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Title: Florida dairy news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00082035/00013
 Material Information
Title: Florida dairy news
Physical Description: 12 v. : illus. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Dairy Industry Association
Publisher: Cody Publications for Florida Dairy Industry Association.
Place of Publication: Kissimmee Fla
Publication Date: August 1952
Frequency: bimonthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Dairying -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Cattle   ( lcsh )
Milk   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-12, no. 1; Nov. 1950-Spring, 1962.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00082035
Volume ID: VID00013
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01386090
issn - 0426-5696

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Main
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Back Cover
        Page 27
        Page 28
Full Text
























U. S. Dept. of Agriculture
Library
Washington 25, D. C.


Officers, Directors and Committee Chairmen of the Florida Dairy Industry A.sociation are pictured as 1951-52 Service Emblems
were presented to them in an impressive Annual Meeting closing session by retiring President Theo Datson. (See Page 5).








PURINA DAIRY CYCLE PROGRAM


PAYS OFF WITH 3-GALLON AVERAGE


FOR KELLY DAIRY ST. PETERSBURG


-4-0


4. MILKING
COWS
This Guernsey cow,
though she is now in
the latter part of her
sixth lactation, is giv-
ing 30 to 35 Ibs. of
milk a day. She is
fed Purina Milk
Chows.



3. HEIFERS
This Guernsey heifer,
now weighing 600
Ibs. at 15 months of
age, and the other
fine heifers of the
Kelly herd get a suit-
able ration of Purina
D & F Chow in ad-
dition to their pas-
ture.


1. DRY COWS


3. HEIFERS I A raivr;


1. DRY COWS
This splendid cow,
now in her third lac-
tation, normally
milks around 56 Ibs.
a day. She was con-
ditioned on a daily
feeding of 8 to 10
Ibs. of D & F Chow.




2. CALVES
The splendid condi-
tion of this 4 months
old calf evidences
the value of its feed-
ing program on
Purina Calf Startena
and proper care
which it has received
from Mr. Kelly's son
and helper, Donnie.


Mr. Leroy B. Kelly of St. Peters-
burg, Florida, a well-known Pinel-
las County dairyman of 24 years
experience, says: "I've been able to
keep my cows in better condition on
Purina than any feed I've ever
used."

Mr. Kelly now has 35 cows milk-
ing and enough heifers growing


out to bring the milking herd to
65 in a short while.

"In addition to keeping my milk-
ing cows in good production," Mr.
Kelly says, "the Purina Program is
valuable in keeping my whole herd
in proper condition."


RALSTON PURINA COMPANY

MIAMI TAMPA AUI^Y
CHOWS
*E E** *.* ..,.E.. ..,,,,,,


2 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


.


111%


-c~c










EDITORIALS


CIVIL RIGHTS, FEPC, AND POLITICS
On all sides ue heat much about the seriousness and importance of the choice the voters
of the United States will make November 4th in selecting the heads of the National Govern-
mnent.
Granting that such issues as peace, defense, foreign policy, taxes and others must be given
great weight by the voters, it is well that those uho live in and love the South not go unin-
formed about nor fail to recognize the seriousness and possible consequences that could result
from the adoption by our Federal Government of the so-called "Civil Rights" Program which
has been strongly advocated and is still supported by many who hold or seek high places in
the Government.
We believe that our readers will find the i. r.. analysis of this prograin by Mr.
Thurman Sensing of Nashville, Tennessee, iJ most inforiatire and timely.
The FEPC Is Purely Political
"The so-called Fair Employment Practices Commission, which the President re-
iterates his intention to enact into law, is not just a matter that concerns the South,
even though its previous enactment has been blocked by Southern Congressmen. It
is not just a question of preventing discrimination on account of race, creed, color,
or national origin, as its wording would profess. It is purely political in its conception
and in its intention, purely an appeal to minority groups for their votes at times of
elections, in fact an appeal to class, race, and religious prejudice.
"The whole civil rights program, which the Administration is so actively pro-
moting, is nothing more than window dressing for the intensive movement to further
centralize complete control over the lives of the people in a bureaucratic government.
It disguises motives with words, with words that deceive the uninformed and confuse
the well-intentioned.
"To the credit of the people of the South and their representatives in the Halls
of Congress, it should be noted that it was the South that first realized there was
something much more fundamental involved than appeared on the surface in the pro-
posal to establish a permanent FEPC. This is why the whole matter has seemed to
many largely a Southern problem, since the race question was involved and since
there was such a large percentage of Negro population in the South. And while it is
true that the civil rights program would attempt to destroy the South's traditional
method of handling the race problem a method which they have found by years of
experience to be best for both races- yet there was something even more fundamen-
tal involved than race relations.
"What the proposal of a permanent FEPC boils down to is a direct violation,
an absolute denial of the fundamental principles on which our government is found-
ed and this holds true whether it is backed by the Democratic party or the Repub-
lican party or any other party. Professing to aid the individual, it denies freedom
to the individual. Professing to be concerned with human welfare, it destroys local
self-government. Without these two elements freedom of the individual and local
self-government we no longer have the democratic form of government on which
the whole progress of our nation has been based.
"How would a permanent FEPC deny freedom to the individual? Let us not
forget that if the government can assert the power to tell the employer whom he must
hire, it can also take the next step and tell the employee for whom he must work!
Then where is your individual freedom? How would it destroy local self-govern-
ment? Very plainly. The people of the South, for instance, do not object to any state
having its own FEPC, if the people of that state desire it. They do object to a great
region, representing one-third the people of the nation, having thrust down its throat
in the name of democracy a measure to which it is solidly opposed.
"There are indications now that the South will not stand alone in the next ses-
sion of Congress in its opposition to this iniquitous piece of legislation, that sound-
thinking people throughout the nation are beginning to realize this is a matter that
affects our whole national welfare.
"This may yet turn out to be the measure on which the lust for power of the
vote-seeking politicians will crash, on which the vaulting ambition of the proponents
of bureaucratic centralization of government will 'o'erleap itself.' It certainly will be,
once the American people see through the hypocrisy of the whole proposal, once they
realize what it would do to their way of life a way of life that has always given the
people more rights and more freedoms than any on the face of the earth."


111111


VOL. N


AUGUST, 1952


THE
FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS
E. T. LAY, Editor & Business Manager


Official Publication of
Florida Dairy Industry Ass'n
WILMER W. BASSETT, JR., President
E. T. LAY, Executive Director
Florida Guernsey Cattle Club
EARL JOHNSON, President
Florida Association
of Milk Sanitarians
R. R. HOOD, President

Florida Dairy Industry Associa-
tion Directors
Producers
FRANK B. DOUB, Jacksonville
GEORGE F. JOHNSON, West Palm Beach
D. WAYNE WEBB, Tampa
JOHN SARGENT, Lakeland
HERMAN BOYD, Miami
Producer-Distributors
WILMER BASSETT, Monticello
FREEMAN HALES, Opa Locka
HERMAN BURNETT, Bradenton
J. N. MCARTHUR, Miami
H. CODY SKINNER, Jacksonville
Distributors
JOHN M. HOOD. St. Petersburg
CLIFF D. WAYNE, Miami
GORDON NIELSEN, West Palm Beach
W. J. BARRITT, JR., Tampa
A. E. (JACK) JOHNSON, Jacksonville
Additional Directors
LARRY J. HODGE, President "Alligator
Club", Miami
SAM SOLOMON, SR., Honorary Director
Quincy
THE FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS is
published monthly by the Florida Dairy
Industry Association, 220 Newnan St.,
Jacksonville, Florida. Subscription price
of $1.00 a year. Entered as second class
mail at the Post Office at Jacksonville,
Fla., under Act of March 3, 1879, as
amended.
Advertising rates furnished upon re-
quest.
Business and Editorial office 220
Newnan Street, Jacksonville.
Member Florida Press Association
NATIONAL EDITORIAL

WWWWSHEMilW


FOR AUGUST, 1952 3


NO. 6









Better


Pastures


are part of

better modern

Dairy

Management



FERTILIZER holds the key to
more profit from grasslands.
Improved pastures provide
more forage . the most eco-
nomical feed for dairy ani-
mals.
DEPEND ON GULF for special-
formula fertilizers that will provide
better pastures for your herd. Re-
member there's PROFIT in
fertilizing pastures. Get complete
facts now.


0


Ask your local GULF Field Rep-
resentative to call and talk over
a better-pastures program. Or
write direct for information.


GUL


FERTUli


The GULF FERTILIZER COMPANY
Tampa and Port Everglades, Fla.


For Our Youth Readers

Your Future Is What You Make It
NOTE: This is the fifth of a series of discussions on "Choosing Your Vocation." It
is of interest to both youth and parents.
In our former discussions we have considered the most important factors in
choosing and testing your choice of a vocation. In our last issue we began a study
of the preparation which is vital to success in any vocation. The importance of the
correct choice of courses in school and the effect that the record you make in school
has upon your future opportunities have been discussed, bringing us to the considera-
tion of the following additional elements of education and training.


Some Courses Are Musts
Some studies are essential, whatever
your work. All help to make you a
well-rounded, more versatile individual.
If you'd like to stand out from the usual
run of job applicants or farm plant op-
erators, practice until you can write neat-
ly and legibly. And if you want to ad-
vance, learn to express yourself in clear
and correct English.
A recent study showed that financial
success has a direct relationship to size
of vocabulary. By wide reading and by
making an effort to learn and use new
words, you can acquire a large vocabu-
lary.
Hand Training Is Brain Training
Although you may plan to enter pro-
fessional or managerial work, try to ac-
quire some hand skill also. The ability
of nearly all Americans to handle tools
efficiently has been one of the secrets of
this nation's production record. It has
been observed by Europeans coming into
this country that American adaptability is
in a large part due to training in doing
things with the hands that is given in the
early years of school. This is something
that textbooks alone can never give. One
may point out that three of the country's
greatest characters, Franklin, Jefferson,
and Lincoln, all excelled in practical arts
requiring dexterity with the hands. A
well known motto of our schools reiter-
ates the idea when it states that we learn
by doing.
Your PerPonal OQalilies Count. Too
Have you known brilliant students
who were failures in life? Perhaps this
will give a clue to the reason.
Personal qualities of honesty, dependa-
bility, enthusiasm and cooperativeness are
as important as education, experience, or
even brilliance. A recent survey of em-


players showed that they placed "per-
sonality" first on their list of considera-
tions in hiring engineers. Salary request-
ed was rated lowest of all consideration.
A personnel manager recently stated:
"Of course we need intelligence, initia-
tive, ability and good health, but there
is entirely too much waste of these quali-
ties because of indifference or an unco-
operative attitude."
* The DAIRY NEW'S uill endeavor to fu;-
nish any vocational or educational and train-
ing opportunities information requested by read-
ers in this column. (Continued next issue)


According to a report by the National
Association of Manufacturers, every dol-
lar you own today is worth only about
half of its value in 1939-that is, only 53
cents.
Your dollar's buying power has drop-
ped because prices have skyrocketed.
What made prices shoot up? The gov-
ernment has kept throwing more and
more money into circulation.
Uncle Sam has been spending a lot
more than he takes in through taxes.
In 18 out of the last 21 years he's been
in the red." So he makes up the differ-
ence by borrowing-and that's how in-
flationary new money gets circulated.
According to the N.A.M., your gov-
ernment must stop cutting your dollar's
buying power and start cutting out need-
less spending, needless waste, needless in-
efficiency, needless programs, needless
"planning"! Then you can stop worry-
ing about inflation eating into the value
of your income and savings!


4 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS








Dr. DuPuis Honored as Florida Dairyman


Two years ago the Florida Dairy In-
dustry Association announced a desire to
honor the State's "Pioneer Dairyman",
which title was designated as meaning
the dairyman who had operated a dairy
in the state continuously for the longest
period of time.
At the 1952 Annual Convention in
Miami Beach, Dr. John G. DuPuis,
founder and President of the White Belt
Dairy Farms of Miami, stood as the un-
challenged contender for this honor with
a record of over 50 years of continuous
operation.
Dr. DuPuis, father of John DuPuis,
Jr., who is now manager of the White
Belt Dairy and a past president of the
Florida Dairy Industry Association, was
an honor guest at the closing luncheon
of the 1952 Annual Convention when he


was presented with a Special Certificate
of Recognition on behalf of the Florida
Dairy Industry and which is reproduced
on this page.
In responding to the presentation of
the award, Dr. DuPuis, now 75, re-
counted in a remarkable manner his 52
years' experience as Dr. DuPuis and Mr.
Dairyman for he has truly lived a double
life as a practicing physician and as man-
ager of his dairy until his son John Jr.
was able to relieve him of the responsi-
bility of the dairy.
Dr. DuPuis said that he went to
Lemon City, now in the north end of
Miami, at the age of 23 to begin his
practice as a young doctor and became
interested in producing milk only after
finding that fresh pure milk was not
available in the area for his patients and
the children of the community. He told
how he added a few cows to the family
cow, which was the beginning of the
White Belt Dairy with its present prize
Dutch White Belt herd and a large pro-
cessine and distributing plant.
The most difficult problems which
confronted him in the operation of his
Dairy farm, Dr. DuPuis said, were those
caused by early herd diseases. He gave
much credit to the late Dr. J. V. Knapp,
who as Florida State Veterinarian led the
State in controlling cattle disease. His
own intense interest through the years in
the control of animal diseases is reflected
in the leadership of his son, John Jr.,
who has given recent years in live stock
disease control as a member of the Flor-
ida Live Stock Sanitary Board of which
he served until recently as Chairman.


COVER PICTURE
Florida Dairy Industry Associa-
tion leaders for the year 1951-52
pictured are, left to right: V. C.
Johnson, Chrmn. Dairy Husbandry
Comm.; George Johnson, Director;
Walter Burton, Asst. Treas.; J. N.
McArthur, Treas. & Director; Alf
Nielsen, Dean and Pres. Bell Cows;
Frank Doub, Vice-Pres.; Gordon
Nielsen, Director; Wilmer Bassett,
Pres.-elect; Theo Datson, Pres.;
Brady Johnston, Chrmn. Public
Health Comm.; Jack Dew, Chrmn.
Dairy Month Program; Bill Har-
man, Chrmn. Milk Production
Comm.; Curry Bassett, Chrmn.
Cost & Accounting Comm.; Her-
man Burnett, Director & Chrmn.
Annual Field Day Comm.; Cody
Skinner, Director; and Andy Lay,
Executive Director.


FOR AUGUST, 1952 5


Certificate of Recognition
Awarded By

THE FLORIDA DAIRY INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION, INC.

