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 Back Cover














Title: Florida dairy news
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00082035/00011
 Material Information
Title: Florida dairy news
Physical Description: 12 v. : illus. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Dairy Industry Association
Publisher: Cody Publications for Florida Dairy Industry Association.
Place of Publication: Kissimmee Fla
Publication Date: April-May 1952
Frequency: bimonthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Dairying -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Cattle   ( lcsh )
Milk   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-12, no. 1; Nov. 1950-Spring, 1962.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00082035
Volume ID: VID00011
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01386090
issn - 0426-5696

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Main
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Advertising
        Page 26
    Back Cover
        Page 27
        Page 28
Full Text





























































New Dairy Laboratory Building, University of Florida



IN THIS ISSUE: Dairy Dept. Univ. of Florida Annual bairy Field Day, May 1- 2 4-H State Dairy
Show F.D.I.A. Convention, June 11-13 Dr. Haskell on Milk Saditation Lawton on Dairy Pastures
..* ". .. .... .:.;.,:.".", "; .: . '...'.,.. ..^ . .".. i.: ..ii : ^.S: ..:: .. ..; "'. :s" .:i.: i "". i'v ..". ".. i-:;...:.. ..:._....-... .. *. *.*i : -









4. MILKING COW
In her fifth lactation,
she has given 10,101
pounds of milk and
298 pounds of fat in
286 days on Purina
Cow Chow. During
her last lactation she
gave 9954 pounds of
milk.




3. HEIFER
Only 16 months old.
Has made plenty of
growth on Purina D. &
F. Chow. Already
weighs about 800
pounds, and will fresh-
en this fall.


I 4. MILKING COWS 1. DRY COWS I


IL 3. HEIFERS


2. CALVES


z' Mwe JjLW.


Je C. IriceOF ORLANDO

GETS 3 3 GALLONS AVERAGE ON PURINA


Mr. J. C. Trice of RFD 6, Box 279, Orlando, has
been in the dairy business all of his life-the past
five years in Orlando. He is president of the Central
Florida Milk Producers Association, and a charter
member (on the Board of Directors) of the Orange
County Breeders Association.
Mr. Trice is milking 251 cows and sending an
average of 7000 pounds of 4.2 per cent milk daily to
Perfection Cooperative Dairies. This averages almost


3 1/3 gallons from every cow standing in the milking
line! He is 100 per cent on the Purina program-
feeding Purina Cow Chow, D. & F. Chow and Calf
Startena.
Low milk prices make efficient production an
absolute necessity, according to Trice. That's why
he feeds Purina and keeps complete herd records
under his DHIA.


RALSTON PURINA COMPANY


MIAMI


* TAMPA


2 0 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


1. DRY COW
A grade Holstein with
four lactations. Fed for
two months dry period
on Purina D. & F.
Chow. Last year she
gave 12,910 pounds of
milk and 426 pounds
of fat in 339 days.





2. CALF
Born January 6. When
picture was taken, she
weighed 225 pounds at
2 months 18 days. She
had 150 pounds of Calf
Startena, with 300
pounds of milk in first
month only.


1 ~F1

~FL


%
E


400


1*ft


0mmm,111 mommmmm mmm mmm











EDITORIALS


Why Do We Have Inflation?
A PROMINENT Democratic member of the U. S. Senate recently asserted that the
policies forced on the Federal Reserve Board brought on a kick upwards of prices
and brought on inflation after the Korean war started.
The Secretary of the Treasury immediately denied the assertion at a joint
Senate-House investigation into the government's monetary policy.
Inflation doesn't just happen. Something causes it. Not the least of the
reasons is the ever-mounting cost of government.
For example take these comparative budget figures of 1940 and those proposed
for 1952-1953.
In 1940 the Commerce Department's burget called for $51.5 million; in 1953
it is asking $931.2 million, or an increase of 1,709 per cent.
In 1940, the Interior Department's budget stood at $98.8 million. For 1953
the Administration proposed $686 million, or an increase of 584 per cent.
In 1940 the Labor Department asked for $30.9 million. For 1953 it demands
$253.8 million, or an increase of 720 per cent.
In 1940 the Justice Department had a budget of $50.5 million. Today it seeks
$188.8 million, or an increase of 273 per cent.
In 1940 the State Department's budget stood at $16.5 million. For the coming
fiscal year, it wants $335 million, or an increase of 1934 per cent.
Does it not seem reasonable to conclude that much of the fuel for inflation
is wrapped up in how much more, how staggeringly much more, it is costing the
people to maintain their government today than what it did ten years ago?


Something Can Be Done, Vote!
If our representative form of government is to survive, we Americans must take
a deeper and more active interest in our government.
This need is certainly emphasized by a report on participation in the last
Congressional and presidential election which states that:
"The 82nd Congress was elected by less than 44 per cent of the eligible
citizens voting.
"Only 52 per cent of the eligible voters took part in the 1948 presidential
election."
What can be done about such a dangerous lack of interest in our government?
First, as American citizens, we must register and VOTE ourselves. Second,
we must go a step further. Each of us can encourage all other citizens-employees,
members of community groups, everyone-to use their precious birthright of the
"VOTE".

At present 38 of the 48 states have more federal than state employees. Exam-
ple: Alabama 17,200 state to 49,537 federal . California 75,700 state to 252,249
federal . New Jersey 23,100 state to 53,875 federal.


