feed
production.
This will give stimulus and assistance to the State Pasture Improvement Contest
launched July 1st as a cooperative project by the University Extension Service and
Experiment Station, and the Florida Dairy Association.
This outstanding program has been released to The Dairy News without a
complete list of speakers, but the subjects selected as outlined below should serve
to convince every dairyman in Florida that his attendance at this meeting should be


a "MUST."
PROGRAM AND SCHEDULE
Sponsored jointly by the University of Florida
and The Florida Dairy Association
THEME OF THE PROGRAM:
"The Fall and Winter Feed Supply"
THURSDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 10
10:00 A.M. OPENING REGISTRATION
Hotel Thomas and Dairy Prod-
ucts Laboratory
12:00 Noon "Early Bird" LUNCH and F.
D.A. Meeting-Hotel Thomas
THURSDAY AFTERNOON, SEPTEMBER 10
(Student Service Center,
University of Florida)
1:00 P.M. CONTINUATION OF REGIS-
TRATION
1:30 WELCOME AND RESPONSE
2:00 Survey of Trends in Use of
Silage and Hay
2:20 Structures for Preserving Silage
2:40 Grass Silage: C. B. Bender, Di-
rector of Research in Grassland
Farming, the Sperry Corpora-
tion, New York, N. Y.
3:10 Sun Curing Hay from Perma-
nent Pasture for Stored Rough-
age Supply, Walter Welkener.
Jacksonville, Florida
3:30 INTERMISSION
3:40 Production and Use of Hay on
Small Dairy Farms in Lafayette
County
4:00 Supplementing Pasture for Milk
Production
4:20 Economics of a Sound Roughage
Program-C. B. Bender
4:40 OPEN DISCUSSION-Producer
Problems
5:30 ADJOURNMENT
THURSDAY NIGHT, SEPTEMBER 10
6:15 P.M. F.D.A. Directors' Reception and
Fellowship Hour Hotel
Thomas
7:30 ANNUAL DAIRY FIELD DAY
DINNER AND ENTERTAIN-
MENT-Student Service Cen-
ter.
Sponsored by "Producers' Coun-
cil," Florida Dairy Association
AWARDING OF NATIONAL
HERD HONOR ROLL DIPLO-
MAS by University of Florida
PRESENTATION OF DAIRY
PRODUCTION EFFICIENCY
AWARDS
Presentation of 1953 Dairy
Month Queen
ADDRESS-Dr. Hillis Miller,
President University of Florida
FRIDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 11
(Student Service Center,
University of Florida)
8:30 A.M. CONTINUATION OF REGIS-
TRATION
9:00 REPORTS ON RESEARCH -
Value of Winter Oat Pasture
for Dairy Cattle


9:12 Pangola-Clover vs. Coastal Ber-
muda
9:24 Pangola-Clover Pastures for Lac-
tating Cows
9:36 Value of Pearl Millet Pasture
for Lactating Cows
9:48 Ups and Downs of Fat Tests
Due to Feed
10:08 TOUR OF DAIRY RESEARCH
UNIT-Dairy Staff, University
of Florida
See (a) Dairy Herd; Fall Pas-
ture Program, irrigated
vs. non-irrigated Pan-
gola Pasture; hay pro-
duction from pasture,
corn harvest; feed pro-
duction practices in op-
eration.
(b) Modern Dairy Farm Equip-
ment Demonstration, per-
forming various dairy farm-
ing operations during the
farm tour.
12:15 P.M. LUNCH AT UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA DAIRY RESEARCH
UNIT
Show Horse Riding Exhibition,
Miss Jane Clardy. State Dairy
Month Queen.
NOTE: The DAIRY PRODUCTS LAB-
ORATORY wil receive visitors all day, Sep-
tember 10 and 11.
Hotel Reservation,,: Should be made early
either direct to Gainesville Hotels Thomas
or White House or to the Florida Dairy As-
sociation.

NEW REMEDY FOUND FOR
DISEASE OF DAIRY COWS
A disease which seems to pick on the
best cows in the nation's dairy herds,
cutting their milk production, may now
be brought under control with new medi-
cines developed through experimental
work at Cornell University.
The disease is known as ketosis, or
acetonemia, and dairymen will soon be
able to obtain these new remedies, based
on the chemical, sodium propionate.
Acetonemia usually occurs from ten
days to six weeks after calving. It is
an upset of the cow's metabolism, often
associated with glandular disturbances.
Though few cows die of the disease, they
refuse their feed, and milk production
drops.
It is estimated that as many as five
per cent of the cows in the nation's dairy
herds are afflicted each year; and as
many as 15 to 40 percent of the cows in
a single herd may suffer one or more
attacks.


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economical.

RESIDUAL SPRAY
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A dependable long-lasting combination
of pyrethrins and piperonyl butoxide
for quick knock-down and methoxy
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insects over extended periods. Order
from your dealer or co-op.
KLENZADE PRODUCTS, INC.
BELOIT. WISCOMSIN
J. P. Boyce
519 E. Giddens, Tampa, Florida
E. E. Fulton
P. O. Box 374, Jacksonville 1, Florida
J. E. Orris
200 N.W. 129th Street, Miami 38, Florida
Geff. Wrenshall
207 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, Florida

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See your dealer or write
L. C. THOMSEN & SONS, INC.
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JULY & AUGUST, 1953 25








Florida Jersey Breeders

Receive Test Reports
The American Jersey Cattle Club recently announced the following reports on
official registry tests made in the herds of several of Florida's well known Jersey
breeders.
WALTER WELKENER, HOLLY HILL DAIRY, JACKSONVILLE-Reg-
istered Jersey cow, OBSERVER TREVA LELIA, has earned the Gold and Silver
Medals award of the A.J.C.C. for completing a production record of 11,708 Ibs.
milk and 618 lbs. b.f. in 305 days at 4-yrs. 8 months. Two registered Jersey cows
have received special recognition for their outstanding production records made on
Herd Improvement Registry tests: BILTMORE STANDARD PEGGY produced
11,010 lbs. milk containing 492 Ibs. b.f. at 10 yrs. 1 month, and SYBIL POMPEY
GRACE produced 8,498 lbs. milk containing 505 lbs. b.f. at 3-yrs. 2 months (these
records exceed 550 lbs. b.f. M.E., the level of production of HIR test required for
special recognition). STANDARD SIGNAL BLAIR, registered Jersey cow, com-
pleted an HIR production record of 9,266 lbs. milk containing 543 lbs. b.f. at 3-yrs.
3 months; M.E. 2x, 305-day basis, to 10,424 Ibs. milk containing 611 lbs. b.f.


DAIRYMEN...