To:

Jr. John 6. Bupuis
PIONEER DAIRYMAN AND HUMANITARIAN
MIAMI, FLORIDA

Who has. been designated by the Associalion as baring ihe longest
continuous record of ownership and operation of a Florida Dairy Farm;,
Who, in 1952, has completed over fifly conseculv'e years in the
ownership and operation of The 1White Bell Dairy Farm in Miami. and
Who, because of this innusual record has been awarded lhib

elt ei _4tiiuvertai ronot war
as Florida's Pioneer Dairyman u'ih ihe longest record of contillous Dairy
Farm ownership and operation.
The Florida Dairy Industry Association and all who know Dr. John
DuPuis, also recognize and honor him for his years of unselfish and
humanitarian service in the Medical Profession in the same community in
which his dairy has been located.
AWARDED BY UNANIMOUS VOTE OF THE
1952 ANNUAL CONVENTION OF THE AS-
SOCIATION AT MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA,
JUNE 11-13, 1952.

THEODORE DATSON,
President

E. T. LAY,
Exec. Director
















F.D.I.A. Convention Delegates marvelled at the oceanfront Miami Beach views ronm their Casablanca picture-windows.
Joe NeSmith, Convention Arrangements Chairman, is seen making arrangements. Mr. and Mrs. Walter Burton, Jacksonville.
spent a two-weeks vacation at the Convention hotel. Mr. and Mrs. John DuPuis, Jr. (left) and Mr. and Mrs. Theo Datson, Miss
Rebecca Daniel, Andy Lay. Mrs. Julia Foster. Rem Remsen. Clark Comstock and Mrs. Elsie Remsen enjoyed the Earlybird
Reception.

Miami Beach Annual Meeting Florida's Largest-Most Successful


Record Attendance, Program
Interest, Recreation and
Entertainment Contribute To
Convention Success

The largest attendance with a total
registration of 376 was not the only
record-breaking feature of the 1952 An-
nual Convention of the Florida Dairy
Industry Association, held June 11-13 in
the Miami Beach's fabulous new Casa-
blanca Hotel.
There is something heart-warming in
the friendly homecoming atmosphere of
a Florida Dairy Industry Convention.
There is something genuine in the greet-
ings and friendly hand-clasps as both the
men and the ladies renew friendships
of previous meetings and enjoy new-
comers in an atmosphere of relaxation
and rest from routine work schedules
and in serious consideration of the var-
ious problems of the industry as pre-
sented on the program.
The pre-convention early-bird recep-
tion, held the evening before convention
opening and sponsored by the President
and Secretary as a new Convention Fea-
ture, proved to be a huge success. The
enthusiasm and good cheer engendered at
this evening-long open-house party car-
ried through the entire convention.


The outstanding success of this con-
vention, according to some, was the
splendid well-rounded program featuring
top speakers from all three of the Dairy
Industry's principal national associations
of producers, milk dealers and ice cream
manufacturers, several of our State Uni-
versity Dairy Department specialists, one
from the University of Illinois and some
of our own most successful Florida Dairy
leaders. The Program Committee, under
the chairmanship of the President-elect
Wilmer Bassett, certainly rang the bell
on this year's program.
Some considered the special all-day
farm tour of several of Miami's fine
dairy farms, pastures and plants the most
valuable feature ever included on an an-
nual meeting program. This portion of
the convention will be reported with
pictures in a special story in the next
issue of the Dairy News.
Those who were recreation-minded and
there were many of them, demonstrated
their ideas about what made the conven-
tion click by their heavy schedules of
swimming, golfing, boating and fishing.
The ladies, whose numbers increase at
each succeeding Florida Convention, were
high on the popularity poll of conven-
tion attractions and how they do help to
make any convention a success.
Now, to get the statistics out of the


way, we must back up the headlines of
this review by reporting the attendance
of 120 dairy representatives, 115 allied
trades, 107 ladies and 34 miscellaneous-
including guest speakers and advisory
members representing Universities,
Health Departments, County Agents,
Milk Sanitarians, Dairy Extension and
Research Departments, the State Depart-
ment of Agriculture, Live Stock Board,
Milk Commission, Florida Veterinary As-
sociation and others.
ALLIED TRADES SPONSOR
ENTERTAINMENT
The Allied Trades Members, under the
leadership of their popular chairman O.
L. Bobo and President-elect Larry Hodge,
certainly left nothing more to be desired
for a complete and enjoyable entertain-
ment program.
The "fellowship hours" held both
evenings on the ocean-front terrace and
pool deck were designated correctly. A
water show, wandering musicians, hill-
billy costumes, a wonderful buffet din-
ner followed by late dancing under the
moon over Miami", made the first even-
ing together a delightful event. The sec-
ond evening beginning with the popular
fellowship hour sponsored by the "Alli-
gator Club" was followed by the elab-
orate Annual Dinner and program in the
Morocco Club Room. Here again the Al-


One of the most beautiful settings on Miami Beach is this oceanfront pool-garden and deck which was the scene of the
Convention's first fellowship hour, a buffet dinner, water show, and hillbilly costume dance. Less than half of the large area
and group seated around the pool could be caught in this night picture.
















Convention groups seen, left to right, are a barn dance group (Bob Hall with hat). Other pictures from the Annual
Dinner are Mr. and Mrs. Bob Hall (standing) and guests; Two F.D.I.A. Presidents: O. L. Bobo, Allied Trades, seated and
Theo Datson; Mr. and Mrs. Larry Hodge. Mrs. John DuPuis, Jr.. Herman Burnett, Mrs. Dr. J. H. Yarborough and Brady
Johnston.


lied Trades Entertainment Committee
were hosts to the Convention for a two-
hour floor show under the masterful di-
rection of Jack Dew, Southern Dairies
entertainment specialist.
CROWNING OF DAIRY MONTH QUEEN
The floor show was preceded by the
selection and crowning of Miss Mary
Butler of Miami as State Dairy Month
Queen. Miss Butler, a charming Miami
High School Senior, was sponsored by
the Miami Dairy Month Committee. She
was selected out of a field of five con-
testants representing Miami, Jacksonville,
Pensacola, Gainesville and St. Petersburg.
Miss Claire Chestnut of Jacksonville,
sponsored by the Jacksonville Jaycee
Dairy Month Committee, was named
Maid of Honor to the Queen and popu-
lar Mrs. Louella Hood of St. Petersburg,
held to be ineligible to compete in the
Dairy Month Queen Contest, was desig-
nated "Queen of the 1952 Convention."
Two other contestants, Miss Mary Good-
bred of Gainesville and Miss Jane Nowak
of Pensacola received special awards and
were designated "Maids to the Queen."
OFFICERS & DIRECTORS ELECTED
Officers and Directors of the Associa-
tion and its two auxiliary groups, the
Allied Trades and the Ladies' Auxiliary,
were elected at the Annual Meeting to
take office, July 1st.
BASSETT ELECTED PRESIDENT
Wilmer Bassett, Jr., of Monticello, a
Producer-Distributor, was advanced from
1st Vice-President to President of F.D.
I.A. Mr. Bassett was reared on a Dairy
Farm at Monticello, was a prominent 4-H
Club Member and graduated from the
College of Agriculture, University of
Florida. He saw over four years' service


BASSETT


DOUB WAYNE


in World War II as a Major of Artillery,
largely in the European theatre.
Mr. Frank Doub, Producer of Jackson-
ville, was advanced to First Vice Presi-
dent and Mr. Cliff Wayne of Miami,
Southern Dairies' District Manager, was
elected Second Vice-President.
Eleven of the Association's 16 Direc-
tors were re-elected. New Directors are
Herman Boyd, Producer of Miami; John
Sargeant, Producer of Lakeland; and
Wayne Webb, Producer of Tampa. These
replaced Laskey Foster, Pensacola; Ver-
non Graves, Tampa; and C. Ray John-
son, St. Petersburg.
John Hood, Distributor of St. Peters-
burg, replaced Theo Datson of Orlando,
who had served as a Director contin-
uously since 1942.
Larry Hodge, Standard Packaging
Corpn., Miami, was elected President of
the Allied Trades Members replacing O.

BOYD WEBB


McARTHUR


L. Bobo, Liquid Carbonic Co., Jackson-
ville. Bill Decklar of Tampa advanced
to become Vice-President and Jimmie
Stewart of Orlando was elected Secretary-
Treasurer of the Allied Trades Group.
Directors re-elected were-Producers:
Frank Doub, Jacksonville; George John-
son, West Palm Beach; Producer-Dis-
tributors: Wilmer Bassett, Jr., Monticel-
lo; J. N. McArthur, Miami; Herman
Burnett, Bradenton; Freeman Hales, Mi-
ami; Cody Skinner, Jacksonville; Dis-
tributors: Cliff Wayne, Miami; W. J.
Barritt, Jr., Tampa; Gordon Nielsen,
West Palm Beach; A. E. (Jack) Johnson,
Jacksonville.
Sam Solomon, Sr. of Quincy is an hon-
orary Director.
Mrs. C. Ray Johnson and Mrs. Leon
H. Sellers of St. Petersburg were elected
by the Ladies' Auxiliary to serve as Presi-
dent and Vice-President respectively. Mrs.
(Continued on page 9)


SERGEANT


HOOD


The Dairy News Camera recorded here F.D.I.A. President-elect Wilmer Bassett greeting Walter Hunnicutt; Mr. and Mrs.
George Hennerich display Mrs. Hennerich's winning hollbilly costume. Four reasons why the Dairy Bar was so popular: Top
hillbilly ladies costume winners, Mrs. Sam Solomon, Mrs. George Hennerich, Mrs. Bob Hall, Mary Goodbred and Mrs. Walter
Burton: Men's hillbilly costume winners, Herman Burnett and Dade County Asst. Farm Agent R. K. Price.


1rnmDAIRB -A1 tt R

.4 .. r








UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


DAIRY REVIEW


Extension Service
Dairy Farm Research Unit


Dairy Products Laboratory
Agricultural Experiment Station


111111-


Dairy Science Department Institutes

New Teaching Plan

DR. H. H. WILKOWSKE
Assistant Professor of Dairy Manufacture


The Department of Dairy Science of
the University of Florida will inaugurate
a revised teaching plan in its dairy man-
ufacturing curriculum beginning this
Fall. The plan has been discussed by
noted educators throughout the United
States for several years but it is believed
that the University of Florida is the first
to adopt in its entirety the completely
new idea of teaching dairy science courses.
Basic courses in market milk, ice
cream, butter, cheese and condensed milks
will no longer be taught as individual
courses. Instead, the
subject matter will
be presented in com-
prehensive courses in
processing, testing,
microbiology and
technology in which
each dairy product "s
will be considered
as the various funda- a
mental are discuss- DR. WILKOWSKE
ed. The introduc- I
tory course to all dairy science courses
and the judging course will remain un-
changed, as will the dairy problems and
dairy seminar courses.
Under the new plan much more com-
prehensive studies can be presented as
well as better continuity and sequence of
subject matter maintained. A saving of
time will be gained which in turn can be
devoted to elective courses which will be
selected on the basis of individual student
desires as to the type of career for which
he plans to prepare himself. Thus, dairy
students interested in business in dairying
may elect additional courses in business
management, accounting, speech and law.
Those interested primarily in the techni-
cal and research phases of dairying may
elect additional courses in chemistry,
mathematics, physics and bacteriology. It
is believed this new approach to the di-
versified interests of students will result
in a more highly specialized, yet well-
rounded, educational program tailored for
the particular needs and desires of each
individual student.


DAIRY HERDSMEN'S SHORT COURSE
TO BE HELD AUG. 26-28
The University of Florida Dairy De-
partment has announced August 26-28 as
the dates for the 1952 three-day Dairy
Herdsmen's Short Course.
Dr. R. B. Becker is in charge of the
program which will emphasize "Feeds
and Feeding," following the topics of
previous years on raising dairy replace-
ments, and dairy herd management.
Among subjects to

characteristics o f
feeds, economy in
purchase and use of
feeds, proportion of
feeds home-grown,
maximum use of pas-
tures, silage feeds,
natural and artificial-
DR. BECKER ly dried hays, min-
lostrum, feeding calves, heifers, dry cows
and the milking herd.
Classroom periods will be in the Dairy
Products Laboratory on the campus, with
practical periods at the Dairy Reserch
Unit where the dairy herd is located.
There will be a period for questions and
special problems.
Registration will be at 8:30 A.M. on
August 26, in the Dairy Products Labor-
atory on the University of Florida cam-
pus, Gainesville. The sessions will con-
clude at 5:00 P.M. on August 28th. De-
tailed programs will be available by Au-
gust 10 in the offices of County Agricul-
tural Agents. Copies may also be ob-
tained by mail upon request to the Dairy
Department, University of Florida,
Gainesville, or to the Florida Dairy In-
dustry Association.
A communication to Florida Dairies
from the Milk Production and Dairy
Husbandry Committees of the Dairy
Association states that these committees
strongly endorse this splendid training
course and urge every Dairyman who can
possibly do so to send his herdsmen and
future herdsmen to participate in this
three-days of intensive training.


GEORGIA'S DR. HENDERSON
HEADS DAIRY SCIENCE ASSN.
Dr. R. B. Becker of the University of
Florida Dairy Science Department has re-
ported the election of Dr. H. B. Hender-
son, head of the Dairy Science Depart-
ment, University of Georgia, to the presi-
dency of the American Dairy Science As-
sociation for the ensuing year.
Dr. Becker, a past president of A. D.
S. A., attended the 1952 Annual Meet-
ing of the Association June 24-26 at the
University of California. Dr. Becker re-
ports that the attendance of nearly 700
members was from 30 states, Canada and
other countries.
The program included 36 subjects on
Dairy Manufactures, 69 on Dairy Pro-
duction subjects, and 12 topics on exten-
sion methods, adult education, D.H.I.A.
Production Testing and Artificial Breed-
ing.
Dr. Becker has made a detailed digest
of the conference program but says that
after listening to over 100 technical re-
ports and discussions on the new things
that have been learned by Dairy Science
throughout the nation in the course of
only one year, there is one simple con-
clusion that comes to one's mind as he
tries to assimilate and comprehend all
that he has heard. This conclusion, he
said, is that "Science Marches On."

U. OF FLA. PROF. KRIENKE
ON NATIONAL PROGRAM
Professor Walter A. Krienke of the
Dairy Science Staff of the University of
Florida has been invited to appear on the
program of the In-
ternational Associa-
tion of Ice Cream
Manufacturers at its
convention in Chica-
go, September 22-
27. Professor Kri-
enke is to discuss
the new ice cream
flavors which he and
KRIE E Dr. Leon E. Mull
KRI E have developed.
Those attending the plant managers' pro-
gram of the Florida Annual Meeting in
Miami Beach had an opportunity to
sample some of these new flavors on that
occasion, which was the first time they
were revealed to the Industry.

