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Title: Florida dairy news
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00082035/00014
 Material Information
Title: Florida dairy news
Physical Description: 12 v. : illus. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Dairy Industry Association
Publisher: Cody Publications for Florida Dairy Industry Association.
Place of Publication: Kissimmee Fla
Publication Date: October 1952
Frequency: bimonthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Dairying -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Cattle   ( lcsh )
Milk   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-12, no. 1; Nov. 1950-Spring, 1962.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00082035
Volume ID: VID00014
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01386090
issn - 0426-5696

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Main
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Back Cover
        Page 27
        Page 28
Full Text







































































PRIZE II I\'NING ANIMALS AND JUDGING TEAMS OF IW'EST FLORIDA


DAIRY SHOW (See Page 8)








RENNER DAIRY LARGO, FLORIDA


GETS TOP MILK PRODUCTION


ON PURINA CYCLE DAIRY


4. MILKING
COWS
Top production, up to
7 gallons per day, is
attained by this
younq cow which
came in at 23 months
and is now in 2nd
lactation. She is fed
according to Purina
programs.



3. HEIFERS
This 700 Ib. home-
grown heifer has just
been bred at 15
months to come into
production at 2 years.
Her fine condition is
maintained with D &
F Chow supplement-
ing pasture.


hIL

3 "WIF


Ih


1. DRY COWS
Typical of the body
condition gained by
daily feeding of
Purina D & F Chow
is this young cow
now coming in for
her 2nd lactation.
Renner drys off his
milkers 60 days be-
fore freshening.



2. CALVES
Seen here is one of
Renner's many fine
home qrown calves
for herd replacement
which are fed Calf
Startena according to
the Purina Calf Pro-
qram.


Paul L. Renner of Largo, Florida,
successful Pinellas County dairy-
man of 8 years' experience, follows
the Purina Program for top milk
production.

Following a trip to the Purina
Research Farm in Missouri, Mr. Ren-
ner converted a former mule barn


into a modern calf barn and started
a replacement program.

He has been on the Purina Dairy
Cycle Program for 3 years.

Mr. Renner says, "I use PURINA
because it keeps my cows in good
condition as well as top produc-
tion."


RALSTON PURINA COMPANY

MIAMI TAMPA oUAIyu
CHOWS

I UIII~~~~I -1









EDITORIALS


ISSUES FACING THE AMERICAN PEOPLE
By Richard B. Russell, U. S. Senator from Georgia
(Editor's Note. In view of the coming national election, November 4th, we believe our Dairy
News readers will welcome an opportunity to review this brief summary of national issues by
this great leader from our neighbor state. Dick Russell was elected to the Senate in 1932 and his
unbroken record of service has placed him fifth in seniority. He is Chairman of Senate Armed
Services Committee, one of the most important and powerful committees on Capitol Hill. For 19
years he has served as chairman of the Senate committee handling the agriculture appropriations
bill. He also is a member of the Joint Senate-House Atomic Energy Committee and the Senate
Democratic Policy Committee.)
"The real issues facing the American people today, are those which rightfully
should unite men rather than divide them.
"If there be one universal yearning in the minds and hearts of the American
people, it is the desire to avoid the calamity of a third world war. Insofar as our in-
ternational relations are concerned, the strength which must come from unity is the
only way to peace.
"Whatever sacrifice may be entailed, we must maintain a defense system adequate
to our needs.
"We cannot escape the responsibilities of world leadership, but in dealing with the
problems of today's troubled world, we should ever be mindful of the limitations of
the economic system which is the basic source of our greatness and the foundation
upon which our precious way of life is erected. If we are to survive, it must be con-
served and protected. National spending, including our assistance to other free people,
must be carefully weighed against our ability to pay and produce.
"No honest candidate for public office in these times can consider the tempting
prospect of promising 'all things to all men.' Our future security depends upon our
self-restraint and ability to cooperate with one another. Our cherished liberties were
not easily won. In today's troubled world they will not be easily held. Our hopes for
salvation can only be realized through willingness to serve and sacrifice.
"The very foundation stone of popular government is the confidence of the peo-
ple in their public servants.
"Fraud, corruption, and divided loyalties cannot be tolerated in positions of trust
and confidence.
"Among the dangers to our continued freedom is any unchecked trend toward
the concentration of all of the powers of Government in the National Capital. The
founding fathers, who had suffered the tyrannies of overcentralized government, wise-
ly sought to define and limit the Federal power.
"I am a Jeffersonian Democrat who believes in the greatest practicable degree of
local self-government. The maintenance of the rights of the States in an indissoluble
union is our protection against that loss of individual rights and liberties which has
always followed undue centralization of authority."

Government As A "Milk Cow"
The average man that I encounter all over the country regards government as a
sort of great milk cow with its head in the clouds eating air and pouring forth heavy
cream for everybody on earth!
With the cow concept of government unchallenged and unclarified, in school
and out, our chances to preserve the structure of American freedom are absolutely nil.
Until the nature and purpose of government in the mind of the average man is
re-instituted in the terms of the blueprint of this republic, there is no hope at all of
preserving the structure of American freedom!
CLARENCE E. MANION
Author "Blueprint For Freedom"
"Vote As You Please, But Please Vote." Americans must do their share in getting
and keeping good government. A citizen who serves his country loves his country.
Few people have the American privilege of electing their own officers by their
own individual ballots. History proves that Statism, in any of its forms, comes only
when people are indifferent to the loss of their personal liberties. This lack of interest
and apathy in voting paves the way for the loss of any nation's most precious posses-
sions its liberty and freedom.


VOL.)(-

OCTOBER, 1952
BI-MONTHLY


NO. 7


1111 II


THE
FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS
E. T. LAY, Editor & Business Manager


Official Publication of
Florida Dairy Industry Ass'n
WILMER W. BASSETT, JR., President
E. T. LAY, Executive Director
Florida Guernsey Cattle Club
EARL JOHNSON, President
Florida Association
of Milk Sanitarians
R. R. HOOD, President

Florida Dairy Industry Associa-
tion Directors
Producers
FRANK B. DOUB, Jacksonville
GEORGE F. JOHNSON, West Palm Beach
D. WAYNE WEBB, Tampa
JOHN SARGENT, Lakeland
HERMAN BOYD, Miami
Producer-Distributors
WILMER BASSETT, Monticello
FREEMAN HALES, Opa Locka
HERMAN BURNETT, Bradenton
J. N. McARTHUR, Miami
H. CODY SKINNER, Jacksonville
Distributors
JOHN M. HOOD, St. Petersburg
CLIFF D. WAYNE, Miami
GORDON NIELSEN, West Palm Beach
W. J. BARRITT, JR., Tampa
A. E. (JACK) JOHNSON, Jacksonville
Additional Directors
LARRY J. HODGE, President "Alligator
Club", Miami
SAM SOLOMON, SR., Honorary Director
Quincy
THE FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS is
published bi-monthly by the Florida
Dairy Industry Association, 220 Newnan
St., Jacksonville, Florida. Subscription
price of $1.00 a year. Entered as second
class mail at the Post Office at Jack-
sonville, Fla., under Act of March 3,
1879, as amended.
Advertising rates furnished upon re-
quest.
Business and Editorial office 220
Newnan Street, Jacksonville.
Member Florida Press Association
NATIONAL EDITORIAL
] IASSOCiT 0 N
'J w L
HMWRWF11111


FOR OCTOBER, 1952 0 3






AMAZING DISCOVERY IN
CLEANING COMPOUNDS:

NEW DIVERSE



DITRAN

Unique New Chemical
Formula Developed by Diversey
Research Gives Astonishing
Cleaning Performance!


NEW DITRAN GIVES ALL THIS:


outcleans them all.
gives billows of suds.
is definitely non-dusting.
makes the clearest solu-
tions you've ever seen.
cuts grease like magic.
positively leaves no film.
dissolves completely,
almost instantly.
rinses and drains freely.


THE DIVERSE CORPORATION
* J. P. BOYCE I J. E. ORRIS
519 E. Giddens 200 N.W. 129th St.
Tampa, Florida Miami 38, Florida
* E. E. FULTON G. WRENSHALL
P. O. Box 374 207 Riverside Ave.
Jacksonville 1, Fla. Jacksonville, Fla.


Modern dairymen are |
using scientific sprin-
kler irrigation on pas-
tures to provide more
and better grazing.
The result is healthier
cattle and greater milk
output, fmc Lockjoint
Portable Irrigation
Equipment makes the farmer independent of
weather conditions. Lightweight, durable, and
flexible, Lockjoint aluminum pipe and permanently
attached or detachable couplings can be easily
carried and quickly connected by one man. Pipe
is available in 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8 inch diameters.
Riser type sprinklers can be located to provide
water exactly where needed. The result is better
grass, better cattle, and better milk.
For complete information write Drawer


FOOD MACHINERY
AND CHEMICAL CORPORATION
Flordia Division-Lakeland, Florida
LJD-2


For Our Youth Readers

Your Future Is What You Make It
Note: This is the sixth of a series of discussions on "You and Industry." Both parents
and young people should find them of practical interest.
In the first five of these discussions we have stressed the importance of a careful
choice of a vocation and considered the most vital factors in the preparation for one's
life work. The record you make in school, both in your academic work and in your
cooperation with your leaders and fellow-students, has been emphasized.


NEW DITRAN
NEW DITRAN
NEW DITRAN
NEW DITRAN

NEW DITRAN
NEW DITRAN
NEW DITRAN

NEW DITRAN


Don't Overlook the Extra-Curricular
You may think of the extra-curricular
activities at school as fun. Of course, they
are. They will also help you enjoy life
more in the future. And they offer further
preparation for your future work.
If you want to be a lawyer, a politician
or a clergyman, take part in debates and
such activities as the "Boy-State" and
"Girl-State" projects. F.F.A. and F.H.A.
projects can be fun as well as profit, too,
because of the spirit of rivalry fostered by
these organizations. 4-H Club work for
both boys and girls can contribute to your
program of preparation. In fact, any of
these are good experience for anyone who
hopes to be a leader in any field.
Sports will help you to keep healthy,
one essential to success, and to learn to
get along with others to work as a
member of a team. Music, dramatics, art
and photography clubs, the school news-
paper and other activities offer excellent
vocational values.
Through these activities, you can also
develop and demonstrate qualities of
leadership. Starting a specific project and
carrying it through to completion will
provide you with a background of experi-
ence which will stand you in good stead
when you apply for a job or start out on
a career in any field. It will also develop
your self-confidence and prove your abil-
ity to assume responsibility.
A high school girl saw an opportunity
to help out when her class wished to raise
money for a gift to the school. She or-
ganized and directed a campaign of sell-
ing with teams in competition with each
other. As a result of this project, a maga-
zine publisher offered her a sales-promo-
tion position in his organization.
Increase Your Hobby Horsepower
Your hobbies reveal a great deal about
you because you pursue them of your own
free will. Are you using your leisure time
profitably or wasting it? Are you spend-


4 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


ing your after-school hours in activities
that will be valuable to you in the future?
Have you looked into interesting hobby
possibilities?
Although some hobbies are expensive
they may be good investments. Others
actually pay their way and may even con-
tribute a small profit. Most will pay off
in dividends of knowledge and in the
satisfaction that comes from achievement.
You may select your hobby for its voca-
tional value or you may develop a skill
doing something for fun that will defi-
nitely affect your success in a business or
profession. Through stamp collecting you
can learn about printing and engraving.
Photography may become either your pro-
fession or a recreation. Gardening may
merely satisfy your urge to see things
growing and your desire for beauty and
orderliness as well -or it may start you
toward a career in farming or landscape
gardening.
The story is told of a 14-year-old boy
who was fascinated with a work-bench
and some cabinet-making tools. Soon he
had made a book-case and some small
tables for his mother. She liked them and
so did her neighbors and friends, who
were very glad to pay for some like them.
He had so many orders that his hobby be-
came very profitable. It was only natural
that after finishing school he applied for
work in a furniture factory, and his hobby
record easily landed him a job.
Hobbies often help in unexpected ways.
Many have met future employers through
working in church activities or helping to
raise money for a community-fund drive.
Others have been able to place themselves
on a friendly basis at once with prospec-
tive employers through mutual interest in
a sport. Certainly there is much satisfac-
tion in having a hobby-something we
do for fun- turn into a practical aid to
success, whether it has developed either
good personality traits or health or voca-
tional skills.







Florida's Six Member 4-H Dairy Team

Describes European Travel Experiences
Four members of Florida's 1951 U. S. Championship 4-H Dairy Judging Team together
with their coach, Florida State Extension Dairyman Clarence Reaves, and Duval County Agri-
cultural Agent Albert Lawton as assistant coach, spent an eventful four weeks in Ireland, England,
Scotland and several countries of the European Continent during June and July as guests of the
Florida Dairy Industry and friends.
Members of the team- Ray and Warren Alvarez of Jacksonville, Paul Thornhill of Dundee,
and Steve Simmons of St. Johns County, by reason of their first place honors won at the 1951 U.
S. National Cattle Congress and Dairy Show--were to represent the 4-H Clubs of the United
States in international dairy judging competition at the British Royal Cattle Sho'w.
However, just as the group were planning to leave for England, word was received in the
United States that the competition at the British Show would have to be cancelled because of
Foot and Mouth Disease outbreaks.
Florida Dairy Industry Association Directors as sponsors of the team's travel fund hastily
conferred with contributors and authorized the team to proceed on the long planned and anti-
cipated trip.
Those who read the team's account of this eventful journey published herewith as a report
and expression of appreciation to those who made the trip possible for them, till recognize
both the immediate and long term value of this unusual experience, for these and countless other
future young dairymen of Florida.