JuAt try o TIINKC

what your



FARM or DAIRY


Vould be like

without*



ELIERIC


FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY


The HOLLY HILL DAIRY also has two
registered Jersey cows which have received
special recognition for their outstanding pro-
duction records made on Herd Improvement
Registry test.
SIGNAL DEBUTANTE RUTH produced
13,887 lbs. milk containing 636 lbs. butterfat,
and SYBIL POMPEY BLUEBELL produced
11,551 lbs. milk containing 595 lbs. butterfat.
In terms of production records made at a
mature age of 6 years on a twice-daily-milk-
ing, 305-day basis, these records both exceed
650 lbs. butterfat.
HOLLY HILL DAIRY also has four reg-
istered Jersey cows which have completed 305-
day records on Herd Improvement Registry
test during the past two months which en-
titles them to special recognition from the
American Jersey Cattle Club.
The high producing animal in the group
was OBSERVER DESIGN DONNA with a
mature record of 13,158 lbs. milk containing
719 lbs. butterfat. The other cows all ex-
ceeded 550 lbs. butterfat on a twice-daily-
milking, 305-day mature equivalent basis.
CLAY COUNTY FARMS, MIDDLEBURG
-The Florida yearling, 365 day milk champ-
ionship for Jersey cows on Register of Merit
test, has been won by ADVANCER TENA,
owned by Clay County Farms. The new
champion produced 11,815 lbs. milk contain-
ing 557 lbs. b.f. in 365 days on twice daily
milking. This production is more than two
and one-half times that of the average
dairy cow in the U. S. ADVANCER TENA
earned the high rating of Very Good when
classified for breed type. This is a score of
more than 85 points on the breed's score
card, which gives 100 points to a perfect ani-
mal.
FAIRGLADE JERSEY DAIRY, ORLAN-
DO-A registered Jersey cow, OBSERVER
DREAM VIOLA FERN, has recently com-
pleted an HIR production record of 13,030
lbs. milk containing 706 lbs. b.f. at 6-yrs. 10
months; M. E. 2x, 305-day basis, 13,043 lbs.
milk containing 707 lbs. b.f.
The FAIRGLADE DAIRY also has a reg-
istered Jersey cow, PROSPECT DREAMING
FERN, that recently completed a 305-day
Herd Improvement Registry production record
of 9,452 lbs. milk containing 545 lbs. butter-
fat at the age of 4 years and 4 months.
The mature age of a Jersey cow is reckoned
to be 6 years. This cow's production on a
twice-daily-milking, 305-day mature equivalent
basis would be 9,868 lbs. milk containing
569 lbs. butterfat.
The FAIRGLADE DAIRY also has a reg-
istered Jersey cow, CHRISTIE XENIA VIC-
TORY, that recently completed a 305-day
Herd Improvement Registry production rec-
ord of 9,769 lbs. milk containing 555 lbs.
butterfat at the age of 7 years and 11 months.
A. T. ALVAREZ DAIRY, JACKSON-
VILLE, has a registered Jersey cow, X
STANDARD IVY NANETTE, that recently
completed a Herd Improvement Registry pro-
duction record of 10,442 lbs. milk containing
568 lbs. butterfat at the age of 5 years and
10 months.
The mature age of a Jersey cow is reckoned
to be 6 years. This cow's production on a
twice-daily-milking, 305-day mature equivalent
basis would be 10,494 lbs. milk containing
571 lbs. butterfat.
The POLK COUNTY owned JERSEY
DAIRY, BARTOW, has two registered Jer-
sey cows which have received special recog-
nition for their outstanding production rec-
ords made on Herd Improvement Registry
test.
DANDY SIR NAN produced 10,051 lbs.
milk containing 548 Ibs. butterfat at the age
of 6 years, and ROYAL FILLPAIL PINKIE
produced 8,585 lbs. milk containing 468 lbs.
butterfat at the age of 2 years and 5 months.


26 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS








Florida Jersey Breeders
Announces State Sale
Walter Welkener, Holly Hill Dairy,
Jacksonville, as chairman of the 1953
State Sale Committee of the Florida Jer-
sey Cattle Club, has announced plans of
the organization to hold the 1953 State
Sale, October 1st in Jacksonville.
The Sale will be held in the new 4-H
Club Show Pavilion on McDuff Avenue.
Mr. Welkener reports that the Sale Com-
mittee has just completed a week's tour
for selection of consignments to the sale
and predicts a very fine sale.
Members of the Sale Committee in
addition to Welkener are Marvin Crutch-
field, Marianna; J. K. Stewart, Bartow;
Lloyd Warren, Southeastern Field Rep-
resentative American Jersey Cattle Club;
and C. W. Reaves, Florida State Exten-
sion Dairyman.
The Annual Meeting of the Florida
Jersey Club will be held in Jacksonville
in conjunction with the 1953 State Sale.

Florida Jersey Breeders
Purchase Top Price Animals
At Southeastern Sale

The J. K. Stewart Dairy, Bartow, and
Alpine Dairy, Jacksonville, brought some
fine new Jerseys back to Florida when
they attended the Southeastern Regional
Jersey Club Sale in Chattanooga, Ten-
nessee, June 3rd. The Stewart Dairy
purchased one of the two top price ani-
mals which brought $1,525 each. The
animal was "Selected Connie Fancy" a
6 year old cow consigned by Green-
fields Dairy. She was "excellent" with a
92.04,% score.
Stewarts also bought "Biltmore Signal
Queenie," a 17 months old heifer from
Biltmore Farms for $725., a cow, "Glen-
coe Zipper Edith" at $450 and a 9
months heifer "Observer Bootsie Bea-
con" at $320.00.
The Alpine Dairy purchased a 13
months old heifer "Melrose Jester's
Zenia," from Melrose Plantation at
$450.00.
There were no consignments from
Florida Jersey breeders.

FLORIDA FROZEN DESSERTS LAW
NOW REGULATES ICE CREAM MIX
The Florida Dairy Association spon-
sored a bill in the 1953 legislative to
amend the Florida Frozen Desserts Law.
The bill which passed as House Bill No.
1252 provided for inclusion of "Ice
Cream Mix" to the various frozen pro-
ducts regulated by the law. The law is
administered by the "Dairy Supervisor"
of the State Department of Agriculture.


Classified Advertising
RATE FOR ALL CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING IS 1Oc PER WORD

RANCH EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES-CATTLE
WATERING TANKS. Ten-foot steel reinforced
FOR SALE Concrete, 2% Feet wide. $60.00, delivered, $50.00
your truck. Four foot wide tanks, $80.00 and
$70.00. Orlando Concrete Specialties. Box 6122,
"ATTENTION DAIRYMEN" Station 6. Orlando, Florida. Phone 3-4111.
I handle the best young Tennessee Cows and BE PROGRESSIVE THRU COOPERATION
heifers to be found. A fine selection on hand at Investigate the advantages of selling your feed
all times. bags Thru;
I deliver top cows all over Florida. THE DAIRY BAG COMPANY
Operated by the management of
W. C. TINSLEY, JR. THE MIAMI DAIRY EQUIPMENT EXCH.
Box 93 Lafayette, Alabama Phone 6431 769 N. W. 18th Terrace
Miami 36, Fla. Phone 2-7188




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"KOLD VAT" FARM TANK Capacities
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Ice Bank Cooling
Double refrigeration. Film
cooling to 400 in less than 5
seconds for maximum prod-
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coils on tank bottom hold milk
at low temperature. Reserve
refrigeration for temporary
power failure. Semi-hermeti-
cally sealed refrigeration unit.
Easily installed. New, perma-
nently marked measuring bar.


Direct Expansion Cooling
Slow speed stainless steel
agitator moves milk down
onto large refrigerated tank
surface for rapid cooling
without churning or foaming.
Low rail height for easy strain-
ing and cleaning. Sharply
pitched for complete drain-
age. New, permanently
marked measuring bar.


"ICY KOLD" FARM TANK Capacities from
100 to 600 gallons.


Ask your Cherry-Burrell Represent-
ative for folders and full details.

