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 Back Cover














Title: Florida dairy news
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00082035/00015
 Material Information
Title: Florida dairy news
Physical Description: 12 v. : illus. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Dairy Industry Association
Publisher: Cody Publications for Florida Dairy Industry Association.
Place of Publication: Kissimmee Fla
Publication Date: December-January 1952-1953
Frequency: bimonthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Dairying -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Cattle   ( lcsh )
Milk   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-12, no. 1; Nov. 1950-Spring, 1962.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00082035
Volume ID: VID00015
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01386090
issn - 0426-5696

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Main
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Back Cover
        Page 35
        Page 36
Full Text



































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FLORIDA DAIRYMEN SEE


PURINA RESEARCH IN ACTION


DAIRY UNIT PURINA RESEARCH
ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI


FARM


These dairymen made a visit to the
Purina Research Farm and actually saw
our research program. Research Farm
division managers explained what we are
doing to improve YOUR results with
calves, heifers, dry cows, and the milking
string. They saw cows up to 12 years
old with lifetime productions up to well
above 150,000 Ibs. of milk per cow.

They saw Holstein heifers calving at 24
months old and averaging over 10,000
Ibs. of milk in their first lactations. They
saw calves being raised on Purina Nursing
Chow and Purina Calf Startena without
a drop of milk-and growing bigger than
our average heifers when milk was fed.


They saw our whole herd that has in-
creased in production from 6,800 Ibs. milk
average per cow in 1928 to 14,321 Ibs.
milk average per cow in 1951. Years of
good breeding, management, sanitation
and feeding have brought about this im-
provement.

Your Purina Salesman and Dealer have
books describing the Purina Program that
is bringing these very profitable resur;s.
Won't you see one of them real soon,
and ask for a copy? You may find that
you can add thousands of pounds to herd
production and thousands of dollars to
your income.


RALSTON PURINA COMPANY

MIAMI TAMPA PI'
I liiCHOiWS
II.U...EE..EE..E...EU.EUi ll ,


BILL SESSIONS
Jacksonville
M. D. CLARK
Orange Park
G. SWEBILIUS
DeLand
J. J. SMITH
Bartow
RAY JOHNSON
Hollywood
HOWARD RENNER
Largo
D. L. WILLIAMS
Mango
JOE BUSCIGLIO
Tampa
DICK KELLY
St. Petersburg











EDITORIALS


A SPECIAL MESSAGE FROM F. D. I. A. PRESIDENT

Reflections on the Past and Future
Of the Florida Dairy Industry Association
The taking of inventory and thought of our course for the future, whether de-
liberately or not, is one of the substantial benefits that come to us during the more
serious phases of the holiday season and the approach of the New Year.
I believe it is a good time for members of the Florida Dairy Industry to reflect
on their State Association.
The Florida Dairy Industry Association, formed in 1946, represents the principle
of unity, cooperation and the working together of the entire Dairy Industry of Florida.
Actually, unity and cooperation in the Florida Dairy Industry existed all during
the period of World War II. The forming of a united organization merely recognized
and provided the best plan that could be found after much careful study for continuing
state-wide and industry-wide cooperative action of the Florida Dairy Industry in all
its branches.
Since 1946, this plan has proved to be successful and is looked upon by Dairy
leaders throughout the country as one of the most ideal and successful State Associa-
tion plans in existence today.
If it is possible that any Florida Dairyman does not have a proper appreciation
of the importance of the Florida Dairy Industry Association to the welfare of his own
dairy, as well as that of the Dairy Industry of Florida as a whole, as President of
the organization and as a dairy farmer, I invite serious reflection on what our present
situation might be if we had not had this united working organization in the past
and what the future might hold without it.

Florida Dairy News Celebrates 2nd Birthday
Volume 3, No. 1 will be seen at the top of the official masthead of the next
issue of the Florida Dairy News.
As President of the Florida Dairy Association, which is owner and sponsor of this
unique publication, I feel that this is a time for a word of recognition, praise and
appreciation of those who have made this magazine possible.
The Florida Dairy News has exceeded all expectations of the Association's Board
of Directors and its original sponsoring Committee of which I was chairman. It not
only started with a high standard of information, make up and appearance but has
steadily maintained this standard. It is unique in that it is the only magazine in the
United States sponsored and produced by a State Dairy Association.
The Dairy News has become the right arm of the Florida Dairy Industry's public
relations program.
The Editor, Andy Lay, who has carried all the burden of editing, managing and
financing this publication, while at the same time performing all his duties as Executive
Director of the Association's comprehensive program, is entitled to a great deal of
credit and appreciation on the part of the Association and all the Florida Dairy In-
dustry, to the benefit of which it is dedicated.
To our good friends, the advertisers in the Dairy News during the past two years,
we also owe a debt of gratitude. Without their interest and support this excellent
publication would hardly have been possible.
Wiliner Bassett, President




WISHING YOU ALL


A Merry Christmas, A Happy Holiday Season

A Happy and Prosperous New Year


Ill111


VOL. 2 NO. 8

DECEMBER, 1952
& JANUARY, 1953
BI-MONTHLY


THE
FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS
E. T. LAY, Editor & Business Manager


Official Publication of
Florida Dairy Industry Ass'n
WILMER W. BASSETT, JR., President
E. T. LAY, Executive Director
Florida Guernsey Cattle Club
EARl. JOHNSON, President
Florida Association
of Milk Sanitarians
R. R. HooD, President

Florida Dairy Industry Associa-
tion Directors
Producers
FRANK B. DOUB, Jacksonville
GEORGE F. JOINSON, West Palm Beach
D. WAYNE WEBB, Tampa
JOHN SERGEANT, Lakeland
HERMAN BOYD, Miami
Producer-Distributors
WILMER BASSETT, Monticello
FREEMAN HALES, Opa Locka
HERMAN BURNETT, Bradentoni
J. N. McARTIIUR, Miami
II. CODY SKINNER, Jacksonville
Disributors
JOHN M. HOOD, St. Petersburg
CLIFF D. WAYNE, Miami
GORDON NIELSEN, West Palm Beach
W. J. BARIIT, JR., Tampa
A. E. (JACK) JOHNSON, Jacksonville
Additional Director
LARIRY J. HODGE, Prerident "Alligator
Club", Miami
SAM SotOMON. SR., lHonor.iy Director
Quincy
THE FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS is
published bi-monthly by the Florida
Dairy Industry Association, 220 Newnan
St., Jacksonville, Florida. Subscription
price of $1.00 a year. Entered as second
class mail at the Post Office at Jack-
sonville, Fla., under Act of March 3,
1879, as amended.
Advertising rates furnished upon re-
quest.
Business and Editorial office 220
Newnan Street, Jacksonville.
member Florida Press Association

NATIONAL EDITORIAL


_^_s~ralrsssasa


DECEMBER, 1952 & JANUARY, 1953 3








FORWARD


In 1953

With The


Florida

Dairy


Industry




Milk Producers,

Producer-

Distributors,

Distributors

& Allied Trades



UNITED

Since


1946


In the


Florida

Dairy

Industry

Association


For Our Youth Readers

Your Future Is What You Make It
Note: This is the sevenilh and final article in a series of discussions on "You and
Your Future."
In the six articles which have preceded this one, we have discussed how to
choose one's life work and how best to prepare for the vocation chosen. Both the
school courses and the recreational activities make important contributions to one's
development and successful entry into the occupation or profession chosen and we
have emphasized their importance in these discussions. Two more topics remain for
our consideration in this, the final article of the series.


HOW TO LAND YOUR JOB
Consider for a moment where jobs
may be found. Manufacturing industries
provide approximately one-fourth of the
employment in the U. S. with farming
of all kinds running a close second. Other
employment is spread over a large variety
of occupations: distribution, transporta-
tion, public utilities, the professions, and
many related service jobs.
No matter what sort of job you want
you must plan how to go about landing
it. The steps involved may be simple or
very complicated but usually require one
or more of the following: an applica-
tion, an interview, and the follow-up.
Neatness, accuracy, honesty and com-
pleteness are the most important rules to
follow in filling out application blanks
or in writing to prospective employers.
Generally, a personal interview is more
important than a written application but
many employers insist upon knowing how
able a prospective worker is in writing
legibly and neatly; also, much informa-
tion may need to be put into the files.
The interview requires attention to
personal appearance and the best and
most courteous manner you can produce.
Be honest and sincere and try to sell the
"real you" because you are really inter-
ested in doing the job you are applying
for.
If you are not hired on the first try,
investigate several jobs. Always try to
keep the way open for further consider-
ation. Make acquaintances and friends
of those who have the kinds of jobs you
are looking for. However, remember that
references and recommendations may tip
the scale in your favor but you still must
sell yourself and your ability.
KEEPING YOUR JOB AND
PROGRESSING IN IT
Getting along with people is the first
essential in keeping a job. No matter how


well qualified one is to do a piece of
work, he must be able to take and hold
his place among the people he works with.
Find out what is expected of you and to
whom you are responsible; then be de-
pendable. Learn the rules of the organ-
ization-working hours, vacations, health
and safety regulations, etc. Don't let your
courtesy get rusty.
SELF IMPROVEMENT AND
LEADERSHIP
Finally, you have a job and you want
to keep it. Therefore, you must improve
yourself and progress in your work. Take
training courses if they are available and
subscribe to trade journals and magazines
which will keep you informed of all
phases of your vocation.
When you become familiar with all
the work you are given to do, perhaps
you will be able to devise better methods
because of your up-to-date information.
Be alert:
If you wish to be a leader, exercise
leadership within your own group and
in the community.
Granted experience, your training and
your personality are still the final keys
to your ultimate progress and final suc-
cess.
Your future is what you make it!
"The family that prays together stays
together."--Anon.
"Work is a golden key that unlocks
the door to happiness."
Compliments usually do more good
than anything you can employ on the
people with whom you come in contact.
Regardless of your own mood or soured
outlook on life, learn to analyze your
associates for their good points, and then
compel yourself to pay them compliments
thereon.


4 FLORIDA DAI


RY NEWS














Iai GISPL AI I I ISS C ITl1 I C.


NEW DAIRY SHOW FEATURES

ANNOUNCED FOR STATE FAIR


Scheduled to run for eleven days and
eleven nights between February 3 and
14, the Calendar of Events of the 1953
Florida State Fair is jammed with en-
tertainment and knowledge for young and
old alike.
Members and associates of the Florida
Dairy Industry Association will be inter-
ested in the program set up for the Dairy
Show which will run the first week in
February, 3rd through 7th. Held under
the auspices of the Livestock and Poultry
Committee, with R. D. Jackson as its
chairman, and sponsored by the Florida
State Fair and Nathan Mayo, Commis-
sioner of Agriculture, several interesting
innovations have been added to this
year's events.
For the first time in the history of
the Florida State Fair, the 1953 Dairy
Show will feature open shows of Ayr-
shire and Guernsey breeds in the Nathan
Mayo Judging Pavilion. The Ayrshire
cattle, in particular, will be represented
by out-of-state interests at the Fair.
Another outstanding event of the 1953
Dairy Show will be held in conjunction
with the presentation of the dairy tro-
phies and awards on Thursday, February
5. Constituting another "first", arrange-
ments have been made to add some much
needed glamour and prestige to the
crowning event of the Dairy Show.

Special Dairy Events
Working in cooperation with the Flor-
ida Dairy Industry Association, Chairman
Jackson and his committee have arranged
for the presentation of these awards early
in the evening just before the scheduled
Dairy Industry banquet sponsored by the
Association. A platform is to be erected
in the center of the judging pavilion and
all awards will be presented in the man-
ner of a Hollywood premiere, complete
with spotlights, flowers, photographers


ATTENTION EXHIBITORS
Dairymen desiring the premium
list and information reqardinq ex-
hibitinq in the Dairy Show may se-
cure same by writing J. C. Huskis-
son, Asst. Fair Mqr., Box 1231,
Tampa, Fla.


and other glamorous props that will add
authentic color. Immediately following
this ceremony, all dairy exhibitors, Dairy-
men from throughout the State, officials
and members of the Guernsey Breeders
Association, the Board of Directors of
the Florida Dairy Industry Association
and officials of the Fair, will attend a
special dinner meeting at the Floridan
Hotel. This dinner, sponsored by the
Florida Dairy Industry Association, is
planned to be an annual occasion.
The Fair Management has announced
that just as a tremendous improvement
will be evidenced in the Dairy Depart-
ment, so will the Fair as a whole sur-
pass all previous years and visitors will
find the county exhibits, poultry, swine,
beef cattle, art, women's work and all
other departments will be more complete
and comprehensive.
The opening day of the 1953 Fair
should attract greater attendance than
normally because this has been designated
Shrine Day, as well as special day for
all the counties of the West Coast area.
A colorful parade will terminate at the
Fair Grounds to be followed with a pro-
gram of fun and frolic in front of the
grandstand.
Gasparilla, of course, will again be the
outstanding event with its thrilling and
spectacular parade on Monday, February
9.
Future Farmers and Future Homemak-
ers will also have an important part on
the Fair program and thousands of these
up-and-coming farm-minded youngsters
from every section of the state will be
in attendance on special days designated
in their honor.
In addition to a brilliant array of top
quality grandstand circus and hippodrome
acts, which will be staged each day, are
three days of auto racing alternating with
the presentation of one of the nation's
outstanding thrill shows.
If favorable weather prevails the 1953
Florida State Fair should smash all at-
tendance records for it is said to be a
better show with more to offer than ever
before. It is a well-balanced exposition
with strength evidenced in every depart-
ment.
The annual Electrical Exposition, spon-
sored by the Tampa Electric Company,


FLORIDA

STATE FAIR CALENDAR

Feb. 3-14 Tampa

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3
Colorful Opening Ceremonies, Shrine
Day Honoring Imperial Potentate
Harvey A. Beffa, and Parade by
Egypt Temple and Shrine Clubs of
Royal American Shows. Night Thrill
Show.
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4
Hernando County Day, Wild-life Con-
servation. Auto Races.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 5
Pasco County Day, Bradford County
Day, Armed Forces Day, Tourist Day.
Afternoon Thrill Show.
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 6
Negro Day. Special grandstand pro-
gram, 10 A.M. by New Farmers and
New Homemakers of America.
Parade of Dairy Show champions
7:30 P.M. before grandstand.
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 7
Future Farmers and Future Home-
makers of America with special
grandstand program at noon. Auto
Races.
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 8
(Closed to the Public.)
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9
Gasparilla Day and Parade. High-
lands County Day, Indian River
County Day and Volusia County
Day.
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10
Governor's Day. All Florida Day,
Children's Day and Hillsborough
County Day.
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11
Children's Gasparilla Parade. Boy
Scout Day.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 12
International Day with special pro-
grams by Pan American Commission.
Night Gasparilla Illuminated Parade.
Columbia County Day, Gadsden
County Day.
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13
County Commissioners' Day. Marion
County Day, St. Johns County Day.
Parade of Beef Show champions
7:30 P.M. before grandstand. Af-
ternoon Thrill Show.
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 14
4-H Clubs Day. Flying Farmers Day,
Everybody's Day. Auto Races.
-I

will again be a feature. So great was the
demand for space from big nationally
known manufacturers who are anxious to
present and demonstrate their newest elec-
trical gadgets and devices that additional
floor space had to be allotted.
New this year will be International
Day with a series of special events pre-
sented by the Pan American Commission
and climaxed with a gigantic illuminated
night parade.


DECEMBER, 1952 & JANUARY, 1953 5















FLORIDA GUERNSEY BREEDERS

HOLD SUCCESSFUL SALES
Florida Guernsey Breeders climaxed the observance of the 75th Anniversary
of the world famous Guernsey breed as well as an active and successful year for the
Florida Guernsey Cattle Club with a two-days round of special activities featuring
the Annual East Coast Guernsey Sale at Lake Worth, October 27th, the Annual
State Sale Dinner meeting of the Club, October 28th, in Largo and the Annual State
Guernsey Sale at Largo, October 29th.
One hundred seven Guernseys were sold at the two sales bringing an average
price of $378.00. The top price animal at the East Coast Sale was a cow consigned
by the Boutwell Dairy, Lake Worth, Florida, which sold to Dr. R. E. Parajon, Jr.,
Guernsey breeder of Havana, Cuba, for $675.00.


The top animal of the State Sale at
Largo, also purchased by Dr. Parajon,
sold for $975.00 and was consigned from
the Brays Island Plantation, Yemassee,
South Carolina.
Dr. Parajon, who purchased a total of
eight animals, is a close friend of Florida
Guernsey breeders and has been a con-
sistent buyer at Florida sales for a num-
ber of years. He and his father have been
hosts to delegations of Florida dairymen
visiting Cuba on a number of occasions.
Chairman of the Sales Committee was
W. A. Boutwell, Sr. The Committee was
ably assisted by John Logan, Secretary,
and Earl Johnson, President of the Flor-
ida Guernsey Cattle Club. Valuable help
was also given by Albert Lawton, former
Duval County Agricultural Agent.
Col. Tom McCord of Montgomery,
Alabama was auctioneer for both sales.
Ralph Coursey of Trion, Georgia read
pedigrees.. W. Reaves, Florida State
Extension Dairyman, and Miss June Bout-
well served as secretaries for the Sales.
The Annual Guernsey Sale Dinner
meeting was held in the auditorium of
the Largo Chamber of Commerce and
Fairground building. Mr. J. McK. Jeter,
Southeastern representative of the Ameri-
can Guernsey Cattle Club, gave the prin-
cipal address at this meeting with Presi-
dent Earl Johnson presiding.
Mr. Jeter spoke on the subject of "Bet-
ter Farm Living With Guernseys", which
has been the 1952 national theme of
the American Guernsey Club and its af-
filiated State Guernsey organizations.
Announcement was made that the 1953
Annual Meeting of Florida Guernsey
Breeders will be held February 6 during
the Florida State Fair in Tampa.