The team's report follows:
"It was a great experience and all of
us enjoyed it thoroughly. We made the
trip over from New York by air Ireland
was our first stop. We returned to this
country by boat. We left in the third
week in June and we returned to the
United States, July 29. We saw many in-
teresting things, talked with many friend-
ly people and learned a great deal about
dairy farming in Europe.
"In Ireland we visited farms, Blarney
Castle near Cork and other castles and in-
teresting places, and learned about the
two breeds of cattle that are native to that
country. We found Blarney Castle a very
interesting old place and we followed the
tradition of visitors and kissed the famous
Blarney Stone, which, as you probably
know, is supposed to bring good luck.
About the Irish cattle The Kerry breed
is the only native dairy breed left in Ire-
land, having been developed in the moun-
tains of Kerry County in Southwestern
Ireland. Other cattle on the Emerald Isle
include Dairy Shorthorns, Friesians, and
Jerseys. The Kerry breed is the survivor
of the ancient black cattle of Western
Europe, and has been called 'the poor
man's cow' because it can survive on
sparse vegetation of poor mountain soils
of Ireland. Like our native Florida cattle,
they developed a wiriness and hardiness
that enables them to live and do fairly
well under adverse conditions. The Ker-
ries are very attractive cattle, with their
black, satiny hair coats, and soft skins.
They are somewhat angular and deer-like
in build, but the best herds have good
chests, are well-ribbed, have rather large
udders, and weigh about 900 pounds at
maturity. We saw the herd of 40 pure-
bred Kerry cows at the Muchross Abbey
estate in the beautiful lake and mountain
country around Killarney, and were told
that the cows give an average of 600 gal-
lons of milk a year on pasture, hay, grass
silage, and a little grain. Incidentally, the


Dexter breed, which is the smallest British
breed, also originated in Ireland. The
Dexter cattle are hardy, compact, and
short-legged, and are said to be the fore-
runners of the Guinea breed, some of
which are still raised in Florida.
From Belfast, Ireland, we went by boat
to Glasgow, Scotland, and thence by train
to Ayrshire, native home of the famous
cattle of the same name. In Ayrshire we
had the pleasure of visiting Hobsland
Farms, owned by Allan Barr, an inter-
nationally known judge. Here we saw 60
cows of the breed being milked by ma-
chine and learned that they were making
high production records. He has sold
prize cattle all over the world. They were
large, straight-top, strong cows with won-
derful square-shaped level udders for
which Ayrshires are known. The build-
ings on the Scotch farms are mostly of
stone with the house and barn frequently
connected and facing a small paved court
yard. We were very much surprised when
we stepped from the Barr's milking barn
into a small court yard and then walked
directly into their living room. We enjoy-
ed talking with Mr. and Mrs. Barr and
their daughter and the cup of tea we had
with them. That evening we saw a small
herd of the shaggy, picturesque, Scottish
West Highland cattle. Twilight lasted
until eleven o'clock.
"We also visited Dunduff Farm, owned
by J. W. Montgomerie, where we saw
125 more fine Ayrshires and observed this
outstanding dairy farmer and his crew cut-
ting and storing grass silage in a trench
silo. Our visit with the Montgomeries
was indeed a pleasant one. Sitting before
a hearth fire in the Montgomeries' living-
room, we looked out of the big picture
window and saw the beautiful Ayrshires
grazing on the green slopes right down to
the Firth of Clyde. And steaming down
the Firth of Clyde at the time were our
big battleship, the Missouri, and three


Florida's National Champion Team as guests
at the British Royal Agricultural Show. (No
cattle were exhibited due to outbreak of Foot
and Mouth Disease.)


IEE
i 'F
Part of group from the American Embassy
in London on Thames River Boat party July
4, 1952 at which the Florida team were guests.
C. W. Reaves in foreground.


^1^ r- f .


Florida's USA Champion 4-H Dairy Cattle
Judging Team with County Agent A. S. Law-
ton and State Extension Dairyman C. W. Reaves
in Mid-Atlantic enroute home from European
Dairy Tour sponsored by the Florida Dairy In-
dustry Association.

Coast Guard cutters on maneuvers. That's
beautiful country, and the scene from the
Montgomerie home will long be remem-
bered by each of us.
"We visited the Channel Islands Jer-
sey and Guernsey-where the famous
dairy breeds of those names were devel-
oped. All registered Jerseys and Guern-
seys in America trace their ancestry to
cattle on those islands. Jersey, the largest
of the Channel Islands, is, like Guernsey,
near the French coast. It is only twelve
miles long and six miles wide, and its
principal crops, besides its fine cattle, are
potatoes and tomatoes. Of 10,000 cattle
on Jersey, all but 100 are registered. We
saw many famous cows and bulls on the
small Jersey Island farms we visited. We
saw the famous cow, Pavillon's Mervia
2nd. This cow is 16 years old, has had 14
calves and is now in calf, and is still pro-
ducing heavily. Another grand old cow,
Keeper's Dreaming Design, that we saw
(Continued on page 18)


FOR OCTOBER, 1952 0 5




















Dairy Month Queen Is Honored

On Tour of Florida and Georgia
The Florida Dairy Industry's charming Queen Mary and her equally attractive
identical twin sister "Mildred" received the admiration and acclaim of their Jackson-
ville Dairy Industry subjects and distinguished guests at a royal reception party in
Jacksonville and of the Georgia State Dairy Convention in Savannah on their recent
royal tour as guests of the June Dairy Month Committee of the Florida Dairy Indus-
try Association.


Mary Butler, Miami high school girl,
was elected Florida's State June Dairy
Month Queen at the annual convention of
the Florida Dairy Industry Association in
Miami Beach, June 12th.
Sponsored by the Miami Dairy Month
Committee, Mary, who had but a short
time previously won the title of Miss
Miami Shores, won the Dairy Industry
Queen Contest over contestants from Pen-
sacola, Gainesville, St. Petersburg and
Jacksonville.
It was not known at the time of the
contest that Mary had a twin sister. It
was later told but not confirmed that her
sister Mildred (an identical twin) had
intended to enter the Dairy Industry Con-
test and that because of sickness on the
night of the contest she sent Mary to rep-
resent her. An examination of the ac-
companying pictures will evidence the
fact that had this happened, no judge
would have known the difference.
After it was learned that the Dairy In-
dustry really had two queens instead of
one, both the girls were invited to parti-
cipate in a tour to Jacksonville and the
Georgia State Dairy Convention, which
had been promised the winner.
These most attractive young ladies won
the hearts and admiration of all who had
opportunity to meet them. Especially two
young men, Ray and Warren Alvarez of


' I_.
Li)


Jacksonville, who were members of the
official reception and entertainment com-
mittee for the girls upon their arrival and
stay in Jacksonville. Ray and Warren had
just returned from a European trip as
members of Florida's National 4-H Club
Dairy Judging Team.
The Jacksonville reception and lunch-
eon for the queen, her sister and her
maids of honor was sponsored by the
Florida Dairy Industry Association June
Dairy Month Committee. Mr. Jack Dew,
Chairman of the Committee, presided and
was assisted by Andy Lay, F.D.I.A. Exe-
cutive Director.
Guests at the luncheon were: Miss
Stephne Ambrose, 1951 State Dairy
Month Queen, who was guest of honor;
the Queen's maids of honor-Miss Claire
Chestnut of Jacksonville and Miss Mary
Goodbred of Gainesville, who were
among the Queen Contestants for 1952;
Congressman Charles Bennett, Jackson-
ville, State Senator Wayne Ripley; Repre-
sentative and Mrs. Fletcher Morgan; Dr.
Wilson Sowder, State Board of Health;
Dr. E. L. Fouts, University of Florida
Dairy Dept.; C. W. Reaves, Extension
Dairyman, University of Florida; Mr.
and Mrs. Floyd McFann of Miami, es-
corts for the Queen's party; J. H. Adams,
President, Jacksonville Dairy Council, and
Mrs. Adams; Mrs. Arlen Jones, Direc-


The above picture panel shows a
series of events featuring Florida's Dairy
Month Queen, Miss Mary Butler, during
her official visit to Jacksonville. Left to
right: Jack Dew, State Dairy Month
Chairman, and reception committee greet
the Queen, her sister, Mildred, and their
escorts, Mr. and Mrs. Floyd McFann of
Miami, their son and daughter upon
their arrival at the Jacksonville airport;
Ray and Warren Alvarez, members of
Florida's 4-H Champion Dairy Judging
team, join the twins in a toast to Dairy
Month; Queen Mary, Miss Claire Chest-
nut (left), lax. Dairy Month Queen,
and Miss Mary Goodbred, Gainesville
Dairy Month Queen; The Jacksonville
luncheon party honoring the Queen
drink a toast to the Queen.


tor of Jacksonville Dairy Council, and
her assistant, Mrs. Ann Johnson; Ray and
Warren Alvarez of Florida State 4-H
Club Dairy Judging Team; Mr. and Mrs.
Walter Welkener; V. C. and Charles John-
son; Mr. and Mrs. E. T. Lay; Mr. Jack
Dew; and Mrs. Joy Coleman of the Jack-
sonville Journal.
In opening the informal program, the
entire group joined in a toast to the
queen. The queen responded by propos-
ing a toast to the Florida Dairy Industry.
Speakers included Senator Ripley, Con-
gressman Bennett, Dr. Sowder, Dr.
Fouts, Mr. Reaves, Mr. Lay, Mr. Dew
and Mr. McFann.
QUEEN ACCLAIMED BY GEORGIANS
When presented at the Annual Ban-
quet of the Georgia Dairy Association in
Savannah, the girls were enthusiastically
received and were almost adopted as
Georgia Queens when the girls disclosed
that they are regular summer visitors to
Georgia to see their grandparents.
(Continued on page 16)






I \







MAAi~r~_~




















Many and Varied Features


Carry Dairy Month Story

In his report of the results accomplished in the Florida Dairy Month Program for
1952, the State Chairman lists the following:
GOVERNOR'S PROCLAMATION-A proclamation for June as Dairy Month
was issued by Governor Warren and a photograph taken of the Governor and
Members of the Cabinet with members of the Dairy Month Committee. This
picture was used on the official Dairy Month Poster and movie film short.
STATE COMMITTEE-A State Program Committee of 50 members including
all local chairmen was in charge of Dairy Month activities.
A special State-wide Dairy Month news story was released by the State Chamber


of Commerce.
POSTERS-Two special Florida Dairy
Month Posters and one National Poster
were made available for use throughout
the State.
MOVIE-A special one-minute movie
sound strip was arranged for with spec-
ial Florida picture and copy and ar-
ranged for showing in 27 Florida the-
atres for two weeks during June.
21,250 COPIES OF THE FOLLOW-
ING SPECIAL MATERIALS were pro-
vided for and distributed for use to the
Dairies and local committees throughout
the State: Envelope Dairy Month
Gummed Labels, special imprinted paper


In the lower picture panel are seen
some of the typical June Dairy Month
events. Left to right: Miami's Dairy
Council Director, Miss Rebecca Daniel,
explains Miami's Dairy Month program
to Miami newspaper food editors;
Miami's luncheon party launching Dairy
Month; Orlando Kiwanis Club Dairy
Month luncheon; Jax. Junior Chamber
of Commerce members nursing contest
at Jaycee Dairy Month program.


hats, specially prepared printed stand-up
place cards for use at all Dairy Month
luncheon and dinner events, stressing
Dairy Industry Facts and Milk Facts,
Place Mats especially printed for Dairy
Month luncheons and dinners, Milk Facts
Booklets (32 pages), auto and truck
bumper cards specially printed, milk shake
and malted milk color posters.


LOCAL EVENTS-JACKSONVILLE:
The Jacksonville Dairy Council spon-
sored Dairy Month activities in Jackson-
ville and secured the able cooperation of
the Junior Chamber of Commerce. Acti-
vities included distribution of posters,
bumper cards, a special window display in
a downtown bank, a milking contest in
central downtown park and at the Jack-
sonville baseball park, a special Junior
Chamber Dairy Month luncheon program,
election of a Jacksonville Dairy Month
Queen, special speakers at various Civic
Clubs. ORLANDO: Dairy Day sponsored
by the Orlando Kiwanis Club with a milk-
ing contest and a special program at a
regular Kiwanis Club meeting, State
Dairy Industry Association officials par-
ticipating. MIAMI: Dairy Month pro-
gram sponsored by a special committee
set up by the Miami Dairy Council. Ac-
tivities included a special Dairy Month
kick-off luncheon program with represen-
tatives of the City and County and all
(Continued on page 23)


Record Participation In Dairy Month
Activities by State Chairman


Jack Dew, Florida's dynamic chairman
of the State June Dairy Month program
for 1952, has issued a letter to various
local Dairy Industry Chairmen and Junior
Chamber of Commerce Dairy Month ac-
tivities chairmen praising the fine pro-
grams held in various parts of the State.
Expressing the belief that there was
both greater participation and better plan-
ned activities than in any previous year,
Mr. Dew urged advance planning for a
still better program in 1953.
Mr. Dew said the State Committee was
very proud of a communication from the


1952 National Dairy Month Chairman
in which he commended Florida for its
splendid Dairy Month program which
compared favorably with many of the
best State Programs.
"I am grateful," Mr. Dew said, "for
the confidence shown in our State Com-
mittee by the Dairy Industry Association
by my reappointment as Chairman for
1953 and I want all who helped make this
year's program the success that it was to
know that their efforts were greatly ap-
preciated."







Much Progress In Dairy Development

Demonstrated at Chipley Dairy Show

Washington and Gadsden County 4-H and F.F.A. Judging
Teams Win Dairy Association Trophies
Sixty-three dairy animals were entered by 4-H and F.F.A. members and adults
from 12 Northwest Florida Counties in the West Florida Dairy Show held August
14th at Chipley, Florida.
Officials of the Show said this topped any previous participation in this seven
year old event. This Show was also held to be the best from the standpoint of quality
of animals entered. All animals were in good condition and had been tested for TB and
Bangs before the Show.


William Schack, Greenwood teen-ager,
won the highest honors of the Show by
winning both the 4-H and F.F.A. Jersey
Championships, the Junior Champion and
the Grand Champion of the Show. Wil-
liam won the Grand Championship in
competition with his father who showed
the championship animal (a Jersey) in
the adult division.
Charles Crutchfield of Jackson County
showed the Reserve Champion.
In the Guernsey class, a youthful Chip-
ley High School lass, Lynn Fitzpatrick,
came through to beat her masculine com-
petitors and take the championship ribbon
for the junior divisions. The same animal,
a calf, won Lynn the beautiful Times-
Union trophy, an engraved sterling silver
platter, for having the best fitted 4-H or
F.F.A. animal.
The $75 awarded for the Guernsey
Grand Champion went to adult exhibitor
Lee Stanton of Washington County.
Young Lynn Fitzpatrick had the Reserve
Guernsey Champion. Special prizes of
registered bulls in both the Jersey and
Guernsey junior divisions, donated by
the Breeders Associations, were taken by
Lynn Fitzpatrick and Charles Crutchfield
of Jackson County, winner of Reserve
Grand Champion Jersey junior honors.
Since Schack had already won an animal
in a preceding show, runner-up Crutch-
field was awarded the prize.
In the F.F.A. judging competition, the
four-member team from Havana piled up
the top percentage followed by Quincy,
Marianna, Frink and Vernon. Best indi-
vidual for the Future Farmers was Bruce
Hasty of Vernon with Bobby Nichols,
Frink, second, and David Stalling, Ha-
vana, third.
In the 4-H judging contest, Washing-
ton County won the blue ribbon with the
two Holmes County teams, Escambia and
Walton, taking the next places. Carthel
Hodge of Holmes had the top individual
score followed by Geraldine Hicks, Wash-
ington, and Bobby Wilkerson, Walton,
and Oscar O'Steen, Washington, who tied
for third.
E. T. Lay presented a beautiful revolv-


ing trophy to each of the two 4-H and
F.F.A. winning judging teams on behalf
of the Florida Dairy Industry Association.
Each trophy will be retained permanently
by the first team winning it twice.
The winning 4-H team from Washing-
ton County consisted of Julian Webb, Jr.,
Gus Duncan, Sherrill Cobb and Oscar
O'Steen.
Members of the F.F.A. team from the
Havana chapter included David Stallings,
Carl Barber and Bobby Holder.
A total of $750, an all-time high in
prize money, was awarded by show offi-
cials.
In addition to the cash prizes, trophies,
and the registered calves mentioned above,
the adult division drew valuable grass
seed and feed prizes. Fifty pounds of Ar-
gentine bahia grass seed was contributed
by the North Florida Experiment Station
at Quincy and Feed Dealers of the area
provided liberal feed prizes.
The West Florida Show, open to coun-
ties and F.F.A. Chapter from Gadsden
County to Escambia County inclusive, is
sponsored by the State Department of
Agriculture, the Vocational Agricultural
Department, the Agricultural Extension
Service, the City of Chipley, Washington
County and the Chipley Kiwanis Club.
C. W. Reaves, Extension Dairyman,
University of Florida, was the judge of
this Show.
John M. Scott, Chief Dairy Inspector,
State Department of Agriculture, and
J. B. White, Associate Agronomist, Chip-
ley Dairy Experimental Unit judged the
fitting of the animals.
J. E. Davis, County Agent, Chipley was
general manager of the Show.
Ring Masters were W. W. Glenn,
County Agent, Marianna and T. M. Love,
Chipley Vocational Agriculture Teacher.
An indication of the wide interest
which this Show and the West Florida
dairy region has received is the personal
attendance at the Show of the Agricul-
tural Editors and photographers of both
the Florida Times-Union, Jacksonville,
and the Tampa Tribune. Milton Plumb
of the Tribune commented in his report


Charles Crutchfield, 4-H son of dairyman
M. T. Crutchfield, Marianna, and brother of
Clyde Crutchfield, member of Florida's 1952
State 4-H Dairy Judging Team, shows his Jer-
sey cou designated Reserve Champion Jr. Div.
at West Fla. Dairy Show. Seen with Charles
is his father.


of the Show, "There are some fine dairy
animals in West Florida".
Both Southern Dairies and Foremost
Dairies are contributing to the develop-
ment of dairy farming in the area by the
operation of milk receiving and proces-
sing plants at Marianna and Chipley re-
spectively.
The State is also assisting by the de-
velopment of a small dairy experiment
farm at Chipley which is endeavoring to
show West Florida dairy farmers what can
be done in cattle feed production and
breeding.