CHERRY-BURRELL CORPORATION
427 W. Randolph Street, Chicago 6, III.
Equipment and Supplies for Industrial and Food Processing
FACTORIES. WAREHOUSES, BRANCHES, OFFICES
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and SUPPLY COMPANY
601 EAST CHURCH STREET, JACKSONVILLE
127 N. E. 27th STREET, MIAMI
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JULY & AUGUST, 1953 27







Dairy Industry Meets Challenge of Expanding

Florida Population
From a "Dairy Month" Radio Talk

By: C. W. REAVES, State Extension Dairyman
Since June is Dairy Month, some notes on the dairy situation in Florida are
appropriate.
Milk production reached an all-time high in Florida in 1952. The U. S. D. A.
Bureau of Agricultural Economics credited the state with 609 million pounds. Pro-
duction of milk is running high at this time so that the dairy cows are doing their
part for a successful June Dairy Month. Many counties over the state are having
special events as milking contests for city officials or for ball players at ball parks,
4-H club members are discussing their dairy work before civic groups, dairy queens
are being selected, and by other ways dairymen are telling the milk story to the
people of the state.
Florida ranks high as an ice cream manufacturing and consuming state, with a
record of ten and one-half million gallons made last year. Ice cream is an excellent
illustration of this year's June Dairy Month theme which is "Dairy Foods-Nature's
Goodness-at its best." Milk, various milk drinks, cheese, and other products are
other examples of this most important food.
Let us see what proportion of the necessary food elements in our national diet
milk is furnishing. Milk and milk products provide: 75 percent of our national food
calcium, 50 percent of the nation's ribo- r r i
flavin, and 25 percent of the protein amounts of lower grade milk which goes
supply. These figures show that milk into manufactured products as butter,
is filling the important place in the diet cheese, and evaporated milk. Only about
of the American people that is claimed one-half the total supply of the nation
for it. The flavor and taste appeal of goes for bottling purposes, while the
wholesome dairy products equal their other half goes to the manufacture of
nutrition value. milk products. Thus, the average price


How the dairy industry has moved out
to produce the milk needed by an ex-
panding Florida population is shown by
the figures on the milk production. The
state's population has increased about 50
percent since 1940. During the same
period, the number of dairy cows has in-
creased by 40 percent. However, the
average production per cow has increased
by 28 percent, making the total milk pro-
duction up by 77 percent over 1940 ac-
cording to the recently revised figures
of the Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Figures from the same source show the
total milk sold increased 129 percent.
These figures show how Florida dairy-
men have moved ahead to cut down the
amount of milk imported into the state
to a negligible amount. However, the
State Chamber of Commerce figures
show a little over two million gallons
of 40 percent cream brought into the
state last year and over three and one-
half million pounds of cottage cheese.
Also practically all butter and all cheese,
and evaporated milk is brought into the
state. This has a bearing on the average
price received by farmers for 100 pounds
of milk. The average price of milk re-
ceived by Florida farmers is sometimes
compared to the average price received
by farmers in other states. This shows a
high price for Florida milk. It is usually
not known by the consumers that the
prices are not comparable. All of Flor-
ida's milk is Grade A milk suitable for
bottling purposes. Other states sell large


received by farmers tor all milk sold in
many states is much lower than the price
received in the same state for Grade A
milk for bottling purposes. Florida has
good quality milk, safeguarded by tlhe
State Department of Agriculture and the
State and local Health Departments. Mi-
ami recently received the very high score
of 95.79 on its milk supply when graded
by the United States Public Health Serv-
ice.
Improvements are constantly being
made by the dairy farmers and milk
plants in equipment and methods of
handling milk. The State Department of
Agriculture has reported as built in 1952,
88 dairy barns, 63 milk rooms, and 13
pasteurizing plants. Others were re-
modeled.
Pipe-line milking machines have come
into use in the last few years with 90
pipe-line milkers, 48 holding tanks, and
112 tank trucks for transporting milk
from the farm to the plant reported in
the last two years by the State Depart-
ment of Agriculture.
Nearly 10,000 Florida cows are on the
Dairy Herd Improvement Association
testing program. Last year 24,309 cows
were bred artificially to high production
dairy bulls.
That the progress in dairying is con-
tinuing is indicated by the fact that the
January 1, 1953 reports showed 58,000
dairy heifers between one and two years
old in the state and 70,000 dairy calves
under one year of age being kept. These


BROWARD BREEDERS GROUP
HOLD ANNUAL MEETING
B. E. Lawton, County Agent, reports
on the Broward County Artificial Breed-
ing Association annual meeting and bar-
becue which was held at the Plantation
Field Laboratory in Fort Lauderdale on
Wednesday, June 10. The meeting was
well attended by dairymen and their
families.
Neil Manley, field representative of
the American Breeders Service, was the
principal speaker. In Florida last year
23,000 dairy cows were bred artificially
and the Broward County association and
private dairymen in the county, with
their own technicians, bred approximate-
ly 40 percent of all cows bred artificially
in the state.
Since the artificial breeding program
has been in effect in Broward County,
many dairies have increased the produc-
tion in their herds by one gallon per
cow. In addition to the increase in pro-
duction our dairymen have greatly re-
duced breeding troubles, and many are
raising their artificially bred calves. It
is hoped that through this program, re-
placement of dairy cows will be cut at
least 50 percent.
On the J. N. McArthur dairy farms
in this county, their first group of arti-
ficially bred heifers, with first calves,
are producing as much milk as the ma-
ture cows in his herd.
Another reason for artificial breeding
is the saving in the cost of feeding bulls.
More than 16,000 cows have been suc-
cessfully bred artificially to a single bull
in one year.
Broward County has the largest breed-
ing association in the State and breeds
its cows cheaper than any other associa-
tion. Plans are now under way to in-
crease the membership for the next
breeding season.

will provide replacements for present
cows and a further increase in dairy cow
numbers in 1954 and 1955.
More pasture and feed production is
being provided by Florida dairymen each
year. Many farmers in all sections of the
state are practicing pasture rotation and
better management for greatest returns.
A Florida Dairy Pasture Contest is being
sponsored by the Florida Dairy Associa-
tion and the Agricultural Extension Serv-
ice to emphasize the value of pasture and
feed production for more efficient milk
production.
In closing, June Dairy Month reminds
us that the dairy cow is a most important
part of the "animal agriculture" of the
state and nation which makes America
the best fed nation in the world. The
dairy cow has a solid place in the Atomic
Age.


28 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS







American Jersey Cattle Club
In Chattanooga Convention
The 85th Annual Convention of the
American Jersey Cattle Club was held in
Chattanooga, Tennessee, June 3rd for the
second highest convention attendance on
record. It was one of the few conven-
tions held by the organization so far
south. Members attending represented
35 states and Canada.
President of the organization, J. B.
Astroth, in addressing the convention re-
viewed the progress of the American Jer-
sey Cattle Club from a testing program
of 10,000 records to the present program
with hundreds of thousands of records
having a greater number of cows classi-
fied than any other breed with close to
200,000.

Florida members in attendance were
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Welkener, Holly
Hill Dairy, Jacksonville; Will Nolan, Sr.,
Alpine Dairy Co., Jacksonville; Mr. and
Mrs. J. K. Stewart, Bartow; and Brighton
Skinner, Meadowbrook Farm, Jackson-
ville.