1952 IS 75TH ANNIVERSARY
AMERICAN GUERNSEY
CATTLE CLUB

The year 1952 marks the 75th Anni-
versary of the founding of the American
Guernsey Cattle Club whose national
headquarters is located at Peterborough,
New Hampshire. Organized in the State
of New York in 1877 by 12 breeders,
the Club has 42,500 members in 1952.
Evidence of increased interest in
Guernseys in recent years is shown by
the fact that, whereas it took 64 years
for the registration of the first million
Guernseys, at the present rate of regis-
tration it takes only 12 years to register
a million animals.
Two hundred people are employed in
the National Guernsey Cattle Club of-
fices to make and maintain the records
on American Guernseys. Nine field of-
fices arc maintained with a personnel of
22.
The original purpose of the American
Guernsey Cattle Club, which was "to
jealously guard the purity of the Guernsey
breed in America", is now expanded to
provide programs for improving and pro-
moting the breed.
The membership of the Florida Guern-
sey Cattle Club includes many of Flor-
ida's finest dairies. Present officers of
the Florida organization are: Earl John-
son, Dinsmore Farms, Jacksonville, Presi-
dent; W. A. Boutwell, Boutwell's Dairy,
Lake Worth, Vice-President; and John
Logan, Pinellas County Farm Agent,
Largo, Secretary.


SEEN IN THE PICTURE PANEL ABOVE
AND BELOW Iare Dairy Newis can.lid shots
of some of those seen at the Annual East
Coast and State Guern.ey sales at Lake IForth
and Largo. TOP PANEL: Left to right, (1)
County Agents M. U. Mounts of Palm Beach
Coilnty and Albert La:,ton of Duial County:
(2) County Agent B. E. Lauwton, Brou'ard
County and Dair man I "iley) Waldrep. Holly-
twood: (3) Mrs. Panl Hood, St. Petersburg,
Mrs. Charles Donegan. Largo, and Mrs. Leon
Sellers, St. Petersburg: (4) County Agents
L.'reice Ed'ards. Miai ni John Logan. Largo;
C. 1V". Reares, Stale Extenvion Dairyman: R.
K. Price of Miami: Alec White. Tampa, and
L. E. Cuiningham. Largo: (5) Dairymen Stin
Hazellon (left) of Eu.l/is and John Sargeant,
Lakeland. BOTTOM PANEL: Left to right,
(1) George Boutwell (left) and IV. A. Bout-
well, Sr., Lake Worth: (2) Dairymen V. C.
Johnson and Raymond Jennings of Jacksonville
:and Young Jennings; (3) Miss Ida Schmid
and her father Walter Schmid, Schmid's Dairy,
Sarasota: (4) Dairymen Carroll Ward, Sr..
left, and Jr. of Winter Park: (5) Miami dairy-
men. left to right, Henry Perry. K. Van
Landingham and J. T. Stewar't.

M. I. F. Announces Schedule

For 1953 Sales Courses

The Milk Industry Foundation has an-
nounced the following schedule for their
1953 Milk Sales Training Classes which
are held at the Burlington Hotel, Wash-
ington, D. C.:
January 26-February 6
March 2-March 13
April 6-April 17
May 4-May 15
September 14-September 25
October 5-October 16
November 9-November 20
November 30-December 11
Each class is limited to 20 men to per-
mit maximum participation by class mem-
bers. The curriculum features numerous
"learning-by-doing" sessions and use of
the conference method of training to in-
crease sales.
Tom Douglas, director of the Institute,
has emphasized the fact that the training
provided is suited to representatives of
both small and large Dairies. A total
of 282 have taken the course to date.
Information regarding attendance can
be had by writing Tom Douglas, M.I.F.,
1625 Eye St., N. W., Washington 6, D.C.






PICTURES AT RIGHT, Top. shous the
State Guernsey Sale in action at Largo. CEN-
TER: The lop price animal of the Largo Sale
:ind buyers, Dr. Roberto Parajon (left) and
his father (with glasses) of Harana, Cuba.
BOTTOM: The top price animal of the Lake
Worth Sale with buyers, the Parajoun of Ha-
tana, and the sellers, WI. A. Boutuell, Sr.
(center) and Earl Jensen (right) of the Bout-
iell Dairy, Lake Worth.

SOUTHERN ICE CREAM GROUP

INVITED TO FLORIDA

Florida Ice Cream Manufacturers were
well represented at the 38th Annual
Convention of the Southern Association
of Ice Cream Manufacturers held Novem-
ber 11-13 in New Orleans.
With a registration of 800, including
Ice Cream Manufacturers, Allied Trades
and wives, the Convention was one of
the largest ever held by this group.
Highlights of the well planned three-
day program, in addition to seeing the
charms of Old New Orleans, were ad-
dresses by John Harvey Furbay, Execu-
tive of Trans-World Airlines on "At
Home In One World"; by Dr. W. A.
King of Clemson College, S. C. on
"What Grassland Farming Means to the
Ice Cream Industry"; by Congressman
Edward Herbert of Louisiana on "Na-
tional Affairs"; by Charles Evans, Execu-
tive of Arkansas Power & Light Co., on
"How Business Clicks"; by Robert C.
Hibben, General Manager, International
Association of Ice Cream Manufacturers,
on "Looking Ahead With the Ice Cream
Industry"; and by Jack Nisbet, Sales
Executive of Columbus, Ohio, on "Mer-
chandising Ice Cream."
Two other important features of the
program were the "Ice Cream Clinic"
with 62 samples of ice cream from all
over the Southern States and a "Panel
Discussion" by a dozen of the Indus-
try's leading Executives on the subject
of "Ice Cream Substitutes."
President Tom Mayfield in his ad-
dress to the Convention said, "The big-
gest problem confronting the Ice Cream
Industry today is the ice cream substi-
tute made wholly of vegetable fats, in-
stead of Dairy Cream which is being
sold as ice cream." The Convention came
to the conclusion that this product is here
to stay just as butter substitutes, and that
the best way to deal with it is to see
that frozen dessert laws identify the
(Continued Page 34)


Some one said recently: "The govern-
ment not only has the habit of living
beyond its income, but also of late of
living beyond OURS."
-Brake Service, Akron, Ohio.


DECEMBER, 1952 & JANUARY, 1953 7









DAIRY ASSOCIATION ACTIVITIES


F. D. I. A. Pasture Committee

To Sponsor State Contest

In Pasture Improvement

Herman Boyd, F.D.I.A. producer director and partner in the Hall and Boyd
Dairy, Miami, has been selected to head the Association's important Pasture Develop-
ment Committee for 1953.
The Hall and Boyd Dairy is recognized as having developed some of the best
dairy pasture and dairy farm grasses anywhere in the State of Florida. These pastures
were among those visited on the farm tour of Miami dairies during the 1952 F.D.I.A.
Annual Meeting. A picture of one of their fields while this tour was in progress
is seen on the cover of this issue of the Dairy News.


The 1953 Pasture Development Com-
mittee is scheduled to meet December
llth in Tampa to complete plans for a
state-wide Dairy Pasture Improvement
and Development Contest which it will
sponsor with the assistance and co-spon-
sorship of Mr. C. W. Reaves, University
of Florida Dairy Extension Specialist and
with the assistance of pasture specialists
of the University of Fla. College of
Agriculture and the cooperation of Coun-
ty Farm Agents.
The program has received the hearty
endorsement of the Association's Board
of Directors.
Committee Members Named
Members of the Pasture Development
Committee recently announced by F. D. I.
A. president Wilmer Bassett are:
DAIRYMEN-Herman Boyd, Chairman;
Glenn S. Datson, Orlando; Henry Perry,
Miami; Walter Welkener, Jacksonville;
Ernest Nowak, Cantonment; Ben S. War-
ing, Madison; W. A. Boutwell, Sr., Lake
Worth; J. D. Fuqua, Altha; Carroll L.
Ward, Sr., Winter Park; T. Stin Haselton,
Eustis; Hubert Christmas, Cottondale; F.
D. Magill, Jacksonville; Julian Lane,
Tampa; T. G. Lee, Orlando; Al Wells,
Jacksonville; H. C. Hunt, Delray Beach;
T. D. Salter, Milton; Warren Tyre, Lake
City; M. M. Bryant, Gainesville; John
Sargeant, Lakeland; Ernest Graham, Mi-
ami; M. T. Crutchfield, Chipley; Lloyd
Benson, Delray Beach; COUNTY FARM
AGENTS-J. N. Watson, Jacksonville;
Alec White, Tampa; Paul Hayman, Lake-
land; M. U. Mounts, West Palm Beach;
and UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
DAIRY AND PASTURE SPECIALISTS
-C. W. Reaves, C. M. Hampson and
Russell Henderson, all of Gainesville.
A beauty preparation manufacturer re-
ports a new super lip-stick that's winter-
proof but the sweet young things may
not be eager to have lips that repel the
chaps.


COMING F.D.I.A. EVENTS
PASTURE DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE
Dec. 11-Tampa
To adopt a 1953 State-wide Pasture Develop-
ment Program and Contest.
DIRECTORS' FINAL 1952 MEETING
Dec. 12-Tampa
LEGISLATIVE COMMITTEE
Dec. 12-Tampa
MEMBERSHIP EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
Dec. 12-Tampa
PUBLIC RELATIONS COMMITTEE
Dec. 12-Tampa
PLANT COMMITTEE
January 7-Jacksonville
The Committee and Milk Plant Managers of
the State Meet to consider Milk Sales Train-
ing. Director Tom Douglas of the Milk
Foundation Sales Training Institute, Wash.,
D. C. will meet with the group.
MILK & ICE CREAM MANAGERS
March 2nd-Jacksonville
A special one-day conference of Florida Milk
& Ice Cream Managers and Sales Managers
to consider plans for special programs, "Milk
in May", "June Dairy Month" and "1953
Ice Cream Festival".
JUNE DAIRY MONTH COMMITTEE
March 2nd-Jacksonville

1953 Florida Convention
Back to Miami Beach
The Florida Dairy Industry Associa-
tion's Annual Meeting and Convention
for 1953 will return to Miami Beach and
the Hotel Casablanca for a return en-
gagement of the 1952 Convention.
Dates announced for the Convention
are June 24, 25, 26-Wednesday, Thurs-
day and Friday.
The unanimous decision of the Annual
Meeting Comimttee and the Board of
Directors to take the 1953 Annual Meet-
ing back to the same location and the
same hotel as the 1952 Convention was
likewise unanimous among the members
who enjoyed the tropical surroundings of
Miami Beach and the superb oceanfront
location and facilities of the Hotel Casa-
blanca.


Dairyman John Sargeant
New F. D. I. A. Director

John Sargeant, Lakeland Dairyman and
Guernsey breeder, has the distinction of
being the first director of the Florida
Dairy Industry Association elected from
Polk County.
Sargeant was elected at the Associa-
tion's 1952 Annual Meeting in June as
one of the five producer directors of the
Association. The others are Wayne
Webb, Tampa; Frank Doub, Jacksonville;
George Johnson, West Palm Beach; and
Herman Boyd, Miami.
The Sargeant Dairy Farms, which John
now operates, is located a few miles
north of Lakeland.
It was established as
a dairy farm by
John's father, Joseph
C. Sargeant, in 1921
and was operated
continuously in both
production and dis-
tribution until 1951
when the distribution
SARGEANT was sold to Borden's.
The Dairy started
breeding Guernseys in 1938 and now has
a 100% registered herd.
As a Guernsey breeder, the dairy has
the Grand Champion female, Alabama
State Fair 1949 and the Florida State
Fair 1949, the Grand Champion Bull in
the Florida Fair 1949 and the Reserve
and Senior Champion Bull in the Florida
State Fair 1952.
John is in the Champion Class him-
self, having served as Vice President of
the Florida Guernsey Cattle Club in 1940
and President of the Club in 1950-51.
The Sargeant Dairy Farm operates with
180 purebred Guernseys on 300 acres of
land with a large percentage of improved
pasture.
John was born in Birmingham, Ala-
bama, went to school in Birmingham and
Lakeland, lives on the farm with his
wife, Ann, and three children. He has
three brothers: J. C. Jr., who lives in
Birmingham; Ralph, who lives in Winter
Haven; and J. Stanley, who lives in
Lakeland.
John is an active member and officer
in the First Methodist Church of Lake-
land and a member of the Kiwanis Club
of Lakeland.


8 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


11 -~






Directors' Meeting Held
October 24 25
In Jacksonville

Florida Dairy Industry Association Di-
rectors met in Jacksonville, October 24-
25 for their 4th regular quarterly meet-
ing of 1952.
Thirteen of the 15 Directors were pres-
ent with the other two members repre-
sented by alternates.
REPORTS AND RECOMMENDA-
TIONS WERE RECEIVED FROM THE
FOLLOWING STANDING AND
SPECIAL COMMITTEES: Committee
on Membership Meetings, Herman Bur-
nett, Bradenton, Chairman; Public Health
Committee, Brady Johnston, Jacksonville,
Chairman; Legislative Committee, by Co-
Chairmen Theo Datson of Orlando and
Frank Doub, Jacksonville; Annual Meet-
ing Committee: Frank Doub, Jackson-
ville, Chairman; Florida Dairy News
Committee, Curry Bassett, Tallahassee,
Chairman; Public Relations Committee,
Cliff Wayne, Miami, Chairman; Plant
Operations Committee, Russell Bevan, St.
Petersburg, Chairman; Membership Com-
mittee, by Co-Chairmen Gordon Nielsen
of West Palm Beach, George Boutwell
of Lake Worth and Frank Doub of
Jacksonville; Finance Committee, J. N.
McArthur, Miami, Chairman and Treas-
urer. Executive Director E. T. Lay re-
ported on Association activities including
the recent annual conventions of the Na-
tional Milk and Ice Cream Associations
held in Chicago.

Action of the Board
(a) Minutes and reports were approved.
(b) The budget for the remainder of
the year 1952 was revised and ap-
proved.
(c) Voted to hold the 1953 ,Annual
Meeting again at the Casablanca
Hotel, Miami Beach June 24, 25, 26.
(d) Voted to sponsor a Florida Dairy
Industry dinner in Tampa during
Dairy Show week at the 1953 Flor-
ida State Fair, February 12.
(e) Approved suggested plans for a
membership campaign for 1953
membership to increase present mem-
bership and complete active local
units of the State Association in
each county or area of the State.
(f) Approved suggested plan for pro-
moting the holding of Safety Train-
ing classes in the larger Dairy Plants
and in each area for groups of
smaller plants.
(g) Approved recommendations for As-
sociation sponsorship together with
the Florida Agricultural Experiment
and Extension Service of a 1953
Green Pasture and Pasture Improve-
ment Program.


Pictured above are te members of the F.D.I.A. Plant Committee which assisted the Dairy
Science Dept., Unit'. of Fla. in the planning and promotion of the 1952 Annual Plant Super-
intendents Short Course, held Oct. 9-11. Standing, left to right, are William J. Harman, Jr.,
Coates Bull, John Lewis, Clarence Wood, Leon C. O'Quinn; James F. Beatty, Lonnie Jones,
and Donald E. Perret. Seated, left to right, are Charles IV. Ankerberg, George Tworoger,
Russell Beranl (Chairman of the Committee), Dr. Leon Mull, Rudy J. Schnedier, and Secretary
E. T. Lay.
F. D. I. A. Plant Committee


DAIRY ASSOCIATION OFFICIALS
IN MEETINGS WITH MEMBERS
THROUGHOUT THE STATE

During the months of October and
November, President Wilmer Bassett and
several other officials of the Florida Dairy
Industry Association toured the State in
whistle-stop conferences with the mem-
bership from Jacksonville to Pensacola to
Miami.
This was the most extensive series of
meetings with the Association members
ever undertaken by a President of the
Association.
Meetings were held in Jacksonville,
Tallahassee, Marianna, Chipley, Pensa-
cola, Orlando, Tampa, Sarasota and Mi-
ami.
President Bassett and Director Her-
man Burnett as chairman of a special
committee appointed by the Board to sur-
vey the membership on dairy problems
and legislative policies, both of whom at-
tended the entire series of meetings, said
they believed the tour was the most con-
structive set of membership meetings held
by the Association in recent years.
Members of the Committee participat-
ing in the meeting, in addition to Bas-
sett and Burnett, were: Frank Doub, pro-
ducer of Jacksonville; Cody Skinner, pro-
ducer-distributor of Jacksonville; Jack
Johnson, distributor of Jacksonville; Theo
Datson, distributor, Orlando; W. J. Bar-
ritt, Jr., distributor, Tampa; John Sar-
geant, producer, Lakeland; George Bout-
well, producer-distributor, Lake Worth;
George Johnson, producer, West Palm
Beach; Dick Dressel, producer-distribu-
tor, Miami; and Herman Boyd, producer,
Miami.


Praised for 1952 Activities

Members of the Plant Committee of
the Florida Dairy Industry Association re-
ceived the commendation of President
Wilmer Bassett in a recent letter to the
Committee's Chairman Russell Bevan
(Borden manager, St. Petersburg) for
the constructive activities of the Commit-
tee during 1952.
Among the activities of the Commit-
tee were: Co-sponsorship of the Annual
Plant Superintendents Short Course and
Conference with the Dairy Science De-
partment of the University of Florida,
cooperation with the Annual Meeting
Committee in planning the Plant portion
of the Annual Meeting program, year-
round attention to matters pertaining to
plant operation with recommendations for
Association action when deemed neces-
sary.
A special accomplishment of the Com-
mittee during 1952 was the sponsoring
of the first Annual Conference and Short
Course at the University of Florida for
Milk Laboratory Technicians. This con-
ference was held June 9-13 at the Uni-
versity of Florida Dairy Laboratory in
Gainesville with the cooperation of the
Dairy Science Department staff with 26
laboratory technicians attending.
The Plant Committee held two plan-
ning meetings-one in Gainesville and
one in Orlando in preparation for the
programs which it sponsored and a final
meeting with the Staff of the University
of Florida Dairy Science Department fol-
lowing the October 9-11 Plant Short
Course for advance planning of the 1953
program.