The Dairy News Moves To Jacksonville
Beginning with the current issue, the Florida Dairy News has a new home at
one of Jacksonville's oldest and finest printing and publishing establishments, The
Miller Press.
This change from The Cody Publications Press in Kissimmee, Florida, was
deemed advisable because of the convenience and necessity of bringing the editorial
and publishing offices together at the headquarters of the sponsor and publisher, the
Florida Dairy Industry Association.
The sponsors and the editor of Dairy News are indebted to Mr. Al Cody,
President of Cody Publications, and his entire staff for their splendid cooperation and
assistance during the past year and a half in establishing and maintaining the excel-
lent standard which it enjoys.


VOL. 2 NO. 4


APRIL, 1952


THE
FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS
E. T. LAY, Editor & Business Manager


Official Publication of
Florida Dairy Industry Ass'n
THEO DATSON, President
E. T. LAY, Executive Director
WILMER BASSETT, Chairman
Florida Dairy News Committee
Florida Guernsey Cattle Club
EARL JOHNSON, President
Florida Association
of Milk Sanitarians
LEWIS T. SMITH, President

Florida Dairy Industry Associa-
tion Directors
Producers
FRANK B. DOUB, Jacksonville
VERNON GRAVES, Limona
C. RAY JOHNSON, St. Petersburg
GEORGE F. JOHNSON, West Palm Beach
LASKEY FOSTER, Cantonment
Producer-Distributors
WILMER BASSETT, Monticello
FREEMAN HALES, Opa Locka
HERMAN BURNETT, Bradenton
J. N. MCARTHUR, Miami
H. CODY SKINNER, Jacksonville
Distributors
THEO DATSON, Orlando
CLIFF D. WAYNE, Miami
GORDON NIELSEN, West Palm Beach
W. J. BARRITT, JR., Tampa
A. E. (JACK) JOHNSON, Jacksonville
Additional Directors
O. L. BOBO, President "Alligator Club"
Jacksonville
SAM SOLOMON, SR., Honorary Director
Quincy
THE FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS is
published monthly by the Florida Dairy
Industry Association, 220 Newnan St.,
Jacksonville, Florida. Subscription price
of $1.00 for two years. Entered as
second class mail at the Post Office at
Jacksonville, Fla., under Act of March
3, 1879, as amended.
Advertising rates furnished upon re-
quest.
Business and Editorial office 220
Newnan Street, Jacksonville.
Member Florida Press Association
NATIONAL EDITORIAL

FOR ARIL, 1 2 O


FOR APRIL, 952 3


111111




























ASTURE and hay provide the
cheapest feed for all classes of
livestock-and are real labor-savers
to boot.
Comparative studies indicate the
response from fertilizer on grass-
lands is as great, or greater, as on
any other crop grown. One ton of
fertilizer produces enough grass,
when properly utilized, to give 1000
pounds of beef or 8000 pounds of
milk. At today's prices this means
a big return from every dollar in-
vested in fertilizer.
Look over your pasture-and fig-
ure how much more profit better
pastures can put in your pocket.
DEPEND ON GULF for special-
formula pasture fertilizers.


There's a GULF Field Represent-
ative in your section. He'll be glad
to recommend a grass-making
program-ask him to call. If you
don't know him, write direct and
your inquiry will receive prompt
attention.




GUL F


FERTI iZERS


The GULF FERTILIZER COMPANY
Tampa and Port Everglades, Fla.


For Our Youth Readers


Your Future Is What You Make It
NOTE: This is the third of a series of discussions on "Choosing Your Vocation." It is of
interest to both youth and parents.


TESTING YOUR VOCATIONAL
CHOICE
Previous discussions one and two (Feb-
ruary and March) have covered the ques-
tions of "What you like to do and what
you care to do best, and the yardsticks of
"Contentment and income," for measur-
ing your vocational selection.
Before taking up the question of test-
ing your vocational choice, we will point
out that another important thing to con-
sider in selecting your vocation is that
of "Opportunity," both in the work you
select and the location you select.
Is your chosen vocational field over-
crowded? Does it continuously add to
the nation's wealth and welfare-or is it
the kind which produces items or services
that are popular only when people have
extra money to spend?
Apply this also to what you have to
offer: Do you think you have outstand-
ing talents in your chosen field or have
you merely the minimum talents which
will enable you to get along during the
company's prosperous times only?
Location may be a very important fac-
tor to you in applying these yardsticks.
Both average wages and living expenses
vary widely in different sections of the
country.
In some communities, opportunities in
the field you have chosen may be more
limited and advancement slower, but liv-
ing conditions may be more pleasant.
Now let us consider the testing of your
vocational choice.
HAVE YOU DECIDED ON A PAR-
TICULAR VOCATION? Give your
choice a practical test. Plan a project to
find out more about this occupation-to
prove to yourself whether your choice is
right or wrong for you. Use the yard-
sticks as your guide in your research, as
you-
Read a number of books and trade
magazines in the field.
Visit the farm, factory, office or
institution where people are working in
this vocation.
Interview men in your chosen field


to check what skills and efforts are re-
quired and what are the good and bad
points of the work.
Make notes of your findings.
Start a work kit, an envelope or
folder in which you will keep all the
vocational information you have acquired.
In this also you should keep all the notes
you have made about yourself, your inter-
ests, records and even notations about
brief, part-time and summer jobs. This
kit will prove your storehouse of ammu-
nition later when you start job-hunting.
Write an outline or article describ-
ing your chosen vocation. By compelling
yourself to organize the material you have
collected, you will make it more valuable
to you in the future.
Evaluate your findings by discussing
them with someone in whom you have
confidence. You may find in the process
of your research that your choice is not
at all what you thought it would be.
If, after completing your investigation,
your occupational choice is still the same,
you are ready to test it further. If pos-
sible, get a summer job in your chosen
work or a related field and try out your
theories. When you talk with your pros-
pective employer, ask him what qualities
he looks for in applicants for jobs and
what it takes to advance in this work.
Add to your knowledge as you go, so that
whether or not you land the particular
job you have in mind, it will be a profit-
able experience.
On the other hand, you can develop
a hobby along your chosen line. If your
choice should be newspaper work, start
your own small newspaper in your club,
church or school. If you wish to enter
business, why not try a small enterprise
of your own? You will find out by ac-
tual experience whether you really like
the work.
4-H Club and F.F.A. Members are
fortunate in the opportunities they have
of trying their hand at various specialized
forms of agricultural and livestock farm-
ing before they are ready to enter college
for specialized training in their chosen
field.
(Continued next issue)