Ralston Purina Company
Seeking Representatives
To The Editor "Dairy News."
"We are looking for young men who
have a vital interest in working with and
helping agricultural people prosper? As
manufacturers of commercial feeds,
which are so vital to the production of
meat, milk and eggs, our business has
expanded in keeping with the human
population growth. This makes possible
a great opportunity in our Sales Depart-
ment for young men who measure up to
these qualifications:
25 to 35 years old. Preferably mar-
ried. Farm background or an under-
standing and appreciation. Preferably
college graduates who are willing to work
hard and pay the price for success.
We would appreciate your publication
of all or part of this information and
should you do so we invite inquiries from
any young man who is interested, also
recommendations from Florida dairymen
and other readers of the Dairy News."
Carl A. Leupold, Sales Mgr.
Ralston Purina, S. E. Division
Lynch Bldg., Jacksonville, Fla.

There is no danger in taking your
money with you these days. The Gov-
ernment gets it before you go any place.
-The Grayson County News,
Leitchfield (Ky.) News.

A fool and his money are soon parted.
The income tax does it for the rest of us.
-Coronet Magazine.


ONE-MAN DAIRY OPERATION


. .








MILKING ROOM TYPE. From cow to cans or
refrigerated farm tank, the De Laval Combine
installed in a separate milking room does the
entire job. It also eliminates stooping, squat-
ting and walking from cow to cow.









BARN TYPE. Installed along the stanchions
in the dairy barn, the De Laval Combine milks
and conveys the milk to the milk house, saving
all carrying and pouring. Ideal for the man
who does not want a separate milking room.


"^ 4ki ^'\


MECHANIZED INDIVIDUAL FEEDING.
Milking stalls, available for use with De Laval
Combines, measure and deliver the exact
amount of grain desired for each cow.

,j


MECHANIZED "IN-PLACE" CLEANING.
Regardless of where it is installed, the
De Laval Combine can be quickly, easily and
thoroughly washed and sanitized by the
De Laval "In-Place" Vacuum Cleaning Method.


One-man dairy operation is now
a practical reality ... today! The
De Laval Combine Milker com-
plelely mechanizes the milking
operation whether installed in the
dairy barn or separate milking
room. It milks, weighs individual
cow production, if desired, filters,
and conveys the milk to cans or
farm tank. After milking, the De
Lanal Combine is washed and
sanitized by De Laval "In-Place"
Vacuum Cleaning... a completely
mechanized method.




















Individual graining of each cow,
in precise quantities, is also fully
mechanized at the milking stall.
Thus, step by step, De Laval has
completely mechanized the entire
milking operation so that today
Sith the average size herd, one man
can easily handle the entire job.
The hard work, heavy lifting, miles
of walking, and high labor costs
have been eliminated. The result
is easier, pleasanter, more profit-
able dairying. In addition, closer
attention to milking, handling, and
feeding each cow is made possible.


DE LAVAL COMBINE MILKERS
"FIRST- SINCE 1928"
r------- ---------1
THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR CO., DEPT. 39-T
i a Poughkeepsie, New York
Please send me interesting new printed matter on
De Laval Combine Milkers

(INDITHE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR COMPANCAE TYPE OF INSTALLATION YOU PREFER)
THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR COMPANY 'l'NiA E '"f'pE- '
POUGHKEEPSIE, N. Y. Name
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JULY & AUGUST, 1953 29




























The Florida Association of Milk Sani-
tarians met on the University of Florida
Campus March 31 to April 3, 1953 with
over 100 in attendance, according to a
report by Dr. H. H. Wilkowske, Secre-
tary of the University of Florida Depart-
ment of Dairy Science. H. L. Thomasson,
the popular executive secretary of the
International, and his charming wife vis-
ited Sunny Florida for the first time to
attend this meeting. "Red" Thomasson
made a big hit with the crowd in his
discussion of the activities and organiza-
tion of the International and his visit
helped win many friends and created a
better understanding of the mutual prob-
lems facing the Florida Association and
its parent organization, the International.
The milk laboratorians have formed an
affiliate section and conducted their an-
nual meeting during the first two days,
under the chairmanship of Hugh Butner,
Bacteriologist, State Board of Health. The
guest speaker for the Laboratorians meet-
ing was Dr. R. P. Myers, Training Section
Bacteriologist from the Environmental
Health Center, Cincinnati. This short
course included discussion, identification,
laboratory practice and interpretation of
the coliform tests as well as a discussion
and demonstration on the direct micro-
scopic grading of milk.
Dr. E. L. Fouts, Head of the Depart-
ment of Dairy Science, discussed the
problem of vegetable fats in dairy
products. Professor W. A. Krienke of
the University of Florida dairy faculty
reported on research being conducted on
the use and application of the Lactometer
and Dr. L. E. Mull reported on the over-
all evaluation of a fiber milk carton.
D. A. Dahlberg, Plant Manager, present-
ed a HTST cleaning demonstration.
Other faculty members were Dr. A. P.
Black, Head of the Chemistry Depart-
ment and recognized authority on water
treatment who pointed out the importance


of giving consideration to water quality
in the cleaning and sanitization of dairy
equipment. Professor J. E. Kiker, Pro-
fessor of Civil Engineering, discussed
waste disposal for dairy farms and dairy
plants, and J. M. Johnson, Extension Ag-
ricultural Engineer, led a panel discussion
of Farm Dairy Structures which clearly
pointed to the need for greater agree-
ment of all sanitarians in respect to giv-
ing approval to various types and ar-
rangements of dairy farm structures.
Mr. C. A. Abele of the Diversey Cor-
poration, by popular demand again ap-
peared on the program and discussed
some of the 3-A Standards basic features
such as material and fabrication details,
and also reported on the latest develop-
ments in cleaning dairy equipment by
circulation. Sam Noles, milk consultant,
State Board of Health, led a dairy farm
inspection tour, assisted by Dr. H. H.
Rothe, State Dairy Supervisor, Dairy
Division of the State Department of Agri-
culture, both of whom also participated
in the Farm Structures panel discussion.
L. P. Bickenbach, Florida representative
for Mojonnier Brothers Company, dis-
cussed and showed slides concerning the
Sanitary Aspects of the Bulk Milk Sys-
tem. Tom Payne, Managing Partner of
Tekni-Craft, Manufacturers of Taylor
Freezers, Rockton, Illinois, discussed
counter freezer sanitation and C. K. Hill,
Florida distributor, demonstrated freezer
cleaning.
The Florida Dairy Association's Plant
Committee sponsored a get-together and
entertainment for an evening banquet
that followed, as well as door prizes. The
other two nights were taken up with a
picnic an da business meeting. At the
business meeting delegate reports of the
Minneapolis meeting were made by H. H.
Rothe and H. H. Wilkowske. A newly
revised constitution was adopted. The
following Officers and Directors were
elected:


Milk Sanitarians Hear International Secretary

At 1953 Florida Annual Meeting


30 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


Seen above are the large group which at-
tended the Short Course for Milk Sanitarians
and four of the leaders in the program at
this meeting; left to right they are; Dr. A. P.
Black, head of the Chemistry department at
the University of Florida; R. R. Hood, State
Dairy Supervisor of Pensacola and immediate
past president of the Florida Association of
Milk Sanitarians; Dr. E. L. Fouts, head of the
department of Dairy Science at the University
of Florida; and L. L. Chaffee, Milk Sanitar-
ian of Pinellas County Health Department and
newly elected president of the Florida Associa-
tion of Milk Sanitarians.
President: L. L. Chaffee, Milk Sanitarian,
Pinellas County Health Department, St. Peters-
burg, Florida.
Vice-President: C. O. Story, Dairy Supervis-
or, Dade County Health Unit, Miami, Florida.
Secretary-Treasurer: H. H. Wilkowske, As-
sistant Professor of Dairy Manufacturing, Uni-
versity of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.
Past-President: R. R. Hood, State Dairy
Supervisor, Pensacola, Florida.
Directors: W. H. Brown, Director Food and
Laboratory Division, Jacksonville Health De-
partment, Jacksonville, Florida.
R. D. Lundv, Milk Sanitarian, Glades and
Hendry County Health Department, Moore
Haven, Florida.
Sam Noles, Milk Consultant, State Board
of Health, Jacksonville, Florida.
J. D. Robinson, State Dairy Supervisor, Plant
City, Florida.
H. H. Rothe, State Dairy Supervisor, Gaines-
ville, Florida.
A proceedings manual containing cop-
ies of all papers presented at this meet-
ing is being prepared and distributed to
all persons who attended by the General
Extension Division, University of Florida,
who conducted this conference.