OCTOBER COVER PICTURE
The October Cover Picture seeks to
honor the top prize winners of the 1952
West Florida Dairy Show held at Chip-
ley, August 14th.
Top left: William Schack, son of
dairyman M. A. Schack of Greenwood,
who entered animals in both the 4-H
and F.F.A. Divisions, is seen with his
prize Jersey cow designated Grand
Champion of the Show as well as Cham-
pion of the Junior Division.
Top right: Julian Webb, Jr., F.F.A.
exhibitor of Chipley (Washington Coun-
ty) is shown with his Reserve Champion
Animal in the Jr. Guernsey Division.
Seen with Julian are his father (center)
and T. M. Love, Chipley Vocational Ag
Teacher and F.F.A. Leader.
Lower left: Members of the winning
Dairy Judging team of the West Florida
Dairy Show, F.F.A. Division. Members
of the team representing the Havana
F.F.A. Chapter are, left to right, David
Stallings, O. E. Yearty (the team's ad-
viser), Carl Barber and Bobby Holder.
Lower right: The 4-H Club Division
top dairy judging team of the West Flor-
ida Dairy Show representing Washing-
ton County. Members are, left to right,
Gus Duncan, J. E. Davis (team adviser),
Julian Webb, Sherrill Cobb and Oscar
O'Steen.


8 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS













It may seem a bit unusual but it is a
fact that two girls and two boys consti-
tute this year's Florida State 4-H Club
Dairy Judging Team which are to repre-
sent Florida in the 1952 National 4-H
Dairy Cattle Judging Contest during the
National Cattle Congress in Waterloo,
Iowa.
As the Dairy News goes to press, this
team is already in Waterloo preparing for
the contest.
Members of the team are: Inez Thorn-
hill, Dundee (Polk County); Marjorie
Lamb, Ocala; Clyde Crutchfield, Marian-
na; and David Page, Fernandina. They
were accompanied to Waterloo by their
coach, State Extension Dairyman C. W.
Reaves, who successfully piloted Florida.s
1951 team to the National Championship,
and Miss Helen Holstein, Food Econo-
mist of Florida State University, as chap-
erone for the girls.
The team members all come from dairy
families which has been a factor in their
early training and enthusiasm for dairy
animals. In order to qualify for the State
Team each member won a top place in
the 1952 State 4-H Dairy Show in Orlan-
do last February and again at the State
Dairy Judging Contest held at the Uni-
versity of Florida in June.
Spurred on with the incentive instilled
by the example of Florida's 1951 team
which won the National Championship
and a tour of European dairy countries,
the team has been engaged in special
training and practice as a group in prep-
aration for the National Contest under
the supervision of Mr. Reaves and other
County Extension Agents. Mr. Reaves
said he planned to give the team several
days special judging training at the Mid-
South Fair Cattle Show at Memphis while
enroute to Waterloo. He is also expected
to make a number of other judging prac-
tice visits at well known Ayrshire, Brown
Swiss and Holstein herds between Mem-
phis and Waterloo. These breeds are
not common in Florida.
According to Reaves, the National
Dairy Cattle Congress will have on exhibit
over 2,000 of the nation's finest dairy
cattle representing all Dairy breeds.
The team's expenses to Waterloo are
sponsored by the State Department of Ag-
riculture and the Florida Dairy Industry
Association Educational Fund subscribed
by various members and friends of the
Dairy Industry.
4-H CLUBS HONOR MAYO
Commissioner of Agriculture Nathan
Mayo was awarded a 4-H Plaque at their
1952 State Conference at the University
of Florida.


Members of Florida'. 1952 4-H Club Dairy
Judging Team are seen as they make a final
check up on their judging ability before lear-
ing for Waterloo. Iowa to compete against
4-H teams from throughout the United States.
Team members are (left to right) Marjorie
Lamb, Ocala: Inez Thornhill, Dundee: David
Page, Fernandina; and Clyde Crutchfield,
Marianna.

4-H State President George Montague
of Ocala presented the plaque on behalf
of Florida's 27,000 4-H Club Members
and the countless thousands of young men
and women who have been 4-H members
during Mr. Mayo's long term as head of
the State Department of Agriculture,
which has been since 1923.

FLORIDA 4-H PROGRAM
SHOWS 100% INCREASE
During the ten year period 1942 to
1952, the 4-H Club Program in Florida
has shown a most gratifying growth. Ac-
cording to a report of Woodrow Brown,
State 4-H Club Agent, a total present
4-H Club membership in Florida is 27,-
000.
Mr. Brown reports that "in 1942 there
were 423 boys and 239 girls enrolled in
dairy cattle projects, with a total of 653
animals involved. In 1951 there were
971 boys and 228 girls enrolled in dairy
projects with 1,371 animals involved. In
1942 there was a total enrollment of 4,-
411 boys carrying a total of 5,190 pro-
jects as compared to 9,839 boys enrolled
carrying 13,246 projects in 1951."
It is interesting to note that while the
increase in dairy projects kept pace with
the total increase of slightly over 100%,
there was a slight reduction in the enroll-
ment of girls in dairy projects.

School Kids And Milk
Nine million children participating in
the National School Lunch Program drank
about 359 million quarts of milk at school
during the year just completed. Milk is
served to them daily in almost 56,000
schools.


New 4-H Dairy Judging Team

To Compete In National Contest


Sept. 27
Oct. 3
Oct. 4
Oct. 4
Oct. 15
Oct. 16

Oct. 18
Oct. 25
Oct. 25
Nov. 1
Nov. 7
Nov. 8


Gadsden County
Taylor County
Madison County
Jefferson County
Jackson County
NORTH FLORIDA AREA,
QUINCY
Volusia County
Orange County
Lake County
Palm Beach County
Osceola County
Polk County


Nov. 15 DISTRICT VII AREA,
ORLANDO
Feb. 23-28 STATE 4-H DAIRY SHOW
AND CENTRAL FLA.
EXPOSITION, ORLANDO

FLORIDA FAIR SCHEDULES
Oct. 6-11 Ala-Flora Fair,
Atmore, Alabama
Oct. 20-25 Jackson County, Marianna
Oct. 22-25 Nassau County, Hilliard
Oct. 27 Suwannee County, Live Oak
Oct 27 North Fla., Tallahassee
Oct. 29 Pensacola Interstate
Dec. 5- 6 Putnam County
Dec. 11-13 Polk County Youth Fair
Feb. 3-14 Florida State Fair, Tampa


FOR OCTOBER, 1952 9


INTEREST OF FARM GIRLS
IN DAIRYING PLEASING
From an Editorial, Florida Times-Union
"Despite the trend toward mechaniza-
tion and specialization in agriculture, a
big percentage of farm operations remains
a family matter. The most successful
farms are those managed with the intelli-
gent and cooperative interest of husbands
and wives, sisters and brothers.
"That women and girls can hold their
own in any field is proved by results of
the statewide 4-H Club dairy judging con-
test at Gainesville. The four winners, who
will form the team to represent Florida
at the National Cattle Congress at Water-
loo, Iowa, include two boys and two girls.
"News reports failed to say whether
this is unusual or just to be expected in
farm youth programs. Nevertheless, it
has its pleasing aspects.
"No phase of farming is more rigorous
than dairying. If the women-folk object
a mere male is likely to be discouraged
from entering this field. Active participa-
tion of 4-H Club girls in dairy judging
contests augurs well for expansion of this
important industry in Florida."

DATES FOR FAIRS
AND 4-H SHOWS

4-H CLUB SHOWS & CONTESTS
Sept. 27 Leon County









DAIRY ASSOCIATION ACTIVITIES


F. D. I. A. Directors Name Executive Committee

And New Committee Chairmen at Tampa Meeting
New Officers and Directors of the Florida Dairy Industry Association elected at
the Annual Meeting in Miami Beach, officially took over their duties and named a six-
member Executive Committee as well as principal Committee Chairmen for the year
at their first meeting held July 28 in Tampa.
The Executive Committee consists of the President and two Vice-Presidents and
one additional member for each of the three classifications to be named by the Board.
The complete Committee named are President Wilmer Bassett, Monticello, and Her-
man Burnett, Bradenton, Producer-Distributors; 1st Vice-President Frank Doub, Jack-
sonville, and George Johnson, West Palm Beach, Producers; 2nd Vice-President Cliff
Wayne, Miami, and W. J. Barritt, Tampa, Distributors.


A special committee of six was named
for the purpose of holding a series of
membership conferences in various areas
of the State. Named to this Committee
were: Herman Burnett, Bradenton, Chair-
man; Dick Dressel, Miami; Frank Doub,
Jacksonville; W. J. Barritt, Jr., Tampa;
A. E. Johnson, Jacksonville; and Herman
Boyd, Miami.

Program Is Adopted
A complete program for the year was
adopted including a statement of general
objectives and a schedule of special events
and activities.
General objectives for the year 1952-
53:
To encourage within the membership
and the entire Industry a greater realiza-
tion and sense of "moral obligation" to
our consumers and to the community for
production of the highest possible quali-
ty products at the lowest reasonable prices
consistent with good business practices.
Promotion of increased effort to con-
trol and prevent disease among Florida
Dairy Herds and secure all possible aid
to Dairymen toward this end. Endorsed
program for enlarging the facilities and
staff of the Veterinary Research Depart-
ment, University of Florida and the es-
tablishing of a new Animal Disease Diag-
nostic Laboratory.
Promotion of increased effort on the
part of all Dairymen to produce more
feed and better pastures and exercise more
efficiency and economy in feeding prac-
tices and more adequate control of milk
production.
Endeavor to arouse the entire Industry
in Florida to greater interest and action in
both individual and Industry-wide "Pub-
lic Relations" activities.
(Continued on page 24)


F.D.I.A. COMING EVENTS
Oct. 9-11 F.D.I.A. Plant Committee co-
sponsors Plant Short Course
Univ. of Fla.
Oct. 6-11 County Farm Agents Annual
Conference-Gainesville
Oct. 10 F.D.I.A. Public Health Com-
mittee meets with Fla. Public
Health Assn. Annual Confer-
ence in Jacksonville.
Oct. 10 October Florida Dairy News
In Circulation
Oct. 14-16 F.D.I.A. Membership Confer-
ences, Tampa, Miami, Orlan-
do and Jacksonville
Oct. 24-25 F.D.I.A. Directors Meet in
Jacksonville
Nov. 4 General Election Date
Nov. 10-14 F.D.I.A. Membership Confer-
ences, Tallahassee, Pensacola
Nov. 11-13 Southern Assn. of Ice Cream
Mfrs. Annual Meeting
Nov. 13-14 Animal Nutrition Conference
University of Florida
Nov. 13-14 Fla. Feed Dealers Assn. An-
nual Meeting, Gainesville
Nov. 27 Thanksgiving Day
Dec. 10 Dec. Fla. Dairy News
In Circulation



FLORIDA'S ORANGE ICE CREAM
DEBUT AT NATIONAL
CONVENTIONS
Orange ice cream, University of Flori-
da Dairy Science Department's new sen-
sational discovery, will very appropriate-
ly make its first appearance in a public
serving at the 1952 Convention of the
International Association of Ice Cream
Manufacturers representing all sections of
the United States and Canada.
Professor Walter Krienke and Dr. Leon
Mull of the University of Florida Dairy
Science Department are given credit for
developing the new process which mixes
cream and orange concentrate.


"All '8' sound good to me"


8-POINT DAIRY
PROGRAM FOR 1952
As a Guide and aid to Florida Dairymen
and Dairy Plants in more efficient and
successful operation, the Florida Dairy
Industry Association adopted an 8-point
efficiency program for recommendation to
all the Florida Industry for 1952.
The 8-points which are based on recom-
mendations from various active commit-
tees of the Association are as follows:
1. Improve dairy pasture and feed pro-
duction.
2. Practice individual and improved
feeding system.
3. Keep adequate individual and herd
records.
4. Follow definite herd improvement
program.
5. Strive for top quality.
6. Work for improvement of herd
health.
7. Use efficient processing and distri-
bution methods.
8. Give more attention to "Public Re-
lations".
The purpose of the 8-Point Program
is aimed at efficient, economic production
and marketing of high quality milk and
milk products. The slogan of the pro-
gram is "Efficiency and Quality Pay."


10 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS























The keen interest displayed by Daytona Beach teachers and school lunch supervisors in the
place of milk in nutrition is seen in this picture taken as this group participated in a teacher
visitation program at the Borden Dairy Plant in Daytona. Jacksonville's Dairy Council Director,
Mrs. Arlen Jones, is seen discussing Dairy Industry educational materials on nutrition.

Daytona Beach Dairies Cooperate

In Teachers Visitation Program
With J. A. Taylor (Borden Manager) serving as chairman, the Dairies of Day-
tona Beach worked together to put on both an enjoyable and profitable program as
a part of a recent Chamber of Commerce and Public Schools sponsored business visi-
tation day for teachers.


The program was held Friday, Sep-
tember 5th, just prior to the opening of
Volusia County Schools. In spite of a
very bad day with some of the season's
heaviest rain continuing well into the af-
ternoon, a splendid group of over twenty
teachers and school lunch managers and
supervisors participated in the dairy visit.
The Daytona Borden Plant was select-
ed for the plant visitation and place of a
general meeting. Raymond Beville, presi-
dent of the Buckeye Dairy, and Archie
Johnston, Assistant manager of the Fore-
most Dairy at Daytona, joined Mr. Taylor
as hosts.
The program included a talk by Mr.
Taylor, a guided tour through the Borden
plant and talks by E. T. Lay on behalf of
the Florida Dairy Industry Association
and Mrs. Arlen Jones, Director-nutrition-
ist of the Dairy Council of Jacksonville.
Two short movies on nutrition and
weight control through diet were shown
and a general round table discussion was
held.
Refreshments of ice cream and milk
were served during the session at the
dairy and the group were guests of the
Dairies for lunch in downtown Daytona.
This program is certainly one which
deserves the fullest cooperation and par-
ticipation by all Dairies throughout the
State.

James Madison said, "The best way to
bring about evil is for good men (and
women) to do nothing."


