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Title: Florida dairy news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00082035/00016
 Material Information
Title: Florida dairy news
Physical Description: 12 v. : illus. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Dairy Industry Association
Publisher: Cody Publications for Florida Dairy Industry Association.
Place of Publication: Kissimmee Fla
Publication Date: February-March 1953
Frequency: bimonthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Dairying -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Cattle   ( lcsh )
Milk   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-12, no. 1; Nov. 1950-Spring, 1962.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00082035
Volume ID: VID00016
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01386090
issn - 0426-5696

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Full Text























DAIRY-GRAM


A MESSAGE TO FLORIDA MILK CONSUMERS
FLORIDA IS NO EXCEPTION TO THE NEED FOR MILK PRICE INCREASES. SINCE
SEPTEMBER 1ST MILK PRICES HAVE BEEN INCREASED IN OVER 40 DIFFERENT CITIES
. . RECENT INCREASES OF MILK PRICES IN SEVERAL FLORIDA AREAS WERE AP-
PROVED BY THE FLORIDA MILK COMMISSION ONLY AFTER THE HOLDING OF PUB-
LIC HEARINGS WITH THE DAIRYMEN AND DAIRY PLANTS OF THESE AREAS ...
PLUS EXTENSIVE STUDIES AND AUDITS BY THE COMMISSION TO DETERMINE THE
COST OF MILK PRODUCTION, MILK PROCESSING AND DISTRIBUTION.
DAIRY FARMERS PRODUCE MILK AT A VERY LOW PROFIT AND A NATIONAL
SURVEY HAS DISCLOSED THAT MILK DISTRIBUTORS' PROFITS ARE ONLY ABOUT 2/5
CENT PER QUART.
THE PRICE OF MILK HAS INCREASED ABOUT 50% LESS IN FLORIDA SINCE 1940
THAN FOR THE NATION AS A WHOLE ... THE NATIONAL AVERAGE PRICE INCREASE
OF MILK IS MUCH LESS THAN THE AVERAGE INCREASE OF ALL OTHER MAJOR FOODS
... A QUART OF MILK IS 2-POUNDS OF NATURE'S MOST NEARLY PERFECT FOOD.
WHILE MILK AND MILK PRODUCTS TAKE ONLY 15 PER CENT OF THE AVERAGE
FAMILY FOOD BUDGET THEY PROVIDE 30 PERCENT OF THE NUTRITIONAL VALUE
OF THESE FOODS. FLORIDA DAIRY ASSOCIATION







Perhaps You, Too, Can Get


A 70-lb. Heavier Calf" for a Lot Less Cost


NURSING CHOW, Purina's New Milk Replacer,


Makes a Big Difference.

*Most dairymen's Guernsey calves, according to Mor-
rison's "Feeds and Feeding," weigh 177 Ibs. at 4
months. Compare that with 251 Ibs.-the average
4-month weight of Guernsey calves fed Nursing Chow
and Calf Startena on the Purina Research Farm during
1952.

Take a look at the calf on the right above. She rep-
resents the average weight of her breed at 4 months.
On the left is a Purina-fed calf at the same age.
Which will make the better cow?


NOW LET'S CONSIDER COSTS
If the calf on the right got an Here's the ration for the calf on
"average" ration, she consumed: the left:
Whole milk........1770 lbs. at 5c...$88.75 Purina Nursing Chow..25 Ibs.... $ 5.50
Grain ............... 200 lbs. at 4c.... 8.00 Calf Startena................300 Ibs..... 21.00
H ay ................. 150 bs. at c.... 1.50 Hay 5 5............................. 125 bs..... 1.25
TOTAL $98.25 TOTAL $27.75

Prices in these rations are estimates of nationwide
averages and may vary up or down in your com-
munity. The relative cost of these two rations, however,
will remain fairly constant.


0 0


Look at the cost of Nursing Chow and Startena
together. Less than half the average cost of the
whole milk they replace. And besides that, anti-
biotics in Nursing Chow help keep down nutrition-
al scours, our research has shown.

There's a new way to raise calves. Your Purina
Dealer will show you how. He's at the Store with
the Checkerboard Sign.

SEND FOR FREE BOOKLET
Send for your free Purina Calf Plan booklet. It shows
plans for calf pens, feed troughs, hay racks, and calf
barn. Also gives our new, low-cost feeding plan.
Just clip this coupon and send to:
RALSTON PURINA COMPANY
1126 Checkerboard Square
St. Louis 2, Mo.
Please send me the free booklet (D-325), "Purina
Plans for Growinq Calves.'
N am e .. ... ... .... .... .. ....
I raise ... ..... .........-. calves yearly.
(number)
Address ....
Town ......... State...........






























Florida Feed Mlrs leu JIacksonville Plant

OUR 28 YEARS EXPERIENCE

IN THE FEED MANUFACTURING BUSINESS, TOGETHER WITH THE PROFESSIONAL AND SCIEN-
TIFIC ASSISTANCE OF OUR ANIMAL NUTRITIONIST, ENABLES US TO MANUFACTURE FEEDS
THAT GIVE THE MOST SATISFACTORY RESULTS FOR FLORIDA.

OUR NEW JACKSONVILLE PLANT

IS EQUIPPED WITH THE MOST MODERN AND EFFICIENT MACHINERY KNOWN TO THE FEED
MILLING INDUSTRY

WE INVITE YOUR INSPECTION

WRITE OR PHONE US FOR ALL YOUR FEED NEEDS
STATEWIDE RAILROAD OR TRUCK DELIVERY


FLORIDA FEED MILLS
MANUFACTURERS OF

X- Tra-oaod FEEDS
P. O. Box 2331 Phone 8-2608
2762 West Beaver Street Jacksonville, Florida


FEBRUARY & MARCH, 1953 3







Florida Dairy Association
ALLIED TRADES MEMBERS
Special Advertising Section

ADAMS PACKING ASSN., INC.
Citrus Pulp, Citrus Meal. Citrus Molasses
Jim Coates, Sales Mgr., By-Products Div.
Auburndale, Fla. Phone 8-7061

AMICA-BURNETT CHEM. &
SUPPLY CO.
Dairy Equipment and Supplies
Phone 4-5606
P. O. Box 2328, Jacksonville, Fla.

CHARLES DENNERY, INC.
New Orleans
Ic Cr am Coating, Fruits and Flavors
ha Stone -602 W. Belmar St.
LAKELAND, FLA.

DIAMOND ALKALI COMPANY
Dairy Cleaner & Alkali
Florida Distributors:
Miller Machinery & Supply, Jax.
Industrial Chem. & Supply Co.,
Tampa

GENERAL MILLS, INC.
Dairy Equipment and Supplies
John W. Manning, Phone 9-4586
1601 Congress Bldg. Miami

GULF PAPER COMPANY, INC.
Ice Cream (Linerless) Cartons,
Butter Cartons
J. H. McVoy
50 E. Magnolia St., Pensacola, Fla.


FLA. REPRESENTATIVE
Grecn Spot Orangeade Concentrate
Krim-Ko Chocolate Flavorings
616 Jessamine Ave. Phone 2-0148
Daytona Beach, Fla,

INTERNATIONAL PAPER CO.
Single Service Division
,Purepak Milk Containers
W. M. Scott
134 Peachtree St., Atlanta 3, Ga.

JIM JENNINGS
MFRS. REPRESENTATIVE
The Vernon Company-Specialty Advertising
Morning Glory Milk Powder
"Eze" Orange Concentrate
Route 9, Box 356, Jacksonville, Fla.

JIFFY MANUFACTURING CO.
Insulated Bags and Liners
Southern Representative-William Romaine
Box 5463, 5 Pts. Sta., Columbia, S. C.

ROBERT A. JOHNSTON CO.
Dairy Chocolate & Cocoa Products
J. L. Hammons
916 S. Rome Ave., Tampa, Fla.

KIECKHEFER CONTAINER CO.,
Pure-Pak Paper Milk Bottles
I. J. Evans-M. A. Knowles
Phone 6-1334
4700 Pearl St., Jacksonville, Fla.


-Q-




Pictures around cylinder-filling operation of
Tesco Chemicals. Inc. are (left to ,ighl) Mr.
T. E. Schneider. President, Mr. F. E. Cooper,
Vice President and Mr. John T. Wijlon, Sales
Tesco Chemicals, Inc., Atlanta, Geor-
gia, has recently opened a new chlorine
and ammonia cylinder-filling plant at
Tampa, Florida. The plant is modernly
equipped for both regular and emer-
gency shipments and provides for pick
up and delivery of chlorine and am-
monia cylinders.



BUD SILAS PROMOTED
BY RALSTON PURINA
Francis J. (Bud) Silas has been pro-
moted by the Ralston Purina Company
to manager of a sales territory in West
Florida with headquarters in Crestview.
Bud comes from one of the pioneer
dairy families of Dade County and was
in the dairy business
himself until Decem-
ber, 1951, when he
joined Purina to con-
tact a n d service
dairymen in the Mi-
ami area.
Purina Mills dis-
trict office in Jack-
sonville announced
that Bud's promotion
SILAS was brought about
by the outstanding job that he did in
working closely with the dairymen of
Broward and Palm Beach Counties.
Bud moved his fine wife, Kay, 3 year
old daughter Susan, and 1 year old son
John Patrick, to Crestview early in Feb-
ruary and says he is looking forward to
working with the dairymen of West
Florida.



"The Miracle of the Can," a 41-min-
ute color motion picture story of the
packaging revolution in America during
the past half century, now is being re-
leased by American Can Company.
The 16-mm. film tells a dramatic and
entertaining story of the contribution
made by the can-making and can-using
industries to the American way of life.
It shows how the teamwork of food pro-
ducer, can-maker, canner, and packer has
helped Americans win man's age-old
battle against hunger.


Florida Dairy Association
ALLIED TRADES MEMBERS
Special Advertising Section

S. H. MAHONEY EXTRACT CO.
Vanilla Products
D. C. Mulligan, Florida Representative
221 E. Cullerton Rd., Chicago 16, Ill.

MEYER-BLANKE COMPANY
Dairy, Ice Cream Equipment
and Supplies
Phone 6-1366
2701 Daulphin St., Mobile, Ala.

NASH-KELVINATOR CORPN.
ICE CREAM CABINETS
Wm. C. Mayfield
788 Spring St., N. W.-Atlanta, Ga.

NATIONAL PECTIN PRODUCTS Co.
Icw Cream Stabilizers & Emulsifiers
Pectin Stab'lizers for Ices, Sherbets & Fruits
J. C. Head, Phone Norfolk, Va. 2-8385
RFD No. 1, Box 48, Bayside, Va.

NEWTH-MORRIS BOX CORPN.
Ice Cream, Popsicle, and
Miscellaneous Packers
Phone: 3-9779
Box 3254, Station "F"
Jacksonville, Fla.

OWENS-ILLINOIS GLASS CO.
Duraglass Milk Bottles
C. W. Paramlee C. N. Comstock
1102 Barnett Bldg., Jax. 2, Fla.
Phone 3-6134 5

PAUL-LEWIS LABORATORIES, Inc.
Lactivase For the Prevention of oxidized
flavor in bottled milk, ice cream,
storage cream
Also Iennet Extract Sir Sirloin, Inc.
765 N. W. 51th St., Miami 37, Fla.

PENN SALT MANUFACTURING
CO.
BKl Powder Cleaners Acids
Bottle Alkalies
JOE FOSS
799 Waring Road-Memphis, Tenn.

RIVERSIDE MANUFACTURING
CO.-MOULTRIE, GA.
Masterbilt Uniforms
James M. Stewart Phone 3-3287
306 Lakeview Ave., Apt. 406, Orlando

STANDARD PACKAGING CORPN.
Tamper Proof Seals--Flexible Vacuum
Packages-Liner Materials
Larry Hodge
1121 duPont Bldg., Miami, Fla.

THATCHER GLASS MFG. CO., INC.
Glass Milk Containers
W. T. LOVE, Florida Representative
3221 Pinehurst PI.-Charlotte 7, N.C.

UNIVERSAL MILKING MACHINE
DIVISION
Pail-less (Pipe line Milking Machines
R. D. Archer-Factory Rep.-Ph. 84-7467
1100 N.E. 134 St., No. Miami, Fla.


4 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS









EDITORIALS


Why I Am a Member

By WILMER If. BASSETT. JR.. President 1953

As a Dairy Farmer and Milk Producer, air well a, a mall Milk Di. rlb/utor. I an,
.1 member of the Florida Dairy Association and anm willing to give .ome of my
time as tell as my share of financial support to il program for a number of
reasons:

FIRST: My dairy and my investment needs the protection of the combined judg-
ment and efforts and strength of the membership of a state-wide Association of
Dairies and Dairymen.
Not One of Us among the more than 1200 Florida Dairymen, large or small, can
single-handedly protect our business against the numerous things that constantly arise
to threaten our welfare. The Dairy Industry is undoubtedly one of the most regulated
and inspected of all industries because of the highly essential and perishable nature of
our products.
This Makes It Necessary that we work together and provide for an organization
through which our combined abilities and efforts can be used to do these things for
us. Such an organization was formed in 1946 when Florida Dairymen and the Dairy
Products group joined together to make the Florida Dairy Industry Association.
The F.D.I.A. has only recently been changed to the Florida Dairy Association and
further strengthened and streamlined in keeping with the growth and changing needs
of the Florida Dairy Industry. We believe that in its re-organized form, the Florida
Dairy Association will prove to be one of the most democratic and effective organiza-
tions of its kind to be found anywhere in the vast Dairy Industry.
The Association's new and unique set-up provides for the State's producers and
distributors to work both separately and jointly.

SECOND: Valuable Services Are Provided. Another reason why I am a member
of the F.D.A. and why I believe every Dairy and Dairyman of Florida should be a
member is the help provided by the full time service of the Association's Office and
Executive Director and Secretary; the careful thought and action of the organization's
22 Directors, and the experience, judgment and active work done for the welfare of
the Dairy Industry through the 24 active committees of the Association.

THIRD: The Florida Dairy News, sponsored and published by the F.D.A., for the
past two years has been a most important source of information to all Dairymen
and carries the Dairy Industry message not only to all Florida Dairymen and all
Dairies but to over 1200 others whose knowledge of and understanding of our prob-
lems is most important. This magazine is an important part of the Dairy Industry's
much-needed Public Relations program.
The wide scope and importance of the work of the Association may be readily
seen by a glance at only a few of the 24 active Committees. Among these are the
Legislative Committee; Dairy Economics Committee; June Dairy Month Committee;
Public Health Committee; Veterinary Committee; Allied Trades Committee; Public
Relations Committee; Dairy Husbandry Committee; Milk and Ice Cream Plant
Committee; Milk Production Committee; Annual Field Day Program Committee; Annual
Meeting Program Committee; Pasture Development Committee.

FOURTH: Important Dairy Events Sponsored by the Association Provide Many
Opportunities for Learning New Ideas and New Methods. Among these are: The
Annual Meeting . Quarterly Directors' Meetings . Directors & Committees
Planning Conference . June Dairy Month Program . Annual Dairy Field Day
at the University of Florida . Special Area Field Days . Annual Dairy Plant
Operations Short Course . Annual Dairy Herdsmen's Short Course.

FIFTH: I firmly believe that no time or expense connected with my dairy is a
better investment than that which I personally devote to this Association. I feel that
any Dairyman who is completely familiar with the work of the F.D.A. will join me in
this conclusion.


VOL. 3


NO. 1


FEBRUARY & MARCH, 1953
BI-MONTHLY

THE
FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS
E. T. LAY, Editor & Business Manager


Official Publication of
Florida Dairy Association
WILMER W. BASSETT, JR., President
E. T. LAY, Executive Director
Also
Florida Guernsey Cattle Club
and
Florida Association
of Milk Sanitarians
DIRECTORS
FLORIDA DAIRY ASSOCIATION

Producers
FRANK B. DOUB, Jacksonville
Vice Pres. & Chrmn.
"Producers Council"
GEORGE F. JOHNSON, West Palm Beach
D. WAYNE WEBB, Tampa
JOHN SERGEANT, Lakeland
HERMAN BOYD, Miami
BILL GRAHAM, Miami
JOHN T. ADKINSON, Pensacola
IRA BARROW, New, Smyrna Beach

Distributors
CLIFF D. WAYNE, Miami
Vice Pres. & Chrmn.
"Distributors Council"
FREEMAN HALES, Opa Locka
HERMAN BURNETT, Bradenton
J. N. MCARTHUR, Miami
H. CODY SKINNER, Jacksonville
JOHN M. HOOD, St. Petersburg
GORDON NIELSEN. West Palm Beach
W. J. BARRITT, JR., Tampa
A. E. (JACK) JOHNSON, Jacksonville

Additional Directors
WILMER W. BASSETT, JR., President
Monticello
LARRY J. HODGE, President
'Alligator Club": Miami
THE FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS is
published bi-monthly by the Florida
Dairy Association, 220 Newnan St.,
Jacksonville, Florida. Subscription price
of $1.00 a year. Entered as second
class mail at the Post Office at Jack-
sonville, Fla., under Act of March 3,
1879, as amended.
Advertising rates furnished upon re-
quest.
Business and Editorial office, 220
Newnan Street, Jacksonville.
Member Florida Press Association
NATIONAL EDITORIAL

tl)FI JUilL a
446<1 1%1111111112 ra


FEBRUARY & MARCH, 1953 5








Forward



In 1953


With The


Florida


Dairy


Industry

0

Milk Producers,

Producer-

Distributors,

Distributors

& Allied Trades


UNITED

Since


1946



In the

Florida

Dairy

Association


For Our Youth Readers


First of a Series of articles on:
A Career in The Dairy Industry
Note: This is the eighth in a series of discussions on "You and Your Future." A
booklet covering the first seven discussions which dealt with "Choosing and Prepara-
tion for a Vocation" will be furnished upon request.