FLORIDA 1953 DAIRY PASTURE
CONTEST LAUNCHED JULY FIRST
The statewide Dairy Pasture Improve-
ment Contest previously announced to
be co-sponsored by the University of
Florida Extension Service, County Farm
Agents and the Florida Dairy Associa-
tion, was officially launched July 1st.
A county "Pasture Contest" committee
has been named for every Dairy County
in the State and official information on
the Contest has been mailed by the
F. D. A. Pasture Committee to every
dairyman in Florida.









Florida Dairy Association
ALLIED TRADE MEMBERS
Special Advertising Section

ADAMS PACKING ASSN., INC.
Citrus Pulp, Citrus Meal, Citrus Molasses
Jim Coates, Sales Mgr., By-Products Div.


Auburndale, Fla.


Phone 8-7061


AMICA-BURNETT CHEM. &
SUPPLY CO.
Dairy Equipment and Supplies
Phone 4-5606
P. O. Box 2328, Jacksonville, Fla.

CHARLES DENNERY, INC.
New Orleans
Ice Cream Coating, Fruits and Flavors
Ira Stone-602 W. Belmar St.
LAKELAND, FLA.

DIAMOND ALKALI COMPANY
Dairy Cleaner & Alkali
Florida Distributors:
Miller Machinery & Supply, Jax.
Industrial Chem. & Supply Co.,
Tampa

GENERAL MILLS, INC.
Dairy Equipment and Supplies
John W. Manning, Phone 9-4586
1601 Congress Bldg. Miami

GULF PAPER COMPANY, INC.
Ice Cream (Linerless) Cartons,
Butter Cartons
J. H. McVoy
50 E. Magnolia St., Pensacola, Fla.

SDOUGLAS J. HEADFORD
FLA. REPRESENTATIVE
Green Spot Orangeade Concentrate
Krim-Ko Chocolate Flavorings
616 Jessamine Ave.-Phone 2-0148
Daytona Beach, Fla.

INTERNATIONAL PAPER CO.
Single Service Division
Purepak Milk Containers
W. M. Scott
134 Peachtree St., Atlanta 3, Ga.

JIM JENNINGS
MFRS. REPRESENTATIVE
The Vernon Company-Specialty Advertising
Morning Glory Milk Powder
"Eze" Orange Concentrate
Route 9, Box 356, Jacksonville, Fla.

JIFFY MANUFACTURING CO.
Insulated Bags and Liners
Southern Representative-William Romaine
Box 5463, 5 Pts. Sta., Columbia, S. C.

ROBERT A. JOHNSTON CO.
Dairy Chocolate & Cocoa Products
J. L. Hammons
916 S. Rome Ave., Tampa, Fla.

KIECKHEFER CONTAINER CO.
Pure-Pak Paper Milk Bottles
R. J. Evans-M. A. Knowles
Phone 6-1334
4700 Pearl St., Jacksonville, Fla.


NEW 20 PAGE BULLETIN
ON BULK MILK
A comprehensive new twenty page
bulletin, covering all aspects of bulk
milk, has just been released by Mojon-
nier Bros. Co. of Chicago. The bulletin
is designed as a working guide to those
interested in bulk milk. In addition to
complete information on all stainless
steel Bulk Coolers, the bulletin contains
field reports, bacteria count studies, data
on sizing of tanks and compressors, di-
mensions and specifications, cooling data,
and a cutaway diagram showing con-
struction features. Also included is a
most complete section on pickup tank-
ers with refrigerated pump-out compart-
ments of special design. All who deal
with Grade A milk will be interested
in this useful and informative report on
the bulk milk movement. Copies are
available free on request from Mojon-
nier Bros. Co., 4601 W. Ohio Street,
Chicago 44, Illinois. Mention Bulletin
290.

Dairy Month Queen
(Continued from Page 11)
The girls were so obliging in accepting
every possible invitation, that the coveted
opportunity to swim and enjoy the sun-
shine at the fabulous Casablanca swim-
ming pool was almost completely lost.
Their most appreciated invitation was
from the "Vagabonds," Miami's famous
entertainers, who not only honored the
girls as guests but featured three of them
as guest performers in the show.
Other organizations inviting them as
special guests were: the North Miami
Rotary Club, who were holding a "Dairy
Month Luncheon," The North Miami
Exchange Club, and the Miami Beach
Exchange Club.
They were also presented as special
guests at the Convention's Ladies Auxil-
iary luncheon and fashion show, held in
the Burdine Department Store Tea Room,
in Miami.


Florida Dairy Association
ALLIED TRADE MEMBERS
Special Advertising Section

S. H. MAHONEY EXTRACT CO.
Vanilla Products
D. C. Mulligan, Florida Representative
221 E. Cullerton Rd., Chicago 16, Ill.

MEYER-BLANKE COMPANY
Dairy, Ice Cream Equipment
and Supplies
Phone 6-1366
2701 Dauphin St., Mobile, Ala.

NASH-KELVINATOR CORPN.
ICE CREAM CABINETS
Wm. C. Mayfield
788 Spring St., N. W.-Atlanta, Ga.

NATIONAL PECTIN PRODUCTS Co.
Ice Cream Stabilizers & Emulsifiers
Pectin Stabilizers for Ices, Sherbets & Fruits
J. C. Head, Phone Norfolk, Va. 2-8385
RFD No. 1, Box 48, Bayside, Va.

NEWTH-MORRIS BOX CORPN.
Ice Cream, Popsicle, and
Miscellaneous Packers
Phone: 3-9779
Box 3254, Station "F"
Jacksonville, Fla.

OWENS-ILLINOIS GLASS CO.
Duraglass Milk Bottles
C. W. Parmalee -C. N. Comstock
1102 Barnett Bldg., Jax. 2, Fla.
Phone 3-6134 5

PAUL-LEWIS LABORATORIES, Inc.
Lactivase-For the Prevention of oxidized
flavor in bottled milk, ice cream,
storage cream
Also Rennet Extract-Sir Sirloin, Inc.
765 N. W. 54th St., Miami 37, Fla.

PENN SALT MANUFACTURING
CO.
BK Powder Cleaners Acids
Bottle Alkalies
JOE FOSS
799 Waring Road-Memphis, Tenn.

RIVERSIDE MANUFACTURING
CO.-MOULTRIE, GA.
Masterbilt Uniforms
James M. Stewart Phone 3-3287
306 Lakeview Ave., Apt. 406, Orlando

STANDARD PACKAGING CORPN.
Tamper Proof Seals-Flexible Vacuum
Packages-Liner Materials
Larry Hodge
1121 duPont Bldg., Miami, Fla.