LARGE FLORIDA ATTENDANCE
AT NATIONAL CONVENTIONS
As the Dairy News goes to press, Flori-
da Dairy Executives are departing for
Chicago from all sections of the State
for attendance at the 1952 Conventions
of the National Ice Cream and Milk In-
dustry Associations as well as the biennial
Dairy Supplies and Equipment Exposi-
tion.
The National Ice Cream Convention
program was scheduled for Monday
through Wednesday, September 22-24
and the Milk Foundation Convention
from Wednesday through Friday, Sep-
tember 24-26 with the exposition running
through the entire week.
Predictions of an attendance of 35,000
have been made by national organization
officials for the combined conventions and
the exposition to be held on the great
Chicago Navy Pier. This is said to be one
of the largest Expositions in the world.
Floridians scheduled for participation
in the convention programs were Alf
Nielsen, West Palm Beach, and Paul E.
Reinhold, Jacksonville, as Directors of
both the Milk Foundation and the Ice
Cream Manufacturers Association. Theo
Datson, Orlando, was to participate in
the Ice Cream Manufacturers Directors
sessions and E. T. Lay was scheduled to
preside at meetings of the National Con-
ference of Dairy Association Executives
of which he is President. Ed Volkwein of
Jacksonville and Cliff Wayne of Miami
were on the Milk Foundation Conven-
tion program.


DAIRYMAN WAYNE WEBB,

NEW F. D. I. A. DIRECTOR

First of a series introducing new members of
the 1952-53 Board of Directors of the Florida
Dairy Industry Association. The 16-member
Board includes 5 producers, 5 distributors, 5
producer-distributors and one Allied Trades
member.
Wayne Webb was elected to the
F.D.I.A. Board as one of five producer
directors and repre-
sents the producers
of the general west
coast area. Wayne
and his brother
James operate a large
modern dairy farm
in Hillsborough
County which they
started in 1946 fol-


lowing James' return
from overseas mili-


WEBB


tary duty.
Wayne demonstrated his belief and
interest in cooperation with his fellow
dairymen and the dairy industry as a
whole by promptly affiliating himself with
the West Coast Milk Producers Associa-
tion and the Florida Dairy Industry As-
sociation. He is now serving as President
of the West Coast Association and as a
Director of the State Association.
He has held continuous membership
on the State Association Legislative Com-
mittee on which he has rendered active
and effective service.
Earlier history discloses that Wayne is
a native of Tampa, attended Hillsborough
High School of Tampa, the Tampa Busi-
ness University and the Norman Junior
College of Norman Park, Georgia. He
engaged in private business in Durham,
North Carolina, 1933 to 1942 and was
employed with the American Tobacco
Company, 1942 to 1946.
Indicating his acceptance of civic re-
sponsibility is the fact that Wayne is a
member of the Methodist Church, Vice-
President of the Sweetwater Civic Club,
a Director of the Dairy Council of Hills-
borough and Pinellas Counties, a mem-
ber of the Artificial Breeders Association
and the Florida Farm Bureau.
Married to the former Winfred Wilson
of Tifton, Georgia, this attractive couple
have a 19 year old son recently discharg-
ed from the U. S. Marine Corps and a
14 months old daughter.


YOUR ONE VOTE CAN COUNT
Many people feel "their vote will not
count." Some say, "What good will my
one vote do?" "I don't know the candi-
dates or anything about the issues, so I
just won't bother."


FOR OCTOBER, 1952 0 11







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


DAIRY REVIEW


Extension Service Dairy Products Laboratory
Dairy Farm Research Unit Agricultural Experiment Station

Herdsmen's Short Course

Attracts Good Attendance

The largest attendance for a number of years is reported for the 1952 Dairy
Herdsmen's Short Course held at the University of Florida, August 26-28.
Parttime participants in the program swelled the total attendance to about 35,
according to C. W. Reaves, State Extension Dairyman, who served with Dr. R. B.
Becker as Co-Chairmen of the program.


Dairy Feeds and Feeding was the gen-
eral theme for the Course which was
equally divided between classroom lec-
tures and discussions and practical demon-
strations at the University of Florida
Dairy Research Farm.
Subjects included in the three-day
course were: Characteristics of Feeds,
Making and Feeding Silage, Hay Drying,
Pasture and Feed Production, The Sills
and Hay Drier, Grass Silages In Europe,
Feeding Calves, Ration Calculations, Feed
Preparation and Mixing, Calf Feeding
and Feeding Research, Mineral Supple-
ments, Dry and Fresh Cows and Bull,
Milk Records and Making Feed Lists,
Economy in Buying Feeds, Producer Prob-
lems in Handling Milk, Antibiotics in
Milk, Round Table and Question Box.
A dinner meeting held at the Univer-
sity Cafeteria and the Dairy Products
Laboratory the evening of the second day
featured brief talks by E. T. Lay, Execu-
tive Director of the Florida Dairy Indus-
try Association, and V. C. Johnson, Chair-
man of the Association's Dairy Husban-
dry Committee.
Mr. C. W. Reaves also spoke at this
session giving a most interesting report
illustrated with color slide pictures of the
recent European tour which he made with
the Florida 4-H Judging Team represent-
ing the United States.
Herdsmen participating in the Short
Course were: Charlie Pettit, Pettit's Dairy,
Punta Gorda; Gerald Cox, T. G. Lee
Dairy, Orlando; J. T. Carlton, Carlton's
Dairy, Hawthorne; Joseph Morris and
August Guntley, Morris Dairy, Holly-
wood; Harvey B. Brown, Brown's Dairy,
Orange Heights; Willie Jim Watkins and
J. W. Watkins, Casey's Dairy, Clearwater;
Harold Allen Taylor, Taylor's Dairy,
Daytona Beach; T. Stin Haselton, Lake
View Dairy, Eustis; Ed Neel Lowrie and
Bo Bedgood, Lowrie's Dairy, Tallahassee;
Kenneth F. Vonhof, Maitland; Ivan E.
Parker, Parker Bros. Dairy, Mt. Dora;


Lamar Dupree, Alachua; T. F. Sheridan,
Moore Haven; Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Bax-
ter, Bixby Dairy, Clewiston; John Bower,
Sebring; Tom A. Shaw, Shaw's Dairy,
Alachua; Warren G. Tyre, Tyre's Dairy,
Lake City; C. C. Boyd, Jr., Acme Dairy,
Delray Beach; James T. Gray, Hunt's
Dairy, Delray Beach; Joe Brown, Brown's
Dairy, Jacksonville; and Dan Rousseau,
Rousseau's Dairy, Lake Park.

DAIRY RESEARCH FINDINGS
REPORTED BY DR. BECKER
Among the many results of Dairy
Science research disclosed at the recent
American Dairy Science Annual Meeting,
the following are pointed out by Dr. R. B.
Becker, University of Florida Dairy Hus-
bandman, as of special interest to Florida
dairymen:
(a) A progress report on production
records of cross bred dairy cattle was
given by J. P. LaMaster (Clemson Col-
lege). Sires were proved, and purebred
heifers from the same dams served as a
basis for comparison. Results to date ap-
peared to indicate that crossbreds were
approximately intermediate in production
between that for the respective parents,
capacity of bulls being measured by pro-
duction of their daughters.
(b) In controlled temperature rooms
at the University of Missouri, S. Brody
determined that Brahman cattle do not
"sweat" more per unit of surface area
than do European cattle, but had 12%
more surface per 100-pounds live weight.
This had an advantage at temperatures of
60 to 105 degrees Fahrenheit, but a dis-
advantage below 40 degrees Fahrenheit.
(c) A new pregnancy test for cows
which was 91% efficient has been de-
veloped at the Oregon Agricultural Ex-
periment Station.
(d) Development of oxidized flavor
in milk was delayed significantly in milk
from cows on fresh green feeds, parti-
cularly oats pastures, in investigations at


SOUTHERN ICE CREAM
CONVENTION PRAISED
BY F.D.I.A. LEADERS

The November 11-13 Annual Conven-
tion of the Southern Association of Ice
Cream Manufacturers to be held at the
Jung Hotel, New Orleans, is well worth
attending, according to the following
appraisal of two Florida Dairy Industry
Association leaders.
President Wilmer Bassett writes: "As
President of our Florida State Association,
I am naturally a booster for attendance
at all worthwhile meetings of the In-
dustry. The Southern Ice Cream Conven-
tion seems to me to be a grand combina-
tion of the State and National Conven-
tions-not too large to be friendly but
large enough to afford the best of every-
thing. While there is nothing lacking in
information and inspiration of a splendid
program, there seems to go with these
Conventions a sort of a picnic flavor that
makes it a joy to attend. Although I do
not consider attendance at the Southern
convention a MUST for the average Ice
Cream Executive, it most certainly is an
outstanding opportunity."
Past President Theo Datson, who cur-
rently is a Director of International As-
sociation of Ice Cream Manufacturers,
writes: "Attendance at the Southern Ice
Cream Manufacturers Convention is an
entirely different experience from that to
be found at any other convention. It is
to the Convention World what the FLY-
ING SAUCER is to aviation. The reason
why this is so is something you can't
exactly understand and you can't quite ex-
plain. It is simply a new and different and
heart-warming experience. There are no
strangers! There is no formality! There
is always a wonderful program tuned to
current problems of the Industry and of
this region and there is fellowship and a
good time. That's why I always look for-
ward to the SOUTHERN CONVEN-
TION."


A. R. (Dolph) Allison, manager of
the Tampa branch of Borden's, is head
of the wholesale division of the Tampa
Community Chest campaign this month.


Broward M. Daniel of Moore Haven
has been appointed to serve as a member
of the governing board of the Central &
Southern Florida Flood Control District.
Mr. Daniel operates the Daniel Dairy at
Moore Haven.

Cornell University. Feeding of three
kinds of silages (corn, pea vine, and al-
falfa) at the Idaho station had no mea-
surable effect on the titratable acidity of
fresh milk.


12 0 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS







Feed Dealers and Univ. of Florida

Sponsor Animal Nutrition Conference

The annual University of Florida animal nutrition conference, which will be held
at Gainesville November 13 and 14, will feature a number of outstanding animal
husbandmen and nutritionists as speakers. The State Feed Dealers Association will
hold its annual meeting in conjunction with the conference.
According to Dr. George K. Davis, who arranged the program, subjects for the
conference will include feeds and feed formulation, breeding animals for efficiency in
gains, feed control aspects, and the outlook for turkey production in the South. Of
special interest to dairymen will be a discussion of roughages in the dairy ration. The
nutrition of dairy cattle, beef cattle, swine, and poultry all will be studied at the con-
ference.


ONE BITE OUT OF THREE
IS A DAIRY PRODUCT
Housewives spend more than 15 per-
cent of their food budgets for dairy pro-
ducts. For this they get nearly 30 percent
of the food consumed annually in this
country.
In making these everyday purchases,
each home becomes a part of an industry
that employs millions and produces bil-
lions. Cash farm income from dairy pro-
ducts currently is around $4,000,000,-
000 annually 13.5% of total farm in-
come from marketing commodities.


The opening session of the two-day
conference will include a talk by Dr.
Davis, who is head of the Florida Agri-
cultural Experiment Station's Nutrition
Laboratory, on non-protein nitrogen sup-
plements. Other speakers on the first af-
ternoon's program will be Dr. W. G.
Kirk, vice-director in charge of the Range
Cattle Station at Ona, Florida, who has
done outstanding work in developing feed
supplements for beef cattle; Dr. Marvin
Koger, Station animal husbandman; Dr.
J. R. Couch, professor of nutrition at
Texas A & M College; and Murry Cohen
of the Joseph Seagram Co.
Dr. R. A. Dutcher, emeritus professor
of agricultural biochemistry at Pennsyl-
vania State College, will speak on the
morning of November 14, on the subject
of production and incorporation of vita-
mins into feeds. Dr. S. P. Marshall, dairy
husbandman of the Florida Agricultural
Experiment Station, will give a talk on
roughages to be used in rounding out the
ration for dairy cows. Dr. Marshall has
done an outstanding job of developing a
year-round roughage program for the
Experiment Station dairy herd.
Other Friday morning speakers will
be Dr. T. J. Cunha, head of the Station
animal husbandry department and a wide-
ly known leader in the field of antibio-
tics; Dr. H. D. Wallace, animal husband-
man; and a feed control official.
Poultry will hold the spotlight in Fri-
day afternoon's program.
The future of the production of turkeys
in the South will be predicted by Curt
Severson of the Ralston-Purina Company,
St. Louis.
The conference will close Friday night
with the annual banquet. Speaker for the
occasion will be Dr. Jerry Sotola of Ar-
mour and Company. Dr. Sotola is well
known for his excellent analyses of feed
and feed men.
Carl Reger of Miami, president of the
State Feed Dealers Association, will pre-
side over the meetings of this group.
Other officers present will be Joe Rhyne,
Jacksonville, vice-president; O. C. Sy-
frett, Miami, secretary; and Earl John-
son, Gainesville, treasurer.


DAIRYMEN'S HELPER!


WILLING WORKER REDDY KILOWATT
gives you all the HOT water you need . .
whenever and wherever you want it.

THEN, OF COURSE, REDDY milks, cleans, gives you
light, and does scores and scores of chores to make
your dairying easier and more profitable . your
living better and happier.

Call at your nearest office for details.


ij FLORIDA POWER &
*' LIGHT COMPANY


FOR OCTOBER, 1952 13








Annual Guernsey Club Sales

To Be Held October 27 and 29

The 14th Annual Florida Guernsey Cattle Club Sale will be held at Largo Wed-
nesday, October 29th. The Second Annual Florida East Coast Sale will be held at
Boutwell's Dairy, Lake Worth, Monday, October 27th. The Florida Guernsey Cattle
Club is sponsoring these Sales to bring in registered Guernsey cattle and have them
purchased by dairymen, Guernsey breeders, Future Farmers and 4-H Club boys and
girls. Officers of the Florida Guernsey Cattle Club are Earl A. Johnson, Dinsmore,
president; W. A. Boutwell, Sr., Lake Worth, vice-president; J. H. Logan, Clearwater,


secretary-treasurer.
Thirty-three of the outstanding Guern-
sey breeders in Kentucky, Tennessee,
North Carolina, South Carolina, Alabama,
Georgia and Florida have consigned 106
animals to the Sales. A large number of
the cows will be heavy springers. There
will also be bred heifers and open heifers.
There are 13 bulls consigned. Most of
them are from dams that have records of
more than 12,000 lbs. of milk and 600
lbs. of butterfat. Ten of the bulls are of
serviceable age. All cattle were selected
by the Sales Committee of the Florida
Guernsey Cattle Club composed of W.
A. Boutwell, Sr., Chairman; C. W.
Reaves, Gainesville; R. R. Jennings, Jack-
sonville; Charles Johnson, Dinsmore;
Carroll Ward, Sr., Winter Park; J. McK.
Jeter, Union, S. C.; and J. H. Logan.
The interest in Golden Guernsey milk
and Guernsey cattle has been increasing
steadily. Many dairymen in Florida who
have grade dairy cattle are now using reg-
istered Guernsey bulls and raising their
replacements.
All dairymen and those interested in
good cattle are cordially invited to attend
the two Sales. There will be entertain-
ment provided for consignors and visi-
tors by local committees in Lake Worth
and Largo.