This article about the milk products
industry is designed to inform our youth
readers of the vocational opportunities in
this field.
As detailed later in this article, the
Dairy Industry -is a stable one, which pro-
vides steady and permanent employment.
Livestock is fundamental 'in agriculture.
The dairy cow produces daily. The con-
sumer needs milk products every day for
healthful nutrition. As the great humani-
tarian, Herbert Hoover, said: "The hu-
man race cannot survive without its dairy
products." Furthermore, dairying is the
kind of agricultural pursuit that improves
and enriches the soil. All of these fac-
tors play a part in providing good jobs
for able men at good pay.
Whether you desire a career as a scien-
tist, salesman, regulatory official, dairy-
manufacturing specialist, or one of the
many other occupations in and incidental
to the production, processing, manufac-
turing or distribution of Dairy Products,
you can still set ambitious goals for per-
sonal advancement and future security.
Those of you who choose your career
in the milk products industry will be
doing something worthwhile for your fel-
lowmen, for your country and for your-
selves.
MILK PRODUCTS INDUSTRY
The Milk Products Industry nationally
is a ten billion dollar enterprise, account-
ing for one of the largest single sources
of income for the United States farmer.
Nearly one out of every 15 U. S. families
is dependent on the Dairy Industry for a
livelihood, either directly or indirectly.
It is greater dollarwise than the steel
industry. Its economic and social con-
tributions to the health and welfare of
the nation is immeasurable.
Occupations directly and indirectly in-
volved in dairying include not only dairy
farmers and processors, but fruit growers
and packers, veterinarians, machinery
manufacturers, engineers, metallurgists,
supply manufacturers, health inspectors,


dairy technicians, salesmen, delivery men,
haulers, brokers, bacteriologists, and many
others.
The stature and stability of this indus-
try has been built upon the role milk
products play in human nutrition. The
average American home spends 15% of
its food budget for milk and its products.
This has come about because milk is one
of the most economical and palatable
sources of the basic dietary requirements.
OPPORTUNITIES
Young people of vision and energy
who wish to earn a good living and make
a contribution to the welfare and pros-
perity of our State and its people, are
needed by the Dairy Industry. It will
provide a sense of accomplishment, se-
curity of employment, contentment and
well-being for the individual. People
employed in this industry are among the
best paid in the food processing field,
with salaries depending on the degree
and skill and experience needed, and type
of work performed. Advancement with-
in organizations is the reward of the en-
ergetic and able. Promotion is determined
by a fundamental education, a desire to
work with people, proficiency, reliability
and constancy of service.
FIELD OF SPECIALIZATION
The wide diversification within the
Dairy Industry provides unlimited job
opportunities for young people, particu-
larly for those having interest in the
technical and processing aspects.
MILK PRODUCTS PROCESSING
AND PLANT OPERATIONS
The processing of milk and products
made from milk is one which requires
specialized information and skills. Among
these are good sanitation practices,
product knowledge, operation of compli-
cated machinery and application of scien-
tific fundamentals. The nature and de-
tails of these operations vary considerably
within each segment of the industry.


6 FLORIDA DA


@ R
i4a!I


IRY NEWS









A magic key

in the

milk industry

Like other alert dairy executives, you
are constantly seeking keys that unlock
new markets and lead to increased sales.
When your milk and cream are packed
in the Canco Disposable Containier, you
S, have that key and your dairy benefits
from the skills and findings of our 310
S. .* B scientists and technicians, whose record
j i industry.
Canco customers have been out in
/front first with almost every new and
San improved product within that con-
better ctaer--anfrequently with
Ctainer. And that's the record not just
for this year. Or last year. But since the
turn of tle century.







Go. first to the people ho are.first! AMERICAN

CAN

COMPANY


Good Hlousekeeping New York, Chicago, San Francisco
Hamilton, Canada
Caiuco's Paper Milk Container has given tre-
mendtous impetus to milk sales for dairies all
across the country-provides housewives with PARENTS
milk in a sanitary, easy-to-carry, one-way con-




Comes in
1-qi., 1-pt., %/-qt., 1/2-pt. sizes.


FEBRUARY & MARCH, 1953 7








DAIRY ASSOCIATION ACTIVITIES


IR-M EWAJ
DOUB WAYNE

F. D. I. A. Is Reorganized
As "Florida Dairy Association"
"The Florida Dairy Industry Associa-
tion," well known name of Florida's State
dairy organization since its formation in
1946, had its name changed to the "Flor-
ida Dairy Association" along with other
important organizational changes adopted
by the Board of Directors at their re-
cent meeting, February 5th in Tampa.
President Wilmer Bassett, who recom-
mended the change in the State Associa-
tion's name, said that this and other im-
portant changes adopted by the Board of
Directors were made necessary by chang-
ing trends and conditions in the Florida
Dairy Industry.
In addition to changing the name, the
charter and by-laws amendments adopted,
reclassified the producer-distributor mem-
bers of the Association as distributors,
which had the effect of placing the As-
sociation membership in two main groups
instead of three. These are producers and
distributors.
These two divisions of the membership
will now be known as the Milk Produc-
ers Council and the Dairy Distributors
Council of the Florida Dairy Association.
The Board of Directors was increased
from 15 to 21 with the producer and
distributor councils having 10 each. The
President, as the 21st member of the
Board, will not be a voting member and
will alternate each year from one group
to the other. A vice president for pro-
ducers and distributors will be the chair-
men of the council of his own group and
each of these will be able to function
separately with the 10 directors of each
group serving as Executive Committee
for the group.
Under this plan, President Bassett ex-
plained, the Florida Dairy Association
will in effect be a two unit organization
with each unit capable of functioning
both separately and jointly with the other
group.


BASSETT


Frank Doub, Jacksonville producer, as
producer vice president of the Florida
Dairy Association is now chairman of the
"Milk Producers' Council" and Cliff
Wayne, Southern Dairies' State Manager
of Miami, as distributor vice president is
chairman of the new "Distributors' Coun-
cil."
All general committees of the Associa-
tion will, under the new plan, have, so
far as possible, an equal number of pro-
ducers and distributors.
President Bassett and other members
expressed the belief that these changes
in the State Association's basic operation-
al plan would do much to increase the
effectiveness of the Association's efforts
on behalf of the industry.


LAY TO ATTEND MEETING
OF ASSOCIATION EXECUTIVES
When the 1953 Annual National Con-
ference of Dairy Association Executives
meet in Chicago, March 20-21, the Flor-
ida Dairy Association's Secretary and Ex-
ecutive Director Andy Lay will preside
as Chairman.
The Conference includes the Execu-
tives of all State and National Dairy and
Dairy Products Associations of the United
States and Canada.
Lay, who is the second Southern Sec-
retary to hold the Chairmanship of the
Conference, will conclude his one year
term at this meeting.
Russell Fox, manager of the New York
State Association of Milk Dealers, is
Chairman of the two-days program com-
mittee.


11111
Dairy Association Elects
Six New Directors
In keeping with the reorganization
plan adopted by the Board of the Florida
Dairy Association at a February 5th meet-
ing in Tampa, five new producer direc-
tors and one new distributor director
have been elected.
The new producer directors were nom-
inated by the five old producer directors
under the Chairmanship of Frank Doub,
1st Vice President of F.D.A. The dis-
tributor directors nominated the one ad-
ditional distributor, Mr. J. F. W. Zirkel-
bach of the Baldwin Dairies, Pensacola.
The new producer directors named are:
Bill Graham, Graham's Dairy, Miami; Ira
C. Barrow, Barrow's Dairy Farms, New
Smyrna Beach; Hugh Adams, Adams
Dairy, Jacksonville; John T. Adkinson,
Adkinson Dairy, Pensacola, and M. A.
Schack, Schack's Dairy, Marianna. All
are recognized as leaders in the area they
represent and their addition with provide
representation on the F.D.A. Board of
the dairymen of all principal dairy pro-
duction areas of the State.


ASSOCIATION DIRECTORS
HAVE A BUSY SEASON
Little do the members of the Florida
Dairy Association and all of the dairies
realize the important service they are re-
ceiving from the Directors and Officers
of their State Association. Neither can
it be realized without having tried it that
serving the dairy industry as a director of
the Association requires considerable per-
sonal time, effort and expense on the
part of each one.
While the regular work schedule for
F.D.A. directors calls for quarterly meet-
ings, experience has shown that occasion-
al special meetings are necessary.
The F.D.A. Board met in Tampa De-
cember 12th for two days. Within a week
they met again in Ft. Pierce for a con-
ference with Governor McCarty. On Feb-
ruary 4th and 5th they met again in
Tampa for both an important business
session and for the F.D.A. sponsored din-
ner honoring the dairymen who were par-
ticipating in the State Fair Dairy Show,
as well as leaders of various Dairy Breed
groups of the State.
The Board meets again in Jacksonville,
March 3rd for a business session as well
as to participate in the Southeastern Dairy
Industry Rally.


8 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


111111






SOUTHEASTERN DAIRY INDUSTRY RALLY

SET FOR MARCH 3rd IN JACKSONVILLE

Speakers From Three National Associations Will Outline
Milk & Ice Cream Festival Plans

March 3rd will be a banner day for Jacksonville and the Florida Dairy Industry.
National recognition has been given the Dairy Industry of the Southeast and par-
ticularly of Florida in the selection of Jacksonville for this important regional meeting
by a committee of the Industry's three most important National Dairy Associations.
The Jacksonville meeting is one of eight such meetings for the entire United
States for the purpose of organizing cooperation in a national program for Milk and
Ice Cream Sales which has been designated the National Milk & Ice Cream Festival.
The Jacksonville meeting is the only milk and ice cream,
one east of New Orleans and south of representatives and
Louisville, Kentucky and New York City. dealers of all food
National organiza- industries related to
tion representatives to Dairy Products,
who will participate in representatives of the
the program are Dr. press, radio and tele-
Richard J. Werner, vision, nutritionists,
General Manager of food editors, health
Milk Industry Founda- department represen-
tion; Robert H. North, tatives, etc. Special
SAssistant General NORTH l displays and exhibits
Manager of Interna- by both the Dairy Industry and various
tional Ice Cream Man- related foods manufacturers is expected


DR. WERNER ufacturers Association;
and Hugh McSweeney, Assistant Manager
of American Dairy Association, national
trade group of milk producers.

Program Committee Named

The Florida Dairy Association has
named the following special committee
which is in charge of the program and
arrangements for the meeting: Ed Volk-
wein, Foremost Dairies, Chairman; Brady
Johnston, Dinsmore Dairy Co.; Maurice
Sherk, Southern
Dairies; Al Wells,
Velda Dairy Prod-
ucts; W. J. Barritt,
S-g, Borden's Dairy;
Frank Doub, Chair-
man of the Milk Pro-
ducers Council of
Florida Dairy Assoc-
iation; Cliff Wayne,
Chairman of Dairy
VOLKWEIN Products Council of
the Florida Dairy Association; Hugh
Adams, President of the Jacksonville
Dairy Council; Dee Widmeyer, Foremost
Dairies; Don Perret, Perret's Dairy; and
Cody Skinner, Skinner's Dairy.
Plans for the program provide for a
Florida Dairy Association luncheon hon-
oring the National Association guests and
a general conference session at 2:30 P.M.
in the George Washington Hotel Audi-
torium.
Plant Managers, Milk and Ice Cream
Sales Managers and representatives of
Milk Producers from Florida and other
Southeastern States are expected to attend.
Also invited to participate in the meet-
ing are the retail dealers and users of


to add much to the interest and effective-
ness of the meeting.
Following the series of eight regional
rallies of which the Jacksonville one is
a part, the Dairy Industry in cooperation
with its related foods groups will launch
a national sales and advertising program
calling for an expenditure of over a mil-
lion dollars.


LEGISLATIVE COMMITTEE
COMPLETING PLANS FOR
LEGISLATURE SESSION
The Florida Dairy Association's Legis-
lative Executive Committee is rapidly
completing selection of committee chair-
men and members in all 67 Florida
Counties.
Membership of the Legislative Execu-
tive Committee is Theo Datson, Orlando,
General Chairman; George Boutwell,
Lake Worth, and Wayne Webb, Tampa,
Co-Chairmen. President Wilmer Bassett,
Vice Presidents Cliff Wayne, Miami, and
Frank Doub, Jacksonville; John Adkin-
son, Pensacola and John Sargeant, Lake-
land.
Chairman Datson has announced com-
pletion of arrangements for the Commit-
tee's Tallahassee office and residence
headquarters to be again at "100 S.
Meridian St." This is the same location
the Association has had for the last three
sessions of the legislature.
Secretary Andy Lay will move as much
of the Association office work to Talla-
hassee during the 60-day session, April
7 to June 5th, so that he can give all
possible assistance to the Legislative Com-
mittee.


Kentucky Boy Becomes
Successful Florida Dairyman


Third of a series introducing new members
of the 1952-53 Board of Directors of the
Florida Dairy Association. The 21 member
Board includes 10 producers, 10 distributors.
the President and the Allied Trades president.

William H. Boyd, known by his friends
as Herman, is a partner in the large and
modern dairy farm-
ing operation of Hall
and Boyd, located
about ten miles west
of Miami in the edge
of the Florida ever-
glades.
Herman was elect-
ed one of the pro-
'* a ; ducer directors of the
Florida Dairy Assoc-
BOYD nation at the June,
1952 Annual Meeting in Miami Beach
after several years of active participation
on committees and in attendance at meet-
ings of the Association.
Herman was born in Christian County,
Kentucky, and attended school in Ken-
tucky and Miami. His father, Seth Her-
man Boyd, and mother, Mrs. Ruby White
Boyd, still live in Pembroke, Kentucky.
Others of his family are Gaither Boyd,
Lake Placid, Fla., Clay Boyd, Miami;
Paul Boyd, Hopkinsville, Kentucky, and
Wayne Boyd, Pembroke, Kentucky.
Herman came to Miami while still a
high school student and received his first
dairy training in the 4-H Club program
in which he became a leader. In 1934
he was married to Florida LaRue Pace.
They now have two children and are
members of the Baptist Church.
After working in herd management for
a number of years for the White Belt
Dairy and Graham's Dairy, both of Mi-
ami, Herman acquired his own farming
and beef cattle operation which he gave
up in 1946 to team up with Bob Hall,
son of a prominent Miami physician to
start the Hall and Boyd Dairy. This op-
eration was started on 633 acres of vir-
gin sand and hammock land without a
sprig of cultivated pasture, a fence or a
building.
After construction of the necessary
fencing and dairy buildings the dairy was
started with 150 cows. Practically all of
the farm is now in cultivated pasture,
much of which is some of the finest in
Florida. A picture of some of the clover
pastures was shown on the front cover
of the Dairy News, December-January
issue.
Since 1946, Herman and Bob have in-
creased their dairy herd from 150 to 700
and are now milking 510. Average daily
milk production is about 1350 gallons.


FEBRUARY & MARCH, 1953 9






Thousands Admire Florida's Finest

Dairy Cattle At State Fair Show



State's First Ayrshire Show
and Sale are Special Features
The Dairy Cattle Show at the 1953 State Fair in Tampa has again provided
Florida's advancing dairy industry an opportunity to put its best foot forward for a
full week in displaying for the inspection of several hundred thousand State Fair
visitors, many of the State's finest dairy cattle.
A total of 232 dairy cattle were entered in the show. Ayrshires, mostly from
Northern states, topped the list with 93 entries. Seventy-three Jerseys and 66
Guernseys were entered.
Interest in this year's Dairy Show was
far greater than previous years due to
participation of Ayrshire and Brown
Swiss breeders for the first time. The
open show for Guernseys and Ayrshires,
another new feature this year, also re-
sulted in a considerable increase in the
number of animals exhibited and the gen-
eral interest in the show.
Another new feature which increased
both public interest and that of many
leading dairymen of the State in the show
was the elaborate program designated ...
"parade of the champions" for parading
and exhibiting the top winners of the
show and presenting awards and tro-
phies. This event was held at 6:00 P.M.,
Thursday, February 5th, in the new live-
stock pavilion. A large gallery of spec-
tators, dairymen, photographers and news-
men were on hand for this event.


Dairy Industry Dinner
The Florida Dairy Association spon-
sored for the first time at this year's Fair
a special dinner program for bringing to-
gether those who participated in the Dairy
Show, including the exhibitors, officials
of the State Fair, judges and officials of
the dairy show, Florida Dairy Association
officers, directors and members, as well
as those of the various dairy breeders
associations. Approximately 100 were
present for this dinner.
Presiding at this program was Presi-
dent Wilmer Bassett of the Florida Dairy
Association whose entire board of di-
rectors of fifteen members were present.
Seldom, if ever, has a more representa-
tive group of the leaders of all groups
of the Florida Dairy Industry been as-
sembled at one meeting. A number of
officials of Jersey, Guernsey, Ayrshire
and Brown Swiss National Organizations
were present.
An address by Dean Gordon Cairns,
Provost of the College of Agriculture of
the University of Maryland, who was the
official judge of the Dairy Show, was a
fitting climax to what Mr. R. D. Jack-
son, Chairman of the Livestock Commit-
tee of the State Fair, termed the out-
standing Dairy Cattle Show in the history
of the Florida State Fair.


Seen above are two of the champion Jerseys
of the 1953 State Fair Jersey Show. Top: J. J.
Smith of Barl/oz, manager of the Polk County-
owned herd of Jerseys, shows his grand chanm-
pion Jersey female, "Sir Dandy Narcisse."
Bottom: Warren Alvarez of A. T. AlIarez
Dairy, Jacksonville, and a member of Florida's
1951 National Champion 4-H Dairy Judging
Team, shows his Jersey which Judge Dean
Cairns judged to he the best uddered coo' of
the Jerfey Fho"-.
Special tribute was paid to the Len-
festey Dairy Equipment and Supply
Company of Tampa who provided and
installed a complete ultra-modern pipeline
system milking parlor behind a huge
plate glass show window. This not only
provided milking facilities for the dairy
cow exhibitors but proved to be one of
the main side-show attractions of the
fair. Thousands of fair-goers daily
crowded the midway outside this milking
parlor to see bossie give her milk.
Praise was also expressed by the dairy
show officials for the assistance given
by the dairy show officials for the assist-
ance given Dean Cairns in judging by
State Extension Dairyman C. W. Reaves
and Jim Schee, the livestock show man-
ager.


'!SLLY HILL DAIRY


Mr. and Mrs. Walter Welkener above, uere
judged the "Premier Exhibitors" at the 1953
Flori .a State Fair Dairy Cattle Show for the
second straight year. The)' are seen receiving
the "Premier Exhibitor" trophy which is
sponsored by the Florida Dairy Association.
The WIelkenei.i also won the "Premier Breed-
er" award.



FLORIDA JERSEY BREEDERS

SHARE STATE FAIR HONORS
The Welkener Holly Hill Jersey Dairy
of Jacksonville, owned by Mr. and Mrs.
Walter Welkener, carried off both the
coveted State Fair Dairy Show annual
trophies in open competition with all ex-
hibitors. These were the "Premier Ex-
hibitor" trophy sponsored by the Florida
Dairy Association and the "Premier
Breeder" trophy sponsored by the Flor-
ida Grower magazine.
The Welkeners won the "Premier Ex-
hibitor" trophy for the second straight
year. The "Premier Breeder" trophy was
won in 1952 by Dinsmore Dairy Farms,
Guernsey breeders also of Jacksonville.
Dinsmore Farms did not exhibit at this
year's State Fair Show.
The grand champion female in Jersey
judging was Sir Dandy Narcisse, entered
by the Polk County-owned Dairy farm
and shown by Farm Mgr. J. J. Smith.
The Polk County entry was also senior
champion, while the reserve grand cham-
pion was Observer Sultan Lois, owned
by Walter Welkener of Jacksonville. Jun-
ior champion was Elect Standard Bossy,
owned and shown by Gloria Alvarez of
Jacksonville.
Dandy Double Draconis owned by A.
T. Alvarez of Jacksonville, took the grand
champion honors in the Jersey bull judg-
ing, while a Polk County entry, Dandy
Dan's Narcisse, was named junior cham-
pion. Reserve grand champion Jersey bull
was Teffia's Royal Basileus, shown by
Welkener.
In the F.F.A. division, Joe Cochran
of Bartow showed the grand champion
Jersey female and George Ford, Quincy
showed the reserve champion.