THATCHER GLASS MFG. CO., INC.
Glass Milk Containers
W. T. LOVE, Florida Representative
3221 Pinehurst P1.-Charlotte 7, N.C.

UNIVERSAL MILKING MACHINE
DIVISION
Pail-less (Pipe line) Milking Machines
R. D. Archer-Factory Rep.-Ph. 84-7467
1100 N.E. 134 St., No. Miami, Fla.


JULY & AUGUST, 1953 31









Florida Dairy Association Announces Additional 1953 Membership Dues Received


Adams, C. J., Dairy
Adams, F. J., Dairy
Adams, S. R., Dairy
Adams, H. M., Dairy
Adams, J. H., Dairy
Adkinson, John, Dairy
Adkinson, E. W., Dairy
Alfar Creamery
Alpine Dairy Company
Anderson, Harry, Dairy
Anderson & Burgess Dairy
Anderson, E. H., Honduras
Anderson & Teal Dairy
Ard, F. D., Dairy
Auburndale Sales Co.
Aultman, W. W., Dairy
Austin, E. R., Dairy
Balch Flavor Co.
Bardot Ice Cream
Barlow, J. B., Dairy
Barrow, Ira, Dairy
Bass, Clint & Sons, Dairy
Baxley, P., Dairy
Bayou Vista Farms
Bellamy Plantation
Bennett, Sam and Son, Dairy
Benson, Lloyd, Dairy
Bielling, A. S., Diary
Boatright, Thomas L., Dairy
Borden's Dairy (All Fla.)
Borden Southern, Jax.
Blanton's Dairy
Bowie, Albert, Dairy
Bowman, R. F., Dairy
Boutwell's Dairy
Boyette, J. W., Dairy
Bradford, R. H., Dairy
Breezy Acres Dairy
Brewton, A. M., Dairy
Broward Jersey Dairy Farm
Brown, Harvey B., Dairy
Buchanan, Wilson, Dairy
Buckeye Dairy
Bunderson, H. W., Dairy
Burks, C. W., Dairy
Burnett, C. E., Dairy
Burnett & Clark Dairy
Burnett & Logue Dairy
Burnett Dairy Farms
Bylsma, Frank, Dairy
C M Dairy
Campbell, E. Ruth, Dairy
Campbell, A. V., Dairy
Caperton, Silva, Dairy
Chance, Ray, Dairy
Chavers, Ben, Dairy
Chavers, E. M., Dairy
Chavers, J. W., Dairy
Chavers, T. L., Dairy
Chestnut, A. J., Dairy
Christopher, Lloyd C., Dairy
Cieszkowski Dairy
Clary, M. M., Dairy
Clark, C. R., Dairy
Cloyd, J. S., Dairy
Collins, H. E., Dairy
Clay County Farms
Coastal Dairy
Collins, J. T., Dairy
Coley, H. S., Dairy
Combee, Oris, Dairy
Cooksey, H. C., Dairy
Cope, Roland, Dairy
Copeland, A. F., Dairy
Cooper, N. P., Jr., Dairy
Cowling, W. B., Dairy
Creighton, C. F., Dairy
Creighton, Clyde, Dairy
Crutchfield, M. T., Dairy


Crutchfield, W. R., Dairy
Crosby, Roy O., Dairy
Crump, J. E., Dairy
Crawford, W. J., Dairy
Cravin Bros. Dairy
Crown Cork & Seal Co.
Cruce Bros. Dairy
Datson Dairy Farms
Datson, Glenn, Dairy
Davis Dairy Farms, Inc.
Day's Dairy
Dean's Dairy
Dennis, F. L., Dairy
Dennis, W. C., Dairy
Dickson, W. B., Dairy
Dinsmore Dairy Company
Dixie Dairies, Coral Gables
Dixie Dairy, Daytona
Dooley, J. Roy, Dairy
Dothan Ice Cream
Doub, Frank, Dairy
Drawdy's Dairy
Drawdy, J. D., Dairy
Dressel Dairy
Dubrock, John, Dairy
Eaddy, Mrs. Stella B., Dairy
East Coast Dairy Farms
Edgewater-Wakulla Dairy
Edwards, R. W., Dairy
Eicher, Leland, Dairy
Eicher, Ward, Dairy
Ellison, Floyd, Dairy
Eunice, Gordon, Dairy
Fairglade Dairy Farm
Fairglade Dairy, Inc.
Farless, Lucy, Dairy
Farmer, T. H., Dairy
Farway Dairy Farms
Farrar, F. H., Dairy
Farrar, W. R., Dairy
Ferrell, L. E., Dairy
Fish, Kenneth R., Dairy
Fitzpatrick, W. C., Dairy
Florida Dairies Co., Miami
Florida Dairy, Inc., Tampa
Flowers, Ira, Dairy
Folsom, W. E., Dairy
Ford, W. L., Dairy
Foster Bros. Dairy
Foremost Dairies (All Florida)
Forman's Sanitary Dairy
Fortner-Glidewell Dairy
Fussill, J., Dairy
Gause, W. B., Dairy
Froelich, E. F., Dairy
Fuqua, J. D., Dairy
Gavin, F. A., Dairy
Gay, Felix, Jr., Dairy
Gee, Dorothy, Dairy
Gerber, C. O., Dairy
Goff, Dick, Dairy
Good Luck Dairy
Goolsby, E. C., Dairy
Goolsby, O. W., Dairy
Goolsby, R. G., Dairy
Goolsby, V. B., Dairy
Gossman, W. C., Dairy
Graham's Dairy, Hialeah
Graham, D. L., Dairy
Gulf Wind Dairy
Gray, Tom, Dairy
Green Acres Dairy
Greenland Dairy
Grimes, Lawrence, Dairy
Griswold, Johnnie, Dairy
Groveland Dairy
Guynn, Rufus, Dairy
Hagood, Mrs. H. H., Dairy
Harms, Harry, Dairy


Hall & Boyd Dairy
Hall, M. P., Dairy
Halley, Wess & Son Dairy
Hamilton, Milton, Dairy
Harden, E. C., Dairy
Harmony Farms Dairy
Harris, S. V,. Jr., Dairy
Harty, E. H., Dairy
Hathcock, D., Dairy
Hart, Lester C., Dairy
Hayes, S. M., Dairy
Henson, Carl, Dairy
Heibert, Ben, Dairy
Hemberger, J. C., Dairy
High Standard Dairy
Hillcrest Dairy
Hitchcock, C. W., Dairy
Holloway, Don, Dairy
Holly Hill Dairy
Holsberry, L. V., Dairy
Hood's Dairy
Hough, S. V., & Son, Dairy
Hricko, Paul, Dairy
Hull, E. B., Dairy
Hunt's Dairy
Hurst, L. R., Dairy
Infinger, P. E., Dairy
Infinger, Willard, Dairy
Ives, J. Cason, Dairy
Jackson, Bishop, Dairy
Jackson, Joseph R., Dairy
Jackson, L. D., Dairy
Jackson, R. A., Dairy
Jackson, Reuben, Dairy
Jackson, R. T., Dairy
Jackson, T. G., & Son, Dairy
Jackson, W. C., Dairy
Jameson, M. E., Dairy
Janssen, J. W., Dairy
Jantz & Weinger Dairy
Jenks, B. H., Dairy
Johnson Bros. Dairy
Johnson, George F., Dairy
Johnson, Gordon C., Dairy
Johnson, C. Ray, Dairy
Johnson, I. S., Dairy
Johnson, R. L., Dairy
Johnson, R. T., Dairy
Jones, Marshall, Dairy
Jones, R. F., Dairy
Jones, T. L., Dairy
Jones, Wm. P., Dairy
Judge, B. W., Dairy
Kelley, Jack L., Dairy
Kersey, J. E., Dairy
King, Penn, Dairy
Kirton, Myron, Dairy
Koon, R. L., Dairy
Koon, T. J., Dairy
Kowitz, Vernon, Dairy
Knight, Thomas, Dairy
Knuth, O. C., Dairy
La Belle Dairy
Lambert's Dairy
Land, Harlow, Dairy
Land, James T., Dairy
Land O'Sun Creamery
Land, George, Dairy
Lane Bros. Dairy
Lay Laine Guernsey Farm
Lee, T. G., Dairy
Leonard, Donald, Dairy
Lepley, Albert, Dairy
Linneman, H. H., Dairy
Lohse, Henry, Dairy
Lone Prairie Dairy
Liles, M. J., Dairy
Long, C. F., Dairy
Lowery, H. H., Dairy