At the right are seen Cuban Guernsey
group tour pictures from the camera of
Mr. Johnron showing Holstein, Brown
Swiss and Guernsey Dairy animals at
the Live Stock Exposition; a modern
Cuban ox team; a not so modern milk
delivery cart and the City of Havana as
seen from a hotel window.

QUAIL ROOST FARMS CONSIGN
TO FLORIDA GUERNSEY SALES
Quail Roost Farms, well known Guern-
sey breeder of Rougemont, N. C., have
announced consignment of three animals
to Florida's Annual Guernsey Sales to
be held October 27 in Lake Worth and
October 29 in Largo. One animal will
be offered at the Lake Worth Sale and two
at Largo.

A. P. Frizzell Replaces Pearce
On Live Stock Sanitary Board
Announcement was made by the Gov-
ernor's office in Tallahassee, August 11th
of the appointment of Arthur Frizzell,
Charlotte County cattleman, as a member
of the Florida State Live Stock Sanitary
Board.
Mr. Frizzell, whose appointment runs
for four years, succeeds J. Olin Pearce
of Okeechobee.


Our Consignment to the Two Florida Sales
To the Lake Worth Sale October 27
ONE BIG, MILKY AR COW DUE TO CALVE OCTOBER 30.
QUAIL ROOST NOMAX POLLY, born January 16, 1948
AR record, 10801 Milk, 487 Fat Jr. 2C-Dam's record, 13529 Milk, 711 Fat 5 yrs.
This cow is ready to produce fall milk. Due 3 days after the sale.
To the Largo Sale October 29
1. The best young herd sire we have offered in Florida
QUAIL ROOST PROUD BAILIFF, born March 2, 1952
Sire: Chicona Pablo, AR, and inbred Langwater Traveler; Dam: Quail Roost NoMax
Bud-This is her second calf. As a two year old she made 13343 Milk-624 Fat.
In addition to heavy production inheritance this bull is a show bull; deep
straight and stylish.
2. A very choice springing heifer, Quail Roost Lady Rachel, born July 2, 1950
She is sired by Quail Roost Master Max and out of a heavy producing
young cow with 10180 Milk-507 Fat in 305 days. Due to arrive two weeks
after the sale. She should make a desirable addition to any herd.
WE BELIEVE YOU WILL LIKE THESE GUERNSEYS.


QUAIL ROOST FARMS


ROUGEMONT, N. C.


I a


"I1
.hh. ->1

*f


Story of Cuban Tour
on Page 22


14 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


:ii


I








GUERNSEYS


At Public Auction


TWO DATES TO REMEMBER


October 27th


EAST COAST SALE
Boutwell's Dairy, Lake Worth, Florida
Monday, October 27, 1952-1:00 P.M.


October 29th

14TH ANNUAL
FLORIDA GUERNSEY SALE
Fair Grounds, Largo, Florida
Wednesday, October 29, 1952-1:00 P.M.


106 Guernseys are consigned to the two Sales by outstanding Guernsey Breeders from Kentucky, Tennessee,
North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, and Florida. All cattle are negative to Bang's and
T. B. and are guaranteed breeders. A large number of them are heavy springers. Most of the bulls are
of serviceable age. Nearly one-half of the cattle are calfhood vaccinated with Strain # 19.


An Opportunity To Buy Foundation Stock
For Your Future Guernsey Herd


SPONSORED BY THE
FLORIDA GUERNSEY CATTLE CLUB
(A Non-Profit Organization for the Advancement of Guernsey Cattle in Florida)


EARL JOHNSON, Dinsmore, President


J. H. LOGAN, Secretary-Treasurer


W. A. BOUTWELL, Sr., Lake Worth
Vice-President and Chairman of Sales Committee
For Catalogs write J. H. LOGAN, Secretary, Largo, Florida
COL. TOM McCORD, Montgomery, Alabama RALPH W. COARSEY, Trion, Georgia
Auctioneer Reading Pedigrees


FOR OCTOBER, 1952 0 15











DAIRY NEWS DIGEST


Members of the Dairy Industry throughout the State are invited to please
send to the "Florida Dairy News" all news about dairies, dairying and the
good people who devote their time, talents and money to this great industry.
-The Editor.


-I,


In the above pictures, Dairy Month "Queen
Mary" and Mildred are seen (top) as they en-
joyed a visit at Savannah Beach; (center) as
the Queen and party were received by Mayor
I. D. Sams of Jacksonville Beach; (bottom)
on their visit to Fo most Dairies, Jacksonville
plant and general offices.


DR. WERNER OF MILK
FOUNDATION SPEAKS TO
SCHOOL LUNCH GROUP
A group of 550 Florida School Lunch
supervisors and managers had the plea-
sure of hearing one
of the American
Dairy Industry's out-
s t a n d i ng speakers
when Dr. Richard J. al
We r ner, General
Manager of the Milk
Industry Foundation,
Washington, D. C.,
addressed their an-
nual conference in
Tallahassee, August WERNER
21st.
Dr. Werner's appearance on the pro-
gram was sponsored by the Florida Dairy
Industry Association.
At the request of Mrs. Thelma Flana-
gan, State School Lunchroom Supervisor,
a special committee of the Dairy Associa-
tion joined Dr. Werner on the stage dur-
ing his address for the purpose of sitting
as a panel discussion group. The Com-
mittee received no questions but was en-
thusiastically applauded by the (all fe-
male) group when it was announced that
the Dairy Industry's newest ice cream sen-
sation, "Ice Cream Bon Bons", would be
served at the conclusion of the meeting.
Members of the F.D.I.A. Committee
participating in the meeting with Dr.
Werner were: Jack Tierney and Red
Hartsfield, Foremost Dairies; Curry Bas-
sett, Borden's Dairy; Wilmer Bassett of
Bassett's Dairy and president of the As-
sociation; and Andy Lay, Executive Di-
rector of the Association.
Mrs. America Escuder, Director-nutri-
tionist of the Dairy Council of Hills-
borough and Pinellas Counties, served
as an instructor in nutrition during the
five-day conference.


QUEEN HONORED ON TOUR
OF GEORGIA AND FLORIDA
(Continued from page 6)
After a day of fun at Savannah Beach,
another at Jacksonville Beach where they
were officially greeted by Mayor I. D.
Sams, and an official visit to several Jack-
sonville dairies, the girls, accompanied by
their escorts (Mr. and Mrs. McFann), re-
turned by Eastern Airlines to Miami.


DR. VICKERS NAMED
NEW STATE VETERINARIAN

Dr. C. Paul Vickers of Tallahassee has
been named State Veterinarian by the
State Live Stock Sanitary Board to suc-
ceed the late Dr. J. V. Knapp who had
filled this important post for over thirty
years.
Dr. Vickers has been engaged in pri-
vate veterinary practice in Tallahassee
since 1937. He was born in Chipley, Flor-
ida and is a graduate of Alabama Poly-
technic Institute, Auburn, Alabama, Vet-
erinary College.


1952-53 COMMITTEES
FLORIDA DAIRY INDUSTRY
ASSOCIATION
Committee Chairman
"ADVISORY MEMBERS"......Dr. E. L. Fouts
Univ. of Fla., Gainesville
"ALLIED TRADES MEMBERS"...Larry Hodge
Standard Packaging Corpn., Miami
ANNUAL FIELD DAY........................Bill Harman
Southern Dairies, Gainesville
ANNUAL MEETING.....................Frank B. Doub
F. B. Doub Dairy, Jacksonville
DAIRY HUSBANDRY..................V. C. Johnson
Dinsmore Farms, Dinsmore
EX ECUTIVE.......................... ............. W ilm er Bassett
Bassett's Dairy, Monticello
FIN AN CE................. ... ..............J. N M cArthur
McArthur Jersey Farms Dairy, Miami
FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS .............Curry Bassett
Borden's Bassett Dairies, Tallahassee
JUNE DAIRY MONTH.......................Jack Dew
Southern Dairies, Inc., Jacksonville
JUNIOR DAIRY ASSN.......W. A. Boutwell, Sr.
Boutwell's Dairy, Lake Worth
LADIES AUXILIARY.... Mrs. C. Ray John on
Johnson's Dairy, St. Petersburg
LEGISLATIVE .... .... ................ Theo Datson
Borden's Dairy, Orlando
Co-Chairman...... ......... .................George Boutwell
Boutwell's Dairy, Lake Worth
MEMBERSHIP-
Co-Chrmn. for Prod-Dist... Herman Burnett
Burnett's Dairy Farms, Bradenton
Co-Chrmn. for Producers.............. Frank Doub
F. B. Doub Dairy, Jacksonville
Co-Chrmn. for Distributors..Gordon Nielsen
Alfar Creamery Co., West Palm Beach
MILK PRODUCTION.......................John Sargeant
Sargeant Dairy Farms, Lakeland
PASTURE DEVELOPMENT. .....Herman Boyd
Hall & Boyd Dairy, Miami
PLANT COST & ACCOUNTING.............
Geo. Boutwell
Boutwell's Dairy, Lake Worth
PLANT PROCESSING....... .......Russell Bevan
Borden's Dairy, St. Petersburg
PUBLIC HEALTH.. ....... ...........Brady Johnston
Dinsmore Dairy Co., Jacksonville
PUBLIC RELATIONS......... .........Cliff Wayne
Southern Dairies, Miami
STANDARDS & REGULATIONS...John Hood
Hood's Dairy, St. Petersburg
UNIVERSITY OF FLA... ...........Alf R. Nielsen
Alfar Creamery Co., W. Palm Beach
"VETERINARY MEMBERS"...Dr. Karl Owens
D. V. M., Gainesville


16 0 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS







Letters to the Editor
Dear Editor:
There seems to be so much misunder-
standing and misinformation going
around concerning the price of milk in
Florida and its comparison to prices in
other areas of the country, I would like
the privilege of calling to the attention
of the readers of the Florida Dairy In-
dusty some facts on comparative milk
prices which appeared in a recent issue
of the "Milk Dealer" magazine.
These figures show, in my opinion, that
there is very little real difference in the
price of milk in Florida and many north-
ern areas when the butterfat content and
quality of the milk is taken into account.
Jacksonville and Miami each has a base
price of 260 per quart for creamline Pas-
teurized Grade A Milk. Miami is listed
in this magazine, page 136, but Jackson-
ville is not. Miami shows the 26 price
for 4% to 4.4% butterfat milk just
about the way of Jacksonville.
Other markets are listed as having a
price of 24 and 250 per quart for 4%
milk. This means that the milk is stan-
dardized to 4%. It is unlawful in Jackson-
ville to standardize milk. Therefore, you
can find milk on this market all the way
up to 5% butterfat. Mobile shows 25
per quart price at straight 4% butterfat
milk. Denver, Colorado is 230 for 3.6%
milk. Hartford, Conn. 240 for 3.7 to 3.8
milk. Atlanta, Ga., is 250 with no butter-
fat standard shown. New Orleans, 25
for 3.8 milk. Augusta and Portland,
Maine, 240 for straight 4% milk -
that's for milk in paper and a penny less
in glass. Atlantic City, N. J., 25.50 per
quart for 3.6 milk. Miami and Jackson-
ville have much the better buy in my
opinion for 4% plus at 260. Durham,
N. C., is 250 for 4% milk. Oklahoma
City 25.50, butterfat not shown. Char-
leston, W. Va., 24.50 for 3.5 to 3.8 but-
terfat. As I see it, we have a better buy
in Florida at 260 for 4% butterfat with
plus-Grade-A Pasteurized Milk than many
of these other areas.
Where Florida prices are 10 to 1.5
higher per quart, there is no benefit to
the dairy because of the extra for trans-
portation costs on feeds.
I think the Dairy Industry should go
all out to show the buying public facts
of this kind as well as what they are get-
ting for their money in the fine milk sup-
ply that is produced in Florida.
Very sincerely yours,
VAL A. LEE
Pres. Miller Machinery
& Supply Co.

Velda Milk Supply has taken over the
retail delivery route formerly serviced by
Bamberg's Dairy of Jasper. Mr. Chandler
Bamberg sold his herd recently and is no
longer in the dairy business.


WITH THE

DE LAVAL COMBINE MILKER

Mr. Isaac Shakarian and his son, Mr. Demos Shakarian, owners
and operators of the Reliance Dairy Farm at Downey, Calif., use
the De Laval Model F Combine Milking System to milk their
1,000-cow herd. We'll let their letter speak for itself:
"I have always believed in giving credit where credit is due-
and your company certainly deserves credit for saving me a lot of
time and money with the new De Laval Model F Combine
Milking System.
"We are saving labor since switching to De Laval. This is a
substantial item in itself; but coupled with this is the satisfaction
of a more efficient, modern operation.
"We operate a 1,000-cow dairy and efficiency is important.
Thanks to a fine job of installation by your dealer, Brown Brothers
of Bellflower, we are now able to machine-milk 120 head of cows
that previously had to be milked by hand, thus our operators are
now freed of drudgery chores and can handle 75 cows each with ease.
"Our veterinary bill has shown a big reduction, and the sanitary
problem is greatly simplified due to the new circulating washup
system incorporated in the De Laval installation."
The De Laval Model F Combine Milking System can save time
and money for you, too. Why not send for full information today?

"Direct from Cow to Can, Cooler or Tank"

U- -r --- --- qr
The Ie Laval Separator Co., Dept. 35-K
Pou-hkeersie. N. Y.
Please send me complete information on:
The De Lavel Model F Combine Milker
THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR COMPANY Name ..................................
Poughkeepsie, N. Y. sp e WA Town ..................................
427 Randolph St., Chicago 6, ll. n .
61 BealeSt., San Francisco 5, Calif. R.F.D...................State.............
-- -- -IIII


FOR OCTOBER, 1952 0 17








4-H DAIRY TEAM DESCRIBES EUROPEAN TRAVEL EXPERIENCES
(Continued from page 5)


is 14 years old, is in high production, and
her calves have included three bulls which
were sold for a total of $14,000. One of
the bulls was bought by an American
farmer for more than $4,000. Keeper's
Dreaming Design has five annual records
running to 14,000 pounds of milk and
more than 700 pounds of butterfat a year.

"We also saw beautiful specimens of
Guernsey cattle on the Island of Guern-
sey. On Guernsey we learned that the
government has adopted a system of com-
pulsory production recording, but it has
not been placed in general operation yet.

"Strictly controlled grazing is practiced
on Jersey and Guernsey, and cows are
tethered or staked out on long chains in
pasture. Much time is required for mov-
ing the cows and taking them to water,
but the close attention given to dairy ani-
mals on the Channel Islands has resulted
in the development of the great breeds
for which they are famous.

"Unfortunately, we did not see much
of the dairy cattle in England because
farm visits were restricted as a measure
in the campaign to wipe out Foot and
Mouth Disease. Dairy Shorthorns and
British Friesians are the main breeds used
in England for milk production.