10 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS






Ayrshires First Showing
At Florida State Fair
The first open show for Ayrshire dairy
cattle at the Florida State Fair brought
93 entries of high grade Ayrshires from
Florida and H. H. Jacobs' Beacon Dairy,
DeLand, were the principal Florida Ayr-
shire exhibitors.
Fifty-five of the cattle exhibited were
sold in a special Ayrshire auction sale
held in the State Fair livestock pavilion
at the close of the show on Saturday,
February 7th.
An outstanding bull, with the impress-
ive title of Maiden Hill Royal Groom,
was shown to a grand championship in
the open or inter-state Ayrshire cattle
show at the Florida State Fair. Its owner is
Maiden Hill Farm of Ward Hill, Massa-
chusetts.
The grand champion Ayrshire female
was Strathglass Valiant Wonder, shown
by Strathglass Farm of Port Chester, N.
Y., another splendid specimen of the
Ayrshire breed which is famous for both
milk yield and butterfat.
Strathglass also had the reserve cham-
pion bull. Maiden Hill exhibited the re-
serve champion female.
But Strathlgass came right back into
the limelight when its grand champion
female was picked by Dean Gordon M.
Cairns of the University of Maryland as
the cow with the best udder. Strathglass
had the winning dairy herd, best three
females, top get-of-sire and winning pro-
duce-of-dam entries.
Knollhill Farm of Frederick, Md., and
Edwin A. Wentworth and Sons, Amherst,
Mass., helped keep Maiden Hill and
Strathglass from monopolizing all the
blue ribbons.


FLORIDA AYRSHIRE SALE
HELD AT STATE FAIR
The first public auction of Ayrshire
cattle ever held in Florida filled the
Lykes Livestock Building and Nathan
Mayo Judging Pavilion at the Florida
State Fair Saturday, Feb. 7, despite the
rain, and 55 lots of cattle sold for ap-
proximately $13,000.
The top price paid was the $460
which H. H. Jacobs, of Beacon Farms,
DeLand, paid for one animal consigned
by Strathglass Farm (Hugh J. Chisholm),
Port Chester, N. Y.
Paul Sanger, Myerstown, Pa., and Bob
Cooper, of Sarasota, were the auctioneers.
The sale was sponsored by Bill Car-
penter, Ayrshire breeder of Rutherford-
ton, N. C.
Many of the animals in the Ayrshire
auction were calves, a factor which pre-
vented the per-animal average from reg-
istering much higher. Few adult animals
were sold.


TOP GUERNSEYS SHOWN AT STATE FAIR


g :.T'P.- :' r, .--,4 i!'
Pictured above are (top) Florida State Fair
grand champion Guernsey bull owned by Bray's
Island Plantation and led by Herd Manager
Merton Sowuerby, and (bottom) the grand
champion female in the inter-tale Guernse) cat-
tle shoru at the Fair also the property of Bray's
Island Plantation, owned b) F. B. Davis. fr.
(right). Admiring the animal is ]. McK. Jeter
(left), Southearn representative of American
Guernrey Cattle Club.

U. S. Department of Agriculture offic-
ials say that milk production in the
United States is now at a record low, on
a per-capita basis. They point out that
average milk yield per cow in this coun-
try is 5,326 pounds a year. Yet there
are more than a million cows in dairy
herd improvement associations now pro-
ducing an average of 9,000 pounds of
milk a year. Only continued increasing
of efficiency in milk production can in-
sure the nation of an adequate supply of
milk.

Among the spectators viewing the cat-
tle from a half-dozen states was Minister
of Agriculture Jacomino of Cuba, accom-
panied by two noted Cuban dairy cattle
breeders, Dr. Roberto Parajon and Rafael-
Garcia Rubio.
The Ayrshire buyers were W. T. Car-
penter, Anderson, S. C.; W. J. Kelly, Ft.
Lauderdale; Bob Robertson, Haines City;
Nick DiSalvo, Tampa; R. W. Edwards,
Bradenton; Tony Fernandez, Tampa;
River Bend Boundary Farm, Rutherford-
ton, N. C.; F. I. Emerine, Brandon; Elmer
C. Jost, Groveland; Manatee County 4-H
Club's program; Florida Dairy, Tampa;
James E. Pelot, Summerfield; H. H.
Jacobs, DeLand; Emma Jost, Groveland;
Columbus D. Jones, Seffner; Dr. C. K.
Newton, Bradenton; Dewey Wilbanks,
Tampa; and R. S. Edmiston, Morrisville,
N. C.


.~r~*
,SC-~ ,
';Uai.l~


& MARCH, 1953 11


The famous Bray's Island Plantation
at Yemassee, S. C. (owned by F. B. Davis,
Jr.) had both grand champions in the
open or inter-state Guernsey Cattle Show
at the Florida State Fair.
The top bull was McDonald Farms'
Le Reliance, a senior yearling which ear-
lier in the show had been designated
junior champion and the best female was
Cesor Mertha, an aged cow and the
senior champion female.
Boutwell's Dairy of Lake Worth
showed to the reserve grand champion-
ship among the bulls, McDonald Farms'
Steadfast Otho, which previously was
picked as the senior champion bull. The
reserve grand champion female was Bray's
Island's Majesty's Mira, the junior cham-
pion.
Dean Gordon M. Cairns of the Uni-
versity of Maryland, show judge, picked
the grand champion cow as also having
the best udder in the show. Bray's Is-
land, with Boutwell furnishing most of
the competition, dominated the group
classes, but Armil's Farm, Largo; L. H.
Sellers, St. Petersburg; Jack Dodd, Mait-
land; Richard H. Parker, Maitland; Billy
Griffin, Bartow; and Arlen Wethering-
ton, Turkey Creek, had quality entries
in the show.
J. McK. Jeter, southeastern field rep-
resentative for American Guernsey Cat-
tle Club, helped conduct the Guernsey
show. Spectators were given bottles of
"Golden Guernsey" milk.


D. A. SALLS of the Clearwater Jersey
flies his private plane to Dairy Sales all
over the nation. Sails says flying is safer
than driving and a big time-saver.





WHERE To Stay
In TALLAHASSEE

CAPITAL CITY

MOTOR COURT
Modern Brick Cottages, 11/4 Miles
South of State Capital Building
ON SOUTH MONROE ST.
The Main Highway South
Operated by Your Old Friends
GEORGE & GRACE NICKLES
For Many Years with the Miami
Dairy Equipment Exchange
Write, Wire or Phone reservation
If you don't have reservation
COME ON OUT


FEBRUARY








GROW YOUR OWN HERD REPLACEMENTS



OTIS O. MclNTOSH
Ralston Purina Company


Dairying should be a sound, profitable
and interesting business with a bright fu-
ture if sound management policies are
followed. More people drink milk today
than at any time in history. Our popula-
tion is increasing rapidly but cow num-
bers are about the same. The demand for
milk has been so great that quantities
of milk that ordinarily go into manufac-
turing have been diverted to fluid milk
use.
Cows are fundamentally the same
everywhere. So why is it that average milk
production per cow in some herds is so
low? Why is it that the annual turnover
in cows in some farm herds is so high?
Why is it that some dairymen make
more money than other dairymen? Why
is it that some dairymen go out of busi-
ness while others right along the same
road or in the same county, build new
houses, send their children to college,
drive good automobiles-all paid for
from profits from the dairy cows.
One of the biggest factors affecting
dairy profits is herd replacements. The
kind of heifers that a dairyman has for
herd replacements determines to a great
extent the length of time his cows stay
in the milking herd, and certainly has a
lot to do with milk production per cow.
Results of a study by a well known
State Agricultural College of thousands
of cows, show that dairymen who raise
their own herd replacements have cows
in the milking string 50% longer than
those who buy replacements. This same
study shows what a beating dairymen who
buy their animals take, compared to those
with home grown replacements:
-Four times as many purchased re-
placements had to be sold because of
breeding and disease difficulties.
-Only about 1/5 as many cows could
be sold for milkers.
-Almost twice as many had to be
sold because of low production.
When high priced milk had to be used
for growing dairy calves, the costs made
such a plan almost prohibitive. Then
dry calf starters came on the market and
good calves were grown with the starters
and a limited amount of whole milk.
Even though such a program produced
good calves, the limited amount of milk
was needed to sell for human consump-
tion.
The Ralston Purina Company's newest
research development, Nursing Chow, re-
places even that last 20 lbs. of milk. No
milk is needed after the calf is 3 days
old. The milk replacement product costs
about one half the value of the milk it
replaces.


4*
-


The pictures abote shou, (lop) a Guernsey
heifer from the Purina Research Farm due to
calve at 22 months, weighing close to 1,000
lbs.: (bottom) calves being fed according to
the Purina Plan on Nursing Chou' and Calf
Starlena.

One pound mixed with 1 gallon of 100"
F. water. Feed a gallon a day for heavier
breeds and 3 quarts a day for lighter
breeds. The feeding should be split be-
tween night and morning. The 4th week
the amount fed should be halved and
none is fed after the 4th week. Feed
high quality hay when calves are 2
months old. Calves should have Calf
Startena or equivalent free-choice starting
the 4th day.
It takes about 25 lbs. of the milk re-
placement product per calf and the cost
is about 1/2 the value of the milk it re-
places.
Heifer calves for replacements grown
out on this program and properly han-
dled during the growing period will pro-
duce heifers that are big enough to breed
and calve 4 months earlier than average
heifers.
The program brings about more com-
plete body development so that the heifers
weigh 100 to 200 lbs. more than the
average at freshening time. Because the
heifers are more developed they milk
heavier in their first lactation period.
Heifers so developed have a better
chance of going into the milking herd
with strong, vigorous systems which will
carry them through a longer milking-life
than cows grown on hay and pasture
alone or on unbalanced rations.


-...


12 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


Tribune Gets Answer
To Milk Price Critics
The following item is quoted from The
Tampa Tribune (Feb. 14) "letters to the
editor" column:
"Blountstown-The complaints about
milk prices from South Florida 'park
roosters and lounge lizards' amuse us
people of North and West Florida very
much. We just pay 20 cents for a small
glass of your orange juice and keep our
mouths shut.
"But the funny thing about all of it
is that you do not seem to mind paying
25 or 30 cents for a can of beer or 75
cents for a Scotch and soda. If you think
27 or 28 cents per quart is too much for
you to pay for quality milk, you can get
out of the parks, and off the sidewalks,
give up your $75 per week jobs picking
oranges, and go out in the scrub, buy a
goat or a cow and produce some milk
for your babies.
"The water is fine, come on in.
E. E. CALLAWAY."


GOVERNOR McCARTY
OUTLINES PROGRAM
In a recent address at a meeting of
Florida Cattlemen, Governor Dan Mc-
Carty (who has now been in office only
about six weeks) outlined his specific
views concerning the Florida Livestock
Industry in four brief points.
These points were:
(1) I want to see the Live Stock
Sanitary Board fulfill its responsibilities,
not only to the livestock industry but to
the public;
(2) I'm interested in establishment of
a diagnostic laboratory;
(3) I'm interested in water conserva-
tion and flood control;
And (4) I want to see agricultural re-
search expanded through the University
of Florida.
To increase dairy profits, make sure
that the heifers going into your dairy
herd are well grown, high producing, dis-
ease-free animals. Start now to raise them
yourself. It is doubtful if any other
factor in dairy farming is more closely
tied in with profits than the kind of re-
placements that go into the dairy herd.

Because this new milk replacement
product contains in proper balance all of
the known ingredients found in milk,
plus extra vitamins, minerals, and a
growth stimulating antibiotic, calves at 4
months of age have been big and stretchy
without fat. Calves grown on such a pro-
gram weigh considerably more than Mor-
rison's Standards.
The feeding program for the new
product is quite simple. Nothing but
colostrum milk is fed for the first 3
days. From the 4th day to the end of
the first month Nursing Chow is fed.








A New Experience for


Florida Dairymen





DLIVERED PA


Cutting and loading pasture grasses and legumes into farm trucks
with a Case Field Forage Harvester each day . hauling the chopped
forage into the feedlot . and letting the dairy cows "graze this
delivered pasture" directly from the farm truck platforms is a new
and different way of feeding that some Florida dairymen are adopting.
Records and observations indicate that pastures produce more forage
by not being walked down... less supplemental feed has to be bought
... cows move about less, increase their milk flow. One report shows a
dairyman with a 350-cow milking herd saved about $1,500 in his feed
bill during a 30-day trial. It's another approach to dairy farming . .
another example of modern machinery in action.
AVKM0= N ..


I..


CASE
FORAGE
HARVESTER


Take a look at the Case Forage Harvester.
Turn the knife wheel pulley by hand.
Notice how easy it turns, how it keeps on
going. This easy-rolling wheel is just one
of the many features that make Case the
"Lightest Running Forage Harvester."
Anti-friction bearings, oil-bath gears, high-
strength steels for light weight, simple de-
sign with few moving parts-all leave extra
power for cutting extra tons every day.
Both Standard and Long-Cut models use
interchangeable row-crop, window pick-
up, and cutter-bar units. Both do good
work with a full 2-plow tractor, have
strength and capacity to make use of
5-plow power. Engine attachment available
for still greater capacity. Ask also about
Case Forage Blowers, Wagon Unloaders. j


SEE
GET


INCREASES
YIELDS


YOUR CASE DEALER
A DEMONSTRATION


Andreasen Tractor & Equip.
Co., Marianna
Batey Equipment Company,
Gainesville
Beasley Tractor Company,
Palatka
Coastal Motors & Equipment,
Belle Glade
Coastal Truck & Equipment
Co., West Palm Beach
Cosey Motor Company,
Wauchula
Dade Tractor Company,
Homestead
Farm Machinery & Sales Co.,
Pompano
Florida Tractor & Supply Co.,
Hollywood
Gerlach Motor Company,
Milton
Grantham Chevrolet Company,
Live Oak


Hibbs Tractor Company,
Cocoa
Ray Moore Implement Co.
Ft. Myers
Medlock Tractor Company,
Orlando
Pasco Motors, Dade City
Pounds Motor Company,
Winter Garden
Pounds Tractor Company,
Winter Haven
Pounds-Zeiss Tractor Com-
pany, Frostproof
Pounds-Zeiss Tractor Com-
pany, Sebring
Al G. Smith Tractor Company,
Palmetto
Taylor-Munnell Mach. Works,
Inc., Fort Pierce
Thompson Tractor & Equip.
Co., Tampa
Wade-Persons, Lake City


FEBRUARY & MARCH, 1953 13


i-~L~s





















The Florida Dairy News photographer found the Florida Jersey Cattle Club Annual Meeting
group at the Hotel Seminole. Jacksonville. January 29, facing their troubles with a smile.
The three officers of the Club, seated in the front row, left to right, are: Ted Alvarez. Sr..
Vice Pres., William Nolan. Jr., President, and Fred Baetzman, Secretary-Treasurer.

Nolan Elected President Florida Jersey Breeders

Adopt Plans For Spring and Fall Sales
The Annual Meeting of the Florida Jersey Cattle Club held in Jacksonville,
January 29th, named two prominent Duval County Jersey dairymen to the two top
posts in the organization: William Nolan, Jr. of the Alpine Dairy, and A. T.
Alvarez, Sr. of Alvarez Dairy, were elected president and vice president respectively.
Fred Baetzman, Orange County Farm Agent, Orlando, was re-elected secretary.
In taking over the president's post, Mr. Nolan succeeded Mr. J. K. Stuart of
Bartow, who had served as president for two years.
Directors elected for the coming year,
in addition to Nolan and Alvarez, were:
M. A. Schack of Altha, W. T. Shower- SALES DATES SELECTED
man of Enterprise, R. B. Becker of Th- location and dates for the Annual
Gainesville, George G. Sixma of Lake Spring and Fall Jersey Sales sponsored
Helen, C. B. Skinner of Jacksonville, M. by the State Jersey Cattle Club were an-
T. Crutchfield of Altha, J. K. Stuart of nounced for April 7th in Marianna, and
Bartow, Walter Welkener of Jacksonville, October 1st in Jacksonville. This will be
and Frank DeBord of Quincy. the first Jersey Cattle Club Sale ever to
Among those participating on the pro- be held in Jacksonville.
gram were Prof. Dix Arnold of the Dairy Announcement was made that the
Department, University of Florida; C. W. American Jersey Cattle Club will meet in
Reaves, Florida State Extension Dairy- Chattanooga, Tennessee in June for their
man; Jim Watson, County Agent, Duval 1953 Annual Meeting and that a South-
County; Woodrow Glenn, County Agent, eastern Jersey Sale will be held in con-
Jackson County; E. T. Lay, Secretary, junction with this meeting. The Nolan
Florida Dairy Association; Albert Law- Alpine Dairy and the Welkener Holly
ton, former Duval County Agent; and Hill Dairy, both of Jacksonville, were se-
members of the 1951 Florida Champion- elected to consign one animal each to the
ship 4-H Club Dairy Judging Team. Chattanooga Sale. The State of Florida
The Club's annual trophy awarded to was allowed only two animals for offering
the top producing Jersey cow was pre- at the Sale. The total consignment to
sented to Mr. Lloyd Minear, o Pennock the Sale will be about 50 animals which
Plantation, Jupiter, Florida, owner of the are expected to sell for an average of
winning cow, Royal Caroline Louise. The $900 to $1,000.
winner's production record was 15,452
pounds of milk at 4.8 percent test and
740 pounds of butterfat in 365 days.
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Welkener of
Jacksonville won the Florida Jersey Cat- BUTTER TO SCHOOL LUNCH
tie Club trophy for the highest herd aver-
age in butterfat production. The Welken- The U. S. Department of Agriculture
er herd record was 8,944 pounds of milk announced that 24 million pounds of
testing 5.5 percent butterfat, or an aver- butter acquired under the 1952-53 dairy
age of 493 pounds, price support program will be donated
The Welkeners were also announced for distribution through non-profit school
as the winners of the 1952 Florida Dairy lunch programs and to other eligible out-
Association trophy as "Premier Exhibitor" lets. This operation was authorized by
in the Dairy Cattle Show of the Florida Congress to encourage additional con-
State Fair. sumption of agricultural commodities.


STATE JERSEY SALE
Marianna April 7
The Florida Jersey Cattle Club
announces their Annual Spring Sale
will be held April 7 in the Jackson
County Fairgrounds, Marianna.
Thirty-five females have been
consigned to the Sale.
Jackson County Farm Agent
Woodrow Glenn, Marianna, is
Chairman of the Sale Committee.