DECEMBER, 1952 & JANUARY, 1953 9






Southern Dairies Buy Plant Building

For Permanent Operation In Marianna


On October 20th the civic authorities
of Marianna and Jackson County, Flor-
ida, celebrated the successful completion
of a community program aimed at the
development of the agricultural resources
of Jackson County.
The occasion of the celebration was the
announcement of Southern Dairies, Inc.,
that after a four year trial operation in
the area in the receiving and processing
of milk produced in the area, the com-
pany's operation was to be placed on
a permanent basis.
As evidence of the decision, Southern
Dairies completed on the same date the
purchase from the Jackson County Im-
provement Association of the $28,000.00
Dairy Plant Building which was con-
structed by that organization in 1948 es-
pecially for and leased to Southern Dairies
for the temporary trial period.
In observing the event a special meet-
ing and ceremony was held at the Mar-
ianna Chamber of Commerce by officials
of Jackson County, the City of Marianna,
the Marianna Chamber of Commerce and
both local and visiting officials of South-
ern Dairies.
The proceedings of the ceremony were
broadcast 'by the Marianna Radio Station
WTVS. County Agent Woodrow Glenn
and other civic leaders reviewed the his-
tory of the civic program which had re-
sulted in the establishing of the Southern
Dairies Plant in Marianna and the great
development of milk production in the
area.
The Improvement Association raised
the money among the business interests
of the area to construct a Dairy Plant
Building in 1947 which it offered to
Southern Dairies on a five-year lease basis
with an option to buy the building if
within that time the project for milk
production and distribution in the area
proved to be profitable and desirable to
them.
Spokesmen for Southern Dairies said
that the fact that the option was taken
up after only four years is evidence of
the fact that the project was a success.
County Agent Glenn reported that
within the brief four year trial period,

ARTIFICIAL BREEDERS GROUP
HOLD FISH FRY MEETING
About 125 persons attended a Novem-
ber 11 fish fry and meeting of the Arti-
ficial Breeders Association of the Sara-
sota-Bradenton area.
State Extension Dairyman C. W.
Reaves addressed the meeting and Sara-
sota County Farm Agent Kenneth Clark
presided.


milk production in the area had in-
creased from practically nothing to to-
day's record of sixty milk producing farms
with a dairy cow population of 2500.
Mr. Jess Hoy, manager of the Southern
Dairies Plant, reported that the plant is
now processing 2500 gallons of milk
daily to meet the demands for milk in
the area but that only about 1400 gal-
lons of this supply is produced in the
area. He stressed the urgent need for
more dairying in the County. "Southern
Dairies would like to see at least 25
more milk producing dairies in the area
with at least 500 more milk cows within
the next six months," he said.
Mr. Glenn pointed out that several
outstanding advances have been made in
Dairy farming of the area as a result of
the past four-years program including
the organization of a Dairy Herd Im-
provement Association designed to im-
prove herd management and milk quality,
the formation of an Artificial Breeding
Association and the development of a
great amount of improved pastures.


MILK FACTS

SOne quart of MILK is 2 pounds of
Nature's most nearly perfect food.
MILK is one of the outstanding
food buys today.



This is the quart of
milk you get at to-
day's Fla. prices.





This is the amount of
milk, about 2/3 quart,
you would get at to-
day's price had milk
prices risen as much
as all foods combined.





There is no industry more important to
the health and welfare of this country
than the Dairy Industry.


~WL~U!DL~ I 'T


Shown above is the Southern Dairies Plant, Marianna and members of the Marianna-Jackson
County Chamber of Commerce and officials of Southern Dairies, Inc., as they completed the
transfer of this Dairy Plant property, constructed by the Jackson County Improvement Associa-
tion, to Southern Dairies, Inc. Front row (left to right): J. A. Ormond, abstract executive;
J. D. Hoy, manager Southern Dairies, Marianna; F. T. MacKinnon, secretary, and R. A. Willis,
Sr., president, Improvement Association; C. D. Wayne, Miami, state manager Southern Dairies.
and C. Davis Turner, director, Improvement Association. Back row (left to right): James
Schools, field representative; W. J. Harman, Jr.. Gainesville, production manager; W: G.
Burton, Jacksonville manager, all of Southern Dairies; C. C. Bro'n and W. S. Bevis. Improve-
ment Corporation: and Mayor J. M. Sims of Marianna.


10 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS




















Seen above are the members of Florida's 1952
4-H Dairy Team which competed in the Na-
tional Cattle Congress 4-H judging contest:
David Page and Inez Thornhill, center, zion
individual honors.
TWO OF FLORIDA'S 4-H TEAM
SCORE IN NATIONAL JUDGING
While Florida's 1952 State 4-H Dairy
Judging Team did not bring home the
National team championship as did the
1951 team, the two boys and two girls
making up the team gave a good account
of themselves in the National 4-H Dairy
Judging Contest held September 29 at
the National Cattle Congress in Waterloo,
Iowa.
David Page, member of the team from
Fernandina, won 1st place in the Jersey
Judging Contest and Inez Thornhill from
Dundee won 2nd high honors in Ayr-
shire judging.
The team placed 4th in Ayrshire judg-
ing but did not place among the first
ten in the over-all contest.
C. W. Reaves, Florida State Extension
Dairyman, acted as coach for the team
and both he and Miss Helen Holstein
of the State Home Demonstration staff,
Tallahassee, accompanies the team to
Waterloo.
Members of the team in addition to
Page and Miss Thornhill were Marjorie
Lamb, Ocala, and Clyde Crutchfield,
Marianna.
The judging contest in which the team
participated included ten classes repre-
senting five major dairy breeds. Both oral
and written reasons were required on
five classes. The team members report
that the national show and the contest
were both an education and an inspira-
tion. Over 2,000 of the best dairy cattle
of the nation were on exhibit.
The team visited a number of well
known dairy farms both enroute to
Waterloo and on their return trip.
Mr. C. W. Reaves, as coach for the
team, reports that in his opinion the
members of the team have every reason
to be proud of their showing in the Na-
tional Contest and that the experience of
attending and participating in the top
Dairy Show of the nation will be of last-
ing value to each of the four dairy-
minded members of the team.


Through the Years
it has been our pleasure
to play host to the
FLORIDA DAIRY INDUSTRY
We take this opportunity to extend to one and all

R lery ferry hristmas

And a Bright and Successful 1953.

0


THE KLOEPPEL HOTELS

ROBERT KLOEPPEL, President
ROBERT KLOEPPEL, JR., V. P. and Gen'l Mgr.


HOTEL MAYFLOWER
Jacksonville


NEW HOTEL JEFFERSON
Jacksonville


HOTEL GEORGE WASHINGTON
Jacksonville


HOTEL PENNSYLVANIA


HOTEL GEORGE WASHINGTON


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DECEMBER, 1952 & JANUARY, 1953


S11


























































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CLEANING. LOWER COUNTS,
AND HIGHER QUALITY MILK
Simplify your cleaning and sanitizing with
the tested and proved Klenzade Farm
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and rinse away heaviest fats and grease-
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ular and best bal-
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coast to coast. Ask
your dealer.

RO 09


Florida Dairymen Attend School At

St. Louis Purina Research Farm


More Pasture Doesn't

Cut YOUR Feed Cost...


BETTER

PASTURES DO!


Take a look at your pasture.
Is it deep rich green, fast
growing and palatable? If not,
NACO can help you. Proper
pasture programs produce
higher nutrient value resulting
in less need for supplements.
Your NACO representative is
an expert on fertilization.
NACO can help you produce
milk most economically.




COMPANY

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
FT. PIERCE, FLORIDA
Manufacturers of Five Star Fertilizers


BY JOHN IV. CHAPIN
Ralslon Purina Coipan y
Florida dairymen are on the lookout
for ideas. Ideas that will help step up
milk production and cut costs-ideas that
mean bigger profits! And they are wil-
ling to hunt for these ideas even if it
means a thousand mile trip! This was
demonstrated when late in September a
group of Florida dairymen joined 250
other Southern dairymen for a trip to St.
Louis to attend a 2-day school and tour
of *the Ralston Purina Research Farm.
Hundreds of Florida farmers have vis-
ited this Farm before on regular tours to
find out how Purina scientists get more
milk and profits out of good average
dairy cows . far more than the U. S.
average. Of course, the method is no
secret for farm people are quick to show
that it's done with careful feeding, sound
management and good sanitation.
Since the group was especially interest-
ed in research work and money-making
information on dairying, Director of Pur-
ina Livestock Research, John Thompson,
keynoted the day with his talk at the
main dairy unit. The Florida dairymen
and the other guests looked over the ade-
quate-but far from fancy individual
calving stalls (the Farm is not a show
place). They heard Thompson say, "Men
-here's where your dairy profits begin.
Right here-with good, healthy calves
that you'll raise yourself for herd re-
placements. And if you do a good job of
growing your calves and breed them by
weight at 750 pounds for Holsteins and
Brown Swiss, 650 lbs. for Ayrshires,
or 550 pounds for Guernseys and Jer-
seys, they'll be in the herd milking before
they're two years old. They'll have a
mighty good chance to pay for them-
selves by 30 to 36 months of age. And
remember . when you raise your own


FARM



Dairy group seen entering the Purina St. Louis Research Farm Auditorium where they attended
classes and demonstrations on latest Dairy Farm methods.


12 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


replacements you know you're not getting
someone else's culls."
It was Mr. Thompson's opinion that
some of the dairymen in concentrated
production areas of Florida would bene-
fit by concentrating on better roughage,
raising replacements, and better feeding
-even if it meant shifting some dairy
herds to less populous areas of the state
to allow room to spread out.
"YOU WANT COWS LIKE
THESE." Mr. Thompson pointed out
cows, both Guernseys and Holsteins, that
had given over 100,000-some over 150,-
000-pounds of milk. "It takes BOTH
long life and high production to make
such records possible. Cows that live a
long time produce milk for less, and
make more profits because their first cost
is spread over more years."
The herd on the Purina Research Farm
was started in 1927. The original cows
during the first year produced an average
of 6,800 pounds of milk. Since then
no new females have been brought in--
no bull used that cost more than $500.
Yet the herd has increased production 15
times faster than has the average U. S.
herd. The average production per cow is
now over 14,000 pounds of milk per
year.
AND CALVES! Those that Martin
Groene raises at the experimental calf
unit average 50 to 60 pounds more than
standard for the breed at four months
old. They are big, growth, healthy
calves-grown on limited milk, (or none
at all) and Calf Startena. No milk after
one month. No hay until two months
old! Martin stressed the no hay angle.
"After all," he said, "a calf doesn't have
much capacity up to two months. So
to keep her growing fast without digestive
disturbances, you need to get all the
(Continued next page)






PURINA FARM SCHOOL
(Continued from page 12)
nutrients you can into her. That's why
we feed Startena alone rather than with
hay.
"DRY COWS CAN BE SAVINGS
BANKS! Just think (Cliff Perdew, Man-
ager of the Farm Dairy Department, was
speaking at the dry cow unit), every
pound of extra condition-not fat mind
you, but good, honest condition you put
on your cows, means an extra 10 to 20
pounds of milk during her lactation!
What's milk worth in Florida? What
would an extra 100 pounds of condition
on each of your cows mean to you in
extra profits?"
"It takes careful feeding and care to
get cows to the extra condition that
means top profit. Dry cows are hard
workers. Fully two-thirds of the calf is
developed in the last 60 days before
calving. And the cow also needs to put
on that 100 pounds of extra condition.
To do the job right she must have a
full two month rest and be fed a body-
BUILDING ration."
What's reported here is a mere frac-
tion of the material that was covered in
talks, demonstrations, and wind-up ses-
sion at the Purina Farm. Men crammed
memo books full of notes, heads full of
ideas, tummies full of good food!
No-it wasn't all speeches. There was
plenty of other fun too-the big family
style noon meal at the Farm, the banquet
at the main office in St. Louis that night,
and the show!
The next afternoon the group was on
its way back to Florida and parts south-
east. But not before they'd seen the St.
Louis Mill and the modern Research
Laboratories where feeds and ingredients
get preliminary testing and where Chows
are tested to insure high quality.
So it was quite a trip! Well worth
the 1,000 miles and two days it took!
Well worth it in ideas to help step up
production and cut costs--ideas that
mean bigger profits for Florida dairy-
men!


ICE CREAM SALES TRAINING
SCHEDULE FOR SPRING 1953
Dates for 1953 Spring Sessions of the
Ice Cream Merchandising Institute, Inc.,
operated in cooperation with the Interna-
tional Association of Ice Cream Manufac-
turers have been announced by George
W. Hennerich, director, as follows:
January 5-January 16
January 26-February 6
February 16-February 27
March 2-March 13
All classes are held at the Institute
headquarters in Washington, D. C. In
each case students should arrive at least
one day before the opening of the course.
Inquiries about attendance may be di-
rected to 1022 Barr Bldg., Washington
6, D. C.

ICE CREAM FACTS
Florida ranked 17th in the nation in
1950 for ice cream production with 91/2
million gallons. Florida ranked 5th in
the Southern States with Texas, North
Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia in first
to fourth place, respectively. Pennsyl-
vania topped the nation in ice cream pro-
duction with 66 million gallons and New
York, second, with 58 million gallons.


N. C. JERSEY BREEDER
WINS NATIONAL HONORS
Biltmore Signal Bess Jane, a 5-year-old
Jersey cow owned by Biltmore Farms,
Biltmore, N. C., repeated her last year's
performance of winning the grand cham-
pion Jersey cow honors at the National
Dairy Cattle Congress held in Waterloo,
Iowa, September 27-October 4. Biltmore
Dendy Royal, a sire from the same farm,
was named grand champion bull in the
Jersey Show.
This year's show was considerably lar-
ger than last year. Sixty-nine exhibitors
from 11 different states entered 194 Jer-
seys in the event, which offered over
$8,000 in premiums and 16 trophies.
Biltmore Farms also won the national
premier breeder and premier exhibitor
awards in the Jersey division.
No Florida breeders participated in the
show.


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DECEMBER, 1952 & JANUARY, 1953 13


TOPS IN QUALITY
TOPS IN UNIFORMITY
ORDER A

MORNING GLO

MELLOHEAT

NON-FAT DRY MILK SOLIDS
Available at:
MILLER MACHINERY & SUPPLY CO. of Jacksonville
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kFTER (

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ORDER











Tampa







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


DAIRY REVIEW


Extension Service Dairy Products Laboratory
Dairy Farm Research Unit Agricultural Experiment Station

Successful Short Course and Conference

For Dairy Plant Supervisors at U. of F.

The 15th Annual Short Course and Conference for Dairy Plant Superintendents
and Supervisors was held October 9-11 at the University of Florida with a registra-
tion of eighty. While most of those attending were from Florida, the States of
Georgia, Alabama and Louisiana were represented.
Although this popular Annual Short Course is sponsored by the Dairy Science
Department of the University of Florida, in recent years it has received the co-spon-
sorship and strong support of the Florida Dairy Industry Association Dairy Plant
Committee.
Dr. E. L. Fouts, Head of the Dairy Science Department, acted as Conference
Chairman; Mr. Russell W. Bevan, Manager of Borden's Dairy of St. Petersburg and
head of the F.D.I.A. Plant Committee, served as Co-Chairman; and Dr. Leon Mull


served as Coordinating Chairman.
This year's Short Course program, con-
sidered one of the best ever held, in-
cluded such outstanding authorities on
Dairy Plant Management as: Mr. H. P.
Hodes of the Tri-Clover Machine Co.,
Kenosha, Wisconsin, who discussed
"Permanent Pipe-lines"; Mr. F. M. Gray,
Southern Dairies, Washington, D. C.,
who spoke on "Personal Management";
Mr. G. C. Urian of the Sharples Cor-
poration, Philadelphia, spoke on the sub-
ject of 'Cold Milk-Clarification-Sepa-
ration-Standardization"; Mr. Win. A.
Cordes of National Dairy Products Cor-
poration, presented the subject of "Starter
Control"; Mr. O. E. Ross of National
Pectin Co., Chicago, spoke on the subject
of "Sherbet Manufacture"; Mr. Lee P.
Bickenbach of Mojonnier Bros. Co., Chi-
cago, discussed "Bulk Handling of Milk";


and Mr. Bruce Thomas of the Florida
Industrial Commission, Tallahassee, spoke
on "Plant Safety."
Considerable interest was shown in the
subject of balancing ice cream mixes,
composition and ingredients, presented by
Mr. John N. Lewis, Plant Superintend-
ent of Southern Dairies, Inc. of Miami.
"When speaking of a quality ice cream,
will undoubtedly have in mind an ice
cream that will be successful in his com-
munity; and ice cream preferences will
vary from community to community.
Sugar and butterfat are two ingredients
which will invariably differ in certain lo-
calities and with these variations, the sell-
ing price will also be affected," said Mr.
Lewis.
Mr. W. A. Cordes, of the Plant Pro-


Members of the U. of F. Dairy Science faculty and group attending the 1952 Dairy Plant
Short Course.


ORDER NOW
1952 Dairy Plant Manual

This Manual includes copies of
the papers and lectures of the prin-
cipal speakers of the 1952 Annual
Short Course for Plant Superintend-
ents and Supervisors held October
9-11 at the Dairy Science Depart-
ment, University of Florida, and
other important Plant Information.
Edited by Staff Members, U. of
F. Dairy Dept.

Copies available from F.D.I.A.
Plant Committee, 220 Newnan
St., Jacksonville, Florida, $1.50
postpaid.



duction Division of National Dairy
Products Co., New York, in discussing
"Starter Control" for the manufacture of
buttermilk and cottage cheese emphasized
that the role of the starter maker is a
difficult one. He must study the con-
ditiorfs under which he must operate
and apply to them a knowledge of the
manner of growth and activity of the two
types of organisms that he has to deal
with in his starters. Success in this work
is a primary factor in the efforts of the
dairy products manufacturer to give con-
sumers superior quality in buttermilk and
cottage cheese," explained Mr. Cordes.
Mr. O. E. Ross of National Pectin Co.
of Chicago, created considerable interest
in a sherbet demonstration in which a
wide variety of samples were used to
show the effect of variations in compo-
sition.
The Yellow Dogs (a secret society of
those who attend the Short Course) were
in their usual good form. Twenty new
members were initiated into the "Pine
Stump Kennel" with Chief Cur W. A.
Krienke officiating. Many of the new
members pledged their presence at initia-
tion ceremonies next year.
About ninety persons, including the
wives and guests of plant superintendents,
attended the colorful 15th Annual Ban-
quet on the University Campus. Dr. H.
H. Rothe, State Department of Agricul-
ture Dairy Supervisor of Gainesville, acted
as Master of Ceremonies for the occasion.
A delightful fellowship hour, spon-
sored by the Allied Trades Members of
F.D.I.A., preceded the Annual Dinner
and the F.D.I.A. Plant Committee spon-
sored a splendid entertainment program.
At the conclusion of the Conference a
brief meeting of the F.D.I.A. Plant Op-
erations Committee and the U. of F.
Dairy Science Department staff was held
for discussion of plans for the 1953
Short Course Program.