PROFESSOR WILLOUGHBY
HONORED BY F.F.A.
The F.F.A. 1952 State Convention at
Daytona Beach in June voted a Special
Award to C. H. Willoughby of Gaines-
ville, a retired University of Florida Pro-
fessor in Dairy Husbandry.
The award stated that it was "to a
friend who has done outstanding serv-
ice to Florida agriculture."


8 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS








Miami Girl Named Dairy Month Queen


Florida's 1952 Dairy Month Queen. Alijs Alary Bilier of liamii. ite Ill
surrounded by admirers as State Dairy Month Chairman Jack Dew decorates the
Oueen wilt an orchid. Assisting with the ceremony are Theo Dalson. F.D.I.A.
President; Oscar MAcFann, Miami Dairy Month Chairman, sponsor of the Queen.
and F.D.I.A. Secretary Andy Lay. More Dairy Month Queen picltres will be
seen in the Dairy Newn' October issue.


F. D. I. A. ANNUAL CONVENTION REVIEW


(Continued from page 7)
Marjorie Lay was reelected secretary.
The Ladies' Aux-
Iliary Members un-
der the leadership of
Mrs. Vernon Graves
of Tampa, President,
and Mrs. Bob Hall '.
of Miami, program
chairman, and her'
wonderful Miami '
Committee, enjoyed '
a full schedule of MRs. JOHNSON
sightseeing in super-
comfort air-conditioned buses. A special
luncheon and fashion show at the Bur-
dine's Department Store, Miami, and a
business session in addition to participa-
tion in all the regular entertainment fea-
tures of the convention.
NEW "BELL COWs" SELECTED
Dean of the Florida Dairy Industry
Association, Alf Nielsen, who also is
President of the Association's Honor So-
ciety, "The Exalted Order of Bell Cows",
announced and installed three new mem-
bers. The Order of Bell Cows was start-
ed a few years ago when Alf Nielsen
became lonesome in his position as
"Dean" and selected a partner in Past
President Ernest Graham.
The following year the two came up
with a plan for enlarging their exclusive
two-member club into an honorary lead-
ership group which would honor with
membership from time to time those who
have demonstrated outstanding leadership
on behalf of the Dairy Industry. The new
members installed for 1952 were: Col.


B. F. Castle, Executive Director of the
Milk Industry Foundation; Dr. E. L.
Fouts, Head of the Dept. of Dairy
Science, University of Florida; and Mr.
Theo Datson, the immediate Past Presi-
dent of the Florida Association. There
are now ten members of the group.

ANNUAL CONVENTION RESOLUTIONS
ADOPTED
Convention resolutions adopted at the
Annual Business Meeting expressed for
the convention and the Florida Dairy In-
dustry:
Appreciation to the Casablanca Hotel
and all members of its executive and
service staff for the excellent services and
facilities provided; to the Miami Dairies
for their courtesy and contribution to the
success of the Convention in their pro-
viding for the Dairy Bar throughout the
Convention; to all Convention speakers
and all who participated in the conven-
tion program; to all the Allied Trades
Members in attendance and their offi-
cers for their cooperation and splendid
contribution to the success of the con-
vention; to all Association Officers, Di-
rectors and others who have served and
assisted in the work of the Association
during the past year.
A resolution favoring and urging the
construction, equipping, and providing
with necessary staff of a Veterinary Re-
search and Diagnostic Laboratory at the
University of Florida and for the ad-
dition to the Florida Agricultural Exten-
sion Service of an assistant to State Ex-


tension Dairyman C. W. Reaves.
A resolution approving the action of
the Board in sponsoring the sending of
Florida's 4-H Club Dairy Judging Team
to England and their action in sponsor-
ing the Dairy Council Classroom infor-
mation program throughout the State in
areas not covered by local Dairy Council
Units.
A resolution of appreciation and con-
gratulations to the Association's Execu-
tive Director upon his election as Presi-
dent of the National Conference of Dairy
Association Executives and completion of
10 years services with the Florida Dairy
Industry.
Resolutions of sympathy to the respec-
tive families of the following deceased:
Mrs. Brady S. Johnston, Mrs. E. L. Fouts,
Mr. J. B. Warner and Dr. J. V. Knapp.
A resolution inviting the 1955 Annual
Conventions of the Dairy Industry to
meet in Florida.
A resolution in recognition of and hon-
oring Dr. J. G. DuPuis as "Pioneer Lead-
er" of the Florida Dairy Industry, having
operated the White Belt Dairy in Miami
continuously for 52 years.
A resolution of appreciation to Gov-
ernor Warren, State Cabinet Members,
various Mayors, the Junior Chamber of
Commerce, the press and all who gener-
ously cooperated in the observance of
June as Dairy Month and to the various
contestants for local and state Dairy
Month Queen.

LADIES' AUXILIARY RESOLUTION
ON THE DEATH OF
MRS. BRADY S. JOHNSTON
Whereas. God in his infinite wisdom
has removed from our fellowship the
person of Bertha Johnston, past president
and director of the Ladies' Auxiliary of
the F.D.I.A., and
l'Whereas. we are deeply conscious of
the loss also of her friendly and helpful
counsel in all our activities;
Now,. therefore, be it resolved that we
hereby express our sorrow for her pass-
ing and our sympathy to her family, and
Be it further resolved that a copy of
this resolution be written into the min-
utes of our meeting and a copy be sent
to the family of Bertha Johnston.
Adopted at the 1952 Annual Meeting,
Miami Beach.
F.D.I.A. LADIES' AUXILIARY,
Mrs. Vernon Graves, President.

The Texas-born captain of an all Texas
company in North Africa told his men:
"Our job here is to promote good neigh-
borliness among other things. We've got
to humor the natives. If they say Africa
is bigger than Texas, agree with them!"


FOR AUGUST, 1952 0 9










DAIRY ASSOCIATION ACTIVITIES



National Dairy Conventions, Dairy Industry

Exposition In Chicago September 22-26


NEW DIRECTORS TAKE OVER
AT JULY 30th MEETING

All Officers and Directors elected at
the Annual Meeting of the Florida Dairy
Industry Association in June will offic-
ially take office at the first meeting of
the new Board to be held July 29-30
at the Floridan Hotel, Tampa.
At this first meeting following their
election, the 16-member Board will name
an Executive Committee of six members,
and all necessary Standing Committees
for carrying out the Association's pro-
gram for the ensuing year which they
will also consider and adopt.
A joint meeting with the Directors of
the West Coast Milk Producers Associa-
tion will be held the evening of July
29th.


FLORIDA DAIRY EXECUTIVES
ATTEND NATIONAL MEETINGS
One important National Conference of
leaders of the Milk and Ice Cream In-
dustry which is little publicized is the
Annual Joint Spring Conference of Di-
rectors of International Assocation of Ice
Cream Manufacturers, the Milk Industry
Foundation, the Presidents of all State
Dairy Industry Associations and the Na-
tional Council of Dairy Association Ex-
ecutives.
This four-day conference was held in
Pocono Manor, Pennsylvania, June 2 to
6. Florida representatives attending were
F.D.I.A. President Theo Datson and Sec-
retary E. T. Lay, Paul E. Reinhold, Henry
Schneider, Alf Nielsen, and J. W. Good-
ing, Jr.
Lay presided at sessions of the Assoc-
iation Executives' Conference. Gooding
presided as chairman at sessions of the
Controllers' Council of I.A.I.C.M. Dat-
son, Schneider and Reinhold participated
in I.A.I.C.M. Directors' Meetings while
Nielsen attended the M.I.F. Directors'
Meetings.
All the group participated in the gen-
eral conference sessions.
The Florida delegation made a strong
bid for this conference to be held in
Florida in 1955.


One of the nation's largest industry
meetings will be the combined 1952 An-
nual Conventions of the Milk Industry
Foundation, International Association of
Ice Cream Manufacturers and the Na-
tional Dairy Industry Supply Association
to be held September 22-26 in Chicago.
The Florida Dairy Industry ranks high
in percentage of attendance of eligible
milk and ice cream plant executives and
supply dealers at these conventions.
Someone remarked at last year's Detroit
convention that the Florida Association
could almost hold its own annual con-
vention there, considering the number of
Floridians present.
The Ice Cream Manufacturers meeting
is September 22-24 at the Conrad Hilton
Hotel and the Milk Foundation meet-
ing, September 24-26 at the Hotel Sher-
man.
The Dairy Industries Exposition will
be at the Navy Pier through the entire
week, September 22-27.
Anyone planning to attend and still
desiring hotel reservations should lose no
time in requesting reservations. Write
F.D.I.A. or your National Association.
No joint transportation plans are being
considered for the Florida delegation.
Theo Datson and Paul Reinhold will
attend Directors' Meetings of Interna-
tional Ice Cream Manufacturers and
Reinhold and Alf Nielsen will attend a
Directors' Meeting of the Milk Founda-
tion. F.D.I.A. Secretary, President of the
National Association of Dairy Associa-
tion Executives will preside at a meeting
of this group.

JUNE DAIRY MONTH
OBSERVANCE IS GRATIFYING

Florida had its most widely observed
and successful June Dairy Month pro-
gram since the incorporation of this im-
portant activity in the Florida Dairy In-
dustry Association's Annual Events.
A picture of the State Dairy Month
Queen will be found on the Annual
Meeting page of this issue of the Dairy
News. A complete Dairy Month review
will be a feature of the October Dairy
News.


CONVENTION DATES
GEORGIA DAIRY ASSOCIATION
August 14-16, General
Oglethorpe Hotel, Savannah

NATIONAL ICE CREAM AND
MILK FOUNDATION CONVENTIONS
DAIRY INDUSTRIES EXPOSITION
Sept. 22-26, Chicago

SOUTHERN ASSN. ICE CREAM
MFRS.
Nov. 11-13, Jung Hotel,
New Orleans

JUNIOR DAIRY GROUP
IS CONSIDERED
A special committee of the F.F.A.
State Convention as well as a Committee
of their leaders in the 1952 Annual Con-
ference of Vocational Agricultural Teach-
ers were appointed to consider partici-
pation of these groups in a proposed new
organization of young Dairymen and
student Dairymen that has been suggested
by the Florida Dairy Industry Associa-
tion, to be designated as the Florida Ju-
nior Dairy Association.
Young men active in 4-H or F.F.A.
Dairying projects, dairying students and
others who have demonstrated a serious
interest in preparing for a future in the
Dairy Industry would be eligible for par-
ticipation in the proposed organization.
Leaders of the F.F.A., 4-H Clubs, Uni-
versity of Florida, and the Florida Dairy
Industry Association would be named as
an Advisory Board to the Junior Group,
according to the plans under considera-
tion.

FLORIDA CONVENTION IS
REPORTED BY DAIRY
PRODUCTS JOURNAL
Those who attended the Florida
Dairy Industry Convention, June
11-13 at Miami Beach will be in-
terested in the very complete pic-
torial report made of the Conven-
tion in the July issue of the South-
ern Dairy Products Journal. The
story covers nine full pages. Be
sure to read it. Copies may be
available from Mr. Fred Sorrow,
Editor, 101 Marietta St. Bldg., At-
lanta.


10 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS
























State Dairy Supervisors Are Recognized For

Important Role In Dairy Development

In the first article of this series, tribute was paid to work of the honorable Nathan Mayo, Com-
missioner of Agriculture, and Professor John M. Scott, Chief Dairy Supervisor, in the establishment
and operation of the Dairy Department of the State Department of Agriculture, an organization
which has contributed much toward the development of Florida's important Dairy Industry which
is estimated to have an annual retail sales volume of over $150,000,000.00. As the Industry has
expanded, the services of the personnel of the Dairy Department have been vitl to its success in
maintaining the high standards required by the regulatory legislation applying to the production,
processing, and distribution of milk and milk products. These are principally the Florida Milk
and Milk Products Law and the Florida Ice Cream and Frozen Desserts Law.


The six dairy supervisors pictured
above are specially trained to be of as-
sistance to the dairy farmer, the proces-
sor, and the distributor. This means that
they must be versatile, as their field of
inspection and aid includes sanitation,
animal diseases, pastures and their culti-
vation, as well as building, mechanical
and electrical engineering as related to
the construction and equipment of dairy
farms and plants.
Lewis T. Smith was the first of the
supervisors selected to assist Mr. John
Scott in the important work of his de-
partment. A native of South Dakota, he
was educated in Walton County, Florida
schools and the University of Florida. He
had practical experience in a milk plant
and is well acquainted with all phases of
plant operation. Mr. Smith served as
president of the Florida Association of
Milk Sanitarians in 1951.
Alex G. Shaw, native Floridian, was
employed as City Milk Inspector for the
City of Jacksonville following his gradu-
ation from the University of Florida.
During World War I. he inspected dairies
and milk plants from Florida to New
York wherever the Army drew its sup-
ply of milk. He has been with the de-
partment since 1930.
Dr. H. H. Rothe is a graduate in both
Veterinary Medicine and Animal Hus-
bandry and for a number of years taught
Bacteriology at the University of Georgia.
A native of Texas, he came to Florida
during the boom days and joined the de-
partment in 1937.


Combining his dairy supervisor's work
with the inspection of gasoline, pure
food, eggs, and poultry, J. W. Saunders
does all the work of the State Department
of Agriculture at Key West. After at-
tending a short course in dairying at the
University of Florida, he had held train-
ing before starting work in 1949.
John D. Robinson, born and reared in
Plant City, was employed as a Milk Sani-
tarian with the Hillsborough County
Health Detpartment before joining the
staff in 1950.
R. R. Hood has owned his own dairy
business and milk plant in Pensacola and
served as Milk Inspector there for sev-
eral years, coming to the State Depart-
ment in the Fall of 1951.


Dairy Supervisors, left to right,
above, Dr. H. H. Rothe, R. R.
Hood, Lewis T. Smith, John D.
Robinson, Alex G. Shaw, and to the
right, J. W. Saunders. Below, Mrs.
Marjorie Schisler, Stenographer;
Mrs. Ora M. Stanley, Secretary; Miss
AMary Goodbred, Stenographer.


Mrs. Ora M. Stanley, Office Secretary,
has been with Mr. Scott's office since
1941. She is assisted by the two steno-
graphers, Mrs. Marjorie H. Schisler and
Miss Mary Godbred. All are graduates
of business schools and their work de-
termines the efficiency of the office in
handling of correspondence, issuing
licenses and permits, and compiling statis-
tical records.