STATE VETERINARIAN REVIEWS
LIVE STOCK DISEASE CONTROL
A Dairy News request to Florida State
Veterinarian, Dr. C. Paul Vickers, for a
brief summary of the live stock disease
control work of the Florida Live Stock
Sanitary Board during the year 1952,
brought the following prompt reply:
"ANTHRAX: Conditions in the an-
thrax area have progressed to the point
that the State Live Stock Sanitary Board
on January 15th removed its quarantine
on all premises except those where spore
vaccines have been used. No new premi-
ses have been infected since September.
There were no deaths in October and
November, and one death on a previous-
ly infected premises during December.
"BRUCELLOSIS: The percentage of
infection of brucellosis in cattle tested
dropped from 2.7% in 1951 to 1.9c
in 1952. 32,905 calves and 17,126 adults
were vaccinated with brucella abortus vac-
cine during the past year. 114,150 cattle
were tested for tuberculosis, showing 47
reactors.
"MASTITIS: There was a sharp re-
duction in the incidence of mastitis in
dairy herds last year. Through the coop-
eration of the dairymen of the State, this
program has made steady and progressive
growth, and at the present time 659
dairymen are participating in the pro-
gram. An examination of 142,042 cattle
last year revealed 15,295 infected with
mastitis organisms.
"PROPOSED BUDGET: The State
Live Stock Sanitary Board has recently
presented its legislative budget for the
1953-55 biennium to the Budget Com-
mission in which it has requested suffic-
ient funds to employ enough field veter-
inarians to properly conduct the T.B. and
brucellosis control programs in coopera-
tion with the U. S. Bureau of Animal
Industry, and to extend the mastitis con-
trol program with the U. S. Bureau of
Animal Industry, and to extend the mas-
titis control program to cover all the
dairymen in the State if they wish to par-
ticipate. The Board also requested in its
budget funds to inaugurate a program
which would aid the dairyman and cat-
tleman in controlling parasites such as
lice, flies, screwworms and ticks."


14 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS







FLORIDA JERSEY CATTLE CLUB


Announces


WEST FLORIDA

PROMOTIONAL SALE

Tuesday, April 7 * * * 12:30 C. S. T.

JACKSON COUNTY FAIR GROUNDS
MARIANNA, FLORIDA
0 0 0

25 Carefully Selected Registered Females
Mostly Cows
WILL BE SOLD AT AUCTION
0 0 0 0

A SPLENDID OPPORTUNITY
To Buy Pure-Bred Jerseys From Some Of
Florida's Leading Jersey Herds


For catalog write
FRED E. BAETZMAN, Secretary-Court House, Orlando, Florida
or WOODROW GLENN, County Agent-Marianna, Florida

REMEMBER APRIL 7 MARIANNA, FLORIDA

AS A MARK THE DATE OCTOBER 1, 1953- FOR THE REGULAR ANNUAL
REMINDER STATE SALE OF THE FLA. JERSEY CATTLE CLUB TO BE HELD IN JACKSONVILLE.


FEBRUARY & MARCH, 1953 15









DAIRY NEWS DIGEST


Members of the Dairy Industry throughout the State are invited to please
send to the "Florida Dairy Neus" all new's about dairies, dairying and the *'
good people iiho devote their time, talents and money to this great indnsl,).
-The Edito,.

Hard Pressed Florida Dairymen

0, Receive Milk Price Increases

A reluctant Florida Milk Commission-after waiting and hoping for improve-
ment of milk production conditions-has finally granted price increases in most of
the areas of the State which are under State regulation.
Hardship pleas were made by dairymen in all of the areas affected. Many
pleaded and submitted records to prove that they were losing money. In all instances,
milk distributors were allowed a portion of the increase to cover their increased costs
in making a price increase effective. Milk processors and distributors maintain that
the plant cost of putting into effect a Ic per quart or 4c per gallon price increase is
about 1/4 cent per quart or Ic of a 4c per gallon increase. This is because of business
lost, sales commissions, and other plant overhead. In some instances the Commission
awarded 3/4 cent of a Ic increase to the Thirty-five of the State's sixty-seven
producers and 1/4 cent to the plants. In counties are now under Florida Milk
other cases where more serious plant Commission supervision.
needs were proven, the division was 1/2 The following Counties have petitions
cent to each. In one area the situation pending and awaiting public hearings for
was reversed due to a recognized inequal- the Milk Commission to extend its super-
ity in the distribution price. In this case vision to them: Alachua, Gilchrist, Dixie,
the plant was awarded 759C of the in- Levy, Suwannee, Madison and Calhoun.
crease instead of 25%. Under the Milk Commission law, the
The areas in which price increases were Commission can operate only in a county
granted and 'the price change made per or area by petition of a representative
quart of pasteurized Grade A milk, are group of the Milk Producers of the area
as follows: and after a public hearing and investiea-


Columbia and Baker
Counties
Duval, Nassau and
Clay Counties
Escambia and Santa Rosa
Counties .....
Highlands County
Lake County .
Orange and Seminole
Counties
Plant City
Polk County


24c to 26c

26c to 27c

25c to 26c
23c to 27c
25c to 27c


*Tallahassee (Leon, Gadsden,
Liberty, Bay, Franklin,
Gulf, Wakulla, Taylor,
Jefferson and Lafayette
Counties) 25c to 26c
Volusia, Flagler and
Brevard Counties 25c to 27c
*In the Tallahassee area, the Dairies have
increased the price to 27c which is Ic
higher than the minimum set by the
Commission.
Prices unchanged now in effect in oth-
er areas are:
Dade, Broward and Monroe
Counties 26c
Manatee and Sarasota Counties 25c
Palm Beach, Martin and Hendry
Counties 27c
Pinellas County 25c
Tampa 25c


tion has proved the need for supervision
by the Commission.


CHIPOLA BREEDERS ASS'N.
REPORTS RAPID GROWTH
The Chipola Artificial Breeders As-
sociation in the Marianna-Chipley area
of Northwest Florida formed in October,
1952, already shows a membership of 45
dairies with over 350 cows bred.
The area covered by the Association in-
cludes Jackson, Calhoun, Liberty, Wash-
ington and Holmes Counties.
Officers of the Association are: E. Lee
Stanton, Chipley, President; O. T. Bur-
gess, Marianna, Vice-President; Woodrow
W. Glenn, Marianna, Secretary-Treasurer;
with M. A. Schack, Greenwood, M. T.
Crutchfield of Altha, Penn King of
Grand Ridge, and R. L. Price of Grace-
ville as directors.
Technician and manager of the Assoc-
iation is Mr. Reuben Mohs, who had a
successful record in artificial breeding
service in Wisconsin for the past five
years, just prior to coming with the
Chipola group.
The Association provides Jersey,
Guernsey and Holstein service to mem-
bers at 50c per cow with a minimum
membership fee of $10.00.


1953 June Dairy Month

Committee Meets March 3rd


Jack Dew, Public Relations director of
Southern Dairies, Jacksonville, who has
been renamed state chairman for the Flor-
ida Dairy Industry's June Dairy Month
Program has called the first planning ses-
sion for the 1953 program to be held in
Jacksonville, March 3rd.
The Committee wil have a luncheon
and afternoon meeting at the Hotel Semi-
nole and will partici-
pate in the South-
eastern "Milk & Ice
Cream Festival Ral-
ly" to be held at the
George Washington
Hotel at 8:00 P.M.,
the same date.
Carl A. Wood,
Vice-President of the
Cherry-Burrell Cor-
DEWi portion, manufac
turers of Dairy Industry equipment, has
been named 1953 National June Dairy
Month Chairman by the National Spon-
soring Committee which represents all
National Dairy Industry Associations. Mr.
Wood is also president of the Dairy In-
dustries Supplies Association.
Florida's State Dairy Month Program




of the State. Mr. Dew announced that
inasmuch as all members of the Commit-
tee have not yet been designated, the
membership would be announced at a
later date.
The F.D.A. Dairy Month Committee
functions as a unit of the Association's
General Public Relations Committee of
which Mr. Cliff Wayne of Miami is
Chairman.


FIRE DESTROYED
BORDEN WAREHOUSE
Fire destroyed a $10,000 warehouse at
Borden's Dairy, Pensacola. A fire de-
partment spokesman said the fire gained
a big headway before the alarm was
sounded and there was little chance to
extinguish the flames.


BAUMEISTER AND CAMMACK
ACQUIRE HOW-ANN DAIRY
George Baumeister, Orange County
DHIA supervisor for the past several
years, and Elbert Cammack, well known
milk producer of Orange County, re-
cently formed a partnership for the pur-
chase and operation of the well known
How-Ann Dairy of Orlando. The pur-
chase was made from Howard and Ann
Kellie.


16 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS






Live Stock Board Animal Disease
Control Supported by F.D.A.
The Florida Live Stock Sanitary Board
continued program of animal disease
prevention and control for the next two
years with a budget increase of 15% re-
ceived the approval of the Board of Di-
rectors of the Florida Dairy Association
at their February 5th meeting in Tampa.
The Board's action came following a
conference with State Veterinarian, Dr.
Paul Vickers, of the Live Stock Board's
current and proposed programs and ex-
penditure in dairy herd disease control
work. The F.D.A. Board's action was
recommended by the Association's Dairy
Husbandry Committee.
While the Dairy Association Directors
did not approve the complete budgets
for the next two years as recommended
by the Live Stock Sanitary Board to the
Budget Commission, they did endorse in
full the budget of $117,975.00 recom-
mended for Anthrax Control.
A 15% increase in all other dairy herd
disease programs was approved in lieu
of larger amounts requested by the Live
Stock Board. These include control pro-
grams on Brucellosis and T. B., Mastitis,
Parasite Control and Live Stock Indemni-
ties.
The total budget of the Board for the
current two-year period, 1951-1953 is
$1,947,287.00.

General Mills Holds Annual
Dairy Equipment Sales School
A two-days conference and sales train-
ing school for Florida dairy equipment
sales representatives of General Mills,
Farm Service Division, was held in Mi-
ami, January 30-31.
Sales officials of six dairy equipment
manufacturers whose products are dis-
tributed by General Mills attended and
participated in the program along with
the General Mills Florida District Sales
Manager R. E. Eikenberry, and District
Sales Supervisor John Manning.
Among the sales specialists taking part
in the program in addition to Eikenberry
and Manning were:
T. N. Jones, Atlanta and H. H. Mc-
Clanahan, Miami of Wyandotte Chemical
Corpn.; Tom Burres, Tank Division, Mil-
waukee, George Pryor, Bottle Washer
Div., Milwaukee, and John Baikie, At-
lanta of The Heil Co.; W. C. Hutchin-
son, Vice-President, Bowey, Inc.; James
Sheek, Mocksville, N. C., and James Os-
born, Miami of the Sealright Co., Inc.;
Harry L. Miller, President, Chester-Jen-
sen Co.; Walter Hoeltje, Philadelphia,
and John Hassell, Atlanta of the Sharpies
Corpn.
The purpose of the conference, ac-
cording to Mr. Eikenberry, was to better
prepare General Mills representatives to
be able to keep their customers accurate-
ly informed of new products as well as
improvements and new uses in old
products.


Our Consignment to:


The Florida Jersey Cattle Club

MARIANNA SALE


APRIL 7, 1953


- 12:30 C.S.T.


TWO COWS:
FILLPAIL MOUNCE QUINTE 1767350
Sire: Blonde Sparking Fillpail 489544
Dam: Bounce Quinle 1657939
AIM DREAMING DAISY
Sire: Aristocrat Aim 449504
Dam: Xenia Dreaming Daisy 1369648

TWO HEIFERS:
ALPINE DANDY XENIA HESTER 1909899
Sire: Standard Dandy De.ign 491810
Dam: Xenia Hester 1674693
ALPINE BASIL ELSA 1909897
Sire: Basil Dandy Sir 514402
Dam: 7. D. O. Elsa 1603418


ALPINE DAIRY W. J. Nolan
Jacksonville




Our
Consignment to:

The Florida Jersey Cattle Club Sale

TUESDAY, APRIL 7 MARIANNA, FLORIDA 12:30 C.S.T.

FAVORITE NICOTINE ROSE 1768194, Dropped Jan. 18, 1950,
1768194, Dropped Jan. 18. 1950. Classified
Good Plus. D. H. 1. A. Record of-
365 Days 8163 Milk 4.9'/ 392 Fat at 1-11 of age.
Fresh and selling open.
A daughter of Standard Fartiie Nicotine 493305. one of our
Senior Herd Sires.
Calfhood Vaccinated.

OBSERVER TREVA BEVERLY 1649272, Dropped Aug. 18, 1947,
1649272, Dropped Aug. 18, 1947, Classified
Good Plus. Herd Improvement Registry Records of---
305 Days 6166 Milk 4.8% 297 Fat at 2-0 of age.
305 Days 6654 Milk 5.2% Fat at 3-1 of age.
Bred July 12, 1952 to X Standard Ivy Volunteer 524809 Very Good-
Son of Biltmore ItJr Buterking 451141, Silver Medal Superior Sire.
Observer Treva Beverly is a Daughter of Obrerrer Trera Favorite 409863,
Senior Superior Silver Medal Tested Sire.
MR. & MRS. WALTER WELKENER


HOLLY HILL FARM


Gold Star Herd
Rt. 3, Box 612,


Constructive Breeder 7X.
Jacksonville, Fla.
HERD T.B. & BANGS ACCREDITED.


FEBRUARY & MARCH, 1 953 17


I -







1953 STATE LEGISLATURE MEETS

APRIL 7 IN SIXTY-DAY SESSION


MEMBERS OF STATE CABINET


REP. BRYANT

Speaker
Of The House


GOV. DAN McCARTY

ROBT. A. GRAY

NATHAN MAYO

J. EDWIN LARSON

CLARENCE M. GAY

RICHARD ERVIN

T. D. BAILEY


Chairman

Sec'y. of State

Comm. of Agri.

Treasurer

Comptroller

Att'y. General

Supt. Pub. Instr.


GOVERNOR McCARTY


Sound Government Expected Under McCarty Administration


The successful functioning of the legislature depends largely
upon the leadership and teamwork of three leaders: The Gov-
ernor, the President of the Senate, and the Speaker of the House.


MEMBERS OF THE HOUSE


County Representatiie Address
Alachua... Ralph D. Turlington
Gainesville
Alachua..... J. Emory Cross..Gainesville
Baker .........John J. Crews....Macclenny
Bay D. D. Mashburn
Youngstown
Hay..... J. Ed. Stokes.Panama City
Bradford... Doyle E. Conner... Starke
Brevard... Wm. G. Akridge ........Cocoa
Brevard-. 0. L. Burton.....Eau Gallie
Broward .John S. Burwell
Ft. Lauderdale
Broward .Thomas E. David..Hollywood
Calhoun Marion B. Knight
Blountstown
Charlotte... John M. Hathaway
Punta Gorda
Citrus ..Harry H. Gleaton..Inverness
Clay.... ....S. D. Saunders-Middleburg
Collier .....D. C. Jones, Sr.........Naples
Columbia. F. W. Bedenbaugh
Lake City
Dade...... George S. Okell ....Miami
Dade ......Dante 1. Fascell ......Miami
Dade.........Robt. L. Floyd......Miami
De Soto......S. C. Smith.............Arcadia
Dixie.......... K. Griner ...... ..Cross City
Duval....... Wm. Lacy Mahon, Jr.
Jacksonville
Duval ......Harry W. Westberry
Jackksonville
Duval... Fletcher Morgan
Jacksonville
Escambia A. Morley Darby..Pensacola
Escambia...Webb C. Jernigan
Pensacola
Flagler.......H. T. Cook.... Bunnell
Franklin Bryant Patton..Apalachicola
Gadsden....W. M. Inman......Q.. uincy
Gadsden.....E. B. McFarland...Havana
Gilchrist..Howell Lancaster Trenton
Glades ..J. H. Peeples, Jr.
Moore Haven
Gulf........Cecil Costin, Jr. Port St. Joe
Hamilton.. J. W. McAlpin
White Springs
Hardee G. W. Williams..Wauchula
Hendry. Elbert L. Stewart Clewiston
Hernando Jacob V. Varn Brooksville
Highlands Edna Pearce...Ft. Basinger
Hllsbr'gh. James S. Moody. Plant City
Hllsbr'gh. Tom Johnson .. Tampa
Hllsbr'gh Sam M. Gibbons... Tampa
Holmes..... J. Edward Andrews Bonifay
Ind'n R'vr Serman N. Smith, Jr.
Vero Beach
Jackson Hugh Dukes ......Cottondale
Jackson. ..John L. McFarlin. Jr.
Marianna
Jefferson..Prentice P. Pruitt
Monticello
Lafayette..J. R. Medlock, Sr.......Mayo
Lake .....J. A. Boyd ... ....Leesburg
Lake .......Carl E. Duncan ....Tavares
Lee .....Ernest Mitts .... Ft. Myers


Counlt' Representatire Addre r
Lee.......Walter O. Sheppard
Ft. Myers
Leon..... Davis H. Atkinson
Tallahassee
Leon.......... Kenneth Ballinger
Tallahassee
Levy .....Frank Marshburn Bronson
Liberty......J. S. Alexander .......Bristol
Madison....E. B. Jones .......Greenville
Manatee.. J. Ben Fuqua ........Palmetto
Manatee.....Joe Bill Rood......Bradenton
Marion ......C. Farris Bryant .....Ocala
Marion. Willard Ayres........... Ocala
Martin ......Kenneth S. Stimmell..Stuart
Monroe...... Bernie C. Papy. .Key West
Nassau .......Harry 0. Stratton..Callahan
Okaloosa... Ferrin C. Campbell
Crestview
Ok'chobee..Nathan Zelmenovitz
Okeechobee
Orange......Henry W. Land... Apopka
Orange ... James E. Keezel
Winter Park
Osceola.... J. J. Griffin, Jr. St. Cloud
Palm Bch.. John E. Bollinger
West Palm Beach
Palm Bch. Elliott .................Pahokee
Pasco... ......J. R. A. Williams. Dade City
Pinellas... Fred C. Petersen
St. Petersburg
Pinellas ...Donald C. McLaren
St. Petersburg
Pinellas . E. Shaffer .Clearwater
Polk ... Roy Surles ...........Lakeland
Polk ... Joe N. Crowder..Auburndale
Polk....... ..Perry E. Murray.Frostproof
Putnam... Thos. B. Dowda....Palatka
St. Johns F. Charles Usina
St. Augustine
St. Johns. Charles E. Shepperd
St. Augustine
St. Lucie...Frank Fee... ...Ft. Pierce
S'ta Rosa...John S. Pittman..............Jay
Sarasota.. William A. Washburne
Nokomis
Sarasota .. Henry S. Bartholomew
Sarasota
Seminole.. Mack N. Cleveland, Jr.
Sanford
Seminole...Volie A. Williams, Jr.
Sanford
Sumter..... J. C. Getzen, Jr...Bushnell
Suwannee. Houston W. Roberts
Live Oak
Taylor.. Gus J. Dekel..... ..........Perry
Union.... G. Fred Andrews
Lake Butler
Volusia ....Thomas T. Cobb
Daytona Beach
Volusia..... James H. Sweeny, Jr.
DeLand
Wakulla... Moody Pearce..Crawfordville
Walton ... M. C. Burke
DeFuniak Snrings
Wash't'n. Jeff Webb .... Chipley


The Governor . addresses a joint session of the House
and Senate upon the convening of the Legislature, reporting
on the affairs of the State and submitting a recommended
legislative program . He has veto power over any legislation
passed unless both Houses vote a two-thirds majority to over-
ride the veto.