"We were the guests of the British
Ministry of Agriculture and the Nation-
al Federation of Young Farmers' Clubs at
the British Royal Agricultural Show and
in London. A number of enjoyable events
were planned for us including a trip up
the Thames River from London with
members of the American Embassy and
a banquet at Hampton Court Hotel.
"Incidentally, England is making stren-
uous efforts to increase production of
more food and more forage for its live-
stock.
"The European breeds have a 'grading
up' plan whereby grade cows meeting
type and production requirements may
be entered in an Auxiliary Register and
within three to five generations secure
full registration with the cattle breed as-
sociations.
"From England we went to Holland
and the Friesland province, where our
American Holstein-Friesians were deve-
loped. It is in Northwestern Holland and
is rated as the best dairy region in the
world. The climate is ideal for dairy
farming, monthly average temperatures
ranging from 65 degrees in summer down
to 35 in winter. On the natural pasture
land of clay and peat the Dutch farmer
grazes his cattle from May to October
and milks them right in the pasture.
Narrow canals filled with water traverse


(Top) Irish milk cart and pony seen at Cork
Island. (Center) Florida team members watch
shocking of grass and clover hay in Scotland.
(Bottom) Mrs. Allan Barr shous Ray Alrarez,
team member, production records of the Ayr-
shire cattle herd at Ayr, Scotland. Mr. and Mrs.
Barr have shipped prize cattle to many coun-
tries over the world.

the fields about every 200 feet, cutting
the farms into small pastures of from
three to seven acres each, and the farmer
rotates his cows from one field to an-
other. The production of the Friesian cat-
tle on grass and water only is outstand-
ing. The Dutch farmer feeds his cows
hay and grass silage and a very small
amount of concentrates during the six
months they are in the barn. The govern-
ment rations concentrates at 375 pounds
per cow per year, but the cows average
about 1,000 gallons of milk a year.
"Like Jersey and Guernsey, Holland
was occupied by the Germans during
World War II, but the Germans did not


kill large numbers of cattle in any of
those places. They recognized the value
of the purebred Jerseys, Guernseys and
Dutch Friesians for milk, and only the
males and cows of least milk production
value were slaughtered.

"In Germany we saw dairy cattle simi-
lar to those of Holland. On the whole,
German lands are well-farmed and good
dairy farming practices are in use. Steep
mountainsides are used for grape produc-
tion.

"Most French dairy herds are of no
particular type and are characterized by
mixed breeding -facts which account to
a large extent for the comparatively low
average production in France.

"On our trip, as has been pointed out,
we saw many interesting things and talk-
ed with many farmers and others. Part
of the time we had the services of inter-
preters in talking with farmers and other
people. The farmers and others whom we
saw were pleasant and friendly, the farms
and landscapes were generally attractive
and picturesque, and the experiences we
had were interesting, entertaining, and
educational. We took pictures, as most
American visitors do. We saw many fam-
ous places, such as Blarney Castle in Ire-
land, Tam-O-Shanter Inn and Robert
Burns' birthplace near Ayr, Scotland, and
Shakespeare's birthplace at Stratford on
the Avon River. In London we went
through the House of Parliament and saw
the fabulous Crown Jewels in the Tower
of London. We saw Queen Elizabeth II
at the British Royal Show and took her
picture. We were not quite close enough,
however, for Albert Lawton to make
good on his promise to kiss the Queen.
We attended church one Sunday in West-
minster Abbey. We took a boat ride
through the canals of Amsterdam and
the boat trip up the Rhine River from
Kologne to Mainz, Germany, ending up
in Paris, where we visited the Louvre
Museum, Versailles Palace, Notre Dame
and other historical places.
"It was a great experience, and all of
us are grateful to those who made it pos-
sible: The Florida Dairy Industry Associa-
tion, the State Department of Agriculture,
the Florida Jersey and Guernsey Cattle
Clubs, dairy producer's organizations,
milk plants, feed and dairy supply men,
many individual dairymen and others."

There is no ruling class in America,
but the people who vote have within their
power the ability to decide what kind of
government we shall have. Won't you
be one of them?

W. Harper Kendrick has been named
County Agent in Manatee County suc-
ceeding Ed L. Ayers who recently became
commissioner for the State Plant Board.


18 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS







More Pasture Doesn't l 9
Cut YOUR Feed Cost... / *

BETTER tktn/
PASTURES DO!
Why not buy your...
Take a look at your pasture.
Is it deep rich qreen, fast / 9
qrowinq and palatable? If not, & PU t
NACO can help you. Proper CITRU S
pasture programs produce
higher nutrient value resulting NOW ?
in less need for supplements.
Your NACO representative is Yes sir, the "early bird catches the worm" and with the current demand
an expert on fertilization, for Florida Citrus Pulp, Citrus Meal, Citrus Pellets and Citrus Molasses at
NACO can help you produce such a high level, we must all anticipate our needs and place our orders
milk most economically. early for these fine products . so rich in carbohydrates and essential
minerals necessary to stimulate milk production!

A c FERTILIZER For full particulars, write Citrus Processors Asso-
SCOMPANY ciation, P. O. Box 403, Tampa, Florida.
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
FT. PIERCE, FLORIDA F, (
Manufacturers of Five Star Fertilizers




MILLER MACHINERY AND SUPPLY CO.
CAN SUPPLY YOUR DAIRY OR PLANT NEEDS


A Florida Plant
we designed and equipped stood in number one position
among 30 plants checked recently as to

LOW MAN-HOUR COST PER HUNDRED GALLONS
MILK PROCESSED

A WELL RUN PLANT
We are going to further reduce their cost with in-place
cleaning of their pipe lines and plate equipment.

We Are At Your Service Also.

JACKSONVILLE MIAMI


FOR OCTOBER, 1952 0 19










CATTLE WANTED
FOR

SLAUGHTER

We are in the market to
purchase Cattle and Hogs
for slaughter or will
slaughter your animals.

NEW AND MODERN
EQUIPMENT
OPERATING UNDER STRICT
STATE INSPECTION

Phone or write:
I. B. McCALL Phone 2-2113
1929 Greenwood Ave. Jacksonville




The first word in our name




AMICA


is more than just a five

letter word. It




MEANS


more to us than that. For

it comes from a Latin word

meaning



FRIENDLY


So let us show you how

friendly we can be and

also give you the best in

supplies, service and

equipment.



AMICA-BURNETT


CHEM. & SUPPLY CO.

Phone 4-5606 P. O. Box 2328

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA


Rudy Schneider, Jr., above (left) is seen discussing an army inspection report with J. M. Punder-
son, Manager, Rochester, Minnesota Dairy Cooperative. Son of Rudy Schneider, Sr., and nephew
of Henry Schneider, Schneider's Creamery, Eustis, Florida, Rudy, Jr. is just completing two years
military service at Ft. Snelling, Minnesota where he has served as Dairy Foods and Veterinary
Inspector.


Allied Trades Members


Florida Dairy Industry Association, Inc.


Allied Dairy Products, Inc.
Ambrosia Chocolate Co.
Adams Packing Association, Inc.
American Paper Goods Co.
American Seal Kap Corporation
Amica-Burnett Chem. &
Supply Co.
Amco Feed Stores, Orlando
Anheuser-Busch, Inc.
Balch Flavor Co.
Broward Grain & Supply Co.
Byars-Forgy, Inc.
California Spray-Chem. Corpn.
Certified Products Co.
Peter Cooper Corporation
Creamery Package Mfg. Co.
Crown Cork & Seal Co.
Dairy-Pak, Inc.
Chas. Dennery, Inc.
De-Raef Corporation
Diamond Alkali Chem. Co.
The Diversey Corporation
Dixie Cup Co.
The Dixson Co.
Ex-Cell-O Corporation
Fla. Citrus Canners Cooperative
Fla. Feed Mills
W. L. Filbert, Inc.
The Fischman Co.
Foote & Jenks, Inc.
General Mills, Jax.
General Mills, Miami
General Mills, Tampa
Gulf Paper Co.
Hackney Bros. Body Co.


Hector Supply Co.
Hudson Manufacturing Co.
W. M. Igou, Inc.
International Paper Co.
Irwin Grain Co.
Jackson Grain Co.
Jiffy Manufacturing Co.
James Jennings Brokerage
Johnson & Johnson
Robt. A. Johnston Co.
Juice Industries, Inc.
Kelco Co.
Kieckhefer Container Co.
Klenzade Products. Inc.
Krim-Ko Corporation
Kuder Pulp Sales Co.
Lakeland Cash Feed Co.
Lenfestey Supply Co.
Lily-Tulip Cup Corpn.
Liberty Glass Co.
Limpert Brothers, Inc.
The Liquid Carbonic Corpn.
Joe Lowe Corporation


National Pectin Products Co.
Newth-Morris Box Co.
Owens-Illinois Glass Co.
Paul-Lewis Laboratories, Inc.
Penna. Salt Mfg. Co.
The Pfaudler Co.
C. M Pitt & Sons Co.
Co.
Ralston Purina Co., Miami
Ralston Purina Co., Tampa
Reddi-Wip Co. of Fla.
Rex Extract Co.
Riverside Manufacturing Co.
Sandner & Co.
Savage Arms Corporation
Schaefer, Inc.
Sealright Co., Inc.
Security Mills, Tampa, Inc.
Security Feed & Seed, Miami
Smith-Lee Co.
J. Hungerford Smith Co.
Southern Cotton Oil Co.
Spartan Grain & Mill Co.
Standard Packaging Corpn.


S. H. Mahoney Extract Co. ein l m ., c.
Marathon Corporation
P. C. Martino & Co. Thatcher Glass Mfg. Co., Inc.
The Mathieson Chem. Corpn.
Meyer-Blanke Co. Universal Milking Machine Co.
Geo. J. Meyer Mfg. Co.
David Michael & Co. Vanilla Laboratories
Miller Mach. & Supply, Jax. Vitex Laboratories, Inc.
Miller Mach. & Supply, Miami Virginia-Carolina Chem. Corpn.
Mojonnier Brothers Co.
Morgan Sales C o. Warner-Jenkinson Mfg. Co.
Morris Paper Mills The Watson-Scott Co.
Murphy Body Works, Inc. Wholesale Brokerage Co.
Williamson Feed Mills
Nash-Kelvinator Corpn. Wyandotte Chemicals Corpn.


As cooperating Associate Members of the Florida Association, the above firms are
entitled to the friendly consideration of the Dairy Members and to the usual
privileges and services of the Association.


20 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS






MILK IN THE FAMILY DIETS
Milk has a unique place in present-day diets. Not only
is milk in its several forms the chief supplier of calcium,
furnishing three-fourths of the total of our national dietary,
but it accounts for nearly half the riboflavin, one-fourth the
protein, and important amounts of several other nutrients.
Small wonder then that educational efforts to improve diets
have put great emphasis on milk.
Practically every study of what people eat-whether it
concerns family diets, or food habits of school children or
other individuals-gives the same picture. In every group
there are substantial numbers of people using too little milk.
Milk is by far the most economical source of calcium
in diets, and offers good returns for the money in many other
nutrients, too. The low cost food plan of Bureau of Human
Nutrition and Home Economics suggests close to six quarts a
week for children of different ages; five quarts for adults,
with extra allowances in pregnancy and lactation. Liberal
quantities like these provide best assurance that diets will
have enough calcium; they will go far toward meeting needs
for riboflavin and high quality protein.
Much remains to be done to bring up milk consumption
where it is too low. Faced with high food prices, consumers
need to know more about uses and nutritional values of
various forms of milk and milk products. They need, above
all, to be convinced of the nutritional importance of milk, not
only for children but for grown-ups as well. This is a chal-
lenge that teachers, nutritionists, and health workers would
do well to accept.
From an article in "Nutrition Neus" B) Dr. Esther Phipard
Bureau of Human Nutrition & Home Economics
U. S. Dept. of Agriculture


WELFARE MILK REQUESTS
"ON THE FUNNY SIDE"
These are some extracts from letters making application
for supplies of Welfare Milk in the Glasgow, Scotland area:
"Please send me some cheap milk as I am expecting
mother."
"I have a baby twelve months old, thanking you for
same. Please send the form for supply of milk for having
babies at reduced rates."
'I have a child two months old fed entirely on cows
and another child."
"Will you please send me a form for cheap milk. I
have a baby two months old. I didn't know anything about
it until a friend told me."
"Sorry I have been so long in filling in form, but I have
been in bed with my baby and didn't know it was running
out until the milkman told me."
"This is my eighth child, what are you going to do
about it?"
"Sir, I am forwarding my Marriage Certificate and two
children one of which has been a mistake, as you can see."
-From "The Milk Industry," London, England


Retail prices of regular milk delivered to homes in 25
major cities in the country averaged 23 cents per quart early
in July. This average was 1.1 cents higher than for July of
last year. Milk dealers' average buying price in more than
100 cities early in July averaged $5.34 per cwt., or 29 cents
higher than in July of a year ago.
In most Florida areas there has been no milk price in-
creases within the past year.


~I~


'N-
WN-


^FF7 _


A GOOD PROSPECT?

Sure! Ask your driver-chances are, he's tabbed a
future "All-American" or two right on his own
route. And we hope that both you and your drivers
know that these youngsters-active and growing-
are top prospects for Vitamin D milk, too! To assure
you a profitable milk fortification program, we offer-
ARPI Brand Vitamin D Concentrate
General Mills ARPI Brand Vitamin D is a con-
centrate of uniform potency, extreme blandness and
high stability-made especially for milk. The carrier
consists entirely of milk products-nothing foreign
to milk is added. (Easy, inexpensive to incorporate
-like adding milk to milk!)
To help you reach persons on low-fat diets with
a strong health appeal, General Mills offers-
DANDA Concentrate
(for low-fat milk fortification)
DANDA consists of important Vitamins D and A
in pure Grade-A milk products. Purified, distilled
Vitamin A and ARPI Vitamin D are incorporated
in evaporated milk, packaged into convenient cans,
sealed and sterilized. Simply add to milk before
pasteurization.
Remember-General Mills concentrates are
backed by a name known for dependability in the
food field. To further assure you of a successful
fortification program, Genera] Mills offers a com-
plete line of sales helps and promotion materials
at far below the price it would cost you to produce
them yourself


DISTRIBUTED BY


General Mills


2 Riverside Avenue
Jacksonville, Florida

711 W. Cass Street
Miami, Florida


FOR OCTOBER, 1952 21


77 W. Livingston St.
Orlando, Florida

7275 N. W. 7th Avenue
Tampa, Florida







GUERNSEY GROUP MAKE

INTERESTING CUBAN TOUR

By V. C. Johnson
Pres. Dinsmore Dairy, Jacksonville

(Pictures on page 14)

The Florida Dairy News has requested that I submit an article reporting a spe-
cial tour to Cuba made some time ago by a group of Florida Guernsey breeders and 1
am happy to tell our friends of some of the features of the tour which appeared to us
to be of special interest.
The tour was sponsored by the Florida Guernsey Cattle Club for the purpose of
becoming better acquainted with the dairy industry in Cuba and with some of the
well known dairy cattle breeders of our close neighbor country to the South of us,
to whom Florida purebred animals have been sold from time to time.


SAVE


Clean-Up Time!