FOR AUGUST, 1952 11


I7,a
I,







FLORIDA'S 8-POINT

DAIRY PROGRAM


Eficieneye" andui 2PayU( 'w
Third of a series of articles on the Florida 8-Point Dairy Program for 1952. This
article, covering point six, is sponsored by the F.D.I.A. Dairy Husbandry and Vet-
erinary Committees, V. C. Johnson and Dr. Karl Owens, Chairmen, respectively.
Prepared By
CHARLES F. SIMPSON, D. V. M.
Asso. Director of
Department of Veterinary Research
Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, University of Florida
IMPROVING HERD HEALTH


The monetary value of products de-
rived from dairy cattle is greater than
that received for products coming from
any other species of live stock. The dairy-
man, therefore, must, of necessity, be
aware of the role that disease prevention
plays in his operation because a profit-
able dairy enterprise cannot be realized
unless herd health is maintained at a
high level. To verify this statement, it
is necessary to make mention of five
diseases tuberculosis, brucellosis, mas-
titis, milk fever and breeding difficulties.
The control of tuberculosis is based
on programs operated by the State and
Federal Agencies, and involves the per-
iodic testing of dairy herds to prevent
the spread of infection, should it acci-
dentally be introduced into a herd. Even
though tuberculosis in dairy animals has
been reduced to a low incidence by the
eradication program, the fact that the
disease is still diagnosed points out that
vigilance against the disease must be
maintained. Infected animals may not
show outward signs of the disease and
may appear to be in perfect health. Un-
less cattle are tested periodically, the
disease may make extensive inroads in a
herd without its presence being suspected.
Brucellosis has not succumbed to an
eradication program as has tuberculosis.
Although much is known about Bang's
disease, much remains to be learned be-
fore information regarding the condition
is complete. Some of the modes of spread
of brucellosis, such as contact with the
infected aborted calf, have been recog-
nized for many years. The symptoms of
the disease are not always well defined,
however. For example, the best known
symptom, the premature birth of the
young, does not always occur. A con-
siderable amount of research, therefore,
is still being conducted with particular
reference to finding better immunizing
agents, and also in the development of
antibiotics or other drugs that may prove
effective in eliminating Brucella infec-
tions, once an animal becomes infected.


At the present time the only recourse at
the disposal of the dairyman is to have
his herd blood tested annually so that
infected animals may be detected.
Mastitis is another condition about
which the dairyman has heard consider-
able comment. The financial losses due
to the disease are often underestimated
because death of the animal seldom re-
sults from the infection. Instead, there
is substantial and permanent decrease in
milk production; and this, in some herds,
is not as obvious a financial loss as is
death of an animal. Mastitis, which
means an inflammation of the mammary
gland, may be so mild as to go unde-
tected by the dairyman and yet be capable
of destroying the glandular tissue of the
udder. When the inflammation has sub-
sided, the udder tissue has been replaced
by scar tissue. This accounts for the
nodular condition so often found in
udders of cows that they have been in
production for several years. Several pre-
disposing factors are responsible for the
onset of mastitis flare-ups. Chief among
these are improper milking, such as leav-
ing the milking machine on the cow too
long, and injury to the teat or quarter.
The control of mastitis in a dairy herd
is essentially a management problem in-
volving precautions to prevent the spread
of infection from infected to healthy ud-
ders. In an effort to accomplish this
purpose, infected animals should be
milked last, and those having incurable
cases of the disease should be disposed
of at the earliest possible time.
Milk fever is a condition that gen-
erally affects high-producing cows. The
condition is generally observed shortly
after calving and is characterized by
paralysis and a comatose condition. The
cause of the ailment concerns a derange-
ment in calcium metabolism resulting
from the onset of lactation. Medication
with a calcium salt, especially in the in-
itial stages, usually gives spectacular re-
covery. Adequate mineral supplements
may lessen the incidence of the disease


Systematic Feeding Pays
8-POINT FLORIDA
DAIRY PROGRAM
As a guide and aid to Florida Dairy-
men and Dairy Plants in more efficient
and successful operation, the Florida
Dairy Industry Association adopted an 8-
point efficiency program for recommen-
dation to all the Florida Dairy Industry
for 1952.
The 8-points which are based on rec-
ommendations from various active com-
mittees of the Association are as follows:
1. Improve dairy pasture and feed pro-
duction.
2. Practice individual and improved
feeding system.
3. Keep adequate indi-
vidual and herd records.
4. Follow definite herd
improvement program.
5. Strive for top qual-
ity.
6. Work for improve-
mend of herd health.
7. Use efficient pro-
cessing and distribution
methods.
8. Give more attention
to "Public Relations."
The purpose of the 8-Point Program
is aimed at efficient, economic production
and marketing of high quality milk and
milk products. The slogan of the pro-
gram is "Efficiency and Quality Pay."

in a herd. Milk fever is no longer a
condition that the dairymen need dread,
but they must be alert to diagnose the
ailment in its initial stage.
Dairymen in this state have become
recognizant of the fact, either through
personal experiences or from the exper-
iences of fellow dairymen, that brucello-
sis can no longer be designated as the
culprit causing all sterility and reproduc-
tive conditions of dairy cattle. Vibriosis,
trichomoniasis and leptospirosis are three
(Continued on page 23)


12 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


FOR

1952









DAIRY NEWS DIGEST


Members of the Dairy Industry throughout the State are invited to please
send to the "Florida Dairy News" all news about dairies, dairying and the
good people who devote their time, talents and money to this great industry.
-The Editor.


WEST FLORIDA DAIRY SHOW IS
SET FOR AUGUST 14 IN CHIPLEY
The 1952 West Florida dairy show
will be held August 14 in City Park,
Chipley, Fla., with entries in the 4-H
Future Farmer and open divisions, ac-
cording to announcement of J. E. Davis,
Washington County Farm Agent, who is
General Manager of the Show.
The Junior Dairy Cattle Show will in-
clude the following classes of female ani-
mals in each of the dairy breeds (pure-
breds and grades will be shown togeth-
er): Calf-6 to 12 months of age, Ju-
nior Yearling Heifer, Senior Yearling
Heifer, and Cows over 2 years of age.
A 4-H or F.F.A. member may enter
animals in 4-H and F.F.A. Divisions but
the same animal can not be shown in
both divisions. No member may show
more than three animals in the entire
show.
The owner of the Grand Champion
Guernsey animal will receive a registered
Bull Calf. (This applies only to the Ju-
nior Divisions.) If the owner has pre-
viously won a bull in this Show, the bull
shall go to the next place winner. The
Florida Times-Union will award a trophy
to the exhibitor of the best fitted 4-H or
F.F.A. animal.
There will be a special prize of $75.00
each for the Champion Jersery and the
Champion Guernsey for the entire Show
(this prize is open to adult as well as
junior exhibitors). All animals must
have been owned by the exhibitor at
least 60 days prior to the Show.
There will be an F.F.A. Judging Con-
test and a 4-H Judging Contest. An
F.F.A. team shall consist of three bona
fide members, while a 4-H team shall
consist of four bona fide members. Each
F.F.A. Chapter may enter one team,
whether or not cattle are exhibited by the
Chapter.
Each County may enter two 4-H teams
whether or not cattle are exhibited by the
County. The County Agent and the
Home Demonstration Agent will decide
whether it shall be a boys' team and a
girs' team or a mixed team (both teams
may be all boys or all girls). Contestants
cannot enter both the 4-H and the F.F.A.
Judging Contest.
Judging will begin at 9:30 A.M., and
the following prizes are offered on a team
basis: First prize $15; second prize $10;
third prize $7.50; fourth to tenth prizes
$5 each. The schedule of prizes for both


the 4-H and the F.F.A. Judging Contests
are identical.
The Florida Dairy Industry Associa-
tion will provide a trophy for the Chanm-
pion 4-H Judging Team and for the
Champion F.F.A. Judging Team.
An Open Cow Show and Judging Con-
test will be held in connection with the
regular Show. This Show will be open
to anyone except 4-H and F.F.A. mem-
bers.
The Show is sponsored by the State De-
partment of Agriculture, the Vocational
Agricultural Department, the Agricul-
tural Extension Service, the City of Chip-
ley, Washington County and the Chipley
Kiwanis Club.
Ringmaster for the Show is W. W.
Glenn, Jackson County Farm Agent.
The Screening Committee were Alex
Shaw, State Dairy Supervisor; J. Lee
Smith, Agricultural Extension Service;
and T .M. Love, Vocational Agriculture
Dept.
August 5th was the deadline for all
entries for both Shows and Contest, ac-
cording to J. E. Davis, County Agent,
chairman of the 4-H Division, and T. L.
Barrineau, State Department of Educa-
tion, Tallahassee, chairman of the F.F.A.
Division.

MILK COMMISSION LOSES
IN SUPREME COURT RULING
The Supreme Court has held the long
disputed Tampa milk price increase of
over a year ago invalid on the grounds
of insufficient evidence regarding the
cost of milk production in the area.
Milk producers of the area have an-
nounced that they wil petition the Milk
Commission for a new hearing for the
purpose of filing additional cost infor-
mation. They still contend that the price
increase ordered by the Milk Commission
was justified and will welcome a further
opportunity to prove it.
The Milk Commission is now defend-
ing in Orlando court its order of several
weeks standing in which it refused to
approve a price increase that had been
requested by the milk producers of that
area.
A group of Orlando producers have
brought the action in court attempting
to prove that the evidence which they
submitted to the Commission entitled
them to a price increase.


MILK FOUNDATION HEAD SAYS
MILK PRICE VS. WAGES
SHOWS 69% DECREASE
Col. Benj. F. Castle, Executive Di-
rector of the Milk Industry Foundation,
national organization of Milk Dealers,
surprised Florida's price-conscious milk
Distributors and Dairymen when, in his
address before the Annual Convention,
he advised them to "discard price shy-
ness" and "go on the offensive" in tell-
ing milk consumers the real facts about
today's price of milk as related to other
inflated costs and inflated incomes.
"The facts are," he said, "that a com-
parison of the relative increase in the
price of milk and increased incomes dur-
ing the past 10 years shows that a quart
of milk in 1942 cost the same as today
in actual money value. In other words,
milk has not advanced in relative cost
in 10 years."
"It requires 69% less time in 1952 for
the average worker to earn a quart of
milk than it did in 1912. In other
words, it took 25.2 minutes at average
wages in 1912 to earn a quart of milk,
while today it takes only 7.8 minutes."
"This is an important story to tell
your customers," Col. Castle said. "This,
plus the fact that the price of milk has
not increased nearly as much as all other
foods combined, should be shouted from
the house-tops. Instead of being shy
about talking up the price of milk, it
should be advertised along with the
matchless qualities of nature's most near-
ly perfect food, milk," he concluded.


DR. WRENSHALL JOINS N. Y.
MANUFACTURING CHEMIST FIRM
Dr. C. Lewis Wrenshall, who for the
past several years has been associated with
the Foremost Dairies home office in
Jacksonville as director of research and
quality control, recently announced his
affiliation with Charles Pfizer and Com-
pany, manufacturing chemists, 11 Bart-
lett St., Brooklyn, N. Y.

DR. C. L. CAMPBELL NAMED
ACTING STATE VETERINARIAN
The Florida State Live Stock Sanitary
Board officially named Dr. C. L. Camp-
bell Acting State Veterinarian. Dr. Camp-
bell, who has been Director of the Live
Stock Board's T.B. and Bangs disease
program for a number of years, had been
serving unofficially as Acting State Veter-
inarian at the request of the Chairman
since the death June 6th of Dr. J. V.
Knapp.

Two things hardest on the heart are
running upstairs and running down peo-
ple.


FOR AUGUST, 1952 13






















Mr. John Norfleet, Manager, Southern Southern Dairies, Inc., as Top District
Dairies, Inc., presenting State F.F.A. Dairy winner; Billy Gunter, Live Oak, State
Award: Left to right Nor- F. F. A. Star Dairy Farmer Winner;
Contest At to George Ford, Quincy; Earl Hunt, Jr..
fleet; Gene Wheele,, Hawthorne; Joe DeLand; and Lloyd Harris, Barton. All
Register. Campbelllon: Jack Davis, Vero six of these boys were District Dairy
Beach, with the plaque presented by Contert Winners.

Dairy Awards Made At F.F.A. Convention

Star Dairy Farmer Named, Six District Dairy Efficiency
Winners and State Dairy Judging Team
Future Farmer Billy Gunter, son of a successful Dairyman of Live Oak, received
the. highest F.F.A. award in dairying, that of "Star Dairy Farmer of 1952" at the
Annual F.F.A. Convention held in Daytona in June.


As a reward Billy received $100.00
from the National Future Farmer Foun-
dation a plaque from Southern Dairies,
Inc., and the Florida Dairy Industry As-
sociation's revolving trophy for making
the best record in the F.F.A. Dairy Show
at the 1952 Florida State Fair.
Billy's unusual record in his F.F.A.
dairy projects as well as his over-all
F.F.A. record is given in a separate sec-
tion on this page.
The six District Winners in F.F.A.
projects (all pictured above) are: Jack
Davis, Vero Beach, who was top District
Winner; Joe Register, Campbellton;
George Ford, Quincy; Gene Wheeler,
Hawthorne; Earle Hurst, Jr., DeLand;
and Lloyd Harris, Bartow.


Mr. Lansing Gordon, Chapter Adviser
at Redland, Dade County, with Clyde
Rogers, Leroy Rogers, and George Cooper,
winning F.F.A. State Dairy Judging
Team.


F.F.A. Slate Daily Judging Team
The honors as State Championship
Dairy Judging Team for 1952 went to
three Dade County boys of the Redland
F.F.A. Chapter.
The winning of this award makes
these boys-Clyde Rogers, Leroy Rogers,
and George Cooper eligible to com-
pete in the National F.F.A. Dairy Judg-
ing Competition at the 1952 Dairy Cattle
Congress to be held in September in Wa-
terloo, Iowa.


BILLY GUNTER STAR DAIRY
FARMER FOR FLORIDA 1952
Billy Gunter, Suwannee Chapter, F.F.
A. at Live Oak, was recognized by the
Florida Future Farmers of America as
"Star Dairy Farmer" of 1952 on the
basis of his leadership record and success
with dairy projects.
Billy finished Suwannee High School
in Live Oak this Spring. He has served
as president of the Student Body there,
has been President of the F.F.A. Chapter,
and Secretary, was editor on the school
annual staff, played in the Band, Treas-
urer of the Key Club, played football and
baseball, is an active member of his
Church, and sings in the Choir. He was
elected Commissioner of Agriculture at
Boys' State last summer, went to Wash-
ington this Spring as a Congressional
Page, is a member of the Florida Guern-
sey Cattle Association, the Florida Dairy
Industry Association, and the Florida


500 FUTURE FARMERS ATTEND
24th ANNUAL CONVENTION

One of the largest and most successful
Annual Conventions ever held by the
F.F.A. in Florida met in Daytona Beach
in June. The five-day session is an in-
tensive leadership training short course
as well as Annual Meeting and Conven-
tion of the State's Future Farmers.
Mr. Harry E. Wood, State Supervisor
of Vocational Agricultural Training, and
Mr. A. R. Cox, State F.F.A. Executive
Secretary, were in

vention program.
Outstanding ac-
tions of the Conven-
tion in addition to
the naming of F.F.A.
Dairy Farming win-
ners of the year, as
reported elsewhere
on this page, were
as follows: The WOOD
Quincy Chapter for
the second consecutive year was named
No. 1 Chapter of the State and the Live
Oak Chapter, second. William Timmons
of Quincy received the annual award of
"Star Farmer."
The DeLand Chapter won the first
place and the F.F.A. Foundation award
in "Farm Safety." Eleven members of
the Live Oak Chapter won State Farmer
Degrees.
Cash prizes totaling $3,067.00, eight
free trips to the National F.F.A. Con-
vention in Kansas City in October, and
five scholarships to the University of
Florida were presented, as well as coveted
plaques and trophies.
Sponsors of awards as well as those
who provide the leadership for this out-
standing program in youth training are
entitled to a great deal of credit. Listed
among these sponsors are Southern
Dairies, Inc., Florida Dairy Industry As-
sociation, Florida Chain Store Council,
Florida Bankers Association, Chilean Ni-
trate Educational Bureau, Florida Cattle-
men's Association, Sears Roebuck & Co.,
and the Florida Times-Union.
Elected new State President of F.F.A.
was Jackson Brownlee, Trenton, to suc-
ceed Copeland Griswold of Jay.
Vice Presidents elected for the new
year are: William Timmons, Quincy; Joe
McRae, Eustis; Charles Salmon, LaBelle;
Ben Arnold Griffin, Chipley; Eugene
Griffin, Bartow; and Billy Gunter, Live
Oak.

Farm Bureau. He won the State and
Tri-State Public Speaking Contests in
1951, and placed second in the Southern
Regional Contest.
When asked for a brief summary of his
accomplishments in dairying, which led
(Continued on page 23)


14 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS







Letters to The Editor

Chicago, Illinois
June 10, 1952
Editor, Florida Dairy News:
I read many trade press magazines and
association publications. You will be in-
terested in knowing that I find yours
most interesting, informative, and at-
tractively designed. It stimulates read-
ing, because you use a quantity of short
articles, and spark them with pictures
concerning dairy industry activities.
You are really doing a nice job, Andy,
and more success to you in telling your
story to your dairy industry in Florida.
Sincerely yours,
NATIONAL DAIRY COUNCIL,
Lloyd H. Geil,
Director of Public Relations.

Tallahassee, Florida
June 24, 1952.
Editor, Florida Dairy News:
I have just read the June edition of
the Florida Dairy News. While I do not
know who wrote the article that appears
on Page 16 entitled "A Tribute to the
Dairy Department of the State Depart-
ment of Agriculture", I want to express
my appreciation of the remarks made
about Mr. John M. Scott, our several
field men, the office force, and myself.
The Dairy Industry always has been
one of my hobbies-not that I am not
interested in all the other agricultural
industries that come under our Depart-
ment and the State of Florida.
This magazine is full of good food
for thought, and I want to congratulate
those who are doing this outstanding job.
With warm personal regard and best
wishes, I am
Yours sincerely,
NATHAN MAYO,
Commissioner of Agriculture,
State of Florida.
Coming from these two well known
gentlemen and the organizations which
they represent, the Florida Dairy News
Editor and the sponsors of the publica-
tion, the Florida Dairy Industry Associa-
tion, appreciate very greatly these ex-
pressions of commendation and good
will.

Florida grown corn-on-the-cob, the
state's newest commercial vegetable crop,
cashed in more than $7 million in the
1950-1951 season.

Florida has blossomed forth as Dixie's
top-ranking producer of flowers-a bou-
quet that is bringing growers more than
$16 million annually.


1 .1
fin

:/ ,I


WITH THE

DE LAVAL COMBINE MILKER

Mr. Isaac Shakarian and his son, Mr. Demos Shakarian, owners
and operators of the Reliance Dairy Farm at Downey, Calif., use
the De Laval Model F Combine Milking System to milk their
1,000-cow herd. We'll let their letter speak for itself:
"I have always believed in giving credit where credit is due-
and your company certainly deserves credit for saving me a lot of
time and money with the new De Laval Model F Combine
Milking System.
"We are saving labor since switching to De Laval. This is a
substantial item in itself; but coupled with this is the satisfaction
of a more efficient, modern operation.
"We operate a 1,000-cow dairy and efficiency is important.
Thanks to a fine job of installation by your dealer, Brown Brothers
of Bellflower, we are now able to machine-milk 120 head of cows
that previously had to be milked by hand, thus our operators are
now freed of drudgery chores and can handle 75 cows each with ease.
"Our veterinary bill has shown a big reduction, and the sanitary
problem is greatly simplified due to the new circulating washup
system incorporated in the De Laval installation."
The De Laval Model F Combine Milking System can save time
and money for you, too. Why not send for full information today?

"Direct from Cow to Can, Cooler or Tank"


The De Laval Separator Co., Dept.
165 Broadway, New York 6, N.Y.
Pease send me complete information on:
The De Laval Model F Combine Milker
THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR COMPANY Name .................................
165 Broadway, New York 6, N. Y. ,, i FO Town ......................... ........
427 Randolph St., Chicago 6, Il.
61 Beale St., San Francisco 5, Calif. RF.D ................... State.............
= = ====111


FOR AUGUST, 1952 0 15







Escambia County's First Annual Farm Tour

Attracts 375 Farmers and Business Men
A large part of Escambia County's 60 Dairymen joined with the County Farm
Bureau and the Pensacola Chamber of Commerce on June 26th in staging one of
the largest attended and most extensive one-day farm tours ever held in the State
of Florida, according to a special report to the Dairy News from E. N. Stephens,
Escambia County Farm Agent.
An estimated 375 who participated in the deluxe tour traveled over 150 miles
mostly by bus, covering practically the entire agricultural, dairy and livestock areas
of the County, Mr. Stephens said.


Twelve farms were visited which were
considered most representative of the
best and most modern of Escambia Coun-
ty's $4,000,000.00 agricultural industry.
Among these was the Foster Brothers
Dairy, selected as representative of the
county's 60 Dairy farms which maintain
over 2,000 dairy cows, producing milk
with a farm value of approximately
$750,000.00 annually. Mr. Stephens said
the Foster Brothers Dairy, one of the
largest in the area, was an eye-opener
to many of the business men on the tour
who little realized the enormous invest-
ment required for the operation of a
modern dairy. Here they saw a herd of
400 dairy animals, representing an in-
vestment in animals alone of over $120,-
000.00. Adding to this the investment
in land and equipment made it plain
to understand that a large responsibility
goes with the ownership and operation
of a dairy farm.
The County Dairy Association coop-
erated in the tour by providing milk and
ice cream for luncheon which was served
at one of the farms.
Other agricultural projects of special
interest on the tour was the growing of
soy beans, corn, cotton, peanuts, potatoes,
some of the world's finest pasture grasses
and beef cattle feeding.


Grasses of special
sacola Bahia, Coastal
Red Clover, and the
Argentine Bahia grass


interest were Pen-
Bermuda, Kenland
largest planting of
in the world.


Some of the modern equipment seen
were grain storage bins, two of which
were equipped with heat and air to pro-
vide mechanical drying of grain and seed
crops. Also equipment for grass hay cut-
ting, bailing and loading.

OCTOBER JERSEY SALE
ANNOUNCED BY FLORIDA
JERSEY BREEDERS
The Annual Fall State Jersey Sale
sponsored by the Florida Jersey Cattle
Club has been announced for October 28.
Mr. Fred Baetzman, Secretary of the
Jersey Cattle Club, states that the Sale
will be held either in Orlando or Bar-
tow.
The Sales Committee, headed by L. V.
Minear of The Pennock Plantation Dairy,
Jupiter, is now making its selection of
animals for the sale which they expect
will be one of the finest groups of reg-
istered Jerseys ever offered at a Florida
sale.
Other members of the Sale Commit-
tee in addition to Chairman Minear are:
Brighton Skinner of Skinners' Dairy,
Jacksonville; M. T. Crutchfield, Marian-
na; and C. W. Reaves, University of
Florida, State Extension Dairyman,
Gainesville.
A detailed announcement concerning
the sale will be made in the October
"Dairy News".


Pensacola area Dairymen are seen at
a recent monthly meeting of the Tri-
County Dairy Association which in-
cludes Escambia and Santa Rosa Coun-
ties of Florida and Baldwin County,
Alabama. John Adkinson is President
of the group.



Guernsey Breeders
Announce Fall Sale
The Florida Guernsey Cattle Club has
announced two Fall sales events for Oc-
tober 27 and 29. On Monday, October
27, the East Coast Guernsey Sale will be
held at the Boutwell Dairy, Lake Worth
at 1:00 P.M. The Florida State Guernsey
Sale is scheduled to be held Wednesday,
October 29, in the Pinellas County Fair
Grounds at Largo.
W. A. Boutwell, Sr., Chairman of the
Sales Committee, has announced selec-
tion by the Committee of 100 animals
for consignment to the two sales from
the best Guernsey herds of North and
South Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee and
Florida.
Members of the Committee in addition
to Mr. Boutwell are Charles Johnson, R.
R. Jennings, J. McKissock Jeeter, John
H. Logan, Carroll Ward Sr., and C. W.
Reaves.
Further information can be had from
Mr. John Henry Logan, Secretary, Flori-
da Guernsey Cattle Club, Largo, Florida.


Participants in the Escambia County Farm Tour, June 26, 1952, (left) admiring a field of Argentine Bahia grass, "a
new and promising pasture grass", and (right) looking over the 400 cow herd at Foster Bros. Dairy.


16 0 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS






100


GUERNSEYS


AT PUBLIC AUCTION


TWO BIG SALES


WHERE

AND


WHEN


WHAT-


EAST
OCTOBER 29, 1952
BOUTWELL'S DAIRY,

14th ANNUAL
OCTOBER 27, 1952
FAIR GROUNDS


COAST SALE
-:- 1:00 P. M.
LAKE WORTH, FLORIDA

FLORIDA STATE SALE
-:- 1:00 P. M.
LARGO, FLORIDA


100 REGISTERED GUERNSEYS FROM OUTSTANDING
HERDS IN NORTH AND SOUTH CAROLINA, GEORGIA,
KENTUCKY, TENNESSEE AND FLORIDA


Both Sales Sponsored By
W H O The Florida Guernsey Cattle Club


WHY


Sponsors of Sales are anxious to promote better cattle
and provide an opportunity for Guernsey breeders,
dairymen, 4-H Club boys and girls and Future Farmers
to select outstanding Guernsey cattle at public auction.
Fresh cows, heavy springers, bred heifers, open heifers,
and bulls of serviceable age will be offered.


OFFICERS OF
FLORIDA GUERNSEY CATTLE CLUB


EARL JOHNSON, Dinsmore, President


W. A. BOUTWELL, SR., Lake Worth
Vice-President and Chairman of Sales Committee


J. H. LOGAN, Largo, Secretary-Treasurer


For Free Catalog after October 1st, write to:
J. H. LOGAN, LARGO, FLORIDA

"Attend Sales for Pleasure, Profit and the Progress of Dairy Industry"


FOR AUGUST, 1952 17







NEWS

DIGEST


Florida 4-H Dairy Team and Advisers are shown about to board a Pan
American World Airways Rainbow Clipper at New York International Airport
for their trip to Ireland, England, Scotland and European Dairy Countries.
They were to represent the United States in the International Dairy Cattle
Judging Contest of the British Royal Cattle Show. Left to right they are C. W.
Reaves, State Extension Dairyman at the University of Florida; Albert Lawton,
Duval County Agricultural Agent; Paul 71.**".'/.://, Bartowv; Ray and Warren
Alvarez, Jacksonville; and Steve Simmons, Green Cove Springs. (Picture by
Pan American World Airways System, N. Y.)


FLORIDA'S 4-H DAIRY TEAM REPORTS

FROM ENGLAND ON EUROPEAN TOUR
A great deal of interest has spread throughout the Florida Dairy Industry and
among others, particularly among the hundreds of 4-H Club Members, concerning
the European tour of Florida's 4-H National Champion Dairy Judging Team.
The team, now completing their three weeks tour of the Dairy areas and Shows
of Ireland, England, Scotland, France, Holland and Denmark, accompanied by
Florida State Extension Dairyman C. W. Reaves and Duval County Agricultural
Agent Albert Lawton, were due to embark by steamer from England to New York
about July 22nd.
EXCERPTS FROM LETTERS
Friends of the group will be interested in the following information from their
letters:
"We have had a great trip . an interesting day every day since we left
Florida . one day in Washington, D. C. as guests of the National 4-H Camp,
visited White House and the USDA Agricultural Research Center at Beltsville, Md.
We visited herds in Maryland and New Jersey enroute."
"We are learning a lot of agriculture and the dairy breeds and dairying as done
here. Tomorrow we visit Ayrshire herds in the County of Ayr, Scotland (birthplace
of the breed and its headquarters) with representatives of the Ayrshire Association
... The team is enjoying our trip."
"We have seen a great deal of Ireland, Scotland and England. The British
Royal Agricultural Show here is an immense show-119 acres mostly under tents.
We are leaving tomorrow (July 4) for London . We visited the exhibit booths
of all the breed associations and of the Milk Marketing Board, and the Milk Records
Association. Also, we were in a favored position at the exhibit of the Ministry of
Agriculture when the Queen came through. We think we got some good pictures
of the Queen but Lawton was not in 'kissing distance'.
"Our next trip is to the Jersey Islands and the Isle of Guernsey . Young
people on the International Youth Program are here from South Africa, Canada,
Australia, and New Zealand."
"We visited the Shakespeare Region at Stratford-on-Avon enroute from Scotland
to here (Newton Abbot, England)."


STATE MILK CONSULTANT
RECEIVES MASTERS DEGREE
Sam O. Noles, milk consultant with
the Florida State Board of Health who
has been on leave for the past year to
attend the University of Minnesota, is
back on the job and hard at work after
acquiring a degree as "master of public
health."
Among his work for the degree were
several courses in sanitation relating to
milk. Of special interest to him -and
to dairymen interest-
ed in increasing pro-
duction from their
present dairy herds,
was a course on the
theory of milk secre-
tion taught by Dr.
William E. Petersen ('
of the University's
graduate school staff.
Dr. Petersen, as NOLES
many dairymen
know, is author of the film, "No Hand
Stripping," which has received wide ac-
claim as one of the best educational
films of its kind ever made available to
the dairy industry.
Mr. Noles' first field assignment fol-
lowing his return to the Jacksonville
headquarters office of the Florida State
Board of Health took him to Lakeland
July 14, to begin a survey of dairies.

VOCATIONAL AG TEACHERS
ATTEND STATE CONFERENCE
One hundred forty teachers of Voca-
tional Agriculture and supervisory staff
membres of the Florida State Board of
Vocational Education held a five-day an-
nual conference at Seabreeze High
School, Daytona Beach, July 21-25.
The meeting was held under the aus-
pices of the State Superintendent of Pub-
lic Instruction, the State Board of Vo-
cational Education and the State Super-
visor of Agricultural Education.
The purpose of the conference was to
promote the professional improvement of
Vocational Agricultural teachers in serv-
ice.
In addition to the extensive program
of conferences, speakers and workshop
sessions, there were fourteen special com-
mittees set up for special consideration
and recommendations to the conference
on various phases of the State's Agricul-
tural Training program. Each of these
committees is aided by a special advisory
committee of practical consultants.


18 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS






4-H TRAVEL EXPENSE FUND
RECEIVES ADDITIONAL GIFTS
Thirty-four donors to the travel ex-
pense fund for the 4-H Dairy Judging
Team and their coach, Mr. Reaves, were
named in the June issue of the Florida
Dairy News. Mr. J. N. McArthur, Chair-
man of the F.D.I.A. Committee sponsor-
ing the fund, announces that since the
first listing of these donors an additional
twenty-four have sent in their contribu-
tions. They are:
Polk County Cooperative Dairies, Win-
ter Haven; W. P. Hayman, St. Augus-
tine; Plantation Foods, Inc. (all Fla.);
Jackson Grain Co., Tampa; Lenfestey
Supply Co., Tampa; Bassett's Dairy, Mon-
ticello and Perry; Amco Feed Store, Or-
lando; J. H. Adams, Jacksonville; H. E.
Wolfe, St. Augustine; Rotary Club, St.
Augustine; Rotary Club, Hastings; Ex-
change Bank, St. Augustine; St. Augus-
tine National Bank; Fla. Power & Light
Co., St. Augustine; Kiwanis Club, St.
Augustine; Duval County Milk Produc-
ers Assn., Jacksonville; Florida Dairy,
Inc., Tampa; Gustafson's Dairy, Green
Cove Springs; Borden's Dairy (all Fla.) ;
Marine Bank and Trust Co., Tampa; First
National Bank of Tampa; Exchange
National Bank, Tampa; West Coast Milk
Producers Assn., Tampa; and Sunny
Brook Dairy, Tampa.


NATIONAL MILK SANITARIANS
HONOR DR. WILKOWSKE
National recognition has come to an-
other of the University of Florida Dairy
Science Department staff in the recent
naming of Dr. Howard Wilkowske as
Secretary-Treasurer of the International
Association of Milk and Food Sanitar-
ians.
Wilkowske was named by the Board
of Directors to fill an unexpired term
which expires at the time of the 1952
Annual Meeting of the group to be held
in Minneapolis, September 18-20. Dr.
Wilkowske plans to attend the convention
as official delegate for the Florida As-
sociation of Milk Sanitarians.


216 East Tenth Street


Dairy Cattle Nutrition Laboratory
Dedicated At Univ. of Georgia
Hundreds of visitors participated re-
cently in the official dedication of a
new Dairy Cattle Research Laboratory
building at the University of Georgia.
Governor Talmadge presented the new
building to the University. Its construc-
tion was made possible by a grant of
surplus funds of the Georgia Milk Con-
trol Board.
Built at a cost of $35,000.00, the
building when fully completed is expect-
ed to be one of the most modern of its
kind in the nation. Dairy Department
officials said the new facilities will make
possible an expanded program of funda-
mental research in dairy cattle nutrition
and related fields.


Kansas Ciy 6, Mo.


IF YOU

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CARROLLTON, ILLINOIS


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Lyndel Reynolds


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PLANT CITY, FLORIDA


FOR AUGUST, 1952 19


GRAHAM SCHOOL
A SCHOOL FOR CATTLEMEN
ONLY SCHOOL OF THE KIND
We guarantee to teach the progressive cattleman how to
accomplish the following or his money back:
How to make many barren cows breed, control abor-
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healthy udders and a thorough working knowledge of the reproductive organs.
Write or Wire for Catalog
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The first word in our name


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is more than just a five
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MEANS

more to us than that. For
it comes from a Latin word
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So let us show you how
friendly we can be and
also give you the best in
supplies, service and
equipment.



AMICA-BURNETT

CHEM. & SUPPLY CO.
Phone 4-5606 P. 0. Box 2328


1-uNNICUTT
Except for the development of the
milking machine, dairy farming as it is
usually practiced is very little different
from that of 25 years ago. During that
time practically all other lines of farm
production have been mechanized and
improved so that the production per
worker, and the rate per hour has been
at least doubled, and in many cases in-
creased several times. Consequently,
dairying has not been attractive to young
people, and the average age of milk pro-
ducers in this country is 55 years or
more.
A new system of producing milk has
been developed based on improved
forages, grown and fed on the farm, and
platform, pipeline milking parlors, which
greatly reduces the labor requirements of
milking and handling cows and permits
milking a far greater number in a given
milking unit to correspond with the high-
er production capacity of improved grass-
lands.
Efficient production of milk should be
based largely on improved forages, fed
as pasture, or hauled green to the cows,
or fed as silage and hay.
Cows can secure most of their nutrients
for milk production from these improved
forages. The usually recommended ratios
for feeding grain to milk produced of 1
pound of grain to 3 to 4 pounds of milk,
can be cut in half or more with little
impairment in production, and with con-
siderable increase in proft and longevity
of the cows.
The visits that I have made to out-
standing farms and the Experiment Sta-
tion at Gainesville in Florida, showed me
that there are a number of high quality
forage legumes and grasses that can be
grown in combination that will supply
these greatly enlarged forage needs.
The grasses include Pangola, common
and Pensacola Bahia, St. Augustine grass,
Coastal Bermuda grass, and Para grass.
The legumes include Louisiana White
Dutch Clover, Hop Clover, Kenland
Clover, Hubam Clover, Peruvian Alfalfa,


and Gregon Giant Birdsfoot Trefoil.
This list is not inclusive, and the adapta-
tion of individual varieties varies with the
soil and the region in Florida but there
are still plenty to make a good grass-
legume mixture.
The most interesting development that
I saw on this trip was the practice at
the Hall and Boyd Farm near Miami,
where a very complete legume-grass mix-
ture, heavily fertilized with a 6-6-6 an-
alysis at the rate of one ton per acre per
year, is chopped in the field each day
and hauled in self-feeder cage wagons to
the feed lot for the cows. This system
greatly increases the cow carrying capac-
ity per acre of an improved pasture be-
cause there is no tramping or manure
contamination of the grass. It has noth-
ing to do but grow without interference,
protected as it is by this "KEEP OFF
THE GRASS" practice. While Hall and
Boyd are chopping their forage, equally
as good, and possibly cheaper results
could be secured by loading feeding
wagons with fresh cut long grass by
means of a Booster Buck rake. The cows
probably would produce more milk on
long than chopped forage, since results
in England and New Zealand show that
long grass silage is about 10 per cent
better than chopped grass silage.
There is no question but that improved
grasses fed as pasture, or on a soilage
basis, or as grass silage, if abundantly
fertilized can supply most of the nutrient
needs of dairy cows on farms having
sufficient acreage to grow these forages.
That kind of milk production with the
emphasis on more forage and less grain
will mean more milk, more profits, and
longer lived cows. It could go far to-
wards solving the problem of increased
milk consumption in Florida, and adapt-
ed to other regions in the U. S. would
solve the problem nationally.
The Dairy Industry then could win
back its market from competing products
and add many million of dollars to the
income of milk producers and build a
sounder business.


MORE MILK DOLLARS PER ACRE
Address of
WALTER D. HUNNICUTT, NATIONAL DAIRIES, INC.
To Producer Section
Florida State Convention, Miami Beach
The Dairy Industry-producers and dealers alike, are faced with the problem
of more milk if sales are to be increased. It sounds almost
too simple to be true but more milk cannot be sold than
is produced.
Milk production nationally has stood about still-actually
declined a little-while our population is increasing 21/2 million
per year. This means that other foods are replacing milk and
dairy products in the housewife's budget for refreshment drinks
and desserts. The industry cannot afford to permit this condition
to continue when actually per capital consumption should be in-
creased one-third for proper nutrition.


JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA


Headquarters for

PASTURE

IRRIGATION

Systems and Supplies


20 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS










MILK LABORATORY TECHNICIANS
ATTEND U. OF FLA. TRAINING COURSE
A Milk Laboratory Technicians' Short
Course held June 9-13 at the Dairy Prod-
ucts Laboratory of the University of Flor-
ida, Gainesville, pushed personnel parti-
cipating a significant step nearer its ma-
jor objectives, according to Hugh Butner
of the Florida State Board of Health Bu-
reau of Laboratories at Jacksonville, who
served as Chairman of the program com-
mittee.
A total of 26 technicians from all
parts of the state attended the short
course which was held under the auspices
of the F.D.I.A. Dairy Plant Committee,
the Dairy Department of the University
of Florida, and the Florida Association
of Milk Sanitarians.
Principal speaker, covering all phases
of the Babcock test and its modifications,
was Dr. E. O. Herreid, professor of Dairy
Technology at the University of Illinois.
Another guest speaker was William Usel-
mann, chemist for the Borden-Galloway-
West Company, Fond-du-Lac, Wisconsin.
Dean C. V. Noble of the University's
College of Agriculture, and Dr. E. L.
Fouts, head of the University's Depart-
ment of Dairy Science, welcomed the
group.
Others participating included R. W.
Bevan, Manager of Borden's Dairy, St.
Petersburg, and chairman of the Plant
Committee of the Florida Dairy Industry
Association; W. N. Butler, quality con-
trol supervisor, Southern Dairies, Tampa;
Dale Dahlberg, laboratory assistant in the
University of Florida Dairy Products
Laboratory; Prof. W. A. Krienke, asso-
ciate professor of Dairy Manufacture,
University of Florida; Dr. L. E. Mull,
associate professor, Dairy Manufacture,
University of Florida; Dr. H. H. Wil-
kowske, assistant professor, Dairy Manu-
factures, University of Florida.
A few of the milk technicians are
members of the Florida Association of
Milk Sanitarians. Plans are under con-
sideration for the formation of a labora-
tory technicians section of the Milk Sani-
tarians Association, to make membership
more attractive for technicians, Mr. But-
ner said.
The objective of the laboratory section
and of the Technicians' Short Course are:
1. To establish better relationship be-
tween regulatory agencies, such as the
State Board of Health, County Health
Departments and the State Department of
Agriculture, and milk plant laboratories
operated by industry units.
2. To establish and develop stand-
ardization of tests so that the regulatory
agencies and the industry laboratories
can talk the same language" where
testing procedures are concerned.


The dates October 9, 10 and 11, 1952,
have been set for the 15th Annual Dairy
Plant Superintendents Conference, to be
held at the Dairy Products Laboratory,
Gainesville, Florida, under the co-spon-
sorship of the Florida Dairy Industry
Association and Florida Agricultural Ex-
periment Station's Dairy Science Depart-
ment, according to Mr. Russell W. Bevan,
Borden's Dairy, St. Petersburg, Chairman
of F.D.I.A. Dairy Plant Operations Com-
mittee.
This year the Dairy Plant Operations
Committee has been especially fortunate
in securing such outstanding men of the
Dairy Industry as Mr. H. P. Hodes of
the Tri-Clover Machine Company, Ke-
nosha, Wisconsin, who will discuss "Per-
manent Pipe-lines"; Mr. F. M. Gray,
Southern Dairies, Washington, D. C.,
who will speak on "Personnel Manage-
ment"; Mr. G. C. Urian of the Sharpies
Corporation, Philadelphia, speaking on
the subject of "Cold Milk-Clarification
- Separation Standardization"; Mr.
Wm. A. Cordes of National Dairy Prod-
ucts Corporation, presenting the subject
of "Starter Control"; Mr. O. E. Ross of
National Pectin Company, Chicago,
speaking on the subject of "Sherbet Man-
ufacture"; Mr. Lee P. Bickenbach of Mo-
jonnier Bros. Co., Chicago, discussing
"Bulk Handling of Milk"; and Mr. Bruce
Thomas of the Florida Industrial Com-
mission, Tallahassee, speaking on "Plant
Safety." These guest speakers and other
experts in the field of Dairy Science Re-
search, Plant Production, Equipment and
Associated Commercial Developments
will participate.
The program is designed to bring the
latest information in the Dairy Industry
to Dairy Plant Superintendents, Assist-
ants, Managers, Owners, Producer-Dis-
tributors, and Dairy Plant Employees.
Everyone interested in Dairy Manufac-
turing subjects is cordially invited to at-
tend.
Printed programs will be distributed by
mail in the near future. If you do not re-
ceive a program or desire extra copies
of the program, send your written re-
quest either to Leon E. Mull, Dairy
Products Laboratory, Gainesville, Fla., or
to Florida Dairy Industry Ossn., Inc., 220
Newnan St., Jacksonville 2, Fla.

Dairy cows in Ohio had to produce
8,125. pounds of 4 per cent butterfat milk
in 1950 to pay their owners average
wages and market price for hay and
grain. The cost of producing and haul-
ing milk totaled $350 per cow.

The average U. S. cow produced 5,292
pounds of milk in 1950.


Dairy Plant Short Course


Give Old Cans
This New Look
THE lower half of this milk
can has been given new
sparkle by swabbing with Oak-
ite Compound No. 84-M, the
mildly acidic cleaner that re-
moves milkstone, scale, rust in
a jiffy.
Try it yourself. Call, or write
your local Oakite Technical
Service Representative, listed
below.
OAKITE PRODUCTS, INC.
R. L. Jones, 6236 Suwannee Road, Jacksonville
M. E. Withers, 7580 N.E. 4th Court, Miami
G. Tatum, 3607 So. Court St, Montgomery, Ala.

L aED INDUSTRIAL Cy4


OAKITE
RLS METHODS *


FOR AUGUST, 1952 ee 21

FOR AUGUST, 1952 0 21


Tampa's Oldest Feed & Fencing Store
Feeds, Barb Wire, Hog Fence, Galvanized
Roofing, Poultry Fencing, Etc.
STALNAKER
BROTHERS
P. O. BOX 1468 TAMPA, FLA.
EAST BROADWAY AT 33RD STREET
37 Years at this Location



FLORIDA owned and operated . .
Supporters of Florida Cattlemen,
Poultrymen and Dairy Producers
LOVETT'S Food Stores
Operated by the
WINN & LOVETT GROCERY CO.
General Offices: Jacksonville






NEWS

DIGEST


111111
DEATH OF STATE VETERINARIAN
SERIOUS LOSS TO FLORIDA
The death, June 6th of Dr. J. V.
Knapp, Florida's State Veterinarian for
the past 30 years, is widely recognized
by the State's important livestock indus-
tries as a serious loss of a sincere friend
and an outstanding authority on the live-
stock diseases peculiar to this region.
Dr. Knapp was directing head of the
State Live Stock Sanitary Board from its
establishment and as such had charge of
cattle and hog disease prevention and
control in the state.
He directed the tick eradication
through the early twenties, when com-
pulsory cattle dipping was one of the
hottest political questions of the day, and
into the late thirties before the program
was successful.
Eventual eradication of the tick is
generally conceded to be one of the ma-
jor factors in establishing Florida's thriv-
ing cattle industry.
Dr. Knapp was a former president of
the U. S. Livestock Sanitary Association.
On the anniversary of his 30th year
of service as Florida State Veterinarian,
January 15, 1952, Dr. Knapp was paid
a high tribute by a resolution of the
Board of Directors of the Florida Dairy
Industry Association.
The resolution, in part, stated that "Dr.
Knapp has rendered an invaluable service
to the Florida dairy industry as well as
to the livestock industry of Florida in
general."
"The Board of Directors of the Flor-
ida Dairy Association extends to Dr.
Knapp an expression of our sincere ap-
preciation for his many years of service
and devotion to the welfare of this indus-
try."

M. I. F. MILK SALES TRAINING
FALL SCHEDULES ANNOUNCED
Tom Douglas, Educational Director
for the Milk Industry Foundation, has
announced the dates for four two-week
Milk Sales Training Courses to be held
at the M. I. F. Washington headquar-
ters, 1625 Eye St., Washington, D. C.,
September through December. The
courses begin September 8, October 6,
November 10 and December 8.
Florida's most recent graduate is Rex
Smith, Foremost Dairies Milk Sales-
manager. The course is highly recom-
mended by many leading dairies. Those
desiring information should write Mr.
Douglas at above M. I. F. Washington
address.


J. H. ADAMS ELECTED
DAIRY COUNCIL PRESIDENT
The Jacksonville Dairy Council elected
and installed new officers for the year
1952-53 at the organization's Fifth An-
nual Dinner Meeting held recently in
the new Jacksonville Y.W.C.A. Building.
J. H. Adams, well-known Duval Coun-
ty producer, was elected president to
succeed Albert Lawton, Duval County
Agricultural Agent, who had served since
the Council was formed in 1947.
Mrs. Julia Foster, Director-Nutrition-
ist, and Mrs. Arlen Jones, Assistant Nu-
tritionist-Director, were re-elected and re-
ceived the highest praise from officials
of the Jacksonville Council and the Pres-
ident of the National Dairy Council, Mr.
Milton Hult, who was guest speaker for
the occasion.
Other officers elected were: Don Per-
ret, Vice President; Treasurer, Cody
Skinner; and Assistant Treasurer, A. E.
(Jack) Johnson.
Directors elected were: Distributors:
W. G. Burton, D. E. Perret, A. E. (Jack)
Johnson, Brady S. Johnston; Producers:
J. H. Adams, F. B. Doub, W. P. Sim-
mons; Producer-Distributors: Mrs. Ber-
tha Nolan Morgan, Cody Skinner; Ice
Cream: A. W. Wells; Member at Large:
Mrs. Margaret Long.

TAMPA DAIRY COUNCIL
NAMES ASSISTANT DIRECTOR
The Dairy Council of Hillsborough
and Pinellas Counties announced recent-
ly the appointment of Mrs. Evelyn Sam-
ras as assistant director and nutritionist.
Mrs. America Escuder, Director, said
Mrs. Samras will spend most of her time
directing the Council's program in Pinel-
las County.
Mrs. Samras is a graduate of the Uni-
versity of Illinois, served her dietetic in-
ternship at Rochester (New York) Gen-
eral Hospital, has been a teacher and es-
tablished the Dairy Council Unit of In-
dianapolis, Indiana.

THIRTY-DAY FLORIDA EMBARGO
ON SWINE OR PORK SHIPMENT
Tampa, July 23-(AP)-Shipment of
live swine and all fresh pork products
into Florida was banned by order of the
State Live Stock Sanitary Board here to-
day for a period of 30 days or until
officially lifted.
The action was taken to prevent the
spread into Florida of a swine disease
similar to hoof and mouth disease in
cattle. Suspected cases have been report-
ed in Alabama and Georgia. Nine South-
ern States were reported as having
adopted or preparing to adopt similar
embargoes.


BEVILLE AND ALVAREZ DAIRIES
SHARE TOP EFFICIENCY HONORS
According to C. W. Reaves of the
University of Florida, Buckeye Dairy, op-
erated by J. W. and R. D. Beville of
Daytona Beach, and A. T. Alvarez of.
Jacksonville were state winners in the
Efficient Dairy Production contest con-
ducted last year. It was sponsored by the
Dairy Herd Improvement Association.
Judging was based on herd records made
on DHIA test and improved farm and
herd practices carried out by the dairy-
men.' These included milk and butterfat
production records, increase over previ-
ous years, cost of production, production
of pastures and home-grown feeds, feed-
ing balanced rations, breeding program
for herd replacements, herd health, and
other improved practices.
The Alvarez Dairy is one of Duval
County's top dairies, as is indicated by
the fact that two sons of the owner, Ray
and Warren, are members of Florida's
National Champion 4-H Dairy Judging
Team which is now on a tour of Euro-
pean dairy countries by courtesy of the
Florida Dairy Industry and friends.

UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI AWARDS
CERTIFICATES IN DAIRY PROCESSING
Professor J. A. Lewis, head of the
Food Technology Department, University
of Miami, announced completion on June
3rd of the University's first Short Course
in Dairy Processing.
The course was taught by Mr. George
Tworoger, Plant Superintendent of Bor-
den's Dairy, Miami.
Prof. Lewis states that twice as many
applied for the Spring Course as could
be admitted and that a full class is al-
ready registered for the Full Course
which is open to University students and
approved dairy workers of the area.
Certificates for completion of the course
were awarded to: Thomas Dempsey and
Merton Johnson of Borden's; John
Thompson of Borden Southern; Elton
Arnet of Dressel's; Earl Mayfield of Fore-
most; Fred Love of Graham's; E. Flem-
ing and Henry Ward of Land O'Sun;
Oscar McFann and H. H. Pilgrim of Mc-
Arthur's; Al Register of Southern; Wal-
ter Brobot and Carl Hartwig of White
Belt; Harvey Jordan of the County
Health Dept.; Richard Gibson and John
D. Irwin of the 435th Supply Co.; Ralph
Anderson, Gerald Douglass, Earl Mur-
dock, Eugene Scott and Angela Funder-
burg of the University and John L.
Hawks.
The following members of the Univer-
sity-Dairy Industry Advisory Committee
participated in presenting certificates to
the class: Mr. J. French Koger, Mr. El-
roy Decker, Mr. Charles Syfrett, Mr. J.
N. McArthur and Mr. John G. DuPuis,
Jr.


22 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS








8-Point Program
(Continued from Page 12)
relatively new conditions that have been
diagnosed in this state that can seriously
disrupt the normal reproductive cycle of
the cow. Until research provides the an-
swers, only limited help can be given to
a dairyman whose herd becomes infected
with any of these last mentioned ail-
ments.
The foregoing discussion points out
the progress that has been made in some
aspects of disease control in dairy cattle,
and the information that must be learned
in regard to other diseases. This, then,
is the problem of research. Its task is
to find the answer to unsolved disease
problems and make it possible for the
dairyman to keep his herd in a state of
good health.


BILLY GUNTER STAR
DAIRY FARMER
(Continued from page 14)
to ihs receiving the Star Dairy Farmer
Award at the recent F.F.A. Convention,
he gave this data:
"During the past three years, I have
accumulated eight registered Guernsey
heifers and a registered bull of mn" "'rn.
These are valued at about $2,450.00.
Five of my heifers are of producing age,
awd I own ten grade cows in partnership
with my father. They are valued at
$1,850.00.
"We have built a dairy barn and in-
stalled milking machines, a cooler box,
a hot water system, and other modern
equipment. I have assisted my father in
planting twenty acres of Pensacola Bahai
grass and twenty-five acres of Love grass
for grazing. I have also carried other
livestock and crops as part of my super-
vised farming program, including one
hundred and fifty broilers for meat, four-
teen beef calves, one pig, fifteen acres of
corn, eight acres of Hairy Indigo, one-
half acre of home garden, and seven acres
of planted pines.
"I have shown some of my best Guern-
sey stock at the past two state fairs. In
the 1951 Florida State Fair one of my
heifers was Reserve Champion female of
the F.F.A. Show. Two others placed third
and fifth in the heifer calf division. At
the 1952 State Fair, my oldest heifer,
Dinsmore Maxmost Estelle, was Grand
Champion Guernsey female of the F.F.
A. Show. I also had a first place win-
ner in the junior yearling class and the
heifer calf class. My winnings for show-
ing animals have totaled over $250.00.
"Because I want to learn all I can about
dairying, I have worked at a local milk
supply plant and learned to operate and
use a cream separator, milk clarifier, pas-


tuerizer, homogenizer, bottle washing
machine, bottling machine, and aerator.
I also operate and service our milking
and cooler box."
His plans for the future include at-
tending the University of Florida to study
Dairying and Agriculture and applying
for the American Farmer Degree. The
future looks bright for Billy, and be-
cause of him and many other Future
Farmers, this country's future looks
brighter too.

WARNING ON CATTLE MOVEMENT
OVER THE STATE LINE
Florida dairymen desiring to haul live
stock over the State line are warned of
regulations now being strictly enforced
by State line-crossing inspectors for the
movement of live stock and/or live stock
hauling equipment.
The live stock must have a health cer-
tificate and a Veterinary Certificate that
the truck has been steam-cleaned and
sterilized.


GEORGIA INCREASES MILK PRICE
The price of milk has just been in-
creased 2c a quart in Georgia due to
serious drought conditions and increased
feed costs. This brings the price through-
out Georgia to 27c per quart.


Dairy foods comprise almost 30% of
the food solids consumed by the average
American family. Yet the cost of dairy
foods absorbs only about 15% of the
family food dollar.


Bigger
Milk Checks S
Coast to coast Klenzade leads in easier,
speedier cleaning, milestone removal and
prevention, and lower bacteria counts.
The Klenzade Farm Quality Program brings
you dairyland's best liked cleaning and
sanitizing procedure fast, economical,
sure, and safe. For better cleaning and
sanitizing results, start now
WRITE with Klenzade tested.
FOR FREE proved, accepted . where-
DETAILS ever quality milk is pro
duced.
L r


FOR AUGUST, 1952 23


< \ The 9wBiOkA






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for Florida Citrus Pulp, Citrus Meal, Citrus Pellets and Citrus Molasses at
such a high level, we must all anticipate our needs and place our orders
early for these fine products . so rich in carbohydrates and essential
minerals necessary to stimulate milk production!


For full particulars, write Citrus Processors Asso-
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*Actual tests made at a
southern experimental
station show that sprinkler
irrigation on pastures
provide 33% more grazing.
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For complete information write Drawer N-8


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FLORIDA


In popular literature there has been,
and is considerable agitation to avoid all
processed foods and
S to obtain foods in as
natural a state as
possible. Milk is one
of the foods which
has been processed
in many ways. It has
b e e n pasteurized,
evaporated, con-
M densed and sweeten-
DR. ABBOTT ed, dried and frozen.
Moreover, modern
methods of processing and storage make
possible the serving of fluid milk that
varies in age from a few hours to many
days or even months. In many sections
daily delivery has been discontinued and
delivery every other day or twice a week
initiated. During the tourist season milk
shipped into Florida is heated prior to
shipment and pasteurized by the regular
method after arrival in the state. Dry
and evaporated milks are processed by
heat and stored for varying lengths of
time.
Since milk is still considered the most
important and necessary single food item,
any factor or factors that impair or de-
stroy its nutritive value should be known.
The effect of processing upon the nutri-
tive value of milk was studied by feeding
tests on white rats.
The rations used in these experiments
consisted of two-thirds ground whole
wheat and one-third milk, both computed
on the dry basis. The milks used were
raw and pasteurized, fed fresh and aged
for four days; non-fat milk solids also
fed fresh and aged over the summer
months without refrigeration, and evap-
orated milk. Vitamin A and fat were
added to diets containing non-fat milk
solids to bring these factors up to the
level found in whole fluid milk. The
supplementary fats used in these diets
were fresh and slightly rancid cottonseed
oil and butter.


As judged by weight, reproduction and
skeletal mineralization of rats, no signifi-
cant differences were found in the nutri-
tive values of raw or pasteurized milk,
evaporated milk, or of non-fat milk sol-
ids supplemented with vitamin A and
fat.
As shown by a decrease in weight
gains of rats, the nutritive value of the
non-fat milk solids-wheat diet was low-
ered when aged milk solids and slightly
rancid vegetable oil were fed as a part
of the milk-wheat diet. However, when
fresh milk solids and rancid oil were
used, weight gains were larger, but when
fresh milk solids and fresh oil were used,
the weight gains were approximately the
same as those made by rats fed fresh raw
milk and wheat.
There were no significant differences
in weights of rats when butter replaced
vegetable oil in the non-fat milk-wheat
diet.
Regardless of the type of milk fed in
the milk-wheat diets, healthy litters were
produced by all groups.
Roentgenograms made at the end of
13 weeks and again at maturity showed
that skeletal development and minerali-
zation of all rats fed the milk-wheat
diets were comparable to those of rats fed
the colony stock diet.
The final conclusion was that under
the conditions of these experiments and
when judged by weight, reproduction and
skeletal development and mineralization
of rats, the nutritive value of milk was
not affected by processing.

It is said that it took 300 words to
write the Declaration of Independence;
297 for the Ten Commandments; 226
for Lincoln's Gettysburg Address; 56 for
the Lord's Prayer; 23 for the two com-
mandments that compromise the Law of
God; but the 0. P. S. in setting the
price of Cabbage has used 26,911 words.
-"Market Bulletin".


24 0 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


Effect Of Processing Upon Value Of Milk
by Dr. O. D. ABBOTT
Head Department of Home Economics Research, University of Florida
and her associates, Mr. R. B. French and Mrs. Ruth Touwnsend
Review of an official nutrition research project at the University of Florida. The
complete printed report will be furnished upon request to the Florida Dairy News.


DAIRY
SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT





TAMPA ORLANDO








General Mills, Inc., Announces Promotions


Mr. W. L. Adams. President of the
Farm Service Division, General Mills,
Inc., has announced a recent change in
both the area organization and the per-
sonnel for the Florida District. Mr.
Adams, a former General Mills Florida
District Manager, issued the announce-
ment from Minneapolis as follows:
"It is with unusual pleasure that we
announce the following appointments ef-
fective July 1, 1952.
"R. E. Eikenberry has been appointed
District Manager for the Florida Dis-
trict. Rog has been with Farm Service
for twenty-one years serving in many
capacities, including
acquisition of a n d
supervision of t he
stores in the Sperry
Division, assistant to
the president of the
Farm Service Divi-
sion in Minneapolis, ,
and for the past sev-
en years assistant dis-
trict manager of the EIKENBERRY
Southeastern District.
We are confident that Rog will afford
the necessary direction for continued
growth and expansion of the Florida
stores.
"Frazier V. Rogers has been assigned
Manager of the Jacksonville store. Fraz-
ier is a graduate of the University of
Florida in agriculture and was an officer
in the Air Corps. He
established an excel-
lent record in sales
work at Jacksonville
where he was located
for several years.
During the past two
years and nine
months he has been
manager of the Tam-
pa store where he ROGERS
has been responsible
for many improvements in that opera-
tion.
"G. E. McGriff became the Store Man-
ager at Tampa replacing Mr. Rogers. He
is a graduate of the University of Flor-
ida. Emmett began his career as a sales-
man at Jacksonville.
From that position
he entered the Army
and was discharged
from the Quarter-
master Corps with a
rank of Major. He
has for some time
been established at 4
Tampa as a senior
outside salesman and McGRIFF
is well qualified for
the responsibilities that he now assumes."


"Carl Bridges, for many years mana-
ger of the Jacksonville store, has been
appointed District Manager of the newly
formed Virginia District, including Blue-
field, West Virginia; Herndon, and Rich-
mond, Virginia. Carl will establish head-
quarters at Bluefield.
Bridges leaves a host of friends in
Florida who wish him success and hap-
piness in his new assignment.


PRICES GOING HIGHER

Don Vincent, editor of the column
"Cattle Clatter" in the Orlando Sentinel,
recently had the following to say regard-
ing farm operation costs:
"Don't figure on prices going down
this year. USDA has come up with an
estimate that you'll pay 5-10 percent
more for farm labor; 6-8 percent more
for farm machinery; 4-5 percent more
for fertilizer; five percent more for build-
ing and fencing materials; and 3-4 per-
cent more in taxes on real and personal
property. As if you didn't know it,
USDA also records that crop production
costs have ben rising steadily since 1938."


disinfect all your
utensils thoroughly with


DIVERSOL








FOR FAST, ,
SAFE, EASY
DISINFECTINGi


THE DIVERSE CORPORATION
J. P. Boyce
519 E. Giddens, Tampa, Florida
E. E. Fulton
P. 0. Box 374, Jacksonville 1, Florida
J. E. Orris
200 N.W. 129th Street, Miami 38, Florida
G. Wrenshall
3207 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, Florida


Classified Advertising
RATE FOR ALL CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING IS 10c PER WORD

EMPLOYMENT FOR SALE (Cont.)
POSITION WANTED: Experienced young plant BE PROGRESSIVE THRU COOPERATION
manager desires position with progressive milk Investigate the advantages of selling your feed
company. Presently managing large New York bags Thru;
state bottling, cheese, ice cream plant. College THE DAIRY BAG COMPANY
degree. Experienced in manufacturing, receiving Operated by the management of
plants, farm inspection, laboratory methods, qual- THE MIAMI DAIRY EQUIPMENT EXCH.
ity control, sanitation, glass and paper equip- 769 N. W. 18th Terrace
ment, personnel management. Excellent refer- Miami 36, Fla. Phone 2-7188
ences. Write Florida Dairy News, Box 8-B.
EXPERIENCED ICE CREAM PLANT SUPER- FOR SALE-2 Heil Bottle Washers, Model HRE8
INTENDENT AND PRODUCTION MANAGER Ser. No. 1386 and Ser. No. 1387. 8 wide Model
wishes to locate in Florida. At present, pro- E, Heavy Duty Bottle Washers, purchased from
duction superintendent of 500,000 gal. plant in Heil Co., Washington, D. C., August 31, 1945.
Michigan. Married and have two children. Ref- Price $2,500.00 each. 1 Cherry-Burrel Gray Vac
erences. Please write Fla. Dairy News, Box A-8. 16. Bottle Filler and Capper with Vacuum, Serial
No. 349R (right hand) purchased June 31, 1944.
Price $1,400.00. This equipment is in good con-
FOR SALE edition and may be seen at Southern Dairies, Inc.,
62 N. E. 27th Street, Miami, Fla.
"ATTENTION DAIRYMEN" RANCH EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES-CATTLE
I handle the best young Tennessee Cows and WATERING TANKS. Ten-foot steel reinforced
heifers to be found. A fine selection on hand at Concrete, 21/ Feet wide. $60.00, delivered, $50.00
all times. your truck. Four foot wide tans, $80.00 and
I deliver top cows all over Florida. $70.00. Orlando Concrete Specialties. Box 6122,
W. C. TINSLEY, JR. Station 6, Orlando, Florida. Phones 3-4111, 3-9425.
Box 93 Lafayette, Alabama Phone 6431
DAIRY HERD FOR SALE: Consisting of 29
FOR SALE: 6000 Round Quart DACRO 45 Milk grade cows, 3 springer, 14 heifers and one
Bottles, (Short type). Also 1000 of the Tall 2-yr. old purebred Guernsey Bull. Herd is Bangs
type, All are used but clean. 0. W. Anderson free and now producing over 45 gallons a day.
Milk Bottle Exchange, 2115 Central Ave., St. Contact owner, Chandler Bamberg at Jasper,
Petersburg, Fla. Phone 7-76021. Florida.

WANTED TO BUY:
Dairy Equipment, Supplies, Livestock
Note: The Dairy News has been requested to make this
column available believing it may furnish a much needed
service. Send in your wants at regular classified rates.


FOR AUGUST, 1952 25







Florida Dairy Industry Ass'n
ALLIED TRADES MEMBERS
Special Advertising Section


ADAMS PACKING ASSN., INC.
Citrus Pulp. Citrus Meal, Citrus Molasses
Jim Coates, Sales Algr., lBy-Products Div.
Auburndale, Fla. Phone 8-7061

AMICA-BURNETT CHEM. &
SUPPLY CO.
Dairy IEquipiment and Supplies
Phone 4-5606
P. O. Box 2328, Jacksonville, Fla.

CHARLES DENNERY, INC.
IRe Cream Coating, Iruits and Flavors
Ia Stone- llotel Riviera Plaza
Miami Beach, Fla.

DIAMOND ALKALI COMPANY
Dairy Cleaner & Alkali
Florida Distributors:
Miller Machinery & Supply, Jax.
Industrial Chem. & Supply Co.,
Tampa

GENERAL MILLS, INC.
Dairy Equipment and Supplies
John W. Manning, Phone 9-4586
1601 Congress Bldg. Miami

GULF PAPER COMPANY, INC.
Ice Cream, (Literless) Cartoni, Butter Carton,
J. II. Alcl'oy
50 E. Magnolia St., Pensacola, Fla.

DOUGLAS J. HEADFORD
FLA. REPRESENTATIVE
Green Spot Orangeade Concentrate
Krim-Ko Chocolate Flavorings
F 616 jessaminie Ave. Phone 4356
Daytona Beach, Fla.

INTERNATIONAL PAPER CO.
Single Service Division
Purepatk Milk Containers
W. M. Scott
134 Peachtree St., Atlanta 3, Ga.

JIM JENNINGS,
MFRS. REPRESENTATIVE
Morning Glory Milk Powder
Camicide Insect Spray
"Eze" Orange Concentrate
Route 9, Box 356, Jacksonville, Fla.

JIFFY MANUFACTURING CO.
Insulated Bags and Liners
Southern Representative-William Romaine
Box 5463, 5 Pts. Sta., Columbia, S. C.

ROBERT A. JOHNSTON CO.
Dairy Chocolate & Cocoa Products
J. L. Hammons Ph. Dearborn 2811
507 Nelson Ferry Rd., Decatur, Ga.


PATRONIZE
FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS
ADVERTISERS


KLENZADE PROGRAMS
PROMINENT IN MILK
AND FOOD SANITATION

Klenzade Products, Inc. this year is
celebrating its 20th year in the field of
sanitation. Their development of sanita-


tion programs for
the various branches
of the milk and food
industries has won
national recognition.
The Annual Educa-
tion Seminar, con-
ducted by the Klen-
zade Organization, is
considered one of
t
i
t


f




SALONS
SALMON


he outstanding san-
tation meetings in
his country.
Mr. Hans Ahle-
eldt, Jacksonville,
la., is District Man-
ager of Klenzade
Products and in the
Miami area, Mr. Ray
Salmons is the repre-
sentative.


SCHAEFER'S GORDON WRIGHT
ATTENDS FLORIDA CONVENTION
William Gordon Wright, district fac-
tory representative for Schaefer, Inc.,
Minneapolis, who has been regular in at-
tendance at F.D.I.A.
Conventions for sev-
eral years, was on
hand for the 1952
meeting, June 11-13,
in Miami Beach.
Mr. Wright dis-
played considerable
enthusiasm for Shae-
fer's new line of Ice
Cream Merchandis- WRIGHT
ing Cabinets.

CURTISS BREEDER SERVICE AVAILABLE
IN JACKSONVILLE AREA
The famous Curtiss Candy Livestock
Farms of Cary, Illinois have announced
the establishing in the Jacksonville area
of daily artificial breeding service from
their famous dairy and beef sires.
Breeds included in the service are
Guernsey, Jersey, Holstein, Brown Swiss,
Ayrshire, Aberdeen Angus, Short Horn
and Milking Short Horn.
Official distributor and technician for
the service is Mr. Bill Zimmerman, a
graduate of Curtiss Candy Farms Artifi-
cial Insemination College. Mr. Zimmer-
man can be reached at Jacksonville, phone
6-9243, or by mail temporarily to 220
Newnan Street, Jacksonville.


Florida Dairy Industry Ass'n
ALLIED TRADES MEMBERS
Special Advertising Section


KIECKHEFER CONTAINER CO.,
're-Pal Paper MJ' ilk Bottles
1I. ]. Evans-,l.A KnowCes
Phone 6-1334
4700 Pearl St., Jacksonville, Fla.

KLENZADE PRODUCTS, INC.
Chenicals for Dairy and Food Plant
Sanitation H. B. Ahlefeldt
Union Term'l Whse., Jacksonville, Fla.

S. H. MAHONEY EXTRACT CO.
Vanilla Products
1). C. Mulligan, Florida Representative
221 E. Cullerton Rd., Chicago 16, III.


NASH-KELVINATOR CORPN.
ICE CREAM CABINETS
Wmin. C. Mayfield
788 Spring St., N. W. Atlanta, Ga.


NATIONAL PECTIN PRODUCTS CO.
Ie Creamn Stabili'rs Eimulsifiers.
Pectin Stabili/ers for ices, shcrlerts & fruits.
J. C. Head, Phone Norfolk, Va. 2-8385
RFD No. 1, Box 48, Bayside, Va.

OWENS-ILLINOIS GLASS CO.
Duraglas Milk Bottles
C. \V. Parmalce C. N. Comstotok
1102 Barnett Bldg., Jax. 2, Fla.
Phone 6-881i8

PAUL-LEWIS LABORATORIES, INC.
Lartivasc-l-or the Prevention off xidized flavor
in b/iilti milk, ire creani storage cream
Also lienniel't l.xtra(i-Sir Sirloin, Inc.
765 N. W. 54th St., Miami 37, Fla.

RIVERSIDE MANUFACTURING CO.
MOULTRIE, GA.
Alaslerlill Uniform,
Janmes A. Stewart P'lone 3-3287
306 Lakeview Ave., Apt. 406, Orlando

SCHAEFER INC.
Ice Cteani Cabinets, Frozen Food Cabinets
IV. G. lWright Plhone 4201
333 Harbor Drive, Venice, Fla.

STANDARD PACKAGING CORPN.
Tamper I'ioo/ Seal.-Fllexible fIacuoum Packages
Iiner Materials
Larry Hodge
1121 duPont Bldg., Miami, Fla.

THATCHER GLASS MFG. GO., INC.
Glass Milk Containers
W. T. LOVE, Florida Representative
3126 Westfield Rd.-Charlotte 7,N.C.

UNIVERSAL MILKING MACHINE
DIVISION
Pail-less (Pipe line) Milking Machines
R. D. Archer-Factory Rep.-Ph. 84-7467
1100 N.E. 134 St., No. Miami, Fla.


26 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS





0 0 000000000000
YOU CAN SEE THE DIFFERENCE
WHEN YOU POUR UP YOUR MILK





I.:


The real advantages of a quality dairy feed such
as SECURITY is measured by the gallons of milk
produced-pounds of milk per cow. This is the
determining factor in dairy profits.
Feed SECURITY and watch milk production in-
crease.


_tl







i10'I sVF7eGSI ~BICC7ER w sq...


VuS\A 'A cb ctoctr oiyvoiif4iodplk


Dari-Rich must be the best . because it's America's largest-
selling chocolate drink! Customers love Dari-Rich's extra-delicious,
extra-rich goodness . come back for more! Easily mixed . .
unvarying color and flavor. Priced for your profit. Order now
from one of General Mills' offices listed below . or write
Bowey's, Inc., 771 Bedford Avenue, Brooklyn 5, New York. Then,
stand back . and watch your sales records sky-rocket!


EXCLUSIVE FLORIDA DISTRIBUTORS

/ I GENERAL MILLS
2 Riverside Avenue, JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
7275 N. W. 7th Avenue, MIAMI, FLORIDA
77 W. Livingston St., ORLANDO, FLORII)A
i ir 711 W. Cass Street, TAMPA, FLORIDA



o MILLION-DOLLAR CHECK





\ro a-a WRITE YOUR OWN CHECK
L _o.~ \00.000 A sheet of these checks is
'. .- \\ bound in this issue, thanks
---- to the fine cooperation of
'T 0/ ,the publishers.
-- MAKE IT $1,000,000o00
lT' Sk Spread the news of Florida's golden
Opportunities. Send MILLION-
ol DOLLAR CHECKS to your friends,
5 and you'll be...
--" [ ^ ,,/ H Here's the latest Florida Power & Light adyo ll
Company promotion for helping increase
summer business in Florida million-dollar vaca-
tion checks to send to friends and relatives up north.
This check is one of a series of year-round promotions p
aimed at selling ALL FLORIDA to more and more
SFpcoplR...boWh tourists and resiGdcnts.
FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY Ravic
e bothioorits andrcsidnrs CUNSIN




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