14 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS





/RELATION OF FLORIDA RESEARCH PROGRAMS

TO MORE EFFICIENT MILK PRODUCTION

By DR. R. B. BECKER
Dairy Husbandman, University of Florida

The Dairy Industry is located in so many small units, and distributed so widely
over the farms in this country that few people realize that dairying truly is big
business. It is the source of over 20 percent of total farm income in the United
States, and more families depend on dairying for part or all of their livelihood than
on any other single branch of industry (1 in every 15 families).
It was Will Rogers who once said that "if all the cows failed to come up to
be milked one morning, it would cause more consternation than if all the banks
should close."
What is this Dairy Industry, and how does it affect us?


Dairy products represent almost one-
fourth of our food supply in this coun-
try-sweet milk and cream, butter, but-
terfat, chocolate milk, ice cream, many
kinds of soft and hard cheese, malted
milk and the milk powders. What cook
can make a delectable meal without
milk? The fine even texture of bread
that stays fresh long is attained from
some of the proteins
of milk. The Betty
Crocker research kit-
chen of General
Mills and others
have improved many
recipes by inclusion
of milk products in
their formulas. Foot-
ball players, movie
DR. BECKER queens, curly headed
youngsters, high
school athletes, working men and women,
and even the aged and infirm benefit
from a quart of milk daily, as experience
has shown.
How does the Dairy Industry and the
consumers of its products benefit from
research ?
Long prior to written history, the
white race domesticated cattle in Asia
and took these good animals with them
in early migrations. Columbus brought
cows to the western world on his second
voyage. A large proportion of the first
Pilgrims died the first winter, including
all under three years of age. Some of
the 13 colonies had laws to prevent kill-
ing of cows, so as to develop a source
of milk particularly for the early colon-
ists. Their cattle were the common kinds
brought from the native lands by these
hardy settlers. Such were the early cows
of the Western Hemisphere.

PROGRESS IN HERD
IMPROVEMENT
Progressive leaders and Agricultural
Societies sought by several means to im-
prove their livestock in some small dis-
tricts and countries over many years,
slowly developing animals of recognized
qualities, that were foundations of dairy


breeds. These breeds became popular for
milk production and spread to many
countries. Some of the earliest improve-
ments of dairy cows in this country was
based on a comparison of milk produc-
tion of the good dairy breeds, of common
cows, and of their first-and second-cross
progeny. Subsequently purebred dairy
bulls were used widely for grading up
dairy herds. One seldom sees a common
cow used even as a family cow, but in-
stead it will be a grade Jersey, Guernsey
or one of the other breeds. Dean H. H.
Kildee, formerly of Iowa State College,
who judged dairy cattle at the Florida
State Fair for the past 3 years was one
of the leaders in this movement. Dairy
specialists and county agents in every
state have encouraged and expanded the
benefits of this research in breeding bet-
ter dairy cattle.
In 1780, artificial breeding began with
dogs in Italy. A few isolated instances
of work with dairy cattle occurred in this
country soon after 1900. In 1937, E. J.
Perry of New Jersey visited Denmark
and observed a cooperative breeding so-
ciety in which a 3-year old bull had sup-
plied semen to some 900 cows in one
season. On returning, he organized the
first cooperative artificial breeding asso-
ciation in America for dairy cattle in 1938,
using bulls whose daughters already had
proved them to be desirable transmitters.
Research begun in Russia soon was trans-
lated, and United States workers applied
their efforts to many problems related
thereto. Last year over 3,500,000 cows
were serviced by few more than 2,000
bulls in the United States alone. There
are too few desirably proved bulls to
meet the needs in this field. Currently,
16 cooperative units bred 18 percent of
the dairy cows in Florida in 1951, and
numbers are on the increase. What has
been the effect? Many dairymen now are
raising an increasing proportion of heifer
calves for replacements, and getting high-
er production per cow from such animals
sired by good proved bulls, than from
the older cows from which they were
raised.


IMPORTANCE OF DAIRY FEEDS
In order to grow, reproduce, maintain
their bodies and produce milk, cows must
have feed. These animals suffered and
many starved in the winter under open-
range conditions of Europe in feudal
times and later. When the move for land
enclosure or "fencing the range" began,
enterprising people took interest in im-
proving pastures and preserving feed for
winter use. Crusaders, travellers, and ag-
ricultural explorers brought in new and
better crops for livestock. The same thing
happened in Florida. Research in live-
stock feeds has been most active. Interest
has increased also, about ways to pre-
serve extra feed for use in winter, and
during dry seasons. Who hasn't heard
of Southland winter oats, White Dutch
clover for winter pasture, Pensacola bahia,
and Pangola grasses-all products of re-
search locally during the last 20 years.
Professor John M. Scott was the first
to feed dried citrus pulp to dairy cows-
a product dried in Tampa by Seth S.
Walker, a former Gainesville resident.
Citrus pulp previously had to be hauled
from the canneries and thrown in the
woods away from habitation. Last year,
as the result of research, service, and
teamwork with industry, there were 188,-
000 tons of dried citrus pulp and 70,342
tons of citrus molasses made in Florida
alone for livestock feed. Other states ac-
tive in the field included Louisiana,
Texas, Arizona and California. Florida
dairy cows benefitted from this research.
Hay drying and ensiling of Florida
crops have been part of the research pro-
gram with feeds. You will hear much
more about them in the next 10 years.
Florida cattlemen are mineral conscious
because of the results of research. The
cause of a condition in cattle called "Salt
Sick" was brought to the Agricultural
Experiment Station at Lake City soon
after it was established, and Dr. G. T.
Maxwell first reported on an autopsy in
1888. Many workers have contributed to
that problem from that day to this. A
part of the problem came close to solu-
tion in Lake City days from Dr. Charles
F. Dawson's work. A local individual
put Dawson's work into commercial use
in a proprietary mixture called "Mann's
Salt Sick Remedy" which cattlemen car-
ried in their saddlebags and administered
to puny animals on the range. It was
Dr. A. L. Shealy, former head of the
Department of Animal Husbandry at the
University of Florida, who established in
1925 that the condition was of nutritional
origin. Since 1929, that project has been
a major one in the Florida Agricultural
Experiment Station, resulting in use of
iron and copper commercially as a sup-
plement to cattle generally since 1931.

(Continued page 32)


DECEMBER, 1952 & JANUARY, 1953


* 15




















FLORIDA DAIRYMEN INSPECT MIAMI'S DAIRY FARMS
AND PLANTS ON CONVENTION DAIRY FARM TOUR
Florida Dairymen who failed to attend the 1952 Annual Convention of the
Florida Dairy Industry Association not only missed one of that organization's finest
annual meeting programs but they missed an all-day dairy farm inspection tour
which cannot be duplicated this side of California, according to C. B. A. Bryant,
Dairy Specialist of the Johnson & Johnson Company, Chicago, who is using motion
pictures of these Dairies for demonstration throughout the country.
French Koger, Dade County's efficient and amiable Chief Dairy Inspector,
served as Chairman and Director of this outstanding Dairy tour and program. It
was arranged at the request of the Florida Dairy Industry Association's Annual
Meeting Program Committee.


IN PICTURE PANEL ABOVE ARE, left
to right: FRENCH KOGER, Dade County
Chief Dairy Supervisor: BOB HALL and
HERMAN BOYD of Hall and Boyd Dairy,
Miami, in a field of alfalfa, Huban and
California Burr Clover; Cows of Hall and
Boyd Dairy feed on fresh chopped lfalfaa;
Milking barn of the Freeman Hales Dairy,
Miami.


The following is Mr. Koger's account
of the tour:
"We left the Casablanca Hotel (which
was convention headquarters) about 9:30
A.M. in a motorcade of about 40 cars
and approximately 140 people. With a
motorcycle police escort we journeyed to
the Florida Dairies' milk plant. This is
one of Miami's newest processing plants,
featuring an upstairs pasteurizing and
processing room and a downstairs bottling
and ice cream room. This particular lay-
out allows an overall plant operation with
a minimum amount of ground space.
Under expert management and efficient
personnel this is one of the most effic-
iently operated milk plants in the coun-
try. Due to the enormous crowd in the
motorcade, all visitors were led through
the plant in squads of fifteen people.
"Our next visit was to the Hall and
Boyd Dairy Farm where we saw and took
notes on farm pastures. The motorcade
of cars drove through fields of clover
and alfalfa car-window high. Cattle are
not allowed to graze the fields but in-
stead, the grasses are cut and chopped
with special machinery and served to the
herds, cafeteria style. Many believe that
the pasture programs of the Hall and
Boyd Dairy Farm is one of the best in
the State of Florida.
"The pastures made up largely of al-
falfa are grown in two main areas of
97 acres and 160 acres. Other grasses
mixed with the alfalfa are Hubam, Cali-
fornia Burr, Ladino, White Dutch Clover
and Medick. There was also Lespideza
and Antauqua reseeding Crimson Clover.
"Parts of these pastures had been cut
over seven times at the time of the tour,
the last part of June, and were contin-


IN THE PANEL AT THE RIGHT ARE.
/op to bottom: The new plant building of
the Florida Dairies Co., Miami: the milking
barn of the Florida Dairies farm, Miami; the
interior and exterior views of the Ray Johnson
Dairy, Hollywuood. All were seen on the Miami
Dairy' FIarn Tour.


COVER PICTURE
On the front cover is seen one of
Florida's finest fields of alfalfa lo-
cated on the Hall and Boyd Dairy
Farm, west of Miami.
It is but one of several such Mi-
ami area grass developments. This
field, never grazed, was mowed
seven lines during the summer
growing season. A combination
mower-chopper is used and the
grass fed daily to the dairy herds
in their holding lots.
The picture was taken i)n June
1952 during a tour of Miami Area
Dairies by the producer section of
the Florida Dairy Industry Associa-
tion's Annual Meeting. Only a
portion of the large tour group are
shown.


uously cut up to middle September. Two
to three thousand pounds per acre of
balanced fertilizer was used with all
needed trace elements added. Almost
enough of the green chopped grass was
sold to neighboring Dairymen to pay for
the cost of fertilizer.
"Bob Hall and Herman Boyd credit
much of their success in developing one
of Dade County's most successful Dairy
farms to their pasture program. They de-
veloped their alfalfa after all other ex-


perienced Dairymen of the area said it
couldn't be done. They are firm be-
lievers that successful pastures can be
developed in most any area of Florida if
enough intelligent, persistent effort is
made.
"After leaving Hall and Boyd Dairy
Farm, we journeyed to McArthur Jer-
sey Farm new Dairy Plant. It was at this
plant that the eyes of many a dairyman
was opened wide. The McArthur Plant


16 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS






MIAMI DAIRY TOUR (Cont.)
is a mammoth operation-spread out over
approximately two city blocks. Every piece
of equipment is in duplicate to avoid
processing delays in case of trouble. All
equipment is of the latest and approved
design. Expertly designed and efficient-
ly operated, this is one of the nation's
outstanding processing Dairy plants.
"A luncheon, buffet style, was served
to all visitors as the guests of Mr. J. N.
McArthur personally. In a very com-
fortable air-conditioned reception room
of the McArthur plant, we enjoyed our
luncheon and heard several very interest-
ing talks on pasture improvements. (See
copy of address on "Green Pastures-
More Milk Dollars Per Acre" made at
this luncheon by Walter Hunnicutt of
New York, page 20, August issue, Dairy
News.)
"Following the luncheon program, our
journey then continued to Plantation
Foods Plant, which is the home of Velda
Ice Cream. Here we saw ice cream manu-
facturing at its best. In a building large
enough to house a small army we saw
a continuous flow of ice cream from six
continuous ice cream freezers, watched Ice
Cream Stick Bars made by the thousands.
We visited an Ice Cream hardening room
large enough to freeze a herd of ele-
phants and saw a laboratory which is
the dream of every milk technician.
"After leaving Plantation Foods, our
next stop was the Ray Johnson Dairy
Farm. Here we observed and took notes
on the first complete pipe-line milker
in the State of Florida. Always wishing
to produce a better grade of milk, Mr.
Johnson had this system installed some
two or three years ago. His money, time
and efforts were spent not in vain, but
to the advantage of the Miami milk con-
sumer.
"Our next stop was Henry Perry's
Dairy, which has a pipe-line operation of
a two-barn capacity. Two 80-cow milking
barns are built parallel with one milk
room. The mechanical aspect of this op-
eration is of dual construction; however,
only one is used at a time. The second
is strictly an emergency measure but both
may be used if desired. In the peak sea-
son as many as one thousand cows are
milked in one afternoon.
"Next on the tour was Freeman Hales
Dairy. This is a large operation built of
modern and up-to-date construction in
every respect. Its modern equipment in-
cludes a pipe-line milking system with
plate cooler, tile feed troughs, tile milk
room with stainless steel and tile wash
vats. It is also equipped with running
hot and cold water at all times and large
toilet and shower rooms for all em-
ployees. The large holding lots are paved
and landscaped with large shade trees.
This is dairying at the top level.


SEEN BELOW ARE, top, The Miami Dairy pasture tour group at the Hall and Boyd Dairy
observing the forage harvester in operation in a field of alfalfa; bottom, The McArthur Jersey
Farm Dairy Plant of Miami where the pasture tour group had lunch as guests of Mr. J. N.
McArthur and a program session where an address on 'Pasture Derelopment" '.as heard.


"Our last stop and visit was Land
O'Sun Farm #2. This super barn, the
largest single milking barn operation in
Florida, houses 140 cows at a milking.
The milk room is of new design and is
equipped with a stainless steel plate type
with cooler. A semi-trailer and stainless
steel-lined thermos type milk tank hauls
the raw milk daily to the plant some 25
miles distant.
"We were quite fortunate in having
with us on this tour, Miss Jane Bellamy,
one of the Miami Herald's top-ranking
writers. Miss Bellamy accompanied us
throughout the entire tour taking notes
on every phase of dairying. The Miami
Herald carried a complete story of the
day's activities.
"The motorcade was disassembled at
our last stop about 5:30 P.M.
"The success of this 'tour was brought
about by the hard work of the following
Committee: J. F. Koger, Chairman; Free-
man Hales, Henry Perry, J. N. McAr-
thur, Bob Hall, Herman Boyd, John
DuPuis and Andy Lay, Secretary of Flor-
ida Dairy Industry Association."


Dairy Industry Blue Book
The manufacturers of dairy equipment
were the first industry to present an in-
dustry report on the use of controlled
materials to government agencies charged
with the responsibility of developing a
strong defense program for our country.
Entitled "A Report on the Essentiality
and Requirements of the Dairy Industry",
it has since become known as the "Blue
Book" of the Dairy Industry.
In the report, the figures are set forth
in simple words and in pictures, showing
the MILK LIFE LINE and indicating
why each link in the line must function
without interruption. This report has
been used by top government officials
as an example of what each vital indus-
try should follow in making a presenta-
tion on essentiality, to the Government.
The report, sponsored by the National
Association of Dairy Equipment Manu-
facturers, indicates that a critical situa-
tion faces the manufacturers of dairy
plant processing equipment because of a
serious shortage of nickel-bearing stain-
less steel.


DECEMBER, 1952 & JANUARY, 1953 17





OLDEST DAIRY "OLD TIMER"
68 YEARS IN DAIRY FIELD
F. H. Soldwedel, president of the F. H.
Soldwedel Company, Pekin, Illinois, was
named the oldest Old Timer by the Old
Timers' Club at the 1952 Dairy Indus-
tries Exposition held in Chicago in Oc-
tober. Soldwedel is 82 and has spent 68
years in the dairy industry.
Two grandfathers and a woman also
were announced as winners of the "Old
Timers Contest" during the social hour
in the Dairy Industries Supply Associa-
tion-sponsored Lounge.
"Old Timers" are persons who have
actively served in some phase of Dairy
Enterprise for 25 years or more or who
have attended at least 10 Expositions.
Soldwedel began driving a milk wagon
at the age of 14 for his father, who
founded the company in 1880. Then
Soldwedel became president of the com-
pany at the age of 21 when his father
was killed in a train accident.
Four of Soldwedel's five sons are as-
sociated with the dairy industries. Carl,
now in the dairy business in Canton, Illi-
nois, has been associated with the dairy
enterprises for 30 years. Identical twins,
Henry and Tim, who are the managers
of their father's company, have been as-
sociated with his organization for 25
years, and Paul has been there 42 years.
Son Fred was associated with the F. H.
Soldwedel Company for 12 years. Sold-
wedel also has a daughter, Mrs. V. H.
Richardson, Springfield, Illinois.

Grandfathers Receive Awards
Two men tied for the "Old Timer
Grandfather" title each having 26
grandchildren. George C. Knackstedt of
the Knackstedt Farm Dairy, St. Louis,
Missouri, listed 22 grandchildren and
four great-grandchildren while Dot Sap-
pington of the Central Dairy, Jefferson
City, Missouri claimed 24 grandchildren
and two great-grandchildren.
An orchid was presented to Mrs. C. L.
Fortney of Chicago because she is the lady
who has contributed the most married
years to the dairy industry. Mrs. Fortney
has devoted 51 married years to the in-
dustry. Her husband is with Mojonnier
Brothers Company, dairy equipment man-
ufacturers.


S. L. Brothers, Lafayette County Farm
Agent, speaking at a recent regular lun-
cheon meeting of the Mayo Rotary Club,
told some of the background of Dairy
farming in Lafayette County. He said
that in 1945 there was only 1 dairy in
the county and now there are 27 dairies
in full operation within the county pro-
ducing between 1200 and 1500 gallons
of milk daily.


"BULL IN A CHINA SHOP" might have been the title of this picture except that this is a
Guernsey cow being milked in the Auditorium of the George Wrashington Hotel while Mrs.
Mae Pynchon, President of the Florida Public Health Association, watches how it is done.
Doing the milking is none other than Bob Kloeppel, Sr., owner of the Hotel. Comforting the
cow is Charles Johnson of Dinsmore Dairy Farm. It was all just a part of the F.D.I.A.
Committee's efforts to provide atmosphere for the Florida Public Health Association barn dance.