4 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


I









Annual Dairy Field Day Meeting


Set For May 1-2, In Gainesville


"One of the most beneficial programs
ever planned for the Dairy Field Day" is
the way F.D.I.A. Field Day Committee
Chairman Herman Burnett describes the
program for the 17th
Annual Dairy Field
7 Day.
The final finishing
touches on the pro-
gram were completed
at a meeting of the
4. Program Committee
and Staff Members
.f of the University of
Florida Dairy De-
H. BURNETT apartment, March 25
in Gainesville.
Mr. Burnett points out that the 1952
program has been streamlined to the
most practical and pressing problem of
Florida Dairymen today . "that of
feed and pasture production."
An examination of the accompanying
summary of the program should convince
Florida Dairy herd and farm owners or
managers that they should take advan-
tage of this opportunity to spend a part
of two days at the State University Ex-
periment Farm to see at first hand and
hear from both our University Farm Ex-
perts and other practical and successful
Dairymen, the latest and most practical
ideas and methods of producing Dairy
pastures and feeds.
On the program will be heard Uni-
versity of Florida Officials: Dr. Miller,
President; Dr. Reitz, Provost for Agricul-
ture; Bill Fifield, Director of Experiment
Stations; Dr. Fouts and Dr. Marshall of
the Dairy Department; Mr. H. G. Clay-
ton, Director, and C. W. Reaves, Exten-
sion Dairyman of the Florida Agricul-
tural Extension Service.
The popular Farm Machinery Exhibit
and Demonstration by members of the
Farm Equipment Association will again
be a feature of the program.
The Annual Dinner program, with its
good fellowship, entertainment, the pre-
senting of annual Dairy Achievement
Awards, and important messages from
our State University Executives, has in
recent years been regarded as an out-
standing annual event for Florida Dairy-
men.
All Florida Dairymen are urged to at-
tend.
Allied Trades Members are invited and
have scheduled a special meeting at the
Hotel Thomas at 6:00 P.M., May 1st.
Members of the F.D.I.A. Field Day
Committee are as follows:


Herman Burnett, Chairman, Bradenton;
John Hentz, Panama City; Thomas G.
Lee, Orlando; Frank B. Doub, Jackson-
ville; Syd Lenfestey, Tampa; C. W.
Reaves, Gainesville; Will Nolan, Jack-
sonville; Wilmer Bassett, M. -,1-".b Bill
Kendall, Tampa; Carl Reiger, Miami;
Dr. E. L. Fouts, Gainesville; Dr. R. B.
Becker, Gainesville; A. R. Hutchinson,
Orlando; George Edmondson, Nokomis;
Paul M. Hood, St. Petersburg; George F.
Johnson, West Palm Beach; W. J. Har-
man, Jr., Gainesville; Jim D. Barritt,
Tampa; Herman Boyd, Miami; Wilbur
J. Casey, Clearwater; Glenn Datson, Or-
lando; Joseph F. Harper, Jacksonville;
Henry D. Perry, Miami; D. Wayne
Webb, Tampa; Albert S. Lawton, Jack-
sonville; Laskey Foster Cantonment.


FARM MACHINERY EXHIBIT
IS FIELD DAY FEATURE
Allen Hutchinson, Secretary of the
Farm Equipment Association, has ad-
vised the Field Day Committee that it
will be their intention this year to have
the maximum variety of machinery on
display with a minimum in quantity so
that every one of the dealers present will
have an opportunity to point out the fea-
tures of his equipment in a minimum
length of time.

F.D.I.A. DIRECTORS TO MEET
President Theo Datson has announced
that the Board of Directors of the Dairy
Industry Association have scheduled their
regular quarterly meeting to be held in
Gainesville at the time of the Field Day
Meeting which will enable them to par-
ticipate in the meeting as well as to hold
their Annual Conference with President
Miller and the Dairy Department Staff
of the University.

HOTEL RESERVATIONS
Hotel reservations for the night of
May 1st should be made direct and with-
out delay to the Hotel Thomas and the
Hotel Whitehouse, Gainesville. The
Hotels have been requested to arrange
Motor Court reservations for those who
request them and for any the Hotels can-
not take care of. The Hotel Thomas will
as usual serve as Field Day headquarters.


FIELD DAY PROGRAM
THEME: Dairy Feed Production
Thursday-May 1, 1952
MORNING
10:00 Opening Registration-Hotel
Thomas.
12:00 Early Bird Lunch-Hotel Thomas.
12:00 Opening Registration Dairy
Research Unit.
AFTERNOON
1:30 Welcome-U. of F. President
J. Hillis Miller.
Response-F.D.I.A. President
Theo Datson.
2:00 Tour and Inspection of Dairy Re-
search Unit, Pastures and Dairy
Herd.
Farm Machinery Exhibit and
Demonstrations by Farm Equip-
ment Association Members.
EVENING
6:00 Allied Trades Meeting-Hotel
Thomas.
6:30 Annual Dinner and Program-
Auspices, Florida Dairy Industry
Ass'n.
U. of F. Student Service Center.
Friday, May 2, 1952
MORNING
7:00 Breakfast Committee Meetings.
9:00 Meeting Opens-Student Service
Center, U. of F.
9:00 "My Experience in Pasture Irriga-
tion."
9:25 Discussion of Pasture Problems.
9:50 Research Work at University in
Hay Drying.
10:00 Hay Drying on Farms.
10:20 Recess.
10:30 Making and Storing Silage:
Results With New-Type Silos.
10:50 Methods of Making Silage.
11:15 What Florida Dairy Farms Con-
tribute to Feed Supply.
12:00 Noon-Lunch.
1:15 Open House, Dairy Products Lab-
oratory.