The President of the Senate .. .presides over the Senate
. . appoints all Senate Committees. The Speaker of the House
presides over the House of Representatives and appoints all
Committees of the House.


Senator Charley E. Johns of Starke is President of the 1953
Senate and Senator George Leaird of Ft. Lauderdale is President
Pro Ter.


Representative Farris Bryant of Ocala is Speaker of the
House. Representative Davis Atkinson of Tallahassee is Speaker
Pro Tem.


MEMBERS OF THE SENATE


District Senator
1 Woodrow W. Melvin.
2 Philip D. Beall.............
3 H. B. Douglas...............
4 Amos Lewis ............
5 C. H. Bourke Floyd.
6 Dewey M. Johnson..
7 Harry E. King..............
8 LeRoy Collins ........
9 James E. Connor ......
10 W T. Davis........ ..
11 J. Frank Houghton.....
12 Evans Crary ........
13 R. B. (Bunn) Gautier.
14 J. Wofford Lindler..
15 Charley E. Johns......
16 A. G. McArthur.
17 J. Graham Black..
18 Wayne E. Ripley.....
19 J. R. Rodgers, Jr........
20 Wallace E. Sturgis.
21 W. Randolph Hodges.
22 S. D. Clarke.........
23 J. Ed. Bakr......
24 James A. Franklin..
25 George C. Tapper.
26 B. C. Pearce.......
27 Doyle E. Carlton. Jr.
28 E. William Gautier
29 Edwin G. Fraser...
30 George W. Leaird
31 Verle A. Pope..
32 W. A. Shands...
33 Irlo Bronson
34 John Branch
35 Russell 0. Morrow......
36 F. Onell Rogells
37 Lloyd F. Boyle.......
38 George C. Dayton.


Counties Included Add ess
..Santa Rosa & Okaloosa ...... .....Crestview
...Escambia ......... ........ .. Pensacola
...Walton & Holmes ........ .................Bonifay
...Jackson ........................ ...... ........ M arianna
..Liberty, Franklin & Wauchula... ....Apalachicola
...Gadsden ... ..... .. ................... ......... Quincy
...Polk .......... .. .... ... ... W inter Haven
...Leon ............ ... .............. .. Tallahassee
..Hernando & Citrus.................... ....... Inverness
...Madison & Taylor.... .. ..... Madison
..Pinellas ........ .............. St. Petersburg
..Martin, St. Lucie & Indian River. ....Stuart
..Dade .... ... .. ........ .. ... M iami
...Columbia ......... ........ Lake City
. Bradford & Union.............. ..... ......... Starke
..Nassau ....... ...... Fernandina
..Suwannee, Hamilton & Lafayette. .... Jasper
...Duval .. ......... Jacksonville
.Orange .......... ...... Winter Garden
.Marion ........ .............. Ocala
..Levy, Gilchrist & Dixie...... Cedar Key
Jefferson .. ... .. ...... .. Monticello
..Lake ..... .. ... ........ Umatilla
..Monroe, Lee, Collier & Hendry ..Fort Myers
..Washington, Bay, Calhoun & Gulf...Port St. Joe
.Putnam .. ......... ... ........ ... ..... Palatka
.Hardee. DeSoto, Glades & Highlands... Wauchula
Volusia ............. ........ New Smyrna Beach
....Clay & Baker ... .. ... ........ Macclenny
..Broward ................................. Ft. Lauderdale
.St. Johns & Flagler ................... St. Augustine
.Alachua .... ........ ...... ...... Gainesville
...Osceola & Okeechobee ...... .. .. Kissimmee
.Hillsborough ........ ........ Tampa
.Palm Beach ..... ....... ... Lake Worth
....Manatee, Sarasota & Charlotte ..... Palmetto
....Seminole & Brevard ... ........ .. Sanford
..Pasco & Sumter Dade City


18 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


SEN. JOH-IIS

Piesid -pt
Of The Senaite







Letters To The Editor

I have read your October issue with a great deal of interest.
We are proud of your publication and will look forward to
an all Guernsey Edition some time in the future.
Sincerely yours,
J. H. LOGAN, Secretary
Florida Guernsey Cattle Club


EDITOR, DAIRY NEWS:
In our minds there seems to be a steady improvement in the
Florida Dairy News. Your editorial columns seem to be very
varied in nature and you make liberal use of pictures. No doubt
you are receiving a very favorable response from your readers.
Cordially yours,
FRANK G. BISHOP, Head
Promotion & Publicity Dept.
American Jersey Cattle Club.


EDITOR, DAIRY NEWS:
Your publication looks better and better each time.
Sincerely,
HENRY R. GEISINGER, Exec. Secretary
Pennsylvania Assn. of Milk Dealers, Inc.


EDITOR, DAIRY NEWS:
You have certainly done a nice job of presenting the Dairy
news of Florida in your several publications, and we use this
information to a great extent in keeping our students abreast
of current happenings.
Sincerely yours,
H. H. WILKOWSKE, Asst. Prof. Dairy Manufacturers
University of Florida


EDITOR. FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS
I u'ould like to request publication of the enclosed letter in the
Dairy Newf ac I heliere it i/ of interest to most of the Dair)men of
Florida.


QUOTE:


Don E. Perrel. Per et Dair. Jacklon;rille.

December 1, 1952.


Mr. George M. Edmondson, Jr.
Edmondson Farms, Inc.
Nokomis, Florida
I have received an unsigned letter from the Florida Milk Producers
Association soliciting our membership. Upon making inquiry about
this organization, which is completely new to me, I am told that you
are President which is why I am writing this inquiry to you.
I have always been interested in our various Dairy Associations
and have been an active member in both our Duval County and State
Associations as long as I can remember. Our Dairy was a member of
the old State Dairymen's Association but due to its inactivity thought
it was a good move when the two old State organizations merged into
the Florida Dairy Industry Association.
It has been my impression that the Florida Dairy Industry Associa-
tion has been doing a fine job for all the Dairy Industry and for this
reason I wonder what the reason and need is for starting another
Association.
If we producers have any problems that are not being taken care of
by our present Association, why don't we try to get it done, rather
than by trying to start a new organization?
The Producers' Division of the Florida Dairy Industry Association,
headed by five of our best known producers, I feel sure is ready to
handle the State-wide problems of our producers, if they are called upon.
Yours very sincerely,
D. E. FERRET.


,.: .i
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JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA

711 W. CASS STREET
MIAMI, FLORIDA


FEBRUARY & MARCH, 1953 19


77 W. LIVINGSTON ST.
ORLANDO, FLORIDA

7275 N. W. 7th AVENUO
TAMPA, FLORIDA







4-H Farm Girls Take Honors

In West Coast Dairy Show

Two 4-H Club girls, 8-year old Melissa Jo Williams of Winter Haven and 13-
year old Ginger Stuart of Bartow, showed the grand champion animals in the 6th
annual West Coast Dairy Show held in Tampa, January 3rd.
Melissa Jo had the "queen" of the show, a beautiful Jersey heifer. Ginger, who
showed both the "king and queen of the 1952 show", also had the 1.953 "king"
with another outstanding Jersey.
Four other girls comprising the Hills- The fairer sex held the spotlight at the sixth
borough County 4-H dairy judging team annuall Florida West Coast Dairy Show ii
Tampa, January 3. The Hillsborough girls'
won second place in the judging contest, team (top) took second place in 4-H team
while Gloria Smith, Mango 4-H girl, judging competition; from left to right, seated,
was named "dream girl" of the show. Judy Mikell, Patsy Deane, and Valerie Payne:
Members of the judging team were: standing, Elaine Mikell. One of the smallest
J exhibitors. Melissa Jo Williams (center) of
Elaine Mikell, Judy Mikell, Valerie Payne Winter Haven. had a grand champion with
and Patricia Deane. her jersey. On hand for the show were the


Two F.F.A. boys showed the reserve
champion animals-also Jerseys. These
were Lloyd Harris and Joe Cochran of
Bartow.
A Pinellas County 4-H judging team
of four boys won first in the inter-county
dairy judging contest. Members of the
team were Gene Mann, Jimmie Schee,
Jr., and Arnold Higgins.
Other county judging teams placed in
the following order: Polk County, 3rd;
another Pinellas County team, 4th; Mar-
ion County, 5th, and Orange County, 6th.
A total of 16 teams participated.
James Thornhill, Polk County, won
high individual judging honors with
Buddy Frazee, Marion County, 2nd and
Elaine Mikell, Hillsborough County, 3rd.

25 Counties To Compete In Si


six daughters of Mr. and Mrs. J. K. Stuart
of Bartow (bottom)-Ginger, second from
left, and Caroline, fourth from left. were
premier exhibitors at the shou'.
F.F.A. WINNERS
The F.F.A. Turkey Creek Chapter won
the inter-chapter F.F.A. championship
dairy judging contest with a Plant City
team winning 2nd; another Plant City
team, 3rd; Brandon, 4th; Ocala, 5th and
Lake Placid, 6th. Eighteen teams partici-
pated.
Members of the winning Turkey Creek
team were B. L. Raburn, Keith Simmons
and Olin Sheppard.
The high individual in F.F.A. judging
was Donald Henderson, Winter Garden.
2nd place went to Olin Sheppard and
Turkey Creek, and 3rd to Charles Zink,
Brandon.


Annual Florida 4-H Dairy Show

Orlando and the Central Florida Exposition will again be hosts to the Annual
4-H Club Dairy Show, February 23 to 25 when Florida's 4-H Junior Dairymen will
exhibit 125 of the best 4-H dairy cattle in the state.
Monday, February 23, is 4-H Dairy Day. Twenty-five counties will be repre-
sented in the dairy show, judging contest, and the showmanship and fitting contests.
Most of the animals exhibited have been shown in one of the seven district shows
held at Chipley, Quincy, Jacksonville, County and home agents are guests of
Ocala, Orlando, Tampa and Miami in re- the Central Florida Exposition.
cent months. The best of these events John Parrish, Alabama Extension
come to the state show, for the climax Dairyman, will judge Jerseys and J. McK.
of the year's efforts and accomplishments. Jeter, Southeastern Fieldman of the Amer-
The 4-H show and related events are un- ican Guernsey Cattle Club, will judge
der the supervision of the State Agricul- Guernseys. Ayrshires and Holsteins will
tural Extension Service and the County be judged by breeders.
Agricultural Agents. The State 4-H Dairy Foods Demon-
stration Contest on February 24 will give
The Central Florida Exposition and the district winners an opportunity to
the State Department of Agriculture pro- compete for state honors. The dairy foods
vide $2,000.00 in premiums for the show. demonstrations will be given as public
Also, many special awards are provided demonstrations at the Central Florida Ex-
by the Florida Dairy Association, the position. This phase of the program deals
breed associations, and individuals and with the use of milk and milk products
commercial firms. in the diet and is under the supervision
All the show awards and the 4-H Ef- of Miss Cleo Arnett, Extension Nutri-
ficient Dairy Production district and state tionist of the State Home Demonstration
awards are made at the 4-H Dairy Ban- Office and the county home demonstra-


quet at which the 4-H members and


tion agents.


Tennessee Dairy Heifers
Purchased for 4-H Members

Forty-one high grade Jersey heifers
and eight registered Jersey heifers were
purchased in Middle Tennessee in Jan-
uary for 4-H Club members in North
Florida. Plans for the purchase were made
at the 4-H District Meeting at Talla-
hassee the last of November. County
Agents signed up 4-H club members
who wanted to buy a heifer. The Com-
mittee that made the trip and selected
the heifers was composed of J. E. Davis,
Chipley County Agent, Bernard Clark,
Asst. County Agent at Quincy, and C. W.
Reaves, State Extension Dairyman.
The heifers were selected on farms,
were tested for tuberculosis, and vacci-
nated for black leg and hemorrhagic sep-
ticemia. They were all calf-hood vacci-
nated for Bang's disease.
The heifers were transported by trailer
and were unloaded at the State Livestock
Pavillion in Quincy for distribution to the
various counties. The boys drew for
choice. They went to Washington, Gads-
den, Jefferson, Madison, Hamilton, and
Taylor counties. Washington County got
the most taking 22 head, which were
(Continued next page)


20 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS



















Winners of the N.E. Florida 4-H Dairy
Show above are, left to right, Patricia Elli.
with grand champion Guernsey, Edith Cam-
eron and reserve champion Guernsey. Sterve
Simmons with both his grand and reserve
champion Jerseys, and DNual County's first
place judging team.

GUERNSEYS & JERSEYS
TAKE HONORS AT
JACKSONVILLE 4-H SHOW
Two attractive farm girls, Patricia Ellis
and Edith Cameron, took their share of
the honors in the Northeast Florida 4-H
Dairy Show held January 9-10 in Jack-
sonville.
Patricia, daughter of Nassau County's
popular County Farm Agent, won the
grand champion Guernsey award with
her four-year old Guernsey, Dinsmore
Mayroyal Vern, which has since been
consigned to the Quail Roost Guernsey
Sale to be held in Rougemont, N. C.,
May 4th.
Edith showed the reserve grand cham-
pion Guernsey while Gloria Alvarez
showed the junior champion Jersey.
The Duval County dairy judging team
took first place in the inter-county con-
test with Donald Hanson, Russell Lloyd
and Al Bowie on the team. Placing 2nd
in the judging competition was Duval
County's girls' team which included Edith
Cameron, Laura Cameron, Gloria Alva-
rez and Alida Weaver. A Nassau County
team placed 3rd.
Steve Simmons of St. Johns County
who was a member of Florida's 1951 Na-
tional Champion 4-H Dairy Team,
showed his two beautiful Jersey cows to
the grand and reserve championship of
the Jersey class.
Patricia Ellis won further honors by
placing first in individual judging.


(Continued from previous page)
placed with boys and girls on a unique
plan by which a local business man
backed each child in making an interest-
free loan. Madison County got 17 heifers.
Most of the heifers were from 5
months to 12 months of age and cost
from $60.00 to just over $100.00 tested,
vaccinated, delivered and insured. Reports
are that most of the youngsters who got
heifers have pasture, are pleased with
their heifers and are taking good care
of them.


Miami Youth Fair Has

Largest 4-H Dairy Show

With seventy-five dairy animals en-
tered, the 1953 annual 4-H dairy show
held early in January in connection with
the Dade County Youth Fair, was the
largest ever held.
The show, which included all Florida
dairy breeds, was open to all youth of
Dade County plus members of the 4-H
Clubs, 10th district. Palm Beach was
the only county of the district other than
Dade which was represented in the show.
The inter-county dairy judging con-
test was won by the Palm Beach County
team with Dade County, 2nd.
Billy Boyd, Miami, showed the grand
champion registered Ayrshire cow; Stanly
Bradshaw showed the grand champion
grade Guernsey, while Marsha Palmer
had the grand champion grade Holstein.
Teddy Kretzschmar showed the grand
champion registered Jersey.
Premiums were paid by the State De-
partment of Agriculture, the Dade Coun-
ty 4-H Leaders Association and the Dade
County Commission.
Earl Jensen of the Boutwell Dairy,
Lake Worth, was official judge. John
Causey, Assistant County Agent, Palm
Beach County, served as clerk, and Ray-
burn Price, Assistant County Agent, Dade
County, acted as ringmaster.


Leon County 4-H Club members pur-
chased cooperatively 54 day old dairy
heifers in December. The 16 club mem-
bers raising heifers expect to sell them
as artificially bred springers in late 1954.
Each heifer is financed at $50 by the
three local banks and underwritten by
local farm supply companies (for two
years). The members expect to raise
their feed for next winter.


Of all the foods required for military
and civilian strength and morale, milk
and other dairy products are FIRST in
importance and in daily consumption.
Dairy products-milk, (fluid, evaporated,
dry), butter, ice cream and cheese-are
the backbone of our daily diet, and are
required in enormous quantities to feed
our Armed Forces.


Winners in the Miami area 4-H Dairy Shou'
and Youth Fair seen belou' are, top to bottom.
Bill)' Boyd with his grand champion registered
Ayrshire: Teddy Kretzschmar and his grand
champion registered Jersey: Stanly Bradshawt
with the grand champion grade Guernsey.
and Marsha Palner with her grand champion
grade Hiolstein.