DAIRY ASSOCIATION COMMITTEE

ENTERTAINS PUBLIC HEALTH GROUP


For the 5th consecutive year, the Public
Health Committee of the Florida Dairy
Industry Association has participated in
the Annual Convention of the Florida
Public Health Association.
The 1952 Convention was held Oc-
tober 9-11 in Jacksonville. In addition
to devoting three days to serious consider-
ation of the public health problems of
the State, this group of approximately
500 men and women devote a portion
of two evenings together in recreation
and fellowship. This is where the Dairy
Association Committee comes in.
Cooperating with the Convention pro-
gram committee, headed by Miss Mary
Luvisi, Director of the Visiting Nurses
Association, Mr. Brady Johnston, Chair-
man, and members of the F.D.I.A. Public
Health Committee assisted in providing
recreation, refreshments and entertain-
ment for the Convention.
At a barn dance party for the group
held in the George Washington Hotel
Auditorium, the F.D.I.A. helped create a
real barn dance setting by installing a
bit of real barn equipment including hay,
feed, plows, etc., and a big as life Dins-
more Dairy Guernsey cow.
Certain dignitaries of the group tried
their hand at a milking contest, including
Mrs. Mae Pynchon, President of the Pub-


lic Health Association, and Bob Kloeppel,
Sr., owner of the George Washington
Hotel.

The F.D.I.A. Committee also furnished
refreshments, decorations, music and en-
tertainment for the convention group at
the second evening's reception and a fel-
lowship hour held at the Jacksonville
Doctors' Auditorium.

F.D.I.A. members who attended and
assisted with this program were: Brady
Johnston, Chairman; Cody Skinner, Mr.
and Mrs. Walter Burton, Theo Datson,
Jack Hartman, Mr. and Mrs. Hugh
Adams, Frank Doub, Jack Johnson, Mrs.
Minna Geller, Al Wells, Mr. and Mrs.
Fletcher Morgan, Al Joiner, Ben Ed-
wards, and V. C. Johnson; Mrs. Arlen
Jones, Mrs. Ann Johnson and Mrs. Mar-
garet Long of the Jacksonville Dairy
Council; E. T. Lay and Mrs. Elsie Rem-
sen of the F.D.I.A. staff.

In the 1949-50 season, 87 percent of
all citrus products canned in the nation
was produced in Florida. Citrus, in the
form of canned juices, sections and fruit
salad, and processed and frozen concen-
trates, leads the list of fruits and vege-
tables favored by the home makers of
the country.


18 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS














Officers of the Florida Veterinary Medical
Association elected at their recent Annual
Meeting in WTest Palm Beach, left to right,
are Dr. C. E. Dee, Hollywood, past president;
Dr. R. F. Jackson, St. Augustine, president;
Dr. E. F. Thomas, Jacksonville, vice-president;
Dr. H. L. McGee, Miami. treasurer: Dr. R.
P. Knowles. Miami. Secretary.

Jackson Elected President
Veterinary Association
The Florida Veterinary Medical As-
sociation elected Dr. Ronald Jackson of
St. Augustine President to succeed Dr.
C. E. Dee of Hollywood at their 1952
Annual Meeting in West Palm Beach,
October 26-28.
Dr. Dee reports the meeting was out-
standing both in attendance and program.
Among the visiting speakers were Dr.
Frantisek Kral, professor of large animal
medicine at the University of Pennsyl-
vania, who gave several papers on the
physical examination of horses and cows
and skin diseases of animals; Dr. W. L.
Sippel, Director of the Coastal Plain Ex-
periment Station in Tifton, Ga., who dis-
cussed Leptospirosis in cattle and ex-
plained @he functions and value of the
State Diagnostic Laboratory in Georgia.
Several outstanding practitioners present-
ed an excellent portion of the program
on small animals.
E. T. Lay, Executive Director of the
Florida Dairy Industry Association, rep-
resented that organization at the meeting.

The Borden Dairy has acquired the
plant and retail operation of the St. An-
drews Bay Dairy, Panama City, accord-
ing to announcement of John Hentz,
owner of the Dairy. Mr. Hentz will
continue to operate his 400 acre dairy
farm.

The Buckeye Dairy of Daytona Beach
recently celebrated its 40th anniversary.
The dairy was acquired in 1912 by the
late John S. Beville, whose son, Raymond,
is now the manager.

A new canned coffee cream product is
reported about to come on the market
which will not spoil, does not sour and
needs no refrigeration.
It is said to be a 100 percent dairy
product in powdered form for use simi-
lar to instant coffee.


The Manufacturers and Distributors of



Great Dane Trailers


Salute the



Florida Dairy Industry


With Best Wishes for Another Successful Year



great ;


TRAILERS

SAVANNAH, GEORGIA


DECEMBER, 1952 & JANUARY, 1953 19


Thristmas greetings

and

Jeto 2ear Pishes


TO YOU OF THE DAIRY INDUSTRY
WHOM WE ARE PROUD TO CALL OUR FRIENDS.
WITH DEEPEST GRATITUDE FOR THE PAST
WE PLEDGE ANEW OUR BEST
FOR THE FUTURE.


MILLER MACHINERY

& SUPPLY CO.
HUBERT MARTIN
ELROY DECKER VAL LEE
MIAMI JACKSONVILLE


I -


I





































4-H Dairy Show, Winning Groups Seen below are: TOP GROUP, Winneis of the Lake
County Show . BOTTOM GROUP, Winners of Leon County Show (left to right), Floyd
Wyrick, Edward Strickland, Mary Godbold, who won top honors of the Show; Pleas Strick-
land and Buford Teston. The last two named tied for 2nd place honors of the Show.

FLORIDA'S 4-H CLUB FUTURE DAIRYMEN MAKE

IMPRESSIVE SHOWING IN FALL SHOWS
Hundreds of hard-working 4-H Club boys and girls from Pensacola to Palm
Beach have spent long and anxious hours during the Fall months of September
through November in preparing for and matching their ability and their coveted
dairy animals with that of other 4-H members in 14 County Fairs and 4-H Dairy
Shows.
Winners of these events will be eligible to compete in the Florida State 4-H
Dairy Show to be held in Orlando, February 23-28, as a part of the Central Florida
Exposition.
Local and State leaders of the Florida 4-H Club program, which makes these
constructive projects possible, are undoubtedly worthy of a great deal more recog-
nition and appreciation than they receive.
Likewise, the many business and civic groups who assist in making these shows
possible by financing of the necessary expenses and awards are to be congratulated
upon their wise investments in this great character and future citizen building pro-
gram.


STATE-WIDE WINNERS
The top award in 4-H dairy projects
is the annual dairy efficiency award.
Arnold Higgins of Pinellas County re-
ceived this award which provides a trip
to Chicago to the National 4-H Congress.
Second place in dairy efficiency went to
Dan Rousseau of Palm Beach County.
District winners in the dairy production
contest in addition to Higgins and Rous-
seau are: Dickie Gibbs, Escambia County;
William Schack, Jackson County; Frankie
Smith, Jefferson County; Warren Alva-
rez, Duval County; Harold McGee, Mar-
ion County; and Mike Barrow, Volusia
County.
The Orange County 4-H dairy group


won 1st place over all County groups.
Jackson County was 2nd; Duval, 3rd;
Palm Beach, 4th; Gadsden, 5th; and
Jefferson, 6th.

TOP WINNERS ANNOUNCED
FOR VARIOUS SHOWS
We regret that space is not available
in the Dairy News to announce the win-
ners of all events of these 14 4-H Shows.
LEON COUNTY 4-H SHOWS-ToP
WINNER, Mary Godbold of Chaires.
Prize, a pure-bred Jersey heifer. TIED
FOR SECOND PLACE WERE: Buford Teston
of Chaires and Pleas Strickland of Talla-
hassee. Sears-Roebuck Co. provided the
prizes.


1953 FAIRS AND SHOWS
FOR DAIRY EVENTS
Including
JANUARY
3 Fla. West Coast 4-H & FFA Dairy
Show-Tampa
9-10 Dist. V, 4-H Livestock Show, Jackson-
ville
15-17 Martin County Fair-Stuart
16-17 S. E. Fla. 4-H Dairy Show and Dade
County Fair-Miami
19.24- Sarasota County Agri. Fair
20-24 Pasco County Fair-Dade City
24-31 Manatee County Fair-Palmetto
FEBRUARY
2-7 S. W. Fla. Fair-Ft. Myers
3-7 Fla. State Fair-Tampa
3 FSF Ayrshire Judging
4 FSF State Jersey Cattle Judging
5 FSF State Guernsey Cattle Judging
7 FSF State FFA Dairy Show
8-14 FSF Beef Cattle Week
14 FSF 4-H Clubs Day
16-17 Indian River Area FFA Show Ft.
Pierce
17-21 Pinellas County Fair-Largo
18-21 Kissimmee Valley Show-Kissimmee
23-28 Central Fla. Exposition-Orlando
23 State 4-H Dairy Show and Judging
Contest (Central Fla. Exposition, Or-
lando)
24 State 4-H Club Dairy Foods Demon-
station Contest (Cen. Fla. Expos.
Orlando)

GADSDEN COUNTY 4-H SHOW-
FIRST PLACE, won by Sara Fletcher,
Greensboro, who was awarded a regis-
tered Jersey heifer. 2ND PLACE: Bobby
Ray Durden, Concord. 3RD PLACE: John
Woodbery, Havana.
TAYLOR COUNTY 4-H SHOW-
1ST PLACE: Won by Tommy Lynn of
Perry who was awarded a purebred Jer-
sey Heifer. 2ND PLACE: Jerry Poppell.
3RD PLACE: Lex Mixon. 4TH PLACE:
Tommy Malone.
MADISON COUNTY 4-H SHOW-
1ST PLACE: Won by Tom Ray Kelly,
Greenville. 2ND PLACE: Mickey Shortt of
Lee. 3RD PLACE: Harry Boulton of Lee.
JEFFERSON COUNTY 4-H SHOW
--1ST PLACE: Won by Felix Johnston,
Jr., Monticello, who was awarded a reg-
istered Jersey heifer. 2ND PLACE: Fenn
Folsom, Monticello. Fenn also won 1st
place in showmanship.
JACKSON COUNTY 4-H HEIFER
SHOW-IST PLACE: Won by Billy Joe
Allen, who was awarded a registered Jer-
sey heifer. 2ND PLACE: Aida Tatom. 3RD
PLACE: Milton Pittman.
JACKSON COUNTY FAIR, 4-H
DAIRY SHOW-JR. HEIFER CLASS, won
by Martin Schack. Placing 2ND and 3RD
respectively, were Billy Joe Allen and
Aida Tatom. SR. HEIFER CLASS, won by
William Shack who showed the Reserve
Champion. Placing 2ND and 3RD respect-
ively, were William Schack and Milton
Pittman. cow CLASS, won by William
Schack showing the Grand Champion.
2ND PLACE was won by Don Edward
Brock.


20 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS






NORTH FLORIDA AREA SHOW-
Quincy, Oct. 16-18. Awards to best Coun-
ty groups: 1ST, Gadsden County; 2ND,
Jefferson County; 3RD, Jackson County;
4TH, Leon County. The Jefferson County
team won the area judging contest. Felix
Johnston of Jefferson County won the
high individual score, with Sarah Fletcher
and Bobby Durden of Gadsden County
placing 2nd and 3rd respectively.
VOLUSIA COUNTY 4-H SHOW-
BLUE RIBBON WINNERS: James Cham-
pagne, DeLand; Mike Barrow, New
Smyrna Beach; Hans Hansen, Pierson;
Earl Hunt, DeLand; Ronald Hunt, De-
Land.
ORANGE COUNTY 4-H SHOW-
With 63 dairy animals entered in 20
different classes, this was the largest 4-H
dairy show on record. TOP HONORS went
to Marcus Eastman. Other top scoring in-
dividuals of the show were: Jack Dodd,
Sandra Dennison, Teddy Smith, Robert
Stone, and Bob Foote.
LAKE COUNTY 4-H SHOW-FIRST
and SECOND PLACE honors went to Arvid
Johnson of Groveland with registered
Guernsey cows. 3RD PLACE was won by
Miss Marvel LaRoe of Eustis. 4TH PLACE
went to Johnny Watkins of Mascotte.
PALM BEACH COUNTY 4-H
SHOW-SHOWMANSHIP 1ST PLACE went
to Kenneth Tyre, West Palm Beach. 2ND
PLACE, to Charles Ashton. 3RD PLACE,
to Donald Yetkow. INDIVIDUAL
JUDGING: 1ST PLACE, was won by
Freddie Williams, Lake Worth. 2ND
PLACE, by Dan Rousseau, Lake Park; and
Roger Reiman, Lake Worth, 3RD. Win-
ners for the best animal in breed classes
were: Jerseys, Donald Yetkow; Guern-
seys, Wendell Johnson; Holsteins, Ken-
neth Tyre; Ayrshires, J. D. Windsor.
POLK COUNTY 4-H SHOW-With
46 entries, this 5th Annual Polk County
Show was considered one of the best
yet held. Top honors in showmanship
went to Ginger Rogers of Bartow. The
six high scoring individuals of the show,
who will represent the County at the
Area Show in Orlando (one 'boy and

4-H Dairy Show Winning Group, seen at
eight ; TOP GROUP, Winners of the Polk
County 4-H Show (left to right), Lillian
Congdon, Haines City; Gail Williams, Winter
Haven; Carolina Stuart, Bartow; Ginger Lyle,
Bartow; Ginger Stuart, Bartow, and James
Thornhill, Dundee . CENTER GROUP,
Winners of Quincy area 4-H Show (left to
right), Billy Joe Turner, Quincy, with grand
champion cow of the Area; John Woodbery,
Havana; Bobby Ray Durden, Concord, and
Gadsden County Asst. Agent Bernard Clark
.. BOTTOM GROUP, Madison County 4-H
Winners (left to right), Tom Kelly, Green-
ville; Mikey Shortt and Harry Boulton of Lee:
Lloyd Downing, Delbert Hicks, Tommy Hud-
con, Edgar Maddox and Tommy Howerton,
of Madison.


five girls) are: James Thornhill, Winter
Haven; Ginger Lyle, Bartow; Ginger
Stuart, Bartow; Gail Williams, Auburn-
dale; Lillian Congdon, Haines City; Caro-
line Stuart, Bartow. All animals entered
were Jerseys.

NASSAU COUNTY 4-H SHOW-
David Page of Fernandina showed the
Grand Champion registered Jersey and
the top Senior Jersey heifer. Harry Strat-
ton, Jr., Callahan, showed the top grade
Jersey; Patricia Ellis, Callahan, showed
the Grand Champion Guernsey, while
Ernest Hansen of Dinsmore showed the
Reserve Champion Guernsey. Al Bowie,
Jr. of Dinsmore showed the 1st place
Jr. Yearling Guernsey. The Callahan 4-H
team won the 4-H judging contest. The
Macclenny F. F. A. judging team won the
F. F. A. judging event.


DADE COUNTY ALFALFA
Dade County dairymen have planted
over one and one-half tons of Hairy
Peruvian alfalfa seed this year, follow-
ing a very successful experiment with this
legume last year, reports Rayburn K.
Price, Assistant County Agent.
Some dairymen harvested as many as
nine cuttings from their alfalfa last year,
he says.

CITRUS COUNTY HAY CROP
A bumper hay crop is in prospect for
Citrus County farmers in spite of damp,
rainy weather during part of the drying
season, according to County Agent
Quentin Medlin.
Hay from peavines, Alyce clover, hairy
indigo, Pangola and Pensacola Bahia is
going into the barns.


DECEMBER, 1952 & JANUARY, 1953


* 21







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Florida Farm Agents

Accorded National Honors

William J. Platt and W. Paul Hayman,
County Agents in Volusia and Polk Coun-
ties, were chosen by Florida County
Agents to receive distinguished service
awards from the National Association of
County Agricultural Agents at its session
in Chicago during the National Club
Congress December 2.
Both are veterans of the work in Flor-
ida and have registered outstanding ac-
complishments in pasture, cattle develop-
ment, 4-H Club work and in other fields.


AMERICAN JERSEY CATTLE CLUB
ANNOUNCES FLORIDA JERSEY
REGISTRY TESTS & AWARDS

WALTER WELKENER, HOLLY
HILL DAIRY, JACKSONVILLE, recent-
ly received a seventh Gold Star Herd
award on his herd of registered Jerseys
for unusually high production over a
4-yr. period. Over the past four years
Welkener has had an average of 55 cows
in his herd producing 8,961 lbs. Milk
containing 487 lbs. b.f. each, which is
more than two times greater than that
of the "average" dairy cow in the U. S.
Five of Welkener's registered Jersey cows,
OBSERVER TREVA ELEANOR, X.
STANDARD IVY EDITH, X. STAND-
ARD IVY LARK, OBSERVER DESIGN
STARLETTE and SYBIL POMPEY
SUSAN, have been awarded the A.J.C.C.
Ton of Gold Certificates in recognition
of having produced over a ton of butter-
fat during a four-year period. To win the
A.J.C.C. Ton of Gold award, cows must
average during a 4-year period. Most
dairy cows are discarded before they have
completed 3 years of production.
SKINNER BROTHERS' MEADOW-
BROOK FARM, JACKSONVILLE. A
registered Jersey cow, SYBIL POMPEY
GARNET, has recently completed a Herd
Improvement Registry production record
of 8,904 lbs. milk containing 569 lbs.
b.f. at the age of 5 years, 5 months.
A. T. ALVAREZ DAIRY, JACKSON-
VILLE. Thirty registered Jerseys of the
Alvarez Dairy were recently classified for
type and rated as follows: 8 rated Very
Good, 13 Good Plus, 8 Good, and 1
Fair. One animal was owned by Warren
T. Alvarez.
POLK COUNTY FARMS, BAR-
TOW. A registered Jersey cow, OB-
SERVER ONYX DUCHESS, has earned
the A.J.C.C. Silver Medal Certificaate
award for recently completing a produc-
tion record of 10,697 lbs. of milk con-
taining,632 lbs. b.f. at the age of 3 years,
11 months.


22 -FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS








DAIRY NEWS DIGEST


Members of the Dairy Industry throughout the State are invited to please
send to the "Florida Dairy News" all news about dairies, dairying and the
good people who devote their time, talents and money to this great industry.
-The Editor.