Lunsford, J. C., Dairy
Lunsford, R. L., Dairy
McArthur Jersey Farm, Inc.
McAteer, R. S., Dairy
Main Line Dairy
Marathon Corporation
Martin, A. O., Dairy
Martino, P. C., Co.
Mandis Stock Farm
Massey, Val, Dairy
McArthur, B. B., Dairy
McArthur Farms, Inc.
McArthur Jersey Farm,
McArthur Dairy, Inc.
McAteer, R. S., Dairy
McCaskill, J. D., Dairy
McClamrock, George, Dairy
McCarter Quality
Dairy Products
McGill, Ada, Dairy
McGill, R. E., Dairy
Mc's Dairy
McMullen, J., Dairy
McDaniel Dairy
McCurdy, R. E., Dairy
Melear, C. R., Dairy
Melear, V. B., Dairy
Melvin, Edgar, Dairy
Miami Home Milk Producers Co.
Miller & Laird Dairy
Minninger, E. B., Dairy
Mitchell, M. G., Dairy
Mole, A. H., Dairy
Moncrief's Dairy
Moore, David, Dairy
Moore, F. E., Dairy
Moore's Dairy, Stuart
Mt. Pleasant Dairy
Mulloy, W. H., Dairy
Myers, E. H., Dairy
Nelson, W. Glenn, Dairy
New Palm Dairy
Newton, Dr. C. K., Dairy
Nichols, C. L., Dairy
Nowak, Ernie, Dairy
Oak Hill Dairy
Odum, Leroy, Dairy
Old Freeburn Farm Dairy
O'Steen, G. B., Dairy
O'Steen, Marshall, Dairy
O'Farrell, John, Dairy
Owens, Theo S., Dairy
Pace, E. G., Dairy
Parker, O. B., Dairy
Palmetto Dairy
Parker, R. L., Dairy
Peacock, H. C., Dairy
Peacock, T. S., Dairy
Pearce, Elmo M., Dairy
Pearson, Joe, Dairy
Peavey, Ralph, Dairy
Peerless Ice Cream
Perret's Dairy
Perry, Artie G., Dairy
Perry, Herbert, Dairy
Pettit, Charlie, Dairy
Perritt, Frank, Dairy
Pennington, T. S., Dairy
Pennsylvania Salt Co.
Peters, Francis, Dairy
Peterman, Jasper S., Dairy
Peters, Orval, Dairy
Phelps, W. I., Dairy
Plantation Foods
Polar Ice Cream
Polaski, C. J., Dairy
Pompano Dairy
Poole, Ode'l, Dairy


(List Continued Page 33)


32 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS









Florida Dairy Association
Announces Additional
1953 Membership
Dues Received


Potter, Joel L., Dairy
Prine, J. L., Dairy
Price, R. L., Dairy
Purvis, R. A., Dairy
Quality Dairy
Radney, Cecil, Dairy
Raattama, Henry, Dairy
Ramer's Dairy
Ranch Dairy
Reagan & Son Dairy
Reagan, Clint L., Dairy
Rhodes, Frank, Dairy
Riley, J. P., Dairy
Roberts Dairy products
Roberts, J. R., Dairy
Rogers, S. O., Dairy
Rooks, Glen, Dairy
Roper's Dairy
Ruskin Dairy
Richardson, J. P., Dairy
Rollo & Bell Dairy
Russell, Roy, Dairy
Sale, J. B., Dairy
Sapp, Delmar, Dairy
Sapp, R. R., Dairy
Sargeant, John, Dairy
Salter, Tom D., Dairy
Sasser, B. F., Dairy
Schack Dairy
Schmidt, Charles F., Dairy
Schmid Milk Co.
Schmid Guernsey Dairy
Schneider Creamery
Schollian, H. F., Dairy
Schneider, Raymond, Dairy
Seale, R. S., Dairy
Sellers, C. C., Dairy
Sellers Guernsey Dairy
Sharpe, Horace, Dairy
Shaw, D. H., Dairy
Shelfer, Lewis W.
Shepard, Marco, Dairy
Shiver, Clinton
Silcox, J. E., Dairy
Silvia Brothers Dairy
Sims, Clyde, Dairy
Simmons, W. J., Dairy
Skinner's Dairy
Slate, James E., Dairy
Smiley Bros. Dairy
Smith, Jake, Dairy
Smith, M. C., Dairy
Snapper Creek Dairy
Spring Hills Dairy
Stanton, Lee, Dairy
Stephens, R. S., Dairy
Sunshine Dairy, Punta Gorda
Sunnybrook Dairy Products
Fidwell, Hubert, Dairy
Tootle, E. L., Dairy
Twin Oak Dairy
Vickers, Lawrence, Dairy
Yoder, Monroe, Dairy


OKI





'OIC spec
,earest0



Removes mill
Cleans equipment
Lowers bacteria
Deodoriz

Reduces labor-
milk, fat and scu
Thermodurics (h

Saves money-
lower than the p

More pleasant
and non-chafing
cows' teats. Deoc

Increases efficie
cause hardening
ber equipment. A
T. M.'S REG. U. S. PAT. OFF.: ORTHO


thorough


time one
m off-and
eat-resista

the cost o
products it

to use. Pr
to the ha
lorizes as

*ncy of mi
or corrosi
actually lei


ovenT to be noiritat






















it sanitizes.

Iking machines. Does not
on on either metal or rub- I
..



ly




-fourth-because it gets
kills bacteria-especially
nt bacteria) -all at once!

f using ORTHO-SAN is I
replaces.

oven to be non-irritating
inds of the operator and
it sanitizes.

king machines. Does not
on on either metal or rub-
ngthens life of equipment.


The ORTHO-SAN formula is the
result of over 1500 field experi-
ments. Test ORTHO-SAN to your
own satisfaction and you'll
never be without it!
CALIFORNIA
SPRAY-CHEMICAL Corp.
P. O. Box 1231
ORLANDO, FLORIDA


JULY & AUGUST, 1953 33


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SWIrNTIdI PST CONlROin
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Editor's Column ...