The removal of milkstone from
pasteurizers (especially H. T. S. T.
plate type), need no longer be a
time-consuming task. Now you can
cut equipment clean-up time in half
by using scientifically designed

Oakite Compound No. 31
The extraordinary penetrating power
of this fast-acting milkstone remover
so thoroughly softens and loosens
caked-on casein deposits that removal
is accomplished in less time and with
less effort. Subsequently chemical
sterilization is more thorough.
Your nearest Oakite Technical Serv-
ice Representative listed below will
be glad to give you a "show-how"
test. Write today!
OAKITE PRODUCTS, INC.
R. L. Jones, 6236 Suwannee Road, Jacksonville
M. E. Withers, 7580 N.E. 4th Court, Miami
G. Tatum, 3607 So. Court St., Montgomery 6, Ala.
L\LtD INDUSTRIAL C4LE4h


OAKITE
RIAts METHODS S~ct c
Qicnay e Qe~eaA iiricv


Acting as our gracious hosts were Dr.
and Mrs. Roberto Parajon of Havana,
prominent Guernsey breeders and both
of whom are practicing veterinarians.
They had been guests in Florida last year
of Florida Guernsey Breeders and were
guest speakers at the 1951 annual meeting
of the Florida Veterinary Medical Asso-
ciation.
Assisting Dr. and Mrs. Parajon in
various arrangements for our party was
our good friend Mr. O. L. Menendez,
Cuban representative of the Standard
Packaging Corporation.
One of the most interesting of the
various places we visited was the Cuban
National Live Stock Exposition at Ha-
vana. Here we had an opportunity to see
many fine animals of some of our own
country's prominent dairy breeds. Among
these were Guernseys, Jerseys, Brown
Swiss and Ayrshires.
Dr. Parajon, who is one of the spon-
sors of the Exposition, had on exhibit a
number of fine Guernseys, one of which
was judged the Grand Champion. Beef
animals and horses were also prominent
in the livestock exhibits.
Our party were guests for dinner at
the Parajon home on their 400 acre
Guernsey Farm where we had an op-
portunity to inspect their herd of 63
registered Guernseys, some of which had
been purchased from prominent Florida
breeders. We were impressed by the Cu-
ban names seen around their dairy barns.
For instance, the calf barn was labeled
"Zona Infantil" and the maternity barn
sign read (if you could read it) "Mater-
niclo".
Much American machinery was seen
both at the Exposition and at the farms
and dairy plants.
One large dairy farm visited furnished
quite a surprise to our party with their
modern 122 cow milking barn.


One of the interesting facts about dairy
farming in Cuba is their development of
a native dual purpose dairy animal, slight-
ly smaller than the average American
dairy cow and of a dark red color. These
cows are said to be good average milk
producers and superior to other dairy
animals for beef.
Another interesting item seen on Cu-
ban farms was their live fence posts which
take root and grow after they are cut
from trees and set out.
Our tour took us by bus more than
half the length of the island, some 343
miles as far as Camaguey which is one of
the country's best dairy areas. Here we
visited a large modern factory which man-
ufactures butter, cheese and dried milk.
In peak season the factory uses 135,000
gallons of milk per day. We also visited
near Camaguey one of Cuba's largest
sugar mills.
A visit to an old American Colony
on the gulf beaches north of Camaguey
proved to be most interesting to our party
as we learned that an original colony
numbering three or four thousand Ameri-
cans was today reduced to only a few
dozen.

Cuba has much of the very modern-
particularly in Havana and other cities.
However, there remains over much of the
country much of what we term the life
of the pioneer days in America.
The production, processing and de-
livery of milk in Havana compare favor-
ably with American cities. However, in
the smaller towns, delivery seemed to be
done entirely with small two-wheel, one-
pony carts.
I recommend a visit to Cuba to any
who have not had the pleasure of going.
An overnight ride on the steamer from
Miami and a return by plane makes a
delightful journey.
Included in our party were: Mr. and
Mrs. W. A. Boutwell, Sr., Mr. and Mrs.
Melear, Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Broduer
and Mr. and Mrs. W. Milne, Lake
Worth; Mr. and Mrs. Leon Sellers, Mr.
and Mrs. Paul Hood and Mr. and Mrs.
Dick Hood, all of St. Petersburg; Mr.
and Mrs. Wilbur Casey, Clearwater; Mr.
and Mrs. Charles E. Donegan and John
H. Logan of Largo; Lovell Shook, Sara-
sota; Webb Alman, North Carolina
Guernsey breeder, and his herdsman,
Mack Adams; Mr. Husted of James Way
Equipment Co.; and Dean and Mrs. H.
H. Kildee of Ames, Iowa, who served
as one of the judges at the Cuban Live
Stock Exposition.

Speeches are like the horns of a steer.
A point here, a point there and a lot of
bull in between.


22 0 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS






MANY FEATURES CARRY
DAIRY MONTH STORY
(Continued from page 7)
Dairy Industry related groups organiza-
tions present as guests. Held special Food
Editors' press conference and party at
Dairy Council headquarters. Originated a
special bumper card, distributed literature
and posters, sponsored radio programs,
conducted Miami Dairy Month Queen
Contest and won the State Queen Crown,
sponsored a milking contest at the baseball
park, and speakers at a number of Civic
Club programs. Provided special display
at the State Dairy Industry Convention
held in Miami Beach. SARASOTA:
Sponsored series of joint Dairy Month ad-
vertising. DAIRY MONTH ACTIVI-
TIES IN A NUMBER OF AREAS
HAVE NOT YET BEEN REPORTED.
STATE QUEEN ELECTED-The
State Committee sponsored the election
of a State Dairy Month Queen at the
Dairy Industry Association's annual
meeting, June 11 13, in Miami Beach.
The Miami contestant, Miss Mary But-
ler, won the State Crown and was
awarded $25.00 Savings Bond and a trip
to Jacksonville and the Georgia State
Dairy Convention in Savannah, Georgia.
A special reception and luncheon honor-
ing the Queen and her party was put on
at the George Washington Hotel, Jack-
sonville with many prominent guests pre-
sent. The Queen and her identical twin
sister Mildred, who was honored as a
Queen's maid, have made wonderful rep-
resentatives of Dairy Month and of the
Florida Dairy Industry.
THE NATIONAL CHAIRMAN, Mr.
Chester Schoby, honored Florida and the
Florida Dairy Month program by at-
tending and addressing the Florida
Dairy Industry Convention in Miami
Beach, June llth.
The State Chairman addressed the
Dairy Convention, outlined the many
Dairy Month activities, showed the Dairy
Month "minute movies" and a special Na-
tional Dairy Month 15-minute film and
urged the group to cooperate more fully
in the future in Florida's Dairy Month
program.


Plant Manager-Superintendent
Available For Florida
A well recommended graduate of
Ohio State Dairy Department with years
of successful experience in quality con-
trol, milk plant superintendent and man-
agement-producer relations and public
relations. Age 43, married, desires to
locate in Florida. Information available
from Florida Dairy Industry Association,
220 Newnan St., Jacksonville.


Look How Easy


p Milk-House Work Can Be!

THE last time milk is han-
dled in the A. D. Lueders'
milk house, Waterford, Va.,
is when it is poured into a
400 gallon Mojonnier Bulk
Cooler, as shown in photo-
graph. The milk is soon
cooled toa safe 380F. Pickup
is made daily by bulktanker.
*There is a Mojonnier Bulk
Cooler for every milk house
requirement. Made in 10
sizes starting at 60 gallons.
Write for copy of Bulletin
240 today. No obligation.
Moionnier Bros. Co., 4601 W. Ohio St., Chicago 44, Ill.


FOR OCTOBER, 1952 23












1:


Simple Cleaning
and Sanitizing
FARM QUALITY PROGRAM
Nu-Kleen removes and prevents
milestone and keeps milking ma-
chines and utensils sparkling clean.
Kleer-Mor rapidly emulsifies fats
and grease. Rinses free easily.
For alternate use with Nu-Kleen.
Klenzade X-4 Sodium Hypochlorite
Solution for all sanitizing. Power-
ful germicide kills bacteria on
contact.
Complete program used daily by
thousands of dairy farmers in
U. S. and Canada.
Ask Your Dealer or Write Direct


BELOIT, WISC


Tampa's Oldest Feed & Fencing Store
Feeds, Barb Wire, Hog Fence, Galvanized
Roofing, Poultry Fencing, Etc.
STALNAKER
BROTHERS
P. 0. BOX 1468 TAMPA, FLA.
EAST BROADWAY AT 33RD STREET
37 Years at this Location



FLORIDA owned and operated . .
Supporters of Florida Cattlemen,
Poultrymen and Dairy Producers
LOVETT'S Food Stores
Operated by the
WINN & LOVETT GROCERY CO.
General Offices: Jacksonville


24 FLORIDA DAIR


House Members Name PERSONAL MENTION...


Atkinson Speaker

Protem for 1953 Session

In an unofficial caucus held in Tampa,
September 13, Democratic nominees for
membership in. the
1953 House of Rep-
resentatives designat-
ed Leon County Rep- "
resentative D a v i s
Atkinson, as Speaker
Protem. in


Atkinson, who is
in the concrete con-
struction materials
business in Tallahas-
see, will be serving


ATKINSON


his second term in the House and was
one of the popular younger members of
the 1951 session.
A similar unofficial caucus of the mem-
bership of the House
voted prior to ad-
journment in 1951
to designate Repre-
sentative Farris Bry-
ant of Ocala as
Speaker of the house A
for the 1953 session.
Hold over mem-
bers of the Senate
who make up half BRYANT
the Senate Member-
ship voted upon adjournment of the 1951
legislature to designate Senator Charley
Johns of Starke to serve as President of
the Senate for the 1953 legislative Ses-
sion.
The Senate President Protein is usually
designated at a caucus of the members
and members-elect after the general elec-
tion in November. However, this year's
caucus is expected to be held November
1st in Gainesville which is the time for
the University of Florida Homecoming
football game.
This custom of designating far in ad-
vance who will be responsible for the
leadership of the State Legislature makes
possible more effective advance planning
for the Session and this undoubtedly
contributes much toward the efficiency of
the Legislature and a saving of much
valuable time which otherwise would be
required for the organization of necessary
details before the Session can get under
way.
Members of the legislature for 1953
will have two more opportunities to meet
informally and get acquainted before time
for the opening of their sixty-day Session
next April. These get together will be
October 3-4 in Jacksonville and Novem-
ber 1st in Gainesville.


We thought it would never happen but
we are sure the many friends of Syd Len-
festey of Lenfestey Supply Co., Tampa,
will be interested to know Syd has "gone
and done it" .. Yes, sir, he got married!
Best wishes, Syd.

Mrs. Julia Foster, nutritionist-director
of the Dairy Council of Jacksonville for
the past four years, resigned September
1st to accept a position with the Board of
Education of Chicago as a diet and nutri-
tion supervisor.

Mr. and Mrs. Ed Salvatore announce
the arrival of Ed Jr., August 3rd, 205
Como St., Tampa. Ed, former Alligator
Club President, represents the Hi-C Divi-
sion of Clinton Foods, Inc.


Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur Casey, Bayou
Vista Guernsey Dairy, Clearwater, an-
nounce the arrival of a son Thomas
Robert, September 5th.


Mr. John Tripson, owner of the Vero
Beach Dairy, has added the White Way
Dairy of Ft. Pierce to his operation. The
dairy was purchased from Mrs. Leolin
Matheson, Jr., who has carried it on since
the death of her husband a year ago.


F.D.I.A. PROGRAM IS ADOPTED
(Contlel/d from page 10)

Sponsor an aggressive campaign to se-
cure the active interest and membership
of all Florida Milk and Ice Cream Plants,
of all Florida Dairymen and of Dairy
Feed, Supplies and Equipment Dealers.
Special Objectives adopted were for
completion of the organization of a
Junior Dairy Association and to work for
bringing the 1955 National Conventions
of the Milk and Ice Cream National As-
sociations to Florida.
Special activities approved for spon-
sorship and participation in by the Asso-
ciation are: Bi-Monthly Publication of
"The Florida Dairy News, Annual Dairy
Field Day at University of Florida, An-
nual Meeting and Convention, Annual
Short Courses at the University of Flori-
da for Dairy Manufacture and Dairy
Herdsmen, Tampa State Fair, Fla. Milk
Sanitarians Association Meeting, Fla. Pub-
lic Health Association Meeting, Fla. Lab-
oratory Technicians Conference, June
Dairy Month Program, Dairy Council
Educational Program, 4-H and F.F.A.
Dairy Shows, Florida Agricultural Coun-
cil, County Farm Agents Conference,
Milk Industry Foundation, International
Association of Ice Cream Manufacturers.


Y NEWS


Headquarters for


PASTURE

IRRIGATION

Systems and Supplies






















Duval County's popular Congressman Charles
Bennett, a guest at the Jacksonville luncheon
party for the Dairy Month Queen, decided he
was seeing double when he met Queen Mary
Butler (right) and her twin sister, Mildred.
Charlie decided there must be two Queens.

AMERICAN JERSEY CATTLE CLUB
ANNOUNCES FLORIDA
REGISTRY TESTS
WALTER WELKENER, HOLLY HILL
DAIRY, JACKSONVILLE. Herd of 61 cows,
averaged 8,946 Ibs. milk containing 479 lbs.
butterfat per cow for the year. Also a register-
ed Jersey cow, X-STANDARD IVEY ESTER
has earned the A.J.C.C. Silver Medal award on
completion of a production record of 8,744
lbs. milk, 461 lbs. b.f. in 305 days at the age
of 2 years. Three registered Jersey cows award-
ed special recognition production records; viz.,
SYBIL POMPEY EVELYN, 11764 Ibs. milk
with 615 lbs. b.f.; SYBIL POMPEY ELLA,
10,577 lbs. milk with 590 lbs. b.f.; OBSERV-
ER DESIGN PRUDENCE, 7,941 lbs. milk
with 452 lbs. b.f. A registered Jersey bull,
BILTMORE IVEY BUTTERKING, has re-
ceived the A.J.C.C. honor rating as Senior
Superior Sire. The rating was based on high
production tests and good breed type of 20
daughters which averaged 9,602 lbs. milk pro-
duction with 544 lbs. b.f. Breed type rating
of the 20 daughters averaged 84.75 points.
A registered Jersey cow, SYBIL POMPEY
RUBY, has received the A.J.C.C. Medal award
on completion of a production record of 14,-
698 lbs. milk with 711 Ibs. b.f. in 305 days
at age of 6 yrs., 1 month. This is 3-times the
butterfat produced by the average American
dairy cow.
W. J. NOLAN, ALPINE DAIRY, JACKSON-
VILLE. A registered Jersey cow, FILLPAIL
MOLLY, earned the A.J.C.C. Silver Medal
award on completion of a record of 10,309 lbs.
milk, 487 lbs. b.f. in 305 days at the age of
2 years, 2 months. A registered Jersey cow,
MIGHTY SUNBEAM, has received the A.J.
C.C. Gold Medal award on completion of a
production record of 13,501 lbs. milk with 630
lbs. b.f. in 305 days at the age of 7 yrs., 3
months . a butterfat production almost 3
times that of the average dairy cow.
CLAY COUNTY FARMS, MIDDLEBURG.
Herd of 39 registered Jerseys classified 1 ex-
cellent, 12 very good, 19 good plus, 4 good,
and 3 fair. OBSERVER TREVA STARVIN, a
Jersey bull, was the "Excellent" animal.
POLK COUNTY FARMS, BARTOW. A reg-
istered Jersey cow, OBSERVER ONYX
DUCHESS, recently completed production rec-
ord of 9,322 lbs. milk, 543 lbs. of b.f. at age
of 3 years, 10 months.
FLA. AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STA-
TION DAIRY FARM, GAINESVILLE. A reg-
istered Jersey cow, OBSERVER DESIGN
FAWN, has received the A.J.C.C. Silver Medal
award on completion of a production record of
12,127 Ibs. milk with 670 Ibs. b.f. in 365
days at the age of 3 years.


PERSONAL MENTION .....