FEED DEALERS HOLD
MEETING AND NUTRITION
CONFERENCE
Feed dealers and livestock owners of
Florida met November 13-14 at the Uni-
versity of Florida, Gainesville, for a dou-
ble program including the 9th Annual
Animal Nutrition Conference sponsored
by the University Department of Animal
Industry and the regular Annual business
meeting of the Florida Feed Dealers As-
sociation.
The Nutrition Conference program was
arranged and directed by Dr. George K.
Davis, head of the Animal Nutrition
Laboratory of the Florida Agricultural Ex-
periment Station, University of Florida.
Carl Reger of Miami, President of the
Feed Dealers Association, presided at the
annual meeting of the Association.
A number of outstanding authorities
on both beef and dairy animal feeding
were heard on the Nutrition Conference
program.
Outstanding among the subjects per-
taining to Dairy feeding was that of Dr.
S. P. Marshall, Dairy Husbandman and
Head of the University Dairy Experiment
Farm at Gainesville. Dr. Marshall dis-
cussed "Roughages Needed In the Dairy
Cow Ration."
Joe C. Rhyne, manager of Howard
Feed Mills, Jacksonville, was elected
President of the Feed Dealers Associa-
tion to succeed Carl Reger, manager Hec-
tor Suppliy Co., Miami. Other officers
of the feed group elected were Charlie
Syfrett, General Mills, Miami, Vice-
President; Keith Morgan, Jackson Grain
Co., Tampa, Secretary; and D. D. Smith,
Flint River Mills, Tallahassee, Treasurer.

DRIED CITRUS PULP FEED
NOW 20 YEARS OLD
Dried citrus pulp feed is 20 years old
this year. It first came on the Florida
market in commercial quantities as a dairy
feed in 1932. At that time a single drier
processed this citrus by-product from two
canneries in Tampa.
Florida's commercial production of cit-
rus pulp feed has risen from about 1,000
tons in 1932-33 to 187,545 tons in the
1950-51 season.
Over 75 percent of this product is
purchased by the Florida Dairy Industry
as feed for dairy animals.


Seen above are the new officers of the Florida
Feed Dealers Association for 1952-53. They
are, left to right, Keith Morgan, Jackson Grain
Co. of Tampa, secretary; Joe Rhyne, Howard
Feed Mills of Jacksonville, president; Charlie
Syfrett. General Mills, Miami, rice-president;
and D. D. Smith, Flint River Mills, Talla-
hassee, treasurer.

DAIRY PRODUCTS DEMAND
TO CONTINUE STRONG
The Bureau of Agricultural Economics
"Dairy Outlook" says that consumer de-
mand for milk products will continue
strong in 1953 and milk production may
increase slightly. They also state that
prices of dairy products and cash receipts
from marketing probably will be a little
higher in 1953 than in 1952.

D. H. I. A. PROGRAM
IMPROVES MILK PRODUCTION
George Baumeister, supervisor of the
Orange County Dairy Herd Improvement
Association, reported at the organization's
annual meeting, November 7, that the
past year's records of the dairies partici-
pating in the program show a slight pro-
duction increase over the previous year.
The average of the 1,714 cows on the
program of the 13-member dairies was
7,310 pounds of milk and 322 pounds of
butterfat.
Due to dairy feed price increases, re-
turns per dollar for feed used by the
group showed a decrease from $2.28 to
$2.14. The average feed cost for 'pro-
duction of 100 pounds of milk was 35
cents higher, according to Baumeister.
Carroll Ward, Sr., prominent Guernsey
breeder of Winter Park, is president of
the Association.
The dairy herd improvement work is
carried out through the Agricultural Ex-
tension Service of the University of Flor-
ida and is a project of the local county
agent.
I,


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PASTURE

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DECEMBER, 1952






Veterinary Committee


Care of New Born Dairy Calves
By DR. D. A. SANDERS
Head, Veterinary Science Department
Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
The Veterinary Committee of the Association desires to be of service to Florida Dairymen
through discussion in this column of any Dairy Herd problems submitted which are of general
interest. Submit your questions to the Editor, FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS. Dr. Karl Owens of
Gainesrille, Chairman of the Committee. twill assign the questions to ,,fe member of the
Committee to aniis'e,.


Q To F.D.I.A. Veterinary Committee: "In view of the in-
creasing necessity of growing herd replacements in Florida,
I would like to suggest an article on raising calves."
A By Dr. D. A. Sanders: "The Veterinary Committee's re-
quest for a discussion on 'raising calves' is a timely one
about which Florida Dairymen should give more thought and
attention. The subject is a large one, if thoroughly covered, and
I will undertake to discuss only the early stages of caring for
the calf in the limited space allotted.


"When the newborn calf arrives it is
necessary for it to establish equilibrium
with the outside world. The balance be-
tween health and disease depends largely
upon the general environmental condi-
tions under which it is required to live.
In the successful growing of strong,
healthy, disease-resistant calves it is nec-
essary that good management methods
and feeding practices be followed. Ex-
perience has shown that unfavorable en-
vironmental conditions, faulty, unsanitary
management methods and errors in feed-
ing are important factors responsible for
low vitality and unthriftiness of young
calves.
"The state of health of the newborn
calf depends largely upon the state of
health of its mother. During the dry
period before calving the cow should re-
ceive essential food constituents in suf-
ficient quantities to meet the maintenance
and growth requirements and provide
protective substances for the foetus and
newborn calf. The dam should be kept
on a clean, grassy plot, in a clean shady
paddock, or in a large, clean, well-venti-
lated maternity stall immediately before,
during and following calving.
"In herds where uterine infections and
calf diseases are present it is advisable
to thoroughly wash and clean the rear
quarters of the mother cow by use of
soap and warm water or a mild antiseptic
solution.
"Under natural conditions the newborn
calf remains with its mother, taking small
quantities of warm colostrum and milk
at frequent intervals. Under these con-
ditions the newborn calf seldom suffers
from intestinal disturbances since it is
able to establish a favorable balance be-
tween the health and disease state. In
the case of hand-raised dairy calves, where
it is necessary to depart from nature dur-
ing a vulnerable period in the calf's life,


diseases and ailments of the newborn calf
due to errors in diet and hygiene are
frequently encountered. Hand-fed calves
are often given the customary two feed-
ings a day. This is in direct contrast to
the natural state, where the calf nurses
at short intervals. The practice of feed-
ing young calves twice daily frequently
predisposes the newborn to digestive dis-
orders and nutritional derangements.
"The young dairy calf preferably
should be left with its mother for the
first 24 hours. It should receive the
dam's colostrum and milk exclusively for
the first four to five days of its life.
Many attempts have been made to raise
calves without feeding an adequate
amount of high grade colostrum. Colos-
trum is rich in antibodies against the
commonly occurring young calf diseases
such as scours, septicemia and local in-
fections of internal organs. In addition,
colostrum contains necessary vitamins and
readily digestible proteins. Moreover, its
laxative effects aid in expelling meconium
and give over-all protection during a vul-
nerable period of the calf's life.
"Cows that are dried off 60 days prior
to calving and supplied adequate feed
during the dry period furnish a good
quality colostrum for the young calf. For
best results the calf should be fed small
amounts regularly at frequent intervals.
Five or six feedings per day for the first
three weeks, and three feedings per day
for the next few weeks give good re-
sults in many instances. This feeding
practice results in smaller milk curds
which are readily digested.
"It is realized that five or six daily
feedings will require more labor in com-
parison to the customary two feedings;
however, the closer one stays to nature
in the feeding practices, the better re-
sults one will have in raising healthy
calves. It should be remembered that


the young calf's stomach is not adapted
to large amounts of milk at any one
feeding. This practice results in the for-
mation of large milk curds and overflow
of milk into the forestomachs, resulting
in fermentation, delayed digestion, gas-
tric disturbances and poor health. The
ordinary young calf takes 15 minutes to
nurse its dam and takes two quarts from
a 21/2 gallon cow, whereas a three-day
calf takes 11/2 quarts from a bucket in
45 seconds, and large calves may con-
sume eight quarts in 40 seconds. It is
amazing how fast a hungry, thirsty calf
will consume its milk allotment from a
bucket.
"The proper milk ration for calves
has been calculated to be six to eight
percent of its body weight per day, given
in several feedings, but not more than
six to eight pounds daily for the first
three weeks. After three weeks the calf
should be encouraged to take protein
and hay preparatory to the change over
from a fluid to a solid diet.
"Good commercial calf meals and hay
or grass provide proteins, carbohydrates,
vitamins, minerals and other essentials.
"Following this practice the calf us-
ually becomes adopted to solid food at
the age of approximately 12 weeks.
"No matter how carefully and sys-
tematically calves are fed, it would be
impossible to prevent losses unless they
are confined under clean, hygienic con-
ditions. The calf houses, stalls or sheds
should be well ventilated and so con-
structed as to be easily cleaned and dis-
infected and to permit entrance of maxi-
mum sunlight and some shade during hot
weather. It is necessary to prevent nurs-
ing among pen mates of the young
calves."
(Note: More detailed and complete in-
formation or answers to specific prob-
lems will be furnished upon request to
che Department of Veterinary Science,
Univ. of Fla., Gainesville.)

The American farm vote is credited
by an Associated Press writer of Wash-
ington, D. C. with breaking the 20-year
national control by the Democratic Party
and the farmers return to their traditional
place in the Republican ranks.


24 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


DR. SANDERS






Director Clayton Reports On Annual
Conference Of Extension Service
The Dairy Industry took part of the spotlight at the annual conference held in
Gainesville October 5-10 by the University of Florida's Agricultural Extension Service,
according to Extension Director H. G. Clayton.
The conference was attended by more than 200 County Agricultural and Home
Demonstration Agents from all parts of Florida.
Extension Specialists C. W. Reaves, Dr. O. F. Goen and J. E. Pace conducted
one panel which dealt in part with dairying in Florida. The Agents also toured the
University's Dairy Farm Unit at Hague and saw the work being done to combat
diseases among cattle at the parasitology laboratory.


During the five-day conference, U. S.
Senator Spessard L. Holland told the Ex-
tension workers that American food pro-
duction including dairy products has
been the nation's top weapon for peace.
"Our production of food," said the
Senator, "has been our ace in the deck,
and food has been used to produce peace
instead of war."
The agents were told, too, that the
farm family will be living under in-
creased financial strain in 1953.
In providing a prospectus of next
year's agricultural economy, Dr. E. W.
Cake, Agricultural Economist with the
Agricultural Extension Service, said that
"farmers may suffer from five to 10
percent drops in prices" for some of
their produce.
Farm labor, equipment, seed, fertilizers
and pesticides likely will be more costly,
the economist declared, but even with a
"tighter financial situation" next year still


should be a period of relatively good
farm prosperity.
Other featured speakers on the five-
day program included I. W. Duggan of
the Farm Credit Administration, Wash-
ington, D. C.; Dr. J. Hillis Miller, presi-
dent of the University of Florida; and
Dr. J. Wayne Reitz, University of Florida
Provost for Agriculture.
Officers of the various units of the
County Agricultural, Home Demonstra-
tion and Extension Service workers were
elected as follows: Florida Extension
Workers Association, Mrs. Edna Eby of
Volusia County, President; Florida Home
Demonstration Agents Association, Miss
Allie Lee Rush of Ocala, President; Flor-
ida County Agents Association, re-elected
Alec White, Hillsborough County Agent,
President, James Watson, Duval County
Agent, Vice-President, and Lawrence Ed-
wards, Dade County Agent, Secretary-
Treasurer.


Recently elected officers of the Florida Ex-
tension Agents Association are left to right:
Mrs. Edna Eby, DeLand. President; James N.
Watson, Jacksont ille. Vice-President; and Miss
Olga Kent, Miami, Secretary-Treasurer.

Foremost Dairies Farms
Receive Recognition
The "Florida Grower," an outstanding
agricultural publication published at
Tampa, Florida, has an excellent story
in its November issue about the Fore-
most Properties Shadowlawn Dairy
Farms, located at Penney Farms near
Green Cove Springs, Clay County, Flor-
ida, which is about 40 miles from Jack-
sonville.
The farms, which are modern in every
respect, have 900 cows grazing on 30
different highly improved pastures, with
a daily milk production of about 1500
gallons. The milk is processed at the
Foremost Jacksonville plant.


OPEN

GUERNSEY SHOW


FEBRUARY


3-7


lorida


State Fair..


YEP . one of the big doing's at the Florida
State Fair (Tampa Feb. 3 to 14) is the open
Guernsey Show held during Dairy Week. You
fellows have really been going places and the
Florida Fair is proud to show your progress to the
Nation.

Don't forget to attend ALL the days of the Fair.
There'll be auto races, thrill shows and a midway
bigger than ever.



GASPARILLA PARADE DAY MONDAY, FEB. 9




* and GASPARILLA CELEBRATION


DECEMBER, 1952 & JANUARY, 1953 25






NATIONAL DAIRY CONVENTIONS
AND EQUIPMENT EXPOSITION
EXCEL ATTENDANCE RECORDS
The 1952 Annual Conventions of the
Milk Industry Foundation and the Inter-
national Associations held September 22-
26 in Chicago reported the largest at-
tendance in the history of these annual
conventions.
The 18th Dairy Industries Exposition
held during the same period at the Navy
Pier in Chicago reports attendance at the
Exposition at 27,000 and a registration
of 18,875, which was 18% more than
attendance at the 1950 Exposition in At-
lantic City. Every State in the United
States, Canada and 32 foreign countries
were represented.
Nielsen Elected Director
Alf Nielsen, President of the Alfar
Creamery, West Palm Beach, who is
recognized as dean
of the Florida Dairy
Industry, was elected
one of the eight new
directors at large of
Sthe International As-
sociation of Ice
Cream Manu fa c-
turers. This gives
Florida three mem-
bers of the 86 mem-
NIELSEN ber Board. The other
Florida Directors are Paul Reinhold, Pres-
ident of Foremost Dairies, and Theo Dat-
son, Borden Company of Orlando. Rein-
hold and Nielsen are also Directors of
the Milk Industry Foundation.
Several Floridians were on the Na-
tional programs, including Ed Volkwein,
Vice-President, Foremost Dairies; Bill
Gooding, Alfar Creamery, West Palm
Beach; Prof. Walter Krienke, Dairy
Dept., University of Fla.; Dr. Frank
Goodwin, School of Business Administra-
tion, University of Fla.; Cliff Wayne,
Southern Dairies, Miami; and E. T. Lay,
Secretary Florida Dairy Industry Associa-
tion who presided at the conference of
Dairy Association Executives as National
Chairman.
Florida was represented by 75 men and
21 ladies from 32 different milk and ice
cream plants.
The National Conventions are expected
to meet in Boston in 1953, in Atlantic
City in 1954 and possibly in Miami
Beach in 1955.

Of animal manures, poultry is the
richest source of plant food, and is fol-
lowed by pig, sheep, horse, and cow
manure. It is important to work them
into the soil to prevent injury to seed
and roots of plants, according to the
University of Florida College of Agri-
culture.


Florida is no exception to the wide-
spread need for milk price increases.
Yielding to the urgent pleas of Florida
dairy farmers and processors alike and
the conclusive evidence of cost records
and extensive operating cost audits, the
Florida Milk Commission has recently
granted a 2c per quart milk price in-
crease in the Orlando and Lake County
areas and a Ic per quart increase in the
Pensacola area.
The milk producers of several other
areas, including Lake City, Mayo and
Blountstown, have filed official petitions
with the Milk Commission for price in-
creases. Hearings in these areas have been
held for the taking of testimony and
records on production costs but pending
the completion of the Commission's fur-
ther studies of these areas, no action has
been taken.
The Commission advises that it has
received additional petitions for price in-
creases from the producers of Daytona
Beach, Cocoa, Lakeland and Plant City
and will hold official hearings in these
areas at an early date to receive testi-


Twelve huge bulldozers crashed into
the tangled undergrowth at the Future
Farmers tract at Zonfo Springs on "Mir-
acle Day", Sept. 16, tearing out brush,
pushing trees and ripping up stumps.
Farmers, cattlemen, implement dealers
and land clearing companies cooperating
with the Soil Conservation Service, the
F.F.A., the Agricultural Extension Serv-
ice and civic minded citizens, had
launched the gigantic task of demonstrat-
ing that modern machinery and willing
workers could clear and plant a 100 acre
tract of F.F.A. land to create the "mir-
acle" of a complete farm unit from raw
ground in a one-day operation.
In the course of one day 100 acres of
a 112 acre tract were cleared, chopped,
fertilized and planted and the remaining
acres, which were so wet that it made
work difficult, was nearly completed.
Many types of machinery, especially
developed for the clearing of land, were
demonstrated at the "Miracle Day." The
machine creating the most interest among
the nearly 10,000 spectators was the
Washburn Rotary Palmetto Plow. This
huge machine, powered by twin diesel
engines with an electric drive, entered a
field which had been stumped only, and
in one operation, completed the work of
getting the land ready for grass planting.
Another machine which created much
interest was the Overstreet grass planter.
One man to drive the tractor which
pulled the machine and four boys are


mony regarding milk production and pro-
cessing plant costs.

Milk Increases Elsewhere
While a general survey of milk prices
throughout the nation is not available,
a quick digest of press announcements
discloses that since September 1st, milk
prices have been increased in 40 differ-
ent areas of 18 different states. These
increases from one-half cent to two cents
per quart.
In considering the cost of milk it is
well to remember that milk cannot be
produced at a loss and quality milk can-
not be produced without a profit. Dairy
farmers produce milk at a very low profit
and the national average retail profit of
the milk distributor is only one-third
cent per quart.
The price of milk has increased about
50 percent less in Florida since 1940
than for the nation as a whole.
The average national increase in the
price of milk since 1940 is considerably
less than the increase of other major
foods.


capable of planting 40 acres of grass per
day compared to about 10 acres with the
same manpower using the old hand meth-
od.
The operation, which used 12 bulldoz-
ers, numerous wheel tractors, choppers,
discs, plows, fertilizer spreaders and oth-
er equipment, got underway at dawn.
Some small amount of preliminary work,
such as the cutting of fence lines and
laying out field boundaries in accordance
with the complete soils may prepared
by the Hardee Soil Conservation District,
was done on Monday, but the bulk of
the work was completed in the one-day
operation.

Dairy Processing Course

Offered By Univ. of Miami
A course in Dairy Processing is being
offered again this Fall by the Food
Technology Department of the Univer-
sity of Miami. Mr. George Tworoger, of
Borden's Dairy, instructs the class. Of-
fered for the first time last Spring, the
course was so well received by local dairy-
men that it was necessary to repeat it.
The University's food technology stu-
dents take the course, but for the con-
venience of dairymen, classes are held in
the Miami Dairy Equipment Exchange, in
space provided by local dairies. A lab-
oratory room has been equipped for the
use of the class.