NEWS & VIEWS

MILK PRICES-Vs-OTHER PRICES
From information submitted at a conm-
mittee hearing of the U. S. Congress, by
the Milk Industry Foundation, we find
the following "Milk Price" facts which
give further weight to our "Dairy News
Editorial" (April-May 1953 issue) point-
ing out the favorable comparison of
Florida Milk prices and advantages to
Florida Milk Consumers of the work of
the Florida Milk Commission.
"The price of fresh milk whether pur-
chased by the public at the home or from
stores has risen much less percentagewise
than have prices generally, or the price
of any other substantial item in the cost
of living. In August 1951 on a com-
parable basis, the retail price of milk
stood at an index of 185, as compared
to all foods at 228, the general price
level at 221, and per-capita consumer
purchasing power at 284."

DAIRY MONTH SALUTE
To Dairy Industry
In cooperation with the National and
Statewide observance of June as Dairy
Month the Florida Power & Light Com-
pany, used the following 'spot" news
announcement in their Radio Broadcast
programs.
"June is Dairy Month, set aside to
call attention to the nutritional value of
milk and milk products. Here in Flor-
ida, the dairy industry has been expand-
ing faster than almost anyplace else in
the country. Milk production has risen
169% since prewar days, from 331/2-
million gallons in 1941 to 90-million
gallons in 1952. The cattle population
has risen from 521/2-thousand in 1940
to over 114-thousand in 1952, an in-
crease of 117%. And, Florida dairymen
say, that is only the beginning. The
trend will continue, and dairy farming
will provide more and more income for
more and more farms. So, Florida Power
& Light Company salutes the Florida's
dairy industry and is proud that depend-
able, cheap electricity is playing an im-
portant part in better and faster dairy
production . and easier, happier living
for Florida's rural citizens."
Let us strive to make more friends
like Florida Power & Light Company.

The Clearwater Jersey Dairy lost 10
milking cows which had taken refuge
under trees near a wire fence during an
electrical storm, recently. County agent
John Logan said the situation was un-
usual because cattle will usually leave
sheltering trees during such a storm.


NORTHWEST FLORIDA DAIRY SHOW ENLARGED
FOR AUGUST 13th EVENT
"The Northwest Florida 4-H, F.F.A. and Open Dairy Show" is the new name
adopted for the Northwest Florida Dairy Show which has been held for the past
several years at Chipley.
Washington County Agricultural Agent, J. E. (Red) Davis, who serves as
General Manager of the show, has announced that the sponsors of the show have
adopted plans expected to increase considerably the interest and participation in the
show which has grown steadily since it was started.
An "Open Show" and Open Judging
Contest have been added to the events Association to the winning 4-H and
which formerly have been limited to 4-H F.F.A. Dairy Judging Teams and to the
and F.F.A. members. These events will winner of the Open Show judging event.
be open to any who are not 4-H and The show is sponsored by the State
F.F.A. members. Department of Agriculture, the Voca-
Leon County has been added to the tional Agricultural Department, the Ag-
area eligible to participate in the show ricultural Extension Service, the City of
which now includes all counties from Chipley, Washington County, Chipley
Tallahassee to Pensacola. Kiwanis Club, Southern Dairies, Fore-
More than $1,000.00 in cash prizes most Dairies and Borden Dairies.
and numerous honorary awards and tro- Woodrow Glenn, Jackson County
phies will be awarded. Among these are Farm Agent, will be Master of Cere-
trophies awarded by the Florida Dairy monies.


NATIONAL MILK COST STUDY
Indiana University has sent a question-
naire to each member of the Milk Indus-
try Foundation, asking for a confidential
report of 1952 operating costs and
profits.
This study is being made by the Uni-
versity at the request of the Foundation
and covers operations for the year 1952.
This is the fifth time that members
of the industry have contributed cost
information for a national study of the
Dairy Industry. The first such study
was made by Harvard University prior
to the war. The last was for the year
1949. These studies have been of inesti-
mable value in dispelling the myth of
high profits in the fluid milk industry.
We urge every Florida member of Milk
Industry Foundation to contribute his
figures to this important study.


LAFAYETTE COUNTY PASTURES
S. L. Brothers, County Agent of Lafay-
ette County, reported early in July that
"pastures in the county are looking
green and growing nicely since receiving
good summer showers. This crop has
steadily increased during the past five
years until now we have some 7300
acres of permanent pastures in the coun-
ty. About 6500 of this is seeded to Pan-
gola Bahia; 300 acres in Argentine
Bahia; and 500 acres in Pangola Grass.
Up until 1953 the income has run from
$50.00 to $200.00 per acre from seed
sales on our Bahia grasses. Due to de-
creased prices on seed, this income will
be less in 1953 but the land is in better
condition and there is usually a need for
grass for grazing by our cattle.


DAIRY PRODUCTS SMALL PART
GOVERNMENT SUPPORT PROGRAM
Even though the Federal government
is committed to support a price level for
dairying, the amount spent is relatively
small compared to the overall farm sup-
port program. Publicity centers around
the support price on butter and cheese
while actually as of a few months ago
the government held about 98 million
dollars worth of cottonseed oil alone,
compared to about 99 million dollars
worth of butter, dried milk and cheese.
The wheat support program for the
comparable period amounted to over 800
million; the corn support program almost
400 million with cotton and tobacco
costing between 200 and 300 million
each.


HANS B. AHLEFELDT


HELM

SANITATION

CHEMICALS

Dairy G Food
Sanitation

OFFICE
PHONE 4610 FERNANDINA
MAIL ADDRESS
AMELIA CITY, FLORIDA

WAREHOUSE
Union Terminal Warehouse
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


34 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS










BULLS BULLS



WE HAVE BULLS FOR SALE OUT OF THESE DAMS:


DINSMORE MAXMOST FLORENCE
8372-430-FFF
14060-707-6yr-365
Classified DESIRABLE '49
Sire: Quail Roost Maxmost
Dam: Butler Island Confidence
"Florence's" bull is sired by
Foremost May Royalty


DINSMORE MAYROYAL MARGY
11319-458-Jr.3-365C
13615-585-Jr4-365 (Pendinq)
Classified VERY GOOD '51 & 53
Sire: Foremost May Royalty
Dam: Butler Island Fayroyal Margy
"Marqy's" bull is sired by
Quail Roost Master Mac


DINSMORE MAYROYAL WINNIE
12754-589-Sr3-365
On retest 9388-423-5yrs-in 193 days
Classified EXCELLENT '51
Sire: Foremost May Royalty
Dam: Dinsmore Royal Winnie
"Winnie's" bull is sired by
Quail Roost Noble Yeoman


DINSMORE MAJESTIC DANICE
9895-400-Sr2-365C
On retest 7171-283-Sr3-in 186 days
Classified DESIRABLE '53
Sire: Dinsmore Majestic Rose King
Dam: Butler Island Janice
"Danice's" bull is sired by
Foremost May Royalty


Write for a copy of our picture folder and a list of young bulls for sale-THEN SELECT


Dinsmore


Guernseys


FEDERAL ACCREDITED 57790

Dinsmore Farms


J. B. LANOUX, Herdsman
10 miles north of Jacksonville
Near U. S. 1


NEGATIVE TO BANG'S

Dinsmore, Florida


EARI A. JOHNSON CHARLES F. JOHNSON


BRADY S. JOHNSTON


V. C. JOHNSON






00 00000000000000














ASK THE COWS

WHO KNOW...

Progressive dairymen know that in order to obtain maximum net
profit from their dairy herd, it is necessary to obtain maximum produc-
tion from every cow. They also know that feeding is an important
factor in obtaining top production from every
cow. SECURITY DAIRY FEEDS are de-
signed to help dairymen obtain maximum
production.


Ask your cows-let them prove to you the
advantages of feeding SECURITY.


I 11 'V




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