Henry Hebble, formerly of Borden's
Lakeland branch, has been made manager
of the Borden Ice Cream operation in
Jacksonville. Harold Anderson succeeded
him in Lakeland.

Foremost Dairies began distribution in
Polk County during September with head-
quarters in Lakeland. Don Zerby heads
this new development.


Borden's Dairy in St. Petersburg has
announced plans for building a new plant
on a tract of land recently purchased in
a new industrial zone outside the down-
town area.

Foremost Dairies began operation of a
new plant in Eau Gallie, August 29, with
Al Ware as manager. Formerly their
headquarters have been at the Ralph Ste-
wart Farm. Five retail, two wholesale and
one ice cream route are now in operation.


DAIRY
SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT


l'd IPS N P Is r I


TAMPA ORLANDO




GRAHAM SCHOOL

I A SCHOOL FOR CATTLEMEN
ONLY SCHOOL OF THE KIND
We guarantee to teach the progressive cattleman how to
accomplish the following or his money back:
How to make many barren cows breed, control abor-
tion, deliver calves, remove afterbirths, artificial insemination, diagnose preg-
nancy, keep cows breeding, keep bulls breeding, disease prevention, have clean
healthy udders and a thorough working knowledge of the reproductive organs.
Write or Wire for Catalog

GRAHAM SCIENTIFIC BREEDING SCHOOL
216 East Tenth Street Kansas Ciy 6, Mo.




Classified Advertising
RATE FOR ALL CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING IS 10c PER WORD

FOR RENT FOR SALE (Cont.)
FOR RENT OR LEASE: 100 acre dairy farm
and equipment, seven room house, permanent RANCH EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES-CATTLE
pasture, bahia, pangola, napier, crimson clover. WATERING TANKS. Ten-foot steel reinforced
Mrs. Terrell H. Yon, Rt. 4, Box 202, Tallahassee. Concrete, 21/ Feet wide. $60.00, delivered, $50.00
your truck. Four foot wide tanks, $80.00 and
$70.00. Orlando Concrete Specialties. Box 6122,
FOR SALE Station 6, Orlando, Florida. Phone 3-4111.
FOR SALE-2 Hell Bottle Washers, Model HRE8
Ser. No. 1386 and Ser. No. 1387. 8 wide Model BE PROGRESSIVE THRU COOPERATION
E, Heavy Duty Bottle Washers, purchased from Investigate the advantages of selling your feed
Hell Co., Washington, D. C., August 31, 1945. bags Thru;
Price $2,500.00 each. 1 Cherry-Burrel Gray Vac THE DAIRY BAG COMPANY
16, Bottle Filler and Capper with Vacuum, Serial Operated by the management of
No. 349R (right hand) purchased June 31, 1944. THE MIAMI DAIRY EQUIPMENT EXCH.
Price $1,400.00. This equipment is in good con- 769 N. W. 18th Terrace
edition and may be seen at Southern Dairies, Inc., Miami 36, Fla. Phone 2-7188
62 N. E. 27th Street, Miami, Fla.
REGISTERED, PUREBRED ENGLISH SHEP- "ATTENTION DAIRYMEN"
HERDS. Excellent stock, heelers, watch, com- I handle the best young Tennessee Cows and
panions. Best Bloodlines.- E. L. Wright, heifers to be found. A fine selection on hand at
Tennessee Ridge, Tenn. all times.
I deliver top cows all over Florida.
YOUR AD in the Florida Dairy News reaches W. C. TINSLEY, JR.
98% of Florida Dairies and Dairymen. Box 93 Lafayette, Alabama Phone 6431

WANTED TO BUY:
Dairy Equipment, Supplies, Livestock
Note: The Dairy News has been requested to make this
column available believing it may furnish a much needed
service. Send in your wants at regular classified rates.


FOR OCTOBER, 1952 25








Florida Dairy Industry Ass'n
ALLIED TRADES MEMBERS
Special Advertising Section


ADAMS PACKING ASSN., INC.
Citrus Pulp. Citrus Meal, Citrus Molasses
Jim Coates, Sales Mgr., By-Products Div.

Auburndale, Fla. Phone 8-7061


AMICA-BURNETT CHEM. &
SUPPLY CO.
Dairy Equipment and Supplies
Phone 4-5606
P. O. Box 2328, Jacksonville, Fla.


CHARLES DENNERY, INC.
NEW ORLEANS
Ice Cream Coating, Fruits and Flavors
Ira Stone-602 W. Belmar St.
LAKELAND, FLA.

DIAMOND ALKALI COMPANY
Dairy Cleaner & Alkali
Florita Distributors:
Miller Machinery & Supply, Jax.
Industrial Chem. & Supply Co.,
Tampa

GENERAL MILLS, INC.
Dairy Equipment and Supplies
John IV. Manning, Phone 9-4586

1601 Congress Bldg. Miami


GULF PAPER COMPANY, INC.
Ice Cream (Linerless) Cartons, Butter Carton.
J. H. McVoy

50 E. Magnolia St., Pensacola, Fla.

DOUGLAS J. HEADFORD
* FLA. REPRESENTATIVE
Green Spot Orangeade Concentrate
Krim-Ko Chocolate Flavorings
616 Jessamine Ave. Phone 4356
Daytona Beach, Fla.

INTERNATIONAL PAPER CO.
Single Service Division
Purepak Milk Containers
W. M. Scott
134 Peachtree St., Atlanta 3, Ga.

JIM JENNINGS,
MFRS. REPRESENTATIVE
Morning Glory Milk Powder
Camicide Insect Spray
"Eze" Orange Concentrate
Route 9, Box 356, Jacksonville, Fla.

JIFFY MANUFACTURING CO.
Insulated Bags and Liners
Southern Representative-William Romaine

Box 5463, 5 Pis. Sta., Columbia, S. C.


ROBERT A. JOHNSTON CO.
Dairy Chocolate & Cocoa Products
J. L. Hammons Ph. Dearborn 2811
507 Nelson Ferry Rd., Decatur, Ga.


KIECKHEFER CONTAINER CO.,
Pure-Pak Paper Milk Bottles
IR. J. Evans-M. A. Knowles
Phone 6-1334
4700 Pearl St., Jacksonville, Fla.


ALLIED TRADES REPRESENTATIVES

REGISTERED AT 1952 F. D. I. A.

CONVENTION, MIAMI BEACH

ADAMS PACKING ASSN., INC.-J. L. Coates.
ALLIED DAIRY PRODUCTS, INC.-Dave
Harms, Morrie Forman.
AMERICAN CAN CO.- V. K. Shuttleworth,
Wm. L. Scott, Fred C. Baselt, Earl R. Franz,
R. L. Hansen, C. J. Heintz, Geo. L. McBrien,
D. W. Rlester, D. H. Shiveler, and C. P. Todd.
ANHEUSER-BUSCH, INC.- John C. Wilder.
AMICA-BURNETT CHEMICALS & SUPPLY
CO.-James H. Page.
CREAMERY PACKAGE MFG. CO. F. S.
Brumley and C. P. Bull, Jr.
CROWN CORK & SEAL CO.-Harry Hoover
and Ralph Costa.
DAIRYPAK, INC.-Jack Strack and Hugh
Macaulay.
CHAS. DENNERY, INC.-Geo. A. Weill and
Ira G. Stone.
DIVERSE CORPN.-J. K. Bradford, Jr.
THE DIXSON CO.-H. R. Dixson and Chas.
L. Engers.
ESKIMO PIE CORPN.-Robt. H. Brown and
Paul Kellenberger.
EX-CELLO CORPN.-J. W. Radke and Geo.
D. Scott.
FLA. CITRUS CANNERS-R. W. Bennett.
FLA. FEED MILLS-Grady R. Swope.
GENERAL MILLS, INC.-Roger Eikenberry,
Chas. Syfrett, John W. Manning, Harold B.
Crane, Chas. Derby, Mr. Plant and Mr. Coach-
man.
GUNDLACH & CO.-Geo. P. Gundlach.
HACKNEY BODY CO.-W. T. Boos.
HECTOR SUPPLY CO.-R. D. Harrell.
INTERNATIONAL PAPER CO.-C. S. Edgar,
T. J. May, W. M. Scott and D. D. Milson.
JIM JENNINGS, MFRS. REPRESENTATIVE.
JUICE INDUSTRIES, INC.-Niles Foster and
Ed C. Salvatore.
JOHNSON & JOHNSON CO.-J. L. Bailey
and Geo. W. Willits, Sr.
ROBT. A. JOHNSTON CO.-Joe L. Hammons.
KELCO CO.-A. C. Dickson.
KIECKHEFER CONTAINER CO.-R. J. Evans
and Murray A. Knowles.
KLENZADE PRODUCTS, INC.-Dr. Wm. H.
Haskell, H. B. Ahlefeldt and Ray Salmons.
KUDER PULP SALES-Forest P. Johnson
and Mallory Roberts.
LENFESTEY SUPPLY CO.-Syd Lenfestey, J.
Ralph Kirkland and Bill Waldeck.
LIBERTY GLASS CO.-Harold O. Rogers.
LILY-TULIP CUP CORPN.-S. T. Tygart and
F. W. Decklar.
LIQUID CARBONIC CORPN.-O. L. Booo, C.
B. Palmer and Hank Tull.
JOE LOWE CORPN.-Jack Hartman and Paul
Deutsch.
MATHIESON CHEMICAL CORPN.-Geo. B.
Armstrong.
MARATHON CORPN.--Chas. J. Fox, Walter H.
Evans and Walter H. Evans, Jr.
MILLER MACHINERY & SUPPLY CO.-Val
Lee, E. L. Decker, Hubert Martin and Ray
Arkley.
MOJONNIER BROS. CO.-Lee P. Bickenbach.
MORGAN SALES CO.-Charlie 0. Morgan.
MORRIS PAPER MILLS-Dick Slye.
NASH-KELVINATOR CORPN.-Wm. C. May-
field, Chip Diamond and Mr. Lepinski.
OWENS-ILLINOIS GLASS CO.-Clark Com-
stock.
PENNA. SALT MFG. CO.-Hugh Morton and
Joe M. Foss.
PASCO PACKING CO.-Joe Graham.
REDDI-WIP CO. OF FLA.-Aaron Block.
RIVERSIDE MFG. CO.-David E. Freeman,
James M. Stewart and Dolf Didwell.
SANDNER & CO.-W. R. Culver, Jr. and W.
F. Burke.
SAVAGE ARMS CORPN.-John Lowry.
SCHAEFER, INC.-Wm. Gordon Wright.
SEALRIGHT, INC.-Bill Callum and Jim Os-
born.
SOUTHERN COTTON OIL CO.-Mark Tin-
dall.
STANDARD PACKAGING CORPN. Larry
Hodge.
THATCHER GLASS MFG. CO., INC.-W. T.
Love.
UNIVERSAL MILKING MACHINES-R. D.
Archer.
VANILLA LABORATORIES, INC.-H. L. Pair
and R. H. Pair.
VA.-CAROLINA CHEM. CORPN.-D. E. Nel-
son.
WATSON-SCOTT CO.-Clyde Spinks, Jr. and
Bill Thompson.
WYANDOTTE CHEM. CORPN.-Henry Mc-
Clanahan.


Florida Dairy Industry Ass'n

ALLIED TRADES MEMBERS
Special Advertising Section


KLENZADE PRODUCTS, INC.
Chemicals for Dairy and Food Plant
Sanitation H. B. Ahlefeldt

Union Term'l Whse., Jacksonville, Fla.


S. H. MAHONEY EXTRACT CO.
Vanilla Products
D. C. Mulligan, Florida Representative
221 E. Cullerton Rd., Chicago 16, 11.


MEYER-BLANKE COMPANY
Dairy, Ice Cream Equipment
and Supplies
Phone 6-1366
2701 Daulphin St., Mobile, Ala.


NASH-KELVINATOR CORPN.
ICE CREAM CABINETS
Wm. C. Mayfield
788 Spring St., N. W.- Atlanta, Ga.


NATIONAL PECTIN PRODUCTS CO.
Ice Cream Stabilizers & Emulsifiers.
Pectin Stabilizers for ices, slerberts & fruits.
J. C. Head, Phone Norfolk, Va. 2-8385
RFD No. 1, Box 48, Bayside, Va.

OWENS-ILLINOIS GLASS CO.
Duraglas Milk Bottles
C. W. Parmalee C. N. Comstock
1102 Barnett Bldg., Jax. 2, Fla.
Phone 6-8868


PAUL-LEWIS LABORATORIES, INC.
listivase-For the Prevention of oxidized flavor
in bottled milk, ice cream, storage cream
Also Rennet Extract-Sir Sirloin, Inc.
765 N. W. 54th St., Miami 37, Fla.


RIVERSIDE MANUFACTURING CO.
MOULTRIE, GA.
Masterbilt Uniforms
James M. Stewart Phone 3-3287
306 Lakeview Ave., Apt. 406, Orlando


SCHAEFER INC.
Ice Cseant Cabinets, Frozen Food Cabinets
W. G. IWright Phone 4201

333 Harbor Drive, Venice, Fla.


STANDARD PACKAGING CORPN.
Tamper Pioof Seals-Flexible Vacuum Packages
Liner Materials
Larry Hodge
1121 duPont Bldg., Miami, Fla.


THATCHER GLASS MFG. GO., INC.
Glass Milk Containers
W. T. LOVE, Florida Representative
3221 Pinehurst PI.-Charlotte 7, N.C.

UNIVERSAL MILKING MACHINE
DIVISION
Pail-less (Pipe line) Milking Machines
R. D. Archer-Factory Rep.-Ph. 84-7467
1100 N.E. 134 St., No. Miami, Fla.


26 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS





K C___


Z N*C BY THE - CONSUMER _,'
SERVICE BUREAU
OF
PARENTS


Canco is proud to have these seals!
They are an endorsement of Canco's
high manufacturing quality.
Both Good Housekeeping and
Parents' Magazine have earned a
reputation for integrity in which
American housewives have placed
faith for generations.
This light, convenient, sanitary
container today brings milk into
millions of homes across the land--
and no wonder!


Women like it because it's disposable
-they can use it once and throw
it away.
Grocers like it because it eliminates
empty-returns-helps them increase
milk sales.
Dairymen like it because it's easy to
ship-easy to move-saves space.
If you haven't yet switched to
this modern way of distributing milk,
isn't it time you called in your local
Cnnco representative?


AMERICAN

1. CAN

I co. HB


StuC4V tPI
I" PO ABL


3


l9eiGv f /Too I For f /








S0 OOOSECUR F STARTER

- SECURITY CALF STARTER


Begin feeding when calf is
only a few days old. Only small
amounts of milk or milk replacer
needed. Contains antibiotics-
fortified with vitamins and min-
erals known to be especially
needed by young calves.


FOLLOW THE SECURITY


"CALF TO CALF"


DAIRY PROGRAM


SECURITY CALF GROWER
Feed after twelve weeks when
the calf's rumen begins to func-
tion. Palatable and nutritious.
Fortified with trace minerals and
vitamins A and D.


SECURITY CONDITIONER
For feeding during the dry
period. Feed for 6 to 8 weeks
before calving and approximate-
ly 4 weeks after calving. Con-
ditions cows for sustained high
production.


SECURITY DAIRY FEEDS
For the milking herd. Made in
16%, 20%, 24% and 32% pro-
tein levels to fit your particular
feeding needs. Contains no fill-
ers. You'll like the results.


A r.- W
L 7W ,-
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