26 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


HIGHER FEED AND PRODUCTION COSTS
IN HIGHER MILK PRICES


MIRACLE OF MODERN FARM MACHINERY

CLEARS, PLANTS 100 ACRES, ONE DAY






























Florida Feed Mills new Jacksonville Plant


OUR 28 YEARS EXPERIENCE

IN THE FEED MANUFACTURING BUSINESS, TOGETHER WITH THE PROFESSIONAL AND SCIEN-
TIFIC ASSISTANCE OF OUR ANIMAL NUTRITIONIST, ENABLES US TO MANUFACTURE FEEDS
THAT GIVE THE MOST SATISFACTORY RESULTS FOR FLORIDA.

OUR NEW JACKSONVILLE PLANT

IS EQUIPPED WITH THE MOST MODERN AND EFFICIENT MACHINERY KNOWN TO THE FEED
MILLING INDUSTRY

WE INVITE YOUR INSPECTION

WRITE OR PHONE US FOR ALL YOUR FEED NEEDS
STATEWIDE RAILROAD OR TRUCK DELIVERY


FLORIDA FEED MILLS
MANUFACTURERS OF

X- 7Tra-fod FEEDS

P. O. Box 2331 Phone 8-2608
2762 West Beaver Street Jacksonville, Florida


DECEMBER, 1952 & JANUARY, 1953 27







The F orida School Lunch Program
And The florida Dairy Industry
By MRS. THELMA FLANAGAN
Supervisor, Florida School Lunch Program
Healthy, well educated children are the State's greatest asset. The Dairy In-
dustry and the school lunch program play an important part in building and safe-
guarding child health. The Dairy Industry and the school lunch program are more
closely related than many realize. They have many mutual interests. The industry
is greatly affected by the nutritional, educational and economic aspects of the school
lunch program.


NUTRITIONAL ASPECTS
The November 1952 American Medi-
cal Association publication, "Today's
Health", contains an article by Ida Bailey
Allen, entitled, "Can The High Cost of
Eating Be Solved?"
She says that in more than 98 percent
of the homes, half to one-third of family
income (after taxes) is spent in feeding
the family. In solving the high cost of
eating, it is necessary to increase use of
proteins, use more nutrient-saving cook-
ing methods and try new ways to serve
popular and cheap foods high in nu-
tritive value.
In accomplishing an increased use of
proteins, use milk in all forms.
In the medical re-survey of nutrition
in Newfoundland made in 1948, follow-
ing an ini.:;l Mur% ,
of needs mad.- in
1944, a report to the
Commissioner o r
Public Health an.d
Welfare enphait.il.
ly recommln& d sc.
eral actions insludn
"maintaini:-Lc o n.
sumption o, milk
and citrus juices and
making these and MRs. FLANAGAN
other foods of high nutritional value
available at the lowest possible prices.
CHOCOLATE MILK IN SCHOOLS
There has been much discussion re-
garding the consumption of chocolate
milk in school lunch departments. Uni-
versity of Wisconsin and University of
Chicago and other studies may be quoted
to indicate that the young people pre-
ferred chocolate milk in as high a ratio
as 8 to 1. It might be added that the
same young people probably would have
preferred the latest movie magazine over
their text books. We do feel that young
people should be trained in developing
sound reading habits, why not train them
as well in developing sound food habits?
Children and young people need the
butterfat and vitamin A in whole milk.
Chocolate milk made of skim milk is
1not an adequate substitute.
In order to serve milk at a price chil-
dren can and will pay, many schools are
now selling milk below cost. When milk


is sold at a loss in school lunch de-
partments the deficit must come from
school lunch funds. Every dollar spent
in this way takes away a dollar which
could be used to buy other agricultural
products. The school lunch program is
an agricultural program-not just a milk
program.
Research shows that milk is a must
each meal for the growing child. "Milk
is the best food buy." In spite of this,
per capital milk consumption in United
States has been dropping each year from
a peak reached in 1945. By contrast,
milk consumption has increased in schools
as a result of school lunch program em-
phasis on milk. Florida's program until
about 1950 improved faster than the av-
erage for the nation. Now Florida is
losing ground.
Florida school lunch programs served
29,689,797 half-pints of milk in 1951-
52 as compared to 21,513,229 half-pints
in 1948-49. In 1951-52 Florida would
have served over 77,000,000 half-pints
of milk at school, had all of the chil-
dren received half-pint of milk for lunch
each day. Every child should have half-
pint of milk at lunch daily if child health
is to be properly safeguarded.

ORANGE JUICE IN SCHOOLS
sound bodies and desirable food habits
orange ice cream and frozen orange juice
on the stick, they become the means of
further improving the diets of the state.
As far as school lunch programs are con-
cerned, it is urged that they help build
are inadequate, too few children are being
by offering only pure orange juice
products. Synthetic and diluted products
such as orange drinks have no place in
a School Food Service program..
The child nutrition and health goals
of the dairy industry and the school lunch
program are far from being achieved.
The help of the Dairy Industry is needed
to improve the nutritional situation which
is tied closely to the educational and eco-
nomic aspects of the program.
ECONOMIC ASPECTS
because of inadequate tax funds to sup-
port the program, school lunch growth
has been greatly retarded, many lunches
are inadequate, too few children are ebing
served, all free lunch needs are not being


Are You A Camel?
Do YOU know that the camel does not
have any real friends?
Men pay tribute to horses and dogs.
They write poems
about them, make
them the heroes of
books, praise them
to the skies.
The Bedouin
Arab knows the
value of the camel.
It would be hard for him to get along
without it. However, he says little or
nothing in its praise.
Now why isn't the camel praised? It's
a useful beast of burden. It renders
great service. Why, therefore, isn't it
popular?
The reason why the camel isn't popu-
lar and why he hasn't any warm friends
is because he is a grumpy grouch. He
keeps on grumbling all the time. He
starts in when you approach the saddle.
He keeps it up when you fasten the
load upon him. He. doesn't do his
work as if he wanted to do it.
You have to decide for yourself whether
or not you belong to it.
-The Curtis Courier

met, tax funds are not meeting the match-
ing requirements of the National School
Lunch Act.
Florida school lunch attendance has not
increased as fast as has school attendance.
Each year a larger number of Florida's
school children are not served adequate
lunches at school.
The quality of lunches has decreased.
122 schools are now serving type B
lunches instead of the type A, as com-
pared to only 34 schools in 1949-50.
Florida children have to pay more for
their lunches than have the children in
other states. The 1951-52 United States
average was 23 cents per lunch com-
pared to Florida's 25. cents. 65 percent of
Florida schools charged 25 cents or above.
Florida has less per capital wealth than
the national average. Florida and na-
tionwide studies show that where sale
prices exceed 20 cents, participation drops
rapidly.
Free lunch needs are not being met.
In 1947-48, 11.9 percent free lunches
were served as compared to 7.0 percent
in 1951-52. The average in the South-
East in 1952 was 10 percent.
Donations, income from lunch sales to
adults and miscellaneous income in ad-
dition to county taxes were needed to
meet National School Lunch Act Match-
ing Requirements in 1952. Matching re-
quirements will double July 1, 1954.
As a result of these critical conditions
a State School Lunch Conference was
called by State Superintendent Thomas D.
Bailey on April 21-23, 1952. That group
(Continued Next Page)


28 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS






FLORIDA DAIRY SCIENCE
PROFESSOR ELECTED BY
NATIONAL ORGANIZATION
Dr. H. H. Wilkowske, Assistant Dairy
Technologist, Florida Agricultural Experi-
ment Station, was elected Secretary-Treas-
urer of the International Association of
Milk and Food Sanitarians, Inc., at the
39th Annual Convention held in Minne-
apolis, Minnesota, in September, 1952.
This is the first time Florida has had an
officer on the Executive Board of the
International Association. For the past
few years, Dr. Wilkowske has been Sec-
retary-Treasurer of the Florida Associa-
tion of Milk Sanitarians which is affil-
iated with the International group. The
International Association has affiliated
state and regional associations in all parts
of the United States and has additional
membership in all U. S. possessions and
56 foreign countries, with a total of over
5,000 members. The International Assoc-
iation takes a leading part in all activities
related to the sanitary aspects of produc-
tion, processing, laboratory control, in-
spection and distribution of milk and
food products. One important activity of
the Association is the publication of the
widely circulated bi-monthly Journal of
Milk and Food Technology which con-
tains authoritative technical and practical
articles on milk and food sanitation.

SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM
(Continued from page 28)
recommended: "Because of variations in
county abilities and needs, many schools
cannot provide adequate school lunch
services. In order to permit the program
to grow and improve, and to meet
matching requirements of the National
School Lunch Act, a state school lunch
appropriation should be provided."
Next to the children, the agricultural
industry and the Dairy farmer in particu-
lar would benefit most from a state school
lunch appropriation. Florida should fol-
low the lead set by Louisiana, a less
wealthy state, and pass a state school
lunch act.
The help of every dairyman in the
State is needed. Suggestions and reac-
tions will be appreciated. They may be
addressed to Mrs. Thelma G. Flanagan,
Supervisor, School Lunch Program, State
Department of Education, Tallahassee,
Fla.

G. I'S PREFER MILK
The No. 1 favorite on the G. I. chow-
line is milk, the Army Quartermaster
Corps reports. Runners-up are meat and
potatoes, fresh lettuce and tomatoes, fresh
buttered corn, lemon cream pie, choco-
late cake.


DECEMBER, 1952 & JANUARY, 1953


To the members of the


ASSOCIATION


FLORIDA DAIRY INDUSTRY


for A Happy Holiday Season and


71 f etoi' I W eat

Jim Jennings Ira Stone
JENNINGS BROKERAGE CO. CHARLES DENNERY, INC.
Lee P. Bickenbach Joe Foss
MOJONNIER BROS. CO. PENN. SALT MFG. CO.
Ed Salvatore Larry Hodge
CLINTON FOODS, HI-C DIV. STANDARD PACKAGING CORPN.
James M. Stewart lames L. Coates
RIVERSIDE MANUFACTURING CO. ADAMS PACKING ASSN., INC.
Dave Freeman Bill Kendall
RIVERSIDE MANUFACTURING CO. SECURITY MILLS OF TAMPA
Wm. C. Mayfield Robert A. Lamson
NASH KELVINATOR CORPN. THE HUDSON MFG. CO., INC.


fie- Iotel asablalca

EXTENDS GREETINGS


To the Members of the FLORIDA DAIRY INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION.

We are proud that you plan to return to Miami Beach and the
CASABLANCA for the 1953 F.D.I.A. Convention, June 24, 25, 26.
Jack Parker, Manager


Hotel Casalanca-Miami Beach
Hotel Casablanca-Miami Beach


* 29








Season's feetings

TO

OUR FRIENDS
OF THE
FLORIDA
DAIRY INDUSTRY

A '/let Cci Latirma and

a -appy Avew least

to all


AMICA-BURNETT

CHEM. & SUPPLY CO.
Dairy Supplies,
Equipment
& Service
Phone 4-5606 P. 0. Box 2328
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
-f^. YJ*M i~ifiti YIP~J~Mtl *ti WJ^Ss


PROMISE YOURSELF For the New Year
To be so strong that nothing can disturb your peace of mind.
To talk health, happiness and prosperity to every person you meet.
To make all your friends feel that there is something in them.
To look at the sunny side of everything and make your optimism
come true.
To think only of the best, to work only for the best and expect only
the best.
To be as enthusiastic about the success of others as you are about your
own.
To forget the mistakes of the past and press on to the greater achieve-
ments of the future.
To wear a cheerful countenance at all times and give every living
creature you meet a smile.
To give so much time to the improvement of yourself that you have
not time to criticize others.
To be too large for worry, too noble for anger, too strong for fear,
and too happy to permit the presence of trouble.
(Christian D. Larson)


An Important Observation on Dairy Progress in Florida
From an address by Dr. Dorsey A. Sanders, Head, Department of Veterinary
Science, Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, at the First Annual
Polk County Dairy Field Day held recently in Barlow.
"Here we have witnessed some of the outstanding accomplishments of civilized
man in the field of dairy production. All around us we see evidence of what can
and is being accomplished in the production of milk and milk by-products, in the
production of food for Americans which is of the utmost importance to all of us.
"We see here a progressive livestock improvement program, soil and pasture
improvement, economical feeding of dairy cattle, and conservation of the natural
resources. We witness here today the rewards of honest labor and the results of
sound principles of dairy husbandry methods as you have adopted them here on this
farm. We see something of America's scientific potential of free enterprise.
"These actual demonstrations of the several phases of dairying, and these dem-
onstrations of accomplishment under approved management methods give renewed
faith in the safety, welfare and destiny of this nation and its ability to produce high
quality dairy products so essential to the health and wealth of this nation."

Milk In the American Home
THE HOUSEWIFE spends about 150 of every dollar of her food budget for milk or its
products. For this 15% of her food money she gets about one-third of all she feeds
her family. And in this one-third she provides her family with three-fourths of its
calcium, one-half of its riboflavin, and very substantial quantities of every other
nutrient recognized by scientists as vital to human development.
As a source of these vital nutrients, dairy products are undeniably leaders among the food
groups. They:
Rank first as a source of calcium, supplying 75%. This builds bones and teeth.
Rank first as a source of riboflavin, supplying 50%. This aids metabolism, aids in avoiding
eye difficulties.
Rank third as a source of protein, supplying 25%. This is the tissue building nutrient.
Rank third as a source of fat, supplying 20%. This supplies energy.
Rank third as source of Vitamin A, supplying 12%. This aids in destroying disease bacteria,
avoiding respiratory difficulties.
Rank third as a source of Thiamine, supplying 10%. This vitamin stimulates growth.
Rank fifth as a source of Ascorbic Acid, supplying 6%. This prevents scurvy and anemia.
Rank sixth as a source of Niacin, supplying 3%. This vitamin prevents pellagra, skin diseases.
Rank ninth as a source of Iron, supplying 3%. This is the blood building element of food.
Special attention should be drawn to milk as a source of protein. While it is an important
source of all protein consumed, it is vastly more important as a source of the essential amino
acids which make up the structural units of protein. Research has shown that essential amino
acids must be consumed simultaneously in order to be effective for building tissue. Milk
and milk products are a complete source of these amino acids, along with meat and eggs.
Of the proteins containing all of the essential amino acids, milk and its products comprise
almost half, are the largest single source of these vital food elements.
-National Dairy Industry Committee, Washington, D. C.


30 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


Season's Vrcetixfgs


FROM

COMMERCIAL

Printing Company

For many years we have
been printing for the
FLORIDA DAIRY INDUSTRY
ASSOCIATION

WE will be happy to sub-
mit our prices and sugges-
tions on
YOUR Printing Needs

* LETTER HEADS ENVELOPES
BILL HEADS CARDS LABELS
PLACARDS PUBLICATIONS

PHONE 3-0278

205 E. Bay St., JACKSONVILLE







PERSONAL MENTION...
HERMAN BURNETT, Burnett Dairy,
Bradenton, was re-elected a member of
the County Commission of Manatee
County.
F. D. YAUN, Yaun's Dairy, Moore
Haven, has been elected Mayor of Moore
Haven.
CURRY J. BASSETT, Manager of
Borden's Bassett Dairies, Tallahassee, has
been elected president of the Tallahassee
Kiwanis Club for 1953.
CLEVELAND INSCO, JR., Assistant
Manager of Borden's Dairy, Clearwater,
has been recently elected president of the
Clearwater Merchants Association. Insco
was also named chairman of this year's
Community Fund Drive for Clearwater.
R. D. (DICK) SAUNDERS, Sales
Manager of Southern Dairies, Tampa,
and holder of the Jaycee award as
Tampa's outstanding young man of 1946,
has been elected president of the Hills-
borough County Crime Commission.
CARL DENNIS, President of Gulf
Coast Dairies, Panama City, has recently
been named chairman of Bay County's
annual March-of-Dimes campaign.
HERMAN BOYD, Producer Director
of the Florida Dairy Industry Associa-
tion and Dairyman of Miami, was re-
cently elected as committeeman for the
Dade County Production and Marketing
Administration.
PAUL HOOD of Hood's Dairy, St.
Petersburg was recently elected President
of the West Coast Dairy Herd Improve-
ment Association which includes Pinellas,
Hillsborough and Polk Counties.
JOHN NORFLEET, Manager of
Southern Dairies, Orlando, has been
awarded an all expense paid tour to Ber-
muda via New York and Washington.
Norflect won a two-state sales contest
including Florida and Georgia. He
showed the largest percentage increase in

Four classes of the Liberty City Pri-
mary School of Miami, whose unit of
study is "Milk" made a recent plant-
tour of the White Belt Dairy. Each
person was served ice cream and milk
by the management of the Dairy.

Borden's EXHIBITOUR, a mobile
dairy industry display now on a nation-
wide tour of schools, fairs, and food
stores, is now being exhibited in Florida
Cities. Inside the colorful trailer, life-
like models of the farm, and a modern
milk plant are spotlighted. A real Elsie
Good Food Line train actually operates
within the unit.


THE HOWARD
ROTAVATOR
ATTACHMENT
11


CUTS CLEAN THRU LABOR COSTS
DEFEATS SOIL EROSION
GETS CROP OFF TO A STRONG START


In preparing the land for drilling-planting or preparing seed beds, complete
cultivation can be carried out with the Rotavator Attachment in one simple
operation employing one man, under normal soil conditions. Ploughing, cultivat-
ing, discing and harrowing are entirely eliminated. On reasonably light land,
the Rotavator will thoroughly till one acre per hour. It has been especially de-
signed to meet the requirements of the grove owner. Being offset and of com-
paratively low overall height, it enables cultivation to be carried out closer to the
trees than is normally possible without damage to the lower branches. Also, ideal
for turning under cover crops. Gauged to cut from 1" to 10" deep, 48" cut.
FOR LITERATURE CONTACT YOUR FORD TRACTOR DEALER OR WRITE:
Florida Distributor-
JACKSONVILLE TRACTOR & EQUIPMENT CO.
5669 W. Beaver Street, Jacksonville, Florida


DECEMBER, 1952 & JANUARY, 1953


It's in the BIG Bag!

NOW AVAILABLE FROM YOUR FEED DEALER


Also -

C;01.A m Citrus Molasses


The sweetest buy at LOWEST PRICES in a long time

available as plain molasses or

with protein added!