FEBRUARY & MARCH, 1953 21


a~ir






Florida Guernsey Breeders

Hold Annual Meeting

The Florida Guernsey Cattle Club held their 1953 Annual Meeting Friday,
February 6th, in conjunction with Dairy Show week at the Florida State Fair.
A morning business session and program and a luncheon program made up the
meeting schedule. Earl Johnson of Dinsmore Dairy, Jacksonville, presided at the
meetings as president. He was assisted during the luncheon program by immediate
past president John Sargeant, who acted as master of ceremonies.
Special features of the meeting were son and his wife, Mr. and Mrs. Paul
the addresses of Dean Cairns, Provost Hood. Mr. Emmett Hood, Sr. was one
of the College of Agriculture, University of Florida's early Guernsey breeders and
of Maryland, who gave the principal ad- he and his several young sons now oper-
dress at the luncheon and of Mr. J. Frank ate one of the State's best dairies at St.
Johnson of Peterborough, N. H. who is Petersburg.
President of "Golden Guernsey, Inc," the
Guernsey Milk Marketing Division of the
Amer:can Guernsey Cattle Club.
Dean Cairns who judged the dairy PROMINENT FLORIDA DAIRYMAN
show at the State Fair, complimented NAMED FARMER OF THE YEAR
Florida on the rapid growth and develop-
ment of the Dairy Industry in the State. V. C. Johnson, President of Dinsmore
He also paid high tribute to the Dairy Farms and Dinsmore Dairy Co., Jackson-
Herd Improvement Association work in ville, has received the "Florida Farmer
Florida as well as the Dairy research and of the Year" award for 1952 by the
extension work of the University of Flor- Progressive Farmer magazine of Birming-
ida. ham, Alabama. So far as we are able to
CONE WINS TROPHY learn, this is the first time a Florida
Dairy Farmer has won this honor.
John Cone of Plant City won the Mr. Johnson's many friends in the
coveted Sargeant Trophy which is pre- Florida Dairy Industry will certainly hear-
sented annually by the Guernsey Cattle tily concur in the
Club to the breeder having the highest choice made by the
milk producing cow. Mr. Cone's cow, staff of the Progress-
Riegeldale Viscount Secret, with a year's ive Farmer for this
milk production record for 1952 of 18,- honor.
333 pounds was far out in front of her For 40 years V. C.
nearest competitor-a Dinsmore Dairy Johnson has been
cow, Dinsmore Mayroyalty Jedetta, with building a better
a record of 15,070 pounds. dairy herd and help-
The Sargeant Trophy given for this ing to improve the
award is a memorial to the father of agriculture and the
John Sargeant who was one of Florida's JOHNSON civic life of Florida.
earliest Guernsey breeders. He started Dinsmore Dairies, 12 miles
Honor guests at the annual luncheon from Jacksonville, in 1911 and has been
program, in addition to Dean Cairns and instrumental in building it into one of
Mr. Frank Johnson, were Dr. and Mrs. the outstanding dairy herds in the United
Roberto Parajon, Guernsey breeders of States. He was first president of the
Havana, Cuba; Mr. and Mrs. Harry Stroh- Florida Guernsey Cattle Club when it
meyer, a former official of the American was organized in 1938. His son, Earl,
Guernsey Cattle Club; Mr. J. McK. Jeter, is president of the club now. He intro-
Field Representative of A.J.C.C.; Mr. J. duced "Golden Guernsey" milk in Flor-
C. Huskisson, Assistant Manager of the ida. He and his sons have made numer-
State Fair; several representatives of the ous contributions to 4-H club boys and
University of Florida; E. T. Lay, Florida girls interested in dairying.
Dairy Association, and others. Born in Bennington, Vt. and reared
All officers and directors of the or- in Westchester County, N. Y., Mr. John-
ganization were re-elected at the annual son came to Florida in 1910 because of
business meeting. Officers, in addition the health of his brother, Francis, who
to President Earl Johnson, are W. A. needed a change of climate.
Boutwell, Sr., vice president, and John He has taken an active part in Dairy
Logan, secretary. Association activities, both local and state-
A special prize was awarded to Future wide, and has for a number of years
Farmer Lloyd Harris who won top honors served as Chairman of the Florida Dairy
at the F.F.A. Dairy Show at the State Association Committee on Dairy Hus-
Fair. Harris was also winner of the bandry.
Florida Dairy Association trophy. These, in brief, are the highlights of
Special recognition was accorded Mr. the career of Florida's 1952 "Farmer of
and Mrs. Emmett Hood, Sr. and their the Year".


The pictures a.bo'e ..re of the Florida
G/elnsey Cattle Ann ual Meeting. The top
group are, left to ;ight. John H. Logan.
Clearuwater. .ecreta3r-trea ,rrer: Earl Johnson.
Jackroni'ille. president: Dean Gordon M.
Cairnr. of the Unizersit)y f iar)yland, daijr
cattle judge for the Florida State Fair. and
WI. A. Boutu'ell. Lake Worith. ice president.
In the bottom group. John Sargeant. left, of
Lakeland. hands to John Cone. center. Plant
City, the Sargeant Trophy for having the best
producing Guernsey con' on /tet in Florida
during 1952. Looking on i C. WI. Reare,.
state extension dairyman.


HENTZ AND SHEFFIELD

LEAVE MILK COMMISSION

Two of the dairy industry's three mem-
bers of the Florida Milk Commission are
retiring from service as soon as the Gov-
ernor appoints their successors.
John Hentz, well known Panama City
producer-distributor member of the Com-
mission for the past several years, is giv-
ing up his membership because of the
sale of his dairy plant operation-the
St. Andrews Bay Dairy of Panama City,
Florida. While Hentz will still operate
his dairy farm, he is no longer eligible
to serve on the Commission as a pro-
ducer-distributor and has resigned.
Louis Sheffield of Jacksonville, who
has been producer member of the Com-
mission for a number of years, has re-
signed because of his election as a mem-
ber and chairman of the Duval County
School Board. In asking the Governor to
replace him, Mr. Sheffield stated that he
just did not have the time to do a good
job for both the Milk Commission and
for the people of Duval County as
Chairman of the School Board and that
he believed his first obligation was to
the people who elected him to the School
Board.


22 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS



















The neuw W world Record Guernsey cou',
Ideal's Beacon's Nina (above) bred and owned
by Jacob Tanis, Ideal Guernsey Farms, Au-
gusta, N. J., has just completed the highest
butterfat record ever made by any Guernsey
cou- and broken the previous record which
stood for 16 years. "Nina" produced 20,385
Ibs. milk and 1,223 lbs. fat as a five year old.
DAIRY SUCCESS STORY
Jacob Tanis, the owner of the new
world record Guernsey cow, started his
career in Dairying as a boy with just
one cow. When this first cow produced
more than the family could consume, he
sold milk to the neighbors. Soon he
bought another cow and so the "Great
American Success Story" goes. Today,
Mr. Tanis owns the "Ideal Guernsey
Farms" of Augusta, N. J., the largest
registered Guernsey herd in the world
and one of the best. His three sons are
now very active in the business. Dr. John,
a veterinarian, is in charge of the herd
of over 1,800 head; Jake, Jr., manages
the farming of 4,500 acres and Bill runs
the huge dairy operation. (American
Guernsey Cattle Club).

BORDEN FIRM RENEWS
U. OF FLA. SCHOLARSHIP
The Borden agricultural scholarship
award to the University of Florida Col-
lege of Agriculture has been renewed for
five years through 1959, it is announced
by Dr. C. V. Noble, dean. The award
has been made annually since 1945.
The Borden Company Foundation, Inc.,
gives $300 to the student who has taken
two or more courses in dairy science
and has achieved the highest average
grade in all college work preceding the
senior year.

DAIRY PRODUCTS ADVERTISING
The American Dairy Association, na-
tional milk producer organization devoted
to promotion of greater consumption of
Milk and Milk Products, has announced
that "milk" advertising will be featured
in Ladies Home Journal in March; Bet-
ter Homes and Gardens in April; Ladies
Home Journal and Look for May will
feature the Milk Festival; Better Homes
and Gardens and Life for June 8; Better
Homes and Gardens for September; Mc-
Call's for October and December.


Be Kind to Bossie!
Oh, you who would abuse the cow, I
wish that I could for once take from
your table as you are about to sit down
to the evening meal all that the cow has
placed thereon. I'd take the cup of milk
setting by the baby's chair, I'd take the
cream biscuit, the custard pie, the cream
for the coffee, the butter, the cheese, the
smoking roast beef or steak, or the sweet
corned plate of juicy meat. In fact, I'd
leave you to make your meal on Irish
potatoes, beet pickles and tooth picks.
(Contributed-Sterling
Research Corpn.)


Protect all the wood-
not only the surface-
insist on pressure-
Veated lumber.


Mastitis
Costs Dairymen Millions $ Every Year!
EARLY DETECTION is EXTREMELY
IMPORTANT. FREQUENT USE of
those accuracy attested




with the green spots help a dairyman
to tell the degree or severity of the
infection.
Write today for samples and prices.
Sterling Research Corp.
DAIRY DIV. FDN BUFFALO 3, N. Y.


,zed
ATED


FEBRUARY & MARCH, 1953 23


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Wolmanized lumber is clean, paintable, odorless and safe to handle
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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


DAIRY REVIEW


Extension Service
Dairy Farm Research Unit


Dairy Products Laboratory
Agricultural Experiment Station


11111'


Summary of 1952 Activities

U. F. Dept. of Dairy Science

By Dr. E. L. Fouts, Head of Department
The members of the staff of the Department of Dairy Science have as their
chief duties experimental work dealing with the herds of pure bred Jersey and
Guernsey dairy cattle at the dairy unit at Hague, experiments with ice cream, milk
and other dairy products, and teaching students the science of dairying and dairy
products manufacture.
Incidental to the main objectives as stated above are many other activities which
are entered into by members of our staff as a means of gaining knowledge, dissemi-
nating information to Florida dairymen and others and representing the University
of Florida at various meetings in the state and elsewhere.
bred Jersey and Guernseys, including
SPONSORS SHORT COURSES cows, bulls and young stock. Sufficient
During 1952 the Department spon- corn and oats were grown on the farm
scored short courses and conferences for to supply grain and silage for the yearly
all segments of the dairy industry in needs of the herd. A pasture program
Florida including, provided green forage of one kind or
Annual Conference for Milk Sanitar- another on a year-round basis. The per-
ians. sonnel of this part of the Department in-
Dairy Plant Operators' Conference. clude Doctors R. B. Becker, S. P. Mar-
Dairy Herdsmen Short Course. shall, J. M. King, Professor P. T. Dix
Dairy Field Day. Arnold, Herdsman Hermon Somers and
Mil Lo Thratonrians' Shnrt Course Farm Foreman Al Sanchez.


These courses and conferences were at-
tended by people from all parts of Flor-
ida and several neighboring states. Our
own staff took an active part in all of
the meetings and outstanding speakers
from industry and from other Universi-
ties presented information of great value
to the people who attended.
DAIRY TRAINING COURSES
A new Dairy curriculum became effect-
ive in September which provides for a
greater diversification of study for Dairy
majors. The new curriculum allows more
time for courses outside of the depart-
ment, especially for students studying
Dairy manufacturing. Courses have been
revised and improved to meet new and
changing conditions in the industry. The
number of students interested in dairying
has increased, but there is still room for
many others in all phases of this growing
industry.
During the year Professors Krienke and
Mull developed formulas for the use of
various citrus products as flavors for ice
cream. This product has received much
favorable publicity and should soon be
available for use by ice cream manufac-
turers.
The physical facilities of the Depart-
ment of Dairy Science include the Dairy
Unit at Hague, with a herd of 250 pure


DAIRY MANUFACTURING RESEARCH
The dairy manufacturing facilities of
the Department are housed in the Dairy
Products Laboratory on the campus, in.
cluding offices for the staff, classrooms,
library, laboratories and the modern and
sanitary dairy products processing labora-


tory. In this laboratory experimental
work and instruction was carried on and
as a result of these activities which re-
sulted in "surplus" dairy products to be
disposed of, 1,088,512 bottles and fiber
containers of milk were processed and
distributed to the various food units on
the campus for consumption by students
and others, and for the same reason 10,-
170 gallons of ice cream were made and
consumed during the year.
The personnel of the dairy manuafc-
turing part of the Department include
Doctors L. E. Mull, H. H. Wilkowske,
Professor W. A. Krienke and Plant Man-
ager D. A. Dahlberg.

ATTEND IMPORTANT MEETINGS

Several members of the staff have
traveled considerably to attend and par-
ticipate in meetings of interest and of
value, to judge cows and dairy products
at fairs and conventions. Among the im-
portant trips by members of the Depart-
ment during 1952 are:
Dr. R. B. Becker attended Feed Sur-
vey Committee of American Feed Manu-
facturers Assn., Chicago; American Dairy
Science Assn. Annual Meeting, Berkley,
California; and The Southern Section,
American Dairy Science Assn., Atlanta,
Ga.
Professor W. A. Krienke attended the
Fermented Milk Conference, Urbana, Illi-
nois; and the International Assn. of Ice
Cream Manufacturers and Dairy Machin-
ery Exposition, both in Chicago.
Professor P. T. Dix Arnold attended
the Southeastern Guernsey Sire Selection
Conference in Norfolk, Va.; the South-
eastern Jersey Cattle Club Meeting in
Talladga, Ala.; and the Jersey Type Clas-
sification Conference, Ridgeway, Michi-
gan.


The Academic Staff, Deparlmelt of Dairy Science. University of Florida Agricultural Ex-
periment Station and College of Agriculture. Left to right, Dr. E. L. Fouts. Dr. Sidney P.
Marshall, Dr. James M. Wing, Dr. R. B. Becker. Prof. P. T. Dix Arnold. Prof. IF. A.
Krienke, Dr. H. H. Wilkowu'se, and Dr. L. E. Mull.


24 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS






MILK SANITARIANS'

MEETING ANNOUNCED

The Florida Association of Milk Sani-
tarians and the University of Florida
Dairy Science Department will sponsor
the ninth annual Milk Sanitarians' Con-
ference to be held in Gainesville April
1-3, according to Dr. H. H. Wilkowske,
Secretary of the Association.
The purpose of the conference is to
provide the latest technical information
concerning milk and dairy plant sanita-
tion and for an exchange of information
and experience relating to safeguarding
public health by careful quality and com-
position control of dairy products during
producing, processing and distribution,
with emphasis on sanitation.
The University of Florida Department
of Dairy Science has arranged an inter-
esting and timely program which will
include discussion of topics, such as: The
fundamental application and limitations
of the Lactometer; Problems of Water
Supply and Treatment; Evaluation of
Fiber Milk Containers; Dairy Building
Design and Construction; Counter Freez-
er Sanitation; Cleaning by Circulation;
Bulk Milk Handling; HTST Cleaning
Demonstration; Dairy Farm Inspection;
Dairy Waste Disposal; Interpretation of
3-A Sanitary Standards; and Dr. E. L.
Fouts will discuss the current Problem of
Vegetable Fats in Dairy Products. The
usual Yellow Dog initiation, business
meeting and banquet will be held, with a
get-together and entertainment sponsored
by the Florida Dairy Association.

The program is designed to be of in-
terest to anyone connected with dairying,
whether they be milk sanitarians, food
inspectors, laboratorians. technicians, vet-
erinarians, dairy plant operators, produc-
ers, distributors, quality control personnel,
and equipment and supply dealers and
their representatives. Attendance is es-
pecially urged at this year's conference,
which is conducted as a public service
for the people of Florida, in order that
due appreciation may be shown to the
University in its Centennial Year Cele-
bration.
The Milk Laboratorians meeting will
begin March 31, and any Sanitarians who
so desire may attend the lecture sessions,
but laboratory practice session will be
limited to 30 persons with preference
being given for persons who do labora-
tory work.
A nominal registration fee of five dol-
lars ($5) will be charged to defray some
of the expenses of conducting these meet-
ings. However, payment of this fee will
entitle one at no extra cost to attend
(Continued page 28)


LABORATORY TECHNICIANS

SHORT COURSE, MARCH 31

The University of Florida Department
of Dairy Science will be hosts for the
fourth Annual Meeting and Short Course
of the Florida Association of Milk Lab-
oratory Technicians beginning Tuesday,
March 31, for a two-day session. All
Laboratory Technicians, both men and
women, whose work includes dairy
products are invited to attend, according
to Hugh Butner, bacteriologist for the
Florida State Board of Health, who is
also chairman of the laboratory group.
Commercial laboratory personnel as
well as public health laboratorians are
urged to attend. The program is sched-
uled to begin one day before the Florida
Milk Sanitarians' Conference so any Milk
Sanitarians who desire may also attend
the Laboratorians' lecture and general ses-
sions. The Dairy Science Department has
announced that because of limited space,
the laboratory practice sessions will be
limited to 30 persons with preference
being given to persons who do labora-
tory work.
Dr. George R. Weber, of the Environ-
mental Health Center, Cincinnati, Ohio,
has been asked to again appear as prin-
cipal speaker for this program. Dr.
Weber who appeared on Florida's first
Annual Laboratorians Program in 1950,
is recognized as an outstanding authority
and speaker on bacteriology.
Timely subjects concerning laboratory
analysis of dairy products will be dis-
cussed, studied, demonstrated and prac-
ticed in the University of Florida re-
search laboratory.
Following one and one-half days of
specialized meetings, the Laboratorians
will join the Florida Milk Sanitarians'
meeting which begins the afternoon of
April 1, for an additional two-day con-
ference. The program committee feels
this will help create a better understand-
ing of the mutual problems of Labora-
torians and Sanitarians.
All eligible persons are urged to at-
tend these meetings and show the Uni-
versity, which is celebrating its Centen-
nial Year, that the people of Florida
appreciate the conference and short
courses that are provided for them.
The Arrangements Committee has an-
nounced that a five dollar registration
fee will be charged, which will entitle
the registrant to attend both the Labora-
tory and Sanitarians sessions, attend the
banquet and receive a printed copy of
the meeting proceedings at no extra cost.
The Proceedings Manuals will be mailed
a few months after the meeting. Extra
banquet tickets for wives and guests will
cost $2.00 additional.


The University of Florida
DEPT. OF DAIRY SCIENCE
Schedule of

1953 SPECIAL EVENTS
For the
FLORIDA DAIRY INDUSTRY



MARCH 31- APRIL 1
4th Annual
Laboratorians Short Course

APRIL 1 3
9th Annual
Milk Sanitarians
Short Course
For milk sanitarians, food inspectors,
laboratorians, technicians, public
health workers, veterinarians, dairy
plant operators, producers, distribu-
tors, quality control personnel, and
equipment and supply dealers.

AUGUST 25 27
22nd Annual
Dairy Herdsmen's
Short Course
For dairy herdsmen, herd owners,
dairy farm helpers, DHIA supervis-
ors, producer-distributors and whole-
sale producers.

SEPTEMBER 10-11
18th Annual
Dairy Field Day
For Milk producer-distributors, dairy
processors, milk producers, veteri-
narians, herdsmen, DHIA workers
and equipment supply dealers.

OCTOBER 1
Open House
Dept. of Dairy Science
An event sponsored by the Dairy
Science Club composed of students
of the Dairy Science Department.
Everyone is welcome.

OCTOBER 1 3
16th Annual
Dairy Plant Short Course
For dairy plant superintendents and
assistants, managers, owners, dairy
plant employees, producer-distribu-
tors, equipment and supply dealers.


& MARCH, 1953 25


FEBRUARY









DAIRY ASSOCIATION ACTIVITIES


111111


F. D. A. PROPOSES CHANGES IN MILK COMMISSION LAW


The Board of Directors of the Florida
Dairy Association at their last meeting,
February 5th, adopted a series of pro-
posed changes in the Florida Milk Com-
mission Act which they are now hav-
ing prepared in bill form to present to
the State Legislature when it convenes
April 7th.
The Directors and members of F.D.A.
have recognized for several years the need
for making a few improvements in this
law but up to this time an agreement
could never be reached concerning the
amendments to be offered.
As a result of a series of dairy meet-
ings held in 10 different areas of the
State by a special committee of the State
Association and consideration a number
of times by the Directors of the State
Association, an agreement has finally been
reached on amendments which the As-
sociation will sponsor.
These amendments briefly stated are:
(1) To change the membership of the
Commission, dropping the producer-dis-
tributor member and the Administrator
and adding one additional consumer mem-
ber who shall be specified as a person
who may reasonably be expected to take
the view of the average citizen without
prejudice.
(2) To increase the operating funds
and budget of the Commission by a pro-
ducer contribution to the fund of about
1/20 of one per cent per gallon of milk
produced. Such increased budget it is be-
lieved would go a long way in making
for more effective enforcement and ad-
ministration of the law.
(3) To provide the Commission with
authority to reduce the rate of contribu-
tion paid by dairies to the administrative
fund, for any period when sufficient
funds are on hand to warrant such re-
duction.
(4) To increase the allowable neces-
sary expense of members of the Com-
mission when on duty and an increase of
the maximum salary permissable for the
Administrator but subject to approval of
the Governor.
(5) To grant distributors the right of
petitioning the Commission for hearings
which they now cannot do.
(6) Improvement of Commission's
procedure and formula for determining
milk production and plant operation costs
and the method of determining fair min-
imum prices.


(7) Make it possible for the Com-
mission to expend such funds as may be
available beyond its needs for actual ad-
ministrative functions for the furnishing
of Milk and Milk Products information
and literature to health departments and
the general public and for other purposes
deemed beneficial to the Florida Dairy
Industry when approved by the Governor
and the Commissioner of Agriculture.
All of these proposed amendments have
been approved by the Commission and
have been tentatively approved by the
Governor and many members of the legis-
lature.
The Board of Directors of F.D.A. has
adopted an appeal to all dairies and dairy-
men of Florida to lend their active sup-
port to these proposed changes.
Any members having further sugges-
tions with regard to the Milk Commission
Law are urged to advise the Association
office.



F.D.A. PLANT COMMITTEE
ANNOUNCED FOR YEAR 1953
President Wilmer Bassett has appoint-
ed the following members to serve on
the 1953 Milk and Ice Cream Plant Com-
mittee:
John N. Lewis, Southern Dairies, Mi-
ami, Chairman; Tames F. Beatty, Fore-
most Dairies, Jacksonville; Russell W.
Bevan, Borden Company, St. Petersburg;
Paul E. Burner, Dinsmore Dairy Co.,
Jacksonville; Emmett Dozier, Plantation
Foods (Velda Dairy), Jacksonville; Dr.
E. L. Fouts, University of Fla. Dairy
Dept., Gainesville; W. L. Henry, Fore-
most Dairies, Gainesville; Charles Hauf-
ler, Borden-Bassett Dairies, Tallahassee;
Emmett Hood, Hood's Dairy, St. Peters-
burg; Lonnie Jones, Perret's Dairy, Dins-
more; S. J. McDugald, Lee's Dairy, Or-
lando; Dr. Leon E. Mull, University of
Fla., Gainesville; Rudy J. Schneider,
Schneider's Creamery, Eustis; Don Stof-
fel, Borden-Datson Dairies, Orlando;
George Tworoger, Borden Co., Miami;
Chas. R. Williams, Borden Southern Co.,
Jacksonville; Clarence Wood, Land O'Sun
Creamery, Sarasota; Al Wells, Velda
Dairy Products, Jacksonville; Richard
Wood, Vero Beach Dairy, Vero Beach;
and Hubert B. Martin, Miller Machinery
& Supply Co., Miami.


M.I.F. SALES TRAINING
CONFERENCE IS HELD
IN JACKSONVILLE
Mr. Tom Douglas, director of the
Sales Training Institute of the Milk In-
dustry Foundation, Washington, D. C.,
participated in a well attended luncheon
and afternoon conference on sales train-
ing, held in Jacksonville, January 7.
The meeting was sponsored by the
Florida Dairy Association. Rex Smith,

of Foremost Dairies,
presided on behalf
of the F.D.A. Milk
SD and Ice Cream Plant
Committee as well as
one of the graduates
of the M.I.F. sales
training courses.
Dr. E. L. Fouts,
Head of the Dairy
DR. DOUGLA s Department, Univer-
sity of Florida, participated in the meet-
ing and made a talk emphasizing the
importance of training not only for sales
but for all departments of dairy plant
operation.
Dr. Douglas outlined the special train-
ing courses which are provided by the
Milk Industry Foundation. The 2-week
course, he explained, has the basic pur-
pose of "training the trainer." Those
who take the course should be sales
managers and assistant sales managers or
those who are anticipating assuming these
duties. Those who complete the course,
he said, are qualified to go back to his
Dairy and train his own salesmen and
supervisors to do a much better job.
The M.I.F. Sales Training Institute
started about two years ago and has now
graduated about 350 men through 21
two-week training periods. These grad-
uates represent 37 states and all sizes of
plants.
The principal cost of attendance is
transportation and hotel expense which
amounts to from $250.00 to $500.00
per person. Anyone interested should
write the M.I.F. or the F.D.A.


One quart of milk a day for each child
and one pint for each adult is generally
considered the minimum need. Use of
milk and of the milk equivalents of dairy
products in amounts greater than these is
highly desirable, however, for growth and
health.


26 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS









Plan Now to Attend ...


The 1953 CONVENTION

OF THE

Florida Dairy Association


JUNE 24-25-26
W1'alter Birton, abore, manager of the South-
em Dari,.es, acksoille plant ilwho i see, MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA
iging, papers of the Florida Dairy Association
as Assist.!.nt Treasurer. Air. Buiton has served
the A nociation in this post for the past two
)ears. acting for the Treasu.rer, J. N. McArthurit
,, Miiam i. inmort of the routine haNdlin of MAKE RESERVATIONS to JACK PARKER, Mgr.
the Association's finances.

F.D.A. PASTURE COMMITTEE 7 te
WILL SOON LAUNCH PROGRAM
(LOW SUMMER RATES)
The 30-member Pasture Development
and Improvement Committee of the Flor-
ida Dairy Association will soon have a
comprehensive program of dairy pasture
development promotion ready to be an-
nounced. m
Members of the Committee, headed by
-lerman Boyd of the Hall and Boyd E
Dairy, Miami, held an all-day planning
session in Tampa on December 1th, and
since that time a sub-committee has been
developing the details of the program 'I
adopted by the Committee and approved.
on the following ; day by the F.D.A. Board .
of Directors.
C. W. Reaves, Florida State Extension
Dairyman, is chairman of the sub-com-
mittee arranging the detailed plans for
the program which will be designed to
encourage Florida dairymen to produce
more abundant and better grasses, so as
to increase the dairy feed supply more
economically.
The program will call for utilization
of the best practices adapted for each
farm, the best methods of management, THE CASABLANCA... Beach Front Swimming Pool
and the most efficient use of farm labor.
An effort will be made to enlist partici-
pation and cooperation of every dairy in
Florida in the program. Suitable annual
recognition and honor awards will be
made of all those entering the program. DAIRY
While the program will be spearhead- SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT
ed by the Florida Dairy Association, the
participation and cooperation of Federal,
State and County Agricultural Agents,
plus that of the University of Florida IeN 'I
Experiment Stations and the Extension
Service will provide the know-how and
much of the service which will be re- TAMPA ORLANDO
quired to make the effort a success.


FEBRUARY & MARCH, 1953 27








UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

DAIRY REVIEW


ACTIVITIES SUMMARY
U. F. DAIRY DEPT.
(Continued from page 24)
Dr. H. H. Wilkowske attended the In-
ternational Assn. of Milk and Food Sani-
tarians, Inc. in Minneapolis and was
elected Secretary-Treasurer of that group.
Dr. S. P. Marshall attended the South-
ern Section, American Dairy Science
Assn. in Atlanta and was elected Secre-
tary-Treasurer. He also attended the Na-
tional Institute of Animal Agriculture in
Lafayette, Indiana and Judged Dairy Cat-
tle at the Annual National Cattle Ex-
position in Sancti-Spiritus, Cuba.
Dr. J. M. Wing attended the Animal
Nutrition Conference in Ft. Collins, Col-
orado and received his Ph. D. Degree
in Ames, Iowa.
Dr. Leon E. Mull attended the Florida
Dairy Industry Convention and Annual
Meeting in Miami Beach and the Gulf
Coast Milk Sanitarians' Meeting in
Tampa.


Dr. E. L. Fouls attended the Interna-
tional Assn. of Ice Cream Manufacturers
Annual Meeting in Chicago; the South-
ern Assn. of Ice Cream Manufacturers
Annual Meeting in New Orleans where
he was official judge at the Ice Cream
Clinic; Florida Dairy Industry Associa-
tion Annual Meeting in Miami Beach;
was on the program of the Oklahoma
A. and M. College Short Course and
visited Dairies in Los Angeles, California
Milk Shed.
All members of the staff have traveled
extensively within the state to offer as-
sistance to dairy organizations, to judge
affairs, to meet with state and regional
committees and to help individuals where
possible.
Members of the staff have made sev-
eral radio addresses and one *member,
Professor Krienke, made an appearance
on a nation-wide television show during
the International Association of Ice Cream
Manufacturers Meeting in Chicago.
STUDENTS WIN HONORS
Special honors won by students of the
Dairy Science Department during 1952
include: William E. Bell who received
the $300.00 Borden Award for high
scholastic standing in all work at the Uni-
versity; Thurinman Lavern Waters who re-
ceived the $25.00 Virginia Dare Award
for special proficiency in the manufacture


30 Years of Furnishing


DAIRY SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT


ENGINEERED TO MEET YOUR PARTICULAR
NEEDS FOR MOST ECONOMICAL OPERATION



MILLER MACHINERY


and SUPPLY COMPANY

"LOUDEN" Barn Equipment


"CHERRY-BURRELL"
Coolers
Pasteurizers
Ice Cream Machinery

601 East Church St., Jacksonville


"DE LAVAL"
Milkers
Separators
Clarifiers

127 N.E. 27th St., Miami


INFORMATION AVAILABLE
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
Bulletin No. 502-On Liver Fluke dis-
ease.
Bulletin No. 107 -Screwworms and
their Control.
Bulletin No. 108-A Calf Croop: Rec-
ommendations to livestock producers.
Bulletin No. 506-Know Your Ferti-
lizers.
Bulletin No. 510-Poisonous Plants in
Florida.
Available free from:
Willard M. Fifield, Director, Agri. Ex-
periment Station, Gainesville, Florida.


of ice cream; and Jack Leonard Barr.
who was awarded the $1,000 Robert W.
Miller Memorial Scholarship and is study-
ing for his M. S. Degree in Agriculture
with a major in dairy manufacturing.
NEW EQUIPMENT ADDED
During the year the Dairy Plant in-
stalled a new 1,000 gallon cold hold
tank, a machine to put up paper cartons
of milk, and a new cold milk separator-
clarifier.
Several Jersey cows were purchased and
six fine Guernsey heifers were added to
the herd. A hay-drier and self feeding
hay storage unit was installed at the farm.
An irrigation system for experimental
pasture irrigation was installed and ex-
periments in this field were begun.
All members of the staff have pub-
lished articles in some form, either in
trade journals, technical journals, farm
papers, or in Experiment Station bulle-
tins during the year.
Plans for the future include a con-
tinuation of our efforts to be of utmost
service to the Dairy Industry of the State
of Florida. Similar activities to those
carried out last year by staff and students
are contemplated for this year, with as
many new activities as can be worked
into our schedule.



MILK SANITARIANS
(Continued from page 25)
all sessions of both meetings, including
the annual banquet, fellowship and en-
tertainment program. Those registered
will also receive a printed bound copy
of the entire meeting proceedings, which
will be mailed a few months after the
meeting. Extra banquet tickets for wives
and guests will be sold for an additional
cost of $2.00.
The Plant Committee of the Florida
Dairy Association assists in the promo-
tion of the conference as well as in pro-
viding the entertainment for the Annual
Banquet and fellowship programs.


28 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


Farm Stores catering to Dairy Farmers' Needs at
Hollywood & Tallahassee











-L-



Show n above are two popular Florida Coun-
ty Farm Agents. nWm. J. Platt of Volusia
County (left) and IF. Paul Hayman of Polk
County, who received distinguished service
awards from the National Association of Coun-
ty Agricultural Agents for the year 1952.

Three New Congressmen
Seated for Florida
The Florida Congressional delegation
of two U. S. Senators and eight Con-
gressmen, was well weighted with ex-
perience as seven old and three new
members of the group were sworn in
January 4th for the 83rd Congress.
Senator Spessard Holland was re-elect-
ed for another 6-year term. Senator
George Smathers had two years of his
present 6-year term yet to serve.
Five veteran Florida Congressmen, who
were re-elected for another 2-year term
are: Representative Bob Sikes, Crestview,
District 3; Representative Chas. E. Ben-
nett, Jacksonville, District 2; Representa-
tive Syd Herlond, Leesburg, District 5;
Representative Dwight Rogers, West
Palm Beach, District 6; and Representa-
tive Bill Lantaff, Miami, District 4. Flor-
ida's three new Congressmen are Repre-
sentative D. R. (Billy) Matthews, Gaines-
ville, District 8; Representative James A.
Haley, Sarasota, District 7; and Repre-
sentative Courtney W. Campbell, Clear-
water, District 1.
Representative Bob Sikes is the oldest
Florida Congressman in point of service.
Representatives Matthews and Haley had
both erved as members of the Florida
Legislature. Haley is an official of the
Ringling Bros. Estate, Sarasota; Matthews
was associated with the Alumni Division,
University of Florida, and Campbell is
an attorney.


ORANGE COUNTY D.H.I.A.
ANNOUNCE 1953 DIRECTORS
The Orange County Dairy Herd Im-
provement Association directors recently
appointed Ellis Brannon of Georgia as
manager and technician to replace George
Baumeister who resigned to go into the
dairy business. The officers and directors
of the Orange County DHIA for 1953
are: President, Carroll Ward of Winter
Park; Vice-President, B. W. Judge, Or-
lando; Secretary, F. E. Baetzman, County
Agent, Orlando; Treasurer, A. W. Bal-
lentine, County Agent's Office; Directors:
Elbert Cammack, Orlando; Hanson Col-


MECHANIZED-ALL THE WAY!


W6dA.i.zezd..:'lN -PLACE" CLEANING
When milking is finished you
can stand in your milk house and
quickly and thoroughly wash and
sterilize the De Laval Combine
"in place" for this job, too, is now
completely mechanized.


DE LAVAL COMBINE MILKERS


De Laval Combine Milkers, in-
stalled either in the dairy barn
along the stanchions or in a sep-
arate milking room, provide
completely mechanized milking.
They milk fast and clean, offer-
ing all the advantages of De
Laval's famous De Laval Mag-
netic "Better Milking." The milk
is conveyed by vacuum through
sanitary glass or stainless steel
pipe directly to milk cans or re-
frigerated farm tank. On the
way, it is automatically filtered
and each cow's milk can be in-


dividually weighed, if desired.
After milking, the entire sys-
tem can be quickly and thor-
oughly washed and sterilized
"in-place" from the milking
room! No more time-consuming
"wash-up," thanks to De Laval
engineering which has now com-
pletely mechanized this part of
the job, too!
For pleasanter, more profit-
able one-man dairy operation,
see your local De Laval Dealer
or mail coupon today.


----------------1
THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR CO., DEPT. '39-P'
Poughkeepsie, New York
Please send me interesting new printed matter on
/ De Laval Combine Milkers

THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR COMPANY (I E TE OF INSTALLATION YOU PREFER)
POUGHKEEPSIE, N. Y. Name1
427 Randolph St., Chicago 6, Illinois
61 Beale Street, San Francisco 5, Calif. Town R.F.D.......-.State-..
FEBRUARY & MARCH, 1-953 29
FEBRUARY & MARCH, 1953 29






AYRSHIRE BREEDERS
FORM ASSOCIATION

Following the successful showing of
Ayrshires at the Florida State Fair and
the purchase of many of the out of state
cattle exhibited by Florida dairymen, a
Florida Ayrshire Breeders Association was
formed.
James Pelot, Marion County, was elect-
ed president of the new group. H. H.
Jacobs of DeLand was elected vice presi-
dent and Marion County Farm Agent
Dave Baillie, Jr. was named secretary.


BORDEN'S "EXHIBITOUR" DAIRY
EXHIBIT COMPLETES FOUR
MONTH FLORIDA TOUR
A unique exhibit on wheels featuring
an action filled story of how milk travels
from farm to family and sponsored by
the Borden Dairy, is completing a four-
months winter tour of eighteen Florida
cities from Pensacola to Miami.
This exhibit named the "Exhibitour"
is on a nation-wide tour which began
in 1950. Since that time, it has traveled
about 100 thousand miles and has caught
the fancy of an estimated two million


visitors.
The "Exhibitour," which houses a com-
plete miniature educational exhibit of the
story of milk from the farm to the con-
sumers table, has proven to be a major
attraction to both children and adults.
According to its sponsor, The Borden
Company, the traveling exhibit was first
originated for use at County Fairs as a
goodwill service for their milk producers.
Its popularity at county fairs led to point
of sale displays at retail stores, principally
Super Markets.
The "Exhibitour" unit, now in Florida,
will complete its four-months Florida
schedule about February 15th in the
Tampa area.
The Borden Company utilizes the "Ex-
hibitour's" appearance to do sampling
and distribute dairy products recipes and
literature. It is also shown at schools
upon request, where the nutritional value
of milk and milk products is explained.
Mr. Paul Le Brecht, a member of the
Borden Public Relations staff, is the full
time operator of the Exhibitour.
Seen in the panel below is the Borden's
traveling exhibit unit, the "Exhibitour", a
portion of the interior display and two ex-
amples of interest shoun by spectators.


.,, ... E irn OUR _,I


30 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


DAIRYMEN'S HELPER!


WILLING WORKER REDDY KILOWATT
gives you all the HOT water you need . .
whenever and wherever you want it.

THEN, OF COURSE, REDDY milks, cleans, gives you
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Forty Brown Swiss Sold
In First Florida Sale
Florida's first sale of the famous Brown
Swiss breed of Dairy Cattle was held at
Peters' Ranch, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida,
Monday, January 26th.
W. J. Kelley, Ft. Lauderdale Brown
Swiss Breeder, and The Brown Swiss
Sales Company of Kenton, Ohio, were
sponsors of the Sale.
Thirty registered females and 10 reg-
istered bulls from some of the country's
best Brown Swiss blood lines were sold
largely to Florida buyers.
A female, "Coys Julie Eega Beva",
brought the top price of the sale at
$500.00. She was consigned by Mrs.
Grace H. Coy of Toledo, Ohio and pur-
chased by Robert K. Martin of West
Palm Beach.
The top price bull brought $440.00.
This was "Colonel Superb," consigned by
Char-Vel Farm of Kenton, Ohio, and
purchased by W. W. McMillan of Jack-
sonville. D. A. Salls of the Clearwater
Jersey Dairy, Clearwater, Florida, pur-
chased 8 animals, the largest number
bought by one buyer.
The average sale price of the 40 ani-
mals was $310.00. Consignors of the ani-
mals were from Ohio, Wisconsin, Illi-
nois and Florida.
Mr. Kelley said that he and his as-
sociates, the Brown Swiss Sales Company,
Kenton, Ohio, hope to have a regular an-
nual Florida Brown Swiss Sale.
Some were sold at a sacrifice, Mr. Kel-
ley said, inasmuch as this was a pioneer
effort to introduce the Brown Swiss to
Florida Dairymen.
According to Mr. Kelley, the Brown
Swiss not only ranks high among the
world's best dairy breeds but ranks next
to the Brahman in adaptation to warm
climates.
Florida now has five registered Brown
Swiss herds and many animals mixed with
the herds of the State's over one thous-
and dairy herds, Mr. Kelley said.
Regular Brown Swiss sales are planned
for the future, Mr. Kelley stated, in or-
der to help meet the growing demand
in Florida for more and better dairy cat-


f&liL-ni Bulk Milk


Whether it's bucket milking or pipeline
milking, a Mojonnier Bulk Cooler in the
milkhouse spells less labor, rapid cooling
and high quality milk. Mojonnier Bulk
Coolers are the last word in quality
construction. For example, outside
shells are stainless steel for easy
cleaning, long life and good appear-
ance. Made in ten sizes beginning with
60 gallons. Bulletin 240 "The Bulk
Cooling Story" sent free on request.

MOJONNIER BROS. CO., 4601 WEST


300 Gallon Mojonnier Bulk Cooler on Norman
Stevenson Farm, Iowa City. Iowa

OHIO STREET, CHICAGO 44, ILLINOIS

Florida Representative
Lee P. Bickenbach
P.O. BOX 2205
LAKELAND, FLA.


FEBRUARY & MARCH, 1953 31


,





















Bigger
Milk Che4


miE Z

K-7Dl'


Coast to coast Klenzade leads in easier,
speedier cleaning, milkstone removal and
prevention, and lower bacteria counts.
The Klenzade Farm Quality Program brings
you dairyland's best liked cleaning and
sanitizing procedure fast, economical.
sure, and safe. For better cleaning and
sanitizing results, start now
WRTE with Klenzade . tested.
R FREE proved, accepted . where-
DETAILS ever quality milk is pro-
duced.
* 4.0


More Pasture Doesn't

Cut YOUR Feed Cost...


BETTER

PASTURES DO!


Take a look at your pasture.
Is it deep rich qreen, fast
qrowinq and palatable? If not,
NACO can help you. Proper
pasture programs produce
higher nutrient value resulting
in less need for supplements.
Your NACO representative is
an expert on fertilization.
NACO can help you produce
milk most economically.



N A. o ^ FERTILIZER
Inl 1v COMPANY
NACO -HY
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
FT. PIERCE, FLORIDA
Manufacturers of Five Star Fertilizers



32 o FLORIDA DAIR


_ _


activities.
Each of Florida's three Councils is
nutritionists.

STAFF CHANGES ANNOUNCED
On January 1st the nutritional director
of the Jacksonville Council, Mrs. Julia
Foster, resigned to become supervisor of
the School Lunch Program of the Chi-
cago Public Schools. Mrs. Arlen Jones,
who had been assistant director in Jack-
sonville for the past two years, was ap-
pointed director and Mrs. Ann Johnson
was appointed assistant director.
Mrs. Jones received her degree in
Home Economics and Nutrition at the
University of Okla-
home in 1943. She
received valuable ex-
perience in nutrition-
al work in the School
Cafeteria department
of the Duval County
schools and as a
special dietitian in
the St. Vincent's
Hospital, Jackson-
MRS. JONES ville.

The Miami Council, which includes
Dade, Broward and Monroe Counties,
announced the appointment on January
1st of Miss Marian Cudworth as assist-
ant director-nutritionist.
Miss Cudworth is a graduate of Cornell
University in Home Economics. Several
years' experience as
Dietitian in Fairmont
College and as man-
ager of a national
;0 service in foods sam-
pling and demonstra-
tion for seven east-
ern cities, gave her
an excellent back-
ground for Dairy
Council work.
Miss CUDWORTH In addition to her
professional training and experience, Miss
Cudworth claims that having grown up
in an important dairy section of the State
of New York, she acquired an early
knowledge and appreciation of the Dairy
Industry.

The Tampa area Dairy Council cover-
ing Hillsborough and Pinellas Counties,
has a capable staff in Mrs. America Es-
cuder, Director and her Associate Direc-
tor, Mrs. Evelyn Samras, who directs the
Council work in Pinellas County.


staffed with well trained and experienced

"AN AMAZING RECORD"
The following summary of activities
of these three educational units of the
Florida Dairy Industry during the year
1952 sounds fantastic, but nevertheless,
this is the record. This is something every
dairyman should know. Just think of it-
3500 conferences held with community
leaders; 1000 meetings addressed; 30,000
persons reached at meetings; 600 film
showings with attendance of 24,000; over
3000 days of exhibits; 260,000 pieces
of informational literature distributed on
nutrition, foods, health and dairy prod-
ucts.

1Milk is a protective food and also nec-
essary for growth. Babies, children,
grownups need it. Water, carbohydrates,
proteins, fats, minerals all are in it. Milk
proteins and their combinations are the
most valuable found in any foods . .
milk has abundant quantities of vitamins.

MILK PRICE INCREASES
Milk price increases have recently been
announced in New York City; Waukegan,
Illinois; Clovis, New Mexico and Fred-
ricksburg, Virginia.



MILK FACTS

One quart of MILK is 2 pounds of
Nature's most nearly perfect food.
: MILK is one of the outstanding
food buvs today.



This is the quart of
milk you get at to-
day's Fla. prices.





This is the amount of
milk, about 2/3 quart,
you would get at to-
day's price had milk
prices risen as much
as all foods combined.


Y NEWS


FLORIDA DAIRY COUNCILS

DO BIG EDUCATIONAL JOB
Florida's three local Dairy Council Units in Jacksonville, Tampa and Miami
are quietly and with little fan-fare doing an amazing amount of educational work
for the Florida Dairy Industry.
These three local organizations, affiliated with and a part of the National Dairy
Council, are supported by local budgets provided by the dairy industry as a whole.
Both the national and local units are dedicated to strictly research and educational

































Florida Dairy Association Secretary-Director E. T. (And)) Lay i'as elected Chairman of
the "Adri.ory Council" of the l:loridai Induriiral Cozniii ion shownn ,bore) at a ,ieetlina
in the State Capitol. February llth. The 15 member Cunc'il. epiresen int lhi/r. ilndtl.t; and
the public. are naNmed by the Industrial Coimi.i.ion and the Governor.


Allied Trades Members


1953


1953


Florida Dairy Association, Inc.

The F.D.A. Membership Committee it pleaded to acknowledge the prompt payment
of 1953 membership duer by the following:


Allied Dairy Products, Inc. Gulf Paper Co.
Adams Packing Association, Inc.
American Paper Goods Co. Hackney Bros. Body Co.
American Seal Kap Corporation Hector Supply Co.
Amica-Burnett Chem. &
Supply Co. W. M. Igou, Inc.
Amco Feed Stores, Orlando International Paper Co.
Anheuser-Busch, Inc. Irwin Grain Co.
Broward Grain & Supply Co. Jackson Grain Co.
Byars-Forgy, Inc. James Jennings Brokerage Co.
Johnson & Johnson
California Spray-Chem. Corpn. Robt. A. Johnston Co.
Certified Products Co.
Peter Cooper orortion Kieckhefer Container Co.
Peter Cooper Corporation Krim-Ko Corporation
Creamery Package Mfg. Co. KurimK o Corporatio
Kuder Pulp Sales Co.
Chas. Dennery, Inc. Lakeland Cash Feed Co.
De-Raef Corporation Lily-Tulip Cup Corpn.
Dixie Cup Co. Liberty Glass Co.
The Dixson Co. Limpert Brothers, Inc.
ion Joe Lowe Corporation
Ex-Cell-O Corporation
S. H. Mahoney Extract Co.
Fla. Citrus Canners Cooperative The Mathieson Chem. Corpn.
Florida Feed Mills Meyer-Blanke Co.
W. L. Filbert, Inc. Geo. J. Meyer Mfg. Co.
The Fischman Co. David Michael & Co.
Foote & Jenks, Inc. Miller Mach. & Supply Co., Jax.
Miller Mach. & Supply Co.,
General Mills, Jax. Miami
General Mills, Miami Mojonnier Brothers Co.
General Mills, Tampa Morris Paper Mills


J. N. Morrison, Distributor
Murphy liody Works, Inc.
Nash-Kelvinator Corpn.
National Pectin Products Co.
Newth-Morris Box Co.
Owens-Illinois Glass Co.
Paul-Lewis Laboratories, Inc.
C. M. Pitt & Sons Co.
The Pfaudler Co.
Ralston Purina Co., Miami
Ralston Purina Co., Tampa
Reddi-Wip Co. of Fla.
Security Mills of Tampa, Inc.
Security Feed & Seed Co.,
Miami
Spartan Grain & Mill Co.
Standard Packaging Corpn.
Thatcher Glass Mfg. Co., Inc.
Universal Milking Machine Co.
Vanilla Laboratories
Virginia-Carolina Chem. Corpn.
Warner-Jenkinson Mfg. Co.
Williamson Feed Mills
Wyandotte Chemicals Corpn.


disinfect all your
utensils thoroughly with




DIVERSOL







FOR FAST, -
SAFE, EASY
DISINFECTING







THE DIVERSE CORPORATION
J. P. Boyce
519 E. Giddens, Tampa, Florida
E. E. Fulton
P. O. Box 374, Jacksonville I, Florida
J. E. Orris
200 N.W. 129th Street, Miami 38, Fl',rida
G. Wrenshall
3207 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, Florida



IF YOU WANT
THE BEST










BEFORE BUYING
YOUR DAIRY CATTLE
Phone, Write or See

Ross Reynolds
& Son
Ross Reynolds Lyndel Reynolds
Phone 6-1248
PLANT CITY. FLORIDA
DEALERS . In Springer
Cows & Heifers, Hol-
steins, Guernseys, Jerseys
& Ayrshires
GRADE OR REGISTERED
OFFERING .. All Kinds of
Dairy Cattle at our Barn
Near Plant City
READY .to fill your Dairy
Cattle needs throughout
the State


& MARCH, 1953 33


As cooperating Associate Members of the Florida Association, the above firms are
entitled to the friendly consideration of the Dairy Members and to the usual
privileges and services of the Association.


FEBRUARY






Editor's Column...


NEWS & VIEWS

It is never too late to say that you
appreciate something or someone . so
even at this late date, I want to say a
sincere thank you for the numerous Holi-
day Greetings which came to Mrs. Lay
and me and to our office at the Christmas
Season.
I would like to pass on to our readers
the following sentiment which came to
us on a simple but beautiful card .
and is a favorite among many, if indeed
one can choose a favorite Christmas mes-
sage:
"At this season of the year, we turn
to our friends to share with them the
joy and happiness that we have been
blessed with through the years and
to acknowledge the contribution their
friendship has made to the security
and wealth of our happiness.
"In this spirit, may I extend my greet-
ings and wish for you a Merry Christ-
mas and a prosperous New Year."


The 1953 National Milk and Ice Cream
Conventions will meet October 25th
through 31st in Boston. The Milk Foun-
dation Convention is the first part of
the week; International Ice Cream is the
last part of the week. Reservation blanks
are not yet available.
The 1954 National Dairy Industry
Conventions and Exposition will return to
Atlantic City.


FOR SALE
RANCH EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES-CATTLE
WATERING TANKS. Ten-foot steel reinforced
Concrete, 21/ Feet wide. $60.00, delivered, $50.00
your truck. Four foot wide tanks, $80.00 and
$70.00. Orlando Concrete Specialties. Box 6122,
Station 6, Orlando, Florida. Phone 3-4111.
REGISTERED, PUREBRED ENGLISH SHEP-
HERDS. Excellent stock, heelers, watch, com-
panions. Best Bloodlines. E. L. Wright,
Tennessee Ridge, Tenn.
FOR SALE: 12-wide Heil washer and 36,000#
tank. Excellent condition and reasonable price.
Write J. N. Morrison, Distributor, 110 Federal
St., Crawfordsville, Indiana.


COURTESY CAMPAIGN
SHOULD BE EXTENDED
The Florida Divisions of the Ameri-
can Automobile Association have
launched a state-wide promotion to en-
courage "courtesy and good will" toward
the millions of tourists who visit Florida
annually.
We would like to suggest that this
Campaign be enlarged to promote a lit-
tle more courtesy on the part of all
motorists toward other drivers, and pedes-
trians.
We would even go so far as to say
there is a need for the practice of more
courtesy and consideration for others by
most of us.


Milk prices are low when compared to
other food price increases . The Ab-
bott Dairies of Philadelphia has pub-
lished a study on food price increases
which shows that Milk would be selling
for from 35c to over 50c per quart today
if the price of milk had increased by as
high a percentage as such other foods as
coffee, flour, pork chops, salmon, cab-
bage, round steak or roast.



WILLIAM NOLAN, JR., partner and
herd manager of the Alpine Dairy Co.,
Jacksonville, was recently appointed by
Governor McCarty to membership on the
Florida Live Stock Sanitary Board. Mr.
Nolan has also just been elected Presi-
dent of the Florida Jersey Cattle Club.


BE PROGRESSIVE THRU COOPERATION
Investigate the advantages of selling your feed
bags Thru;
THE DAIRY BAG COMPANY
Operated by the management of
THE MIAMI DAIRY EQUIPMENT EXCH.
769 N. W. 18th Terrace
Miami 36, Fla. Phone 2-7188
"ATTENTION DAIRYMEN"
I handle the best young Tennessee Cows and
heifers to be found. A fine selection on hand at
all times.
I deliver top cows all over Florida.
W. C. TINSLEY, JR.
Box 93 Lafayette, Alabama Phone 6431


SINUS SUFFERERS
AMAZING NEW DISCOVERY FREE TRIAL
THIS AMAZING NEW DISCOVERY gives quick relief from sinus head-
aches, pressure in forehead, soreness in eyes, aching cheek bones, bridge
of nose, top of head. back of head and down neck, can't think straight
or see well at times even tho' glasses have been recently fitted, nervous-
ness, dizzyness. This new treatment relieves most sinus headaches in few
minutes and as general rule soreness in head, face and n-ek is entirely
relieved in short time. No matter how long you have suffered or how
chronic your case may be or how many different treatments you have
tried or how much money you have spent without results, we believe
you will be amazed at the fast relief this amazing new treatment gives
you. It has given amazing fast relief to thousands. Write for FIVE DAY
FREE TRIAL, post paid to you, no cost or obligation except this: when
you write for it, it is agreed that you will mail it back at the end of
five days if not satisfied, since it is not a sample.
NATIONAL LABORATORIES LODI, CALIFORNIA

34 FLORIDA DAIRY NEW S


CHANGE OF ADDRESS
The office of John M. Scott, Chief
Supervisor, State Department of Agricul-
ture, Dairy Division and Marks and
Brands Division, has moved from Room
408, Seagle Building to Room 608 Seagle
Building, Gainesville.


Former Dairyman in the White House
We have heard of dairymen senators
and dairymen governors, dairymen college
presidents and dairymen congressmen, but
who has heard of a dairyman in the
Whitehouse?
Yes sir, President of the United States.
The dairy industry is proud to learn
that President Ike takes pride in the fact
that one of his jobs as a young man was
with the Belle Springs Creamery, Abilene,
Kansas from 1906 through 1910.
Dairymen should take heart from this
success story and set their sights high.


LENGENDARY CANDLE
AS CHRISTMAS GIFT
The Pennock Plantation Dairy of Jupi-
ter distributed a Yule-tide remembrance
for customers and patrons by presenting
Bayberry candles.
The dairy management stated: "The
candle, symbol of light and freedom, has
a particular significance at this time, when
world forces of light and freedom are
pitted against the forces of darkness and
slavery.
"Candles made from Bayberry wax
burn slowly with little smoke and emit
an agreeable, balsamic fragrance. They
were highly treasured by early American
settlers.
"They were costly because of the long
time and the skills involved in refining
the wax. So they reserved the Bayberry
Candle for burning chiefly during the
Yule-tide.
"From this tradition of thrift evolved
the legend-'Bayberry Candles, burned
to the socket, bring luck to the house
and gold to the pocket'."


NATIONAL ORGANIZATION
HONORS HOWARD BROWN
W. Howard Brown, Director of the
Food and Laboratory Division of the
Jacksonville, Florida, Health Department,
has been appointed to serve on the Pro-
fessional Development Committee of the
International Association of Milk and
Food Sanitarians. For the past ten years
Mr. Brown has been active in the Florida
Association, which is affiliated with the
International Association. This appoint-
ment is the result of the desire of the
International officials to recognize the
professional leadership shown by respon-
sible people and Associations in the
South.


Classified Advertising
RATE FOR ALL CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING IS 1Oc PER WORD








THE SENIOR BULL STAFF

__..._ DINSMORE JURYMAN
11 daughters on test
Over 75 young daughters in our herd that will be
tested as they calve. One daughter, Dinsmore Jury
Irenetta, is consigned to the Quail Roost Sale, Rouge-
mont, N. C., May 4, 1953
Sire: Quail Roost Noble Yeoman
(see below)
Dam: Butler Island Janice
11374-507-GG
13803-603-CC
Excellent '49
Dam of Dinsmore Royal May
DINSMORE JURYMAN EXCELLENT '49 '50 '51 ($10,000)

FOREMOST MAY ROYALTY
36 AR Daughters
22 daughters on test
1 EXCELLENT, 8 VERY GOOD
All records are immature-up to 15,000 lbs. milk
and 620 lbs. fat. 1st Get of Sire & Grand Champion
daughter at Tampa, Fla. '52
Sire: Foremost Royal Valor
7 daughters over 900, 11 over 800.
76 AR daughters, 25 AR Sons.
Dam: Foremost Loyalty
13759-653-GG
18229-856-CC
FOREMOST MAY ROYALTY 2 AR daughters, 3 AR Sons

QUAIL ROOST NOBLE YEOMAN
29 AR daughters
14 daughters on test
4 VERY GOOD
Sire: Cesor Noble Maxim
30 AR daughters
13 AR Sons
- 7 EXCELLENT

13337-649-FF
3 AR daughters 2 AR sons

QUAIL ROOST NOBLE YEOMAN


Write for a copy of our picture folder and a list of young bulls for sale--THEN SELECT



Dinsmore Guernseys
FEDERAL ACCREDITED 57790 J. B. LANOux, Herdsman NEGATIVE TO BANG'S
10 miles north of Jacksonville *
Dinsmore Farms 10 miles north U.. Jacksnville Dinsmore, Florda
V. C. JOHNSON EARl. A. JOHNSON CHARLES F. JOHNSON BRADY S. JOHNSTON







S0 0 ooooooooooo0


PRODUCTION GOES UP

WHEN YOU FEED 1


SECURITY DAIRY

FEEDS






And low feed cost per gallon of milk
depends on top production from every
cow in the herd. Dairymen who keep
records of their "feed-cost per gallon of
milk" know that all-grain feeds like
SECURITY DAIRY FEEDS are their most
economical buy.


I



L'


Follow the Security "calf-to-calf" dairy program.





SECURITY CALF STARTER For your calves

SECURITY CALF GROWER For growing heifers

SECURITY CONDITIONER For dry cows

SECURITY DAIRY FEEDS For the milking herd


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