RESEARCH UNIT-OPEN HOUSE
FOR "EARLY BIRDS"
There will be a special pre-regis-
tration open house at the Dairy Re-
search Unit from 12 to 1:30 Thurs-
day, May 1, 1952.
The milking herd will be in the
barn, the newly -acquired Guern-
seys will be on display and build-
ings and other facilities will be
ready for your inspection.


FOR APRIL, 1952 5









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


DAIRY REVIEW


Extension Service
Dairy Farm Research Unit


Dairy Producit Laboratory
Agricultural Experiment Station


111111


University of Florida Dairy Department

Provides Modern Dairy Training

and Research -


by DR. E. L. FOUTS
Head of Deparlltelnt
The Department of Dairy Science is a
part of the Florida Agricultural Experi-
ment Station and the College of Agricul-
ture. Its functions are
to conduct research,
the results of which
will be useful to
those people in Flor-
3 ida and other states
interested in dairying
and to teach and
train students in the
science of dairying.
DR. FouTS Both general fields
of dairying, that is,
dairy production and manufacturing, are
fully covered. The staff does some ex-
tension work and the equipment and phy-
sical facilities of the department also are
used for demonstration purposes.
The academic staff of the Department
of Dairy Science at the University of
Florida and Florida Agricultural Experi-
ment Station is comprised of eight men:
P. T. Dix Arnold, R. B. Becker, E. L.
Fouts, W. A. Krienke, S. P. Marshall,
L. E. Mull, H. H. Wilkowske and J. M.
Wing. These men were born in Alabama,
Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Okla-
homa, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin. Their
ages are 31, 34, 36, 41, 45, 49, 51 and
59, the average being 43 years. These
men studied in preparation for their
work in dairying in colleges and univer-
sities in Colorado, Florida, Illinois, Indi-
ana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Minnesota,
Missouri, New York, North Carolina,
Oklahoma and Texas. A total of 60
years of specialized study, an average of
71/2 years per man, has prepared each
man in this group well for the work he
is doing. Five of the men hold the Ph.D.
degree; the other three have M. S. de-
grees. Additional graduate work is in
progress by some of the men. In addi-
tion, the men in this group have been
employed in some phase of dairying, in


dairy plants, on dairy farms, in teaching
or research in California, Colorado, Flor-
ida, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Iowa, Min-
nesota, New York, Oklahoma, South
Carolina and Texas for a total of 124
years, an average of 151/2 years per man.
Most of the men have spent some time
in the service of their country in the
Army, Navy or Air Corps in either
World Wars I or II, providing oppor-
tunities for extensive travel in many
parts of th- world.
This all adds up to a well trained
group of men with a breadth of view
and vision, who are bringing to the Uni-
versity of Florida and thus to the dairy
people of the state of Florida a wealth
of experience and training in dairying.
This experience and training has been
gleaned from living, working and study-


ing in the great dairy areas in the United
States, extending from coast to coast and
border to border (see map).
In addition to the academic staff of
the Department of Dairy Science many
others are employed to carry on the work
of the department. The picture showing
the larger group includes, in addition to
the academic staff, the budgeted employ-
ees at the Dairy Products Laboratory and
at the Dairy Farm at Hague. It includes
such workers at the Laboratory as Plant
Manager, Foreman, Mechanic, Assistants
and Secretaries; at the Farm, Herdsman,
Farm Foreman, and Secretary. Mr. C. W.
Reaves, Extension Dairyman, is included
in this group. While Mr. Reaves is em-
ployed by the Extension Division he
works closely with the members of our
staff, and we claim him as one of our
group. He grew up on a dairy farm,
worked as a Dairy Herd Improvement
Association supervisor, and served as As-
sistant Extension Dairyman in Tennessee
prior to coming to Florida.
(Continued on Page 7)


Cover Picture
The latest picture of the Dairy
Science Building, University of
Florida, is carried on the Dairy
News Cover for April to accom-
pany the story on this page, and
honoring Dr. E. L. Fouts, head of
the Dairy Science Department, and
his popular staff members pictured
below.


The Academic Staff and group of people holding key positions in the Depart-
ment of Dairy Science, University of Florida.
Left to right:
Back Ron'-W. J. Leukel, Orin E. Teuton. P. T. Dix Arnold. Dr. E. L. Fouts,
D. A. Dahlberg, Thomas A. Bruce, Jr.. IF. A. Krienke.
Middle Row-Dr. R. B. Becker, Dr. Sidney P. Marshall, Pauline Layne, Edna
Haufler. Mary Frances Mays. Irene Bryant. A. B. Sanchez.
Front Row--C. WI. Reaves. Dr. H. H. Wilkowske, H. L. Somers, James M.
Wing. Frederick Doster. Dr. L. E. Mull.


6 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS







Dairy Department
University of Florida
In addition to this group there are two
full-time employees at the Laboratory and
ten to fifteen students working part time
to gain experience in their field of study
and to pay part of their expenses while
in school. There are ten men employed
full time at the Farm, eight of whom
live with their families in houses pro-
vided by the department.
At the present time the herd consists
of approximately 214 animals, including
five bulls, 105 cows, 104 heifers and
calves, 26 being Guernseys and 188 be-
ing Jerserys. The Dairy Unit is located
on 1,200 acres of farm land 11 miles
north of Gainesville, with several soil
types and conditions being represented.
Excellent buildings and facilities are
available for study and experimentation.
The Dairy Products Laboratory is fully
equipped with modern dairy processing
machinery and has complete laboratory
facilities for teaching and research. It is
located on the University campus. The
milk from the farm is brought to the
laboratory each day. It is pasteurized,
bottled and delivered to the Food Units
on the campus where it is consumed by
students. Ice cream and other dairy prod-
ucts also are made in the laboratory.
The research program in dairy manu-
facturing has centered around projects
which had for their purpose the improve-
ment of the quality of dairy products and
improvement in the processes involved in
the manufacture of dairy products.
Through the years, projects have con-
sidered some of the factors involved in
the manufacture of ice cream, studies on
the composition of milk produced in
Florida, and methods for the manufac-
ture of cottage cheese and cultured but-
termilk. The most recent project has
been a study of the effect of antibiotics,
such as penicillin and aureomycin used
in the treatment of mastitis, on the re-
sulting milk when used for cheesemaking
and fermented milk products.
The research at the dairy farm has con-
sidered the effect of certain feeds on
milk flavor; mineral requirements of
dairy cattle; a study of the ensilability of
Florida forages, factors affecting breed-
ing efficiency and depreciation in Florida
dairy herds; relation of conformation and
anatomy of the dairy cow to her milk and
butterfat production; a study of Napier
grass for pasture purposes; effect of aure-
omycin feeding upon the performance of
dairy calves; development and function
of the bovine stomach; and many other
projects.
(Coll/inued on Page 24)


The De Laval Combine Milker


AND REFRIGERATED FARM TANK



CUT COSTS...INCREASE PROFITS


*The De Laval Combine Milker and refrigerated farm tank comprise
a single milk producing unit which provides a straight flow of milk
from cow to pickup tanker-without handling!


Milking the greatest number of cows with the least amount of
help ... getting the milk from the farm to the milk plant at lowest
cost and with minimum handling.., producing higher quality
milk and getting paid for all of it...cutting down the loss and
waste of rejected milk-these and many other advantages are
being enjoyed right new by dairymen using the De Laval
Combine Milker with refrigerated farm tank.
This De Laval Combine Milking system is truly straight-line
milk production with every bit of non-profitable walking, carry-
ing, pouring, straining and can handling eliminated. Write for
the full story today. P. S. Bulk tank pickup... elimination of the
milk plant receiving room... the end of can handling, repairs
and washing and other economies are facts for milk plant
operators to study and consider. Write for Bulletin SA 769.


*At the milk plant the pickup tanker ties directly into the plant milk
line and becomes, in effect, the holding tank and receiving room.
The savings to both milk producer and processor are obvious.


THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR CO., DEPT.
SPOUGHKEEPSIE, NEW YORK B-35
Please send me printed matter on:
J i A I The De Laval Model F Combine Milker
THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR COMPANY with Refrigerated Farm Tank
POUGHKEEPSIE, NEW YORK Name ....................................
427 Randolph Street, Chicago 6, III. Town.............. ....RFD ...............State.................
61 Beale Street, San Francisco 5, Calif. --

FOR APRIL, 1952 7







State 4-H Dairy Show

r Reported Best to Date


e'3






iii ~
E


U



, ii S~i^ ^*


by C. W. REAVES, Extension Dairyman
The best and largest number of 4-H
Dairy cattle from all sections of the state
were shown in the 1952 State 4-H Dairy
Show at Orlando the week of February
25. Competition was strong in all classes.
The registered Jersey calf class consisted
of 17 animals and the junior yearling
heifer class of 15 entries. There was also
strong competition in the registered
Guernsey classes and in the grade divi-
sions of each breed.
The Best County Group class was
headed by the three animals representing
St. Johns County, followed in order by
Polk, Jackson, Volusia, Duval, Orange,
Pinellas and Gadsden Counties. In all,
20 counties participated in the Show and
Judging Contest. Grand Champion Jer-
sey was the junior yearling belonging to
Virginia Stuart of Bartow. Reserve Grand
Champion belonged to Steve Simmons of
St. Johns County. Senior Champion Reg-
istered Jersey belonged to Wesley Smith
also of St. Johns County.
Grand Champion Registered Guernsey
was shown by Patricia Ellis of Nassau
County, while the Reserve Grand Cham-
pion was shown by Jack Dodd of Orange
County. Marilyn and Linda Jacobs of
Volusia County owned the Grand and
Reserve Grand Champions, respectively
in the Registered Ayrshire Show. Grand
and Reserve Grand Champion Holsteins
were shown by Wade Edwards and Teddy

Pictures from top to bottom:
Dr. Sidney Marshall, Dairy Husband-
man of University of Florida, who judged
the show.
Patricia Ellis, Nassau County, with her
grand champion Dinsmore Mayroyal
Vern.
Wade Edwards of Dade County, with
his Senior Champion Holstein Cow.
Wesley Smith, St. Johns, with his Sen-
ior Champion registered Jersey.
The Alvarez brothers, Warren and Ray-
mond, showing the two registered Jersey
calves, which were donated and sold at
auction for benefit of the European
travel fund for Florida's U. S. Cham-
pionship 4-H Dairy Judging team.
Right hand column, top: Virginia
Stuart of Bartow shows her grand cham-
pion female Jersey Draconis Signal Bet-
ty, which also won the title of "Queen"
of the 1952 West Coast Dairy Show.
St. John's County group which won the
Florida Dairy Industry Association Tro-
phy.


8 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


Kretzschmar, respectively, both from
Dade County. A list of the Blue Ribbon
winners in each of the registered and
grade divisions of each breed are given
elsewhere.
In the Dairy Cattle Judging Contest,
Nassau, St. Johns, Pinellas, Duval and
Polk County teams took the first five
places. High individuals in order were
Patricia Ellis, Nassau; George Gordon,
Dade; Dan Rousseau, Palm Beach; Bev-
erly Simmons, St. Johns; and Buddy
Sever, Pinellas.
Warren Alvarez of Jacksonville won
first in the Showmanship Contest fol-
lowed by Patricia Ellis, Nassau; Jack
Dodd, Orange; Ginger Stuart, Polk; and
Margie Bell, Dade. The Fitting Contest
was won by Marcus Eastman of Orange
County with Steve Simmons, of St. Johns
County, in second.
A number of trophies were provided
by various dairy organizations, breeders,
newspapers and other business firms. The
trophy for the much sought after Best
County Group was provided by the Flor-
ida Dairy Industry Association. Plaques
for second and third County Groups were
provided by Sixma's Dairy, Lake Helen,
and Steve Simmons, of St. Johns County.
Trophies for the top three Judging Teams
were provided by the Florida Times-
Union, T. Stin Haselton, and the Orlando
Sentinel Star. The state and national










4-H Dairy Show

purebred breed associations provided spe-
cial awards for champions in their respec-
tive breeds. Dinsmore Dairy provided
the trophy for the best fitted animal and
the American Saving Building and Loan
Association of Orlando provided the
plaque for the Champion Showman.
The premium list for the Show was
provided by the Central Florida Exposi-
tion and the State Department of Agri-
culture. The Dairy Show Day was ended
by a banquet given by the Central Flor-
ida Exposition honoring the 4-H Dairy
Club members. The awards were pre-
sented at this time. The banquet was at-
tended by over 200 club members, their
county and home demonstration agents,
show officials, representatives of the Cen-
tral Florida Exposition and the various
state dairy organizations, and donors of
special awards.

BLUE RIBBON WINNERS IN STATE
4-H DAIRY SHOW
(Name of County in Parenthesis
After Member's Name)
REGISTERED JERSEYS
Heifer Calves (17 entries)
1. Steve Simmons (St. Johns); 2. Billy Brown
(St. Johns); 3. Mike Barrow (Volusia) ; 4. Wil-
liam Shack (Jackson); 5. Bobby McDonald (Vo-
lusia); 6. James Champaign (Volusia); 7. Chloe
Zimmerly (St. Johns) ; 8. Jessica Ritter (St.
Johns).
Junior Yearling Heifers (15 entries)
1. Virginia Stuart (Polk); 2. Millissa Jo Wil-
liams (Polk); 3. Charles Crutchfield (Jackson);
4. Gloria Alvarez (Duval) ; 5. David Tice (Polk);
6. Paul Thornhill (Polk) ; 7. Gail Williams
(Polk).
Senior Yearling Heifers (3 entries)
1. Clyde Crutchfield (Jackson) ; 2. Ray A.
Kincaid (Polk).
Two-Year-Old Cows (4 entries)
1. Wesley Smith (St. Johns); 2. Steve Sim-
mons (St. Johns).
Cows, Three Years Old and Over (1 entry)
1. Warren Alvarez (Duval).
Champions
Junior Champion Heifer--Ginger Stuart (Polk)
Reserve Junior Champion Heifer-Steve Sim-
mons (St. Johns)
Senior Champion Cow Wesley Smith (St.
Johns)
Reserve Senior Champion Cow-Warren Alvarez
(Duval)
Grand Champion Female-Ginger Stuart (Polk)
Reserve Grand Champion Female-Steve Sim-
mens (St. Johns)
GRADE JERSEYS
Heifer Calves (6 entries)
1. Merriam Simmons (St. Johns) ; 2 Beverly
Simmons (St. Johns).
Junior Yearling Heifer (6 entries)
1. Sarah Fletcher (Gadsden).
Senior Yearling Heifers (1 entry)
1. Charles Chason (Duval).
Two-Year-Old Cows (1 entry)
1. Robert Stone (Orange).
Champions
Junior Champion Heifer-Merriam Simmons
(St. Johns)
Reserve Junior Champion Heifer-Beverly Sim-
mons (St. Johns)
Senior Champion Cow-Robert Stone (Orange)
Reserve Senior Champion Cow-None
Grand Champion Female-Merriam Simmons
(St. Johns)
Reserve Grand Champion Female Beverly
Simmons (St. Johns)
REGISTERED GUERNSEYS
Heifer Calves (8 entries)
1. Edith Cameron (Duval) ; 2. Bill Sever
(Dade) ; 3. Jack Dodd (Orange).


Will You Join Us?
The Florida Dairy Industry Association
is sponsoring the raising of a special fund
to send these boys and their coach, Ex-
tension Dairyman C. W. Reaves, to Eng-
land in June to represent Florida and the
United States in competition with similar
youth Dairy teams at an International
Live Stock and Dairy Show.
Those who wish to have a part in this
project are invited to send contributions
to E. T. Lay, Secretary for the fund, 220
Newnan Street, Jacksonville.


Junior Yearling Heifers (8 entries)
1. Laura Cameron (Duval; 2. Cameron Rollins
(Pinellas)
Senior Yearling Heifers (5 entries)
1. Tommy Woodruff (Orange) ; 2. Billy Boyd
(Dade).
Two-Year-Old Cows (2 entries)
1. Jack Dodd (Orange); 2. Patricia Ellis (Nas-
sau).
Cows, Three Years Old and Over (3 entries)
1. Patricia Ellis (Nassau) ; 2. Jack Dodd
(Orange).
Champions
Junior Champion Heifer Laura Cameron (Du-
val)
Reserve Junior Champion Heifer-Edith Cam-
eron (Duval)
Senior Champion Cow-Patricia Ellis (Nassau)
Reserve Senior Champion Cow Jack Dodd
(Orange)
Grand Champion Female-Patricia Ellis (Nas-
sau)
Reserve Grand Champion Female-Jack Dodd
(Orange)
GRADE GUERNSEYS
Heifer Calves (9 entries)
1. Eddie Belcher (Pinellas); 2. Monroe Mon-
crief (Hardee).
Junior Yearling Heifers (8 entries)
1. Gayle Coleman (Sarasota) ; 2. Roger Reimann
(Palm Beach); 3. Arvid Johnson (Lake).
Cows, Three Years Old and Over (1 entry)
1. Margie Bell (Dade).
Champions
Junior Champion Heifer Gayle Coleman (Sara-
sota)
Reserve Junior Champion Heifer-Eddie Bel-
cher (Pinellas)
Senior Champion Cow-Margie Bell (Dade)
Reserve Senior Champion Cow-None


Grand Champion Female-Gayle Coleman (Sara-
sota)
Reserve Grand Champion Female-Margie Bell
(Dade)
REGISTERED AYSHIRES
Heifer Calves (1 entry)
1. Pans Hansen (Volusial.
Junior Yearling Heifers (1 entry)
1. Shirley Nelson (Orange).
Senior Yearl:ng Heifers (1 entry)
1. Linda Jacobs (Volusia).
Two-Year-Old Cows (2 entries)
1. Marilyn Jacobs (Volusia); 2. Joy Jacobs
(Volusia).
Champions
Junior Champion Heifer Linda Jacobs (Vo-
lusia)
Reserve Junior Champion Heifer-Hans Hansen
(Volusia)
Senior Champion Cow-Marilyn Jacobs (Vo-
lusia)
Reserve Grand Champion Female-Linda Ja-
cobs (Volusia)
GRADE HOLSTEINS
Heifer Calves (2 entries)
1. Teddy Kretzchmar (Dade) ; 2. Marjorie Lamb
(Marion).
Two-Year-Old Cows (1 entry)
1. Wade Edwards (Dade).
Champions
Junior Champion Heifer-Teddy Kretzschmar
(Dade)
Reserve Junior Champion Heifer Marjorie
Lamb (Marion)
Senior Champion Cow-Wade Edwards (Dade)
Reserve Senior Champion Cow-None
Grand Champion Female Wade Edwards
(Dade)
Reserve Grand Champion Female-Teddy Kretz-
schmar (Dade)


1952 Officers and Directors of the Florida Retail Farm Equipment Association,
sponsors of the Farm Machinery Exhibit at the Dairy Field Day, are: Seated,
left to right, J. B. Pike, Live Oak, Director; Ottis Brown, Live Oak, Director;
Otto McCollister, Trenton, Vice-President; Ralph 1. King, Tampa, President;
Allen Hutchinson, Orlando, Secretary-Treasurer; and George Newell, Palatka,
Director. Standing, left to right, John Jennings, Lakeland, Director; George
Cooper, Princeton, Director; W. H. Boyd, Ft. Pierce, Director; T. E. Moss, Jr.,
Hollywood. Director; J. W. Lyle, Winter Haven, Director. Additional Director
not in the picture: Clyde Griffin, Brandford.


FOR APRIL, 1952 9










DAIRY ASSOCIATION ACTIVITIES


Gainesville Planning Session

Held on F.D.I.A. Programs


Several key Committee Chairmen of
the Florida Dairy Industry Association
held an important half-day planning con-
ference with Dairy and Agricultural lead-
ers of the University of Florida, the De-
partment of Agriculture and the Depart-
ment of Education.
Wilmer Bassett, First Vice-President of
F.D.I.A., presided at the meeting.
Committee Chairmen were present rep-
resenting the Association's Standing Com-
mittees on Annual Field Day, Annual
Meeting, Milk Production, Dairy Husban-
dry, Dairy Standards and Regulations, Ad-
visory Membership, Junior Dairy Associa-
tion, June Dairy Month, and Veterinary
Committee.
Advisory group members present were
representatives of the University of Flor-
ida Dairy Science, Dairy Extension, Ex-
periment Station, the State Department of
Agriculture Dairy Department, the State
Department of Vocational Education and
the State 4-H Club program.
A significant action of the meeting was
the further completion of plans for the
formation of a Florida Junior Dairy As-
sociation to be sponsored jointly by the
Florida Dairy Industry Association, the
Department of Vocational Education, the
University Dairy Department, and the
4-H Club Department.

STATE CHAMBER NAMES
DAIRY COMMITTEE
Mr. Doyle E. Carlton, President, Flor-
ida State Chamber of Commerce, recently
announced appointment of the following
Dairy Sub-Committee of the State Cham-
ber's General Agriculture Committee:
Alf R. Nielsen, Chairman, Alfar Cream-
ery Co., West Palm Beach; R. K. Alex-
ander, Security Mills of Tampa, Inc.,
Tampa; Theo Datson, Borden's Datson
Dairies, Orlando; John G. DuPuis, Jr.,
White Belt Dairy Farm, Inc., Miami;
G. R. Heine, Southern Dairies, Inc.,
Tampa; E. T. Lay, Florida Dairy Indus-
try Association, Jacksonville; Wellington
Paul, Foremost Dairies, Inc., Jacksonville;
Fred Wilson, Wilson's Dairy, Marianna;
W. J. Barritt, Jr., Borden's Dairy, Tampa;
and Wilmer W. Bassett, Jr., Bassett's
Dairy, Monticello.

10 FLORIDA DAIRY


F.F.A. AND DAIRY EXECUTIVES
HONOR F.D.I.A. SECRETARY
Now in his tenth year as Executive
Secretary of the Florida Dairy Industry
Association and the dairy organizations
which preceded it,
E. T. Lay . better
known as "Andy"...
has recently been ac-
corded both State
and National recog-
nition by farm and
dairy groups.
In Florida, the
Florida State Chapter
E. T. LAY Future Farmers of
America awarded
him at the 1952 Florida State Fair the
Honorary State Farmer Degree of that
organization.
At the recent Annual Spring Meeting
of the National Conference of Dairy As-
sociation Executives, Andy was elected
Chairman of the Conference for the com-
ing year.
The Conference membership includes
88 State and Regional Dairy Associa-
tions and 23 National and International
Associations.


THEY'RE ON THE PROGRAM
June Annual Meeting
Among the featured guest speak-
ers scheduled for the Annual Meet-
ing Program are:
Col. B. F. Castle, Washington,
D. C., Executive Director of the
Milk Industry Foundation.
Mr. George Hennerich, Washing-
ton, D. C., Director, Ice Cream
Merchandising Institute.
Mr. Walter Hunnicut, New York
City, Executive of National Dai-
ries.
Mr. C. R. Schoby, Algona, la.,
President, American Dairy (Pro-
ducers) Association.
Mr. McGregor Smith, President,
Florida Power & Light Co.,
Miami.
Dr. E. L. Fouts, University of Flor-
ida.
Other speakers to be announced
later.

STATE FAIR COMMITTEE
ON LIVESTOCK TO MEET
Mr. R. D. Jackson, Chairman of the
1953 Florida State Fair Livestock Com-
mittee, has announced the first meeting
of the Committee to be held May 2nd in
Gainesville.
The meeting called in conjunction with
the Dairy Industry's Annual 2-day Field
Day which will be in session at the Uni-
versity of Florida, May 1st and 2nd, will
be held for breakfast the morning of
May 2nd at the Hotel Thomas.


Pictured above are F.D.I.A. Committee Chairmen and Members who attended
a Program-Planning-Conference held in Gainesville, March 25. Standing, left
to right, Jack Dew, W. J. Harman, ]r., T. G. Lee, Dr. E. L. Fouts, Wilmer W.
Bassett, Jr., Dr. Karl Owens, Herman Burnett and Dr. F. W. Parvin. Seated,
left to right, Dr. D. A. Sanders, P. T. Dix Arnold, John M. Scott, A. E. (Jack)
Johnson, Walter Krienke, Dr. S. P. Marshall, J. G. Smith, Dr. H. H. Wilkowske
and W. T. Loften. Present but not in the picture were: C. IF. Reaves and
Andy Lay.


NEWS






F.D.I.A. Plant Committee Plans

Programs for Superintendents

and Laboratorians


Improvement of methods and effici-
ency in Florida Dairy Plant Operation
was the subject of an all day conference
held in Orlando recently by members
of the Plant Operations Committee of
the Florida Dairy Industry Association.
Eleven of the 14-member committee,
headed by Russell Bevan, Borden Dairy
Manager of St. Petersburg, and represent-
ing all sections of Florida, were present.
Other members of the committee present
were: George Tworoger, Borden's Dairy,
Miami; Leon O'Quinn, Alfar Creamery
Co., West Palm Beach; Rudy J. Schnei-
der, Schneider's Creamery, Eustis; Lonnie
Jones, Perret's Dairy, Jacksonville; Charles
Ankerberg, Foremost Dairies, St. Peters-
burg; James F. Beatty, Foremost Dairies,
Jacksonville; William J. Harman, Jr.,
Southern Dairies, Gainesville; John
Lewis, Southern Dairies, Miami; Clarence
Wood, Land O'Sun Creameries, Sarasota;
Dr. Leon Mull, University of Florida,
Dairy Department, Gainesville; and Don-
ald E. Perret, Perret's Dairy, Jacksonville.
Members of the committee absent were:
Paul E. Burner, Dinsmore Dairy Co.,
Jacksonville; and Carroll B. Greene,
Greene's Dairy, DeLand.
Also attending were Theo Datson,
President, and E. T. Lay, Executive Sec-
retary of the Florida Dairy Industry As-
sociation. Also Mr. Coates Bull, Cream-
ery Package Manufacturing Co., Atlanta,
Georgia.
The group adopted plans for the pro-
gram of a four-day Dairy Plant Superin-
tendent's Short Course, to be held during
the month of October, 1952, at the Dairy
Department, University of Florida.


This short course, designed to provide
training and information on all the latest
dairy products processing and plant man-
agement procedures, is sponsored jointly
by the University of Florida Dairy De-
partment and the Florida Dairy Industry
Association.
The Committee also voted to sponsor
in 1952 an annual conference and train-
ing course at the University of Florida
for Laboratory Technicians, dealing with
milk and milk products.
This conference, which will be open
to both Dairy Plant Laboratory Techni-
cians and Health Department Techni-
cians, will be held June 9-13.

DAIRY PLANT MANUAL
IS WELL RECEIVED
Among the many comments concern-
ing the 1951 Plant Manual, the first
copies of which were recently distributed,
is this one from Bob Hibben, Executive
of the International Association of Ice
Cream Manufacturers:
"Thanks very much for the 1951 Flor-
ida Plant Manual. Certainly a good job
was done in reporting the Florida Short
Course. Such information is very valu-
able to us here and should be valuable
to any Dairy Plant."
A limited number of these manuals
containing the