WILL DELIVER AT YOUR TANKS.

ADAMS PACKING ASSOCIATION, INC.
BY-PRODUCTS DIVISION Phone 8-7061 Auburndale


* 31






RESEARCH PROGRAMS
AID MILK PRODUCTION
(Continued from page 15)
For cattle on certain soils, it was found
necessary in 1937 to add cobalt to these
two trace minerals. Then it became pos-
sible to raise cattle on almost any type
of land in this region. It was found
earlier, from analyses of Everglades grasses
in the Spectographic Laboratory by Dr.
L. W. Gaddum that some of them con-
tained a high amount of molybdenum.
Dr. George K. Davis, University of Flor-
ida professor in Animal Nutrition, has
investigated the inter-relationships of cop-
per, cobalt and molybdenum. He has
contributed greatly to the nutrition of
cattle on muck land, working with Ralph
W. Kidder at the Everglades Experiment
Station and others.
But to go back a few years, the need
for an adequate calcium supply for milk
cows, and of phosphorus for all cattle
on many ranges, came from teamwork at
the Florida Agricultural Experiment Sta-
tion. The use of a mineral box in the
pastures, and of calcium, phosphorus and
common salt in mixed dairy feeds now
is almost universal-resulting in larger
cattle, stronger bones, and more milk from
the same feeds. These mixers of feeds
and mineral supplements, and all of the
dairy and beef cattle industry of this
region are keeping a watchful eye on re-
search in this field.
Mineral research is an essential but
minor item in feed supply. The major
items are the homegrown feeds-pastures,
hays and silages-the research with all of
these being watched by dairymen with
interest, since they represent the major
expenditures or investments of feed
money.
The Department of Agricultural Eco-
nomics-from Dr. J. E. Turlington and
Bruce McKinley to A. H. Spurlock-have
contributed to the Florida Dairy Industry
in its economic phases.
Health problems come in frequently to
Drs. D. A. Sanders, Leonard Swanson
and their associates of the Veterinary
Science Department.
A number of important research and
experimental studies for determining the
nutritional values of dairy foods have
been conducted by Dr. Ouida Abbott and
her associates in the Department of Home
Economics.
Problems relating to the processing,
manufacture, packaging, and distribution
of dairy products receive constant study
and research in the Department of Dairy
Science. Problems of production of milk
and the breeding, feeding and care of
dairy animals as well as the production
of pastures and feeds, is constantly con-
ducted at the main Dairy Farm Unit in
Gainesville and the several regional Ex-
periment Stations.


Letter to the Editor


Compares Milk Prices

With Other Food Prices
Editor, The Dairy News:
I am enclosing a letter and some most interesting data comparing milk and
other food prices, which was sent to me by a reader of the Dairy News who read
my letter on "Milk Prices" that was published in the Dairy News, October issue.
Yon are at liberty to quote this information if you like.
Val A. Lee, President
Miller Machinery & Supply Co.
Quote from above-mentioned letter:
"I was interested in reading your letter relative to milk prices which was pub-
lished in the October issue of the Florida Dairy News.
"One thing that most of the people overlook when they are discussing milk
prices is that the net edible solids in milk actually cost a great deal less than the
edible solids in other foods. This matter came up in a discussion more than a year
ago and we proceeded to obtain information relative to the percentage of solids in
roast beef, sirloin steaks and other meats, and compare their costs with the costs of
solids in milk. You will find information about this on the back sides of both of
the enclosed Dairy Products Data Sheets."
C. J. Linden, Vice-Pres.
Olsen Publications, Inc.
Quoting "Olsen Dairy Products Data Sheet #5, July, 1951":
"Milk would be an inexpensive food even if you had to pay twice the prevailing
price. We'll explain . Milk testing 3.5% butterfat contains 12.1% total food
solids. A quart of such milk weighs 2.15 pounds, and therefore contains 0.26015
pounds of food solids. Using 22 cents per quart as a fair average price, the food
solids in milk cost 84.57 cents per pound. These solids consist of 0.289 pounds of
butterfat and 0.711 pounds of healthful milk protein and minerals-and that's all
nourishing, digestible food. No water, bone or gristle. In the table below you will
find the percentage of edible solids, the current average cost per pound and the price
you pay for the solid matter for milk as compared to the most commonly used meals:


Milk
Roast Beef
Sirloin Steak
Round steak
Hamburger
Pork chops
Ham, whole
Ham, slice


Percentage
of solids
12.1
40.0
38.0
31.0
45.0
42.0
47.0
47.0
(END OF


Ave. cost
per lb.
$0.102
.75
1.15
1.08
.68
.70
.60
1.10
QUOTE)


Ave. cost per
lb. solids
$0.8457
1.88
2.99
3.48
1.52


NOTE: It must be remembered that the above prices were given as national average
for July 1951. The price of milk per quart in Florida at that time was about 25c
and is now 26c
Our inquiry as to beef and pork prices indicate Florida prices on beef were 7 to
10 percent lower and pork prices higher by about the same amount than the
national average.
CONCLUSION: Milk is a bargain food buy!


DAIRY
SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT



TAMPA ORLANDO

TAMPA ORLANDO


32 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS







INFLATION IS EXPLAINED
The Music Goes Round and Round

The other day there appeared in the editorial colums of The
Daily Record of Stroudsburg, Pa., a letter from Irvin F. Angle.
of nearby Portland, Pa. We recommend it to all those inter-
ested in the subject of inflation and prosperity. Here it is:
"Once there was a farmer who raised corn and a man who
raised hens, but no corn. The hens said no corn no eggs.
So the man agreed to work for the farmer one day a week
for $5 a day. And the farmer agreed to sell corn to the man
for $1 a bushel.
"They paid each other off every time with the long green.
The farmer paid the man $5 and the man paid the $5 back
to the farmer for the five bushels of corn which he wheeled
home in his wheelbarrow. After a while the man said to the
farmer, 'Everything's gone up, and I regret to inform you that
I can't work for less than $6 a day.'
"The farmer said 'I understand. But you must understand
that everything's going up with me, too, and I can't sell you
my corn for less than $1.20 a bushel.' The man said he
understood. So the man got $6 a day and at $1.20 a bushel
paid the farmer for five bushels of corn. Both of them said
'Happy days are here again'.
"By and by the man said to the farmer, 'Things have gone
up still more and I can't work for less than $7.50 a day.'
The farmer agreed that was fair, but told the man that things
were going up still higher with him. He would have to get
$1.50 a bushel for the corn. The man agreed that was fair
and both said, 'Prosperity is here.'
"After all, the man was getting $7.50 a day. The farmer
was getting $1.50 a bushel for corn, and the hens were get-
ting five bushels as always. And so things went until the
man was getting $10 a day and the farmer got $2 a bushel
for five bushels. And the hens kept right on laying even on
Thursday and the man told his wife, 'Ain't it wonderful .
$10 a day.'
"And the farmer told his wife, 'Ain't it wonderful .$2
i bushel.' And the hens kept clucking away on five bushels
of corn.
"And the statisticians down Washington way said, 'Ain't it
wonderful . national income at record levels.' And the
politicians said, 'Ain't it wonderful' and bragged that they
had done it. And everybody felt so good and prosperous that
the man and the farmer voted for the politicians and that is
how it was 'eggsactly'.
"The man got three times as much for his eggs, but paid
three times as much for his shoes, and the music went round
ind round."
This is a humorous way to portray a very serious matter-
because we must never forget that inflation ranks next to war
and famine as a cause of human misery in this world. Inflation
grinds many people between the upper and the nether mill-
stones.
Nor must we forget that it remains a number one problem
with us in this nation, because most of the claims of those who
believe in taxing and spending and of "prosperity" under
present conditions are based on an inflated dollar.
(Southern States Industrial Council).


The Dairy Industry Builder of Soil and Men

Is the backbone of our standard of living; converts grass
and forage crops into human food; provides 30% of our food
for only 15% of our food dollar; provides at least ten million
persons with a livelihood; needs to be expanded to meet the
demands of our growing population.


LET US HELP YOU CUT

MILK HANDLING COSTS

with

GIRTON FARM COOLING TANKS

ARE YOU A PRODUCER?

Join the thousands of dairymen who have
found this the easiest and most profitable
way to handle milk.

ARE YOU A PROCESSOR?

Join the forward looking plant operators
who find bulk cooling makes more money
for them.
Cleaner milk
No waste of milk or butterfat
Requires less refrigeration
More accurate weight
Pick-up any time of day
More accurate samples
Eliminate receiving room spillage
Eliminate receiving stations
Lower handling costs
Cut labor costs

WRITE FOR COMPLETE BULLETIN.



General Mills

2 RIVERSIDE AVENUE 77 W. LIVINGSTON ST.
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA ORLANDO, FLORIDA
tL-.
711 W. CASS STREET 7275 N. W. 7th AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA TAMPA, FLORIDA


DECEMBER, 1952 & JANUARY, 1953 33


I~f~e








Florida Dairy Industry Ass'n
ALLIED TRADES MEMBERS
Special Advertising Section


ADAMS PACKING ASSN., INC.
Citrus Pulp. Citrus Meal, Citrus Molasses
Jim Coates, Sales Mgr., By-Products Div.
Auburndale, Fla. Phone 8-7061

AMICA-BURNETT CHEM. &
SUPPLY CO.
Dairy Equipment and Supplies
Phone 4-5606
P. O. Box 2328, Jacksonville, Fla.

CHARLES DENNERY, INC.
NEW ORLEANS
Ice Cream Coating, Fruits and Flavors
Ira Stone-602 W. Belmar St.
LAKELAND, FLA.

DIAMOND ALKALI COMPANY
Dairy Cleaner & Alkali
Florida Distributors:
Miller Machinery & Supply, Jax.
Industrial Chem. & Supply Co.,
Tampa

GENERAL MILLS, INC.
Dairy Equipment and Supplies
John W. Manning, Phone 9-4586
1601 Congress Bldg. Miami

GULF PAPER COMPANY, INC.
Ice Cream (Linerless) Cartons, Butter Carton,
J. H. Mcl'oy
50 E. Magnolia St., Pensacola, Fla.

DOUGLAS J. HEADFORD
FLA. REPRESENTATIVE
Green Spot Orangeade Concentrate
Krimi-Ko Chocolate Flavorings
616 Jessamine Ave.-Phone 2-0148
Daytona Beach, Fla.

INTERNATIONAL PAPER CO.
Single Service Division
PIrepak Milk Containers
W. M. Scott
134 Peachtree St., Atlanta 3, Ga.

JIM JENNINGS,
MFRS. REPRESENTATIVE
The Vernon Company Specialty Advertising
Morning Glory Milk Powder
"Eze" Orange Concentrate
Route 9, Box 356, Jacksonville, Fla.

JIFFY MANUFACTURING CO.
Insulated Bags and Liners
Southern Representative-William Romaine
Box 5463, 5 Pis. Sta., Columbia, S. C.

ROBERT A. JOHNSTON CO.
Dairy Chocolate & Cocoa Products
I. L. Hammons
916 S. Rome Ave., Tampa, Fla.


KIECKIIEFER CONTAINER CO.,
Pure-Pak Paper Ailk Bottles
II. J. Evans--M. A. Knowles
Phone 6-1334
4700 Pearl St., Jacksonville, Fla.


Bill Cass, Photographer

F. D. I. A. Annual Meeting
Scarcely a person was more in evidence
around the 1952 Annual Meeting of the
Florida Dairy Industry Association than
Bill Cass of J. Hungerford Smith Co.
Bill was busy taking candid shots of the
delegates, as the semi-official convention
photographer. In the future, Bill had
better take his own picture to prove he
was there!
A Dairy News list in the October is-
sue failed to mention Bill Cass among
the Allied Trades Members present. It
was just an oversight and the Dairy
News' Staff apologize.


ICE CREAM CONVENTION

INVITED TO FLORIDA
(Continued from page 7)

product by name and set a specific stand-
ard for it. Some speakers advised that
the Ice Cream Industry should manufac-
ture the product rather than resisting its
manufacture.
In reviewing the statements of various
speakers, we find (a) THAT vanilla
ice cream was said to still be the In-
dustry's favorite product (b) THAT ice
cream consumption habits are changing
greatly from consumption at the point
of purchase to home consumption. Home
freezer units, grocery store sales and the
half-gallon container were credited with
this change;
(c) THAT the tremendous gain in
ice cream consumption experienced dur-
ing the war has seen but a slight in-
crease since;
(d) THAT ice cream consumption in
the United States has increased about
300% since 1923. Per capital consump-
tion is now 29 pints a year;
(c) THAT the South is making just
as good ice cream as the North;
(f) THAT the national goal for Ice
Cream Sales by 1955 is "One Billion
Dollars." Is now $664,000,000.00 per
annum.
E. D. Mitchell of Asheville, N. C. was
elected President of the Association for
the coming year. Dave Adams was re-
elected Secretary. Jack Tierney, a Vice-
President of Foremost Dairies, is Flor-
ida's member of the Association's Board
of Directors.
Two Florida Allied Trades Members
Sy Tygart and Syd Lenfesty, were
elected to the Executive Committee of
the Association's Allied Trades group,
"The Dixie Flyers."
Florida's large delegation invited the
Association's 1953 Convention to meet
in Florida. Within the past few years,
the Convention has met twice in St.
Petersburg and once in Palm Beach.


Florida Dairy Industry Ass'n
ALLIED TRADES MEMBERS
Special Advertising Section


S. H. MAHONEY EXTRACT CO.
Vanilla Products
D. C. Mulligan, Florida Representative
221 E. Cullerton Rd., Chicago 16, I11.

MEYER-BLANKE COMPANY
Dairy, Ice Cream Equipment
and Supplies
Phone 6-1366
2701 Daulphin St., Mobile, Ala.


NASH-KELVINATOR CORPN.
ICE CREAM CABINETS
Wm. C. Mayfield
788 Spring St., N. W.- Atlanta, Ga.

NATIONAL PECTIN PRODUCTS CO.
Ice Cream Stabilizers & Emulsifiers.
Pectin Stabilizers for ices, sherberts & fruits.
J. C. Head, Phone Norfolk, Va. 2-8385
RFD No. 1, Box 48, Bayside, Va.

OWENS-ILLINOIS GLASS CO.
Duraglas Milk Bottles
C. W. Parinalee C. N. Comstock
1102 Barnett Bldg., Jax. 2, Fla.
Phone 6-8868

PAUL-LEWIS LABORATORIES, INC.
Lactivasc-For the Prevention of oxidized flavor
in bottled m il, ice cream, storage cream
Also I etiennt Extract-Sir Sirloin, Inc.
765 N. W. 54th St., Miami 37, Fla.

PENN SALT MANUFACTURING
CO.
BK Powder Cleansers Acids
Bottle Alkalies
JOE FOSS
799 Waring Road-Memphis, Tenn.

RIVERSIDE MANUFACTURING CO.
MOULTRIE, GA.
Masterbilt Uniforms
.anie, \ Slewart Phone 3-3287
306 Lakeview Ave., Apt. 406, Orlando

SCHAEFER INC.
Ice C(:iea Cabinets, Frozen Food Cabinets
IV. c;. I'iight 'hione 4201

333 Iarbor Drive, Venice, Fla.

STANDARD PACKAGING CORPN.
7 tampel I' oo] Silt,- Flexible Vacuutm Packages
Liner Materials
Larry Hodge
1121 duPont Bldg., Miami, Fla.

THATCHER GLASS MFG. GO., INC.
Glass Milk Containers
W. T. LOVE, Florida Representative
3221 Pinehurst PI.-Charlotte 7, N.C.

UNIVERSAL MILKING MACHINE
DIVISION
Pail-less (Pipe line) Milking Machines
R. D. Archer-Factory Rep.-Ph. 84-7467
1100 N.E. 134 St., No. Miami, Fla.


34 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS







IF YOU WANT TOPS

IN THE SALE RING


Sire:
DINSMORE PRINCE ROYAL
26 AR Daughters
Jr. & Res. Champ.,
Tampa '42.


Dam:
BUTLER ISLAND JANICE
13803# milk-603# fat at 3 yrs.
1 Son in service at Dinsmore


DINSMORE ROYAL MAY
Classified EXCELLENT-15261# milk-643# fat in 10 mo. at 5 yrs.-Sold for $10,000. Grand Champ, 5 State Fairs.
IN THE SHOW RING


Sire:
FOREMOST MAY ROYALTY
37 AR Daughters
1st prize Get of Sire
Tampa '52


Dam:
DINSMORE ROYAL JEDETTA
Half sister to
Dinsmore Royal May (above)


DINSMORE MAYROYAL JEDETTA
Classified VERY GOOD-15070# milk-619# fat at 4 years-Grand Champ. & Best Udder, Tampa Fair, 1952
IN PRODUCTION


Sire:
DINSMORE MAJESTIC ROSE KING
28 AR Daughters
5 over 700# fat


Dam:
DINSMORE GLORIANA
15512# milk-676# fat
Just "passed on" in her 16th year.


DINSMORE MAJESTIC GILDA
14206# milk-708# fat at 3 yrs. 18343# milk-787# fat at 5 yrs.
17237# milk-830# fat at 4 yrs. 16877# milk-716# fat at 7 yrs.
15923# milk-591 # fat at 8 yrs.

THEN SELECT



Dinsmore Guernseys
FEDERAL ACCREDITED 57790 J. B. I-ANOUX, Herdsman NE(;ATIVE TO BANG'S
Dinsm e F s 10 miles north of Jacksonville
Dnsmore Farms Near .S. 1 Dinsmore, Florida
V. C. JOHNSON EARL A. JOHNSON CHARLES F. JOHNSON BRADY S. JOHNSTON






0 0 0 00o0000 0 00

PRODUCTION GOES UP
WHEN YOU FEED

SECURITY DAIRY -
FEEDS




And low feed cost per gallon of milk l
depends on top production from every
cow in the herd. Dairymen who keep
records of their "feed-cost per gallon of
milk" know that all-grain feeds like
SECURITY DAIRY FEEDS are their most
economical buy.






Follow the Security "calf-to-calf" dairy program.
SECURITY
DAIRY
SECURITY CALF STARTER For your calves
SECURITY CALF GROWER For growing heifers FEEDS
SECURITY CONDITIONER For dry cows
SECURITY DAIRY FEEDS For the milking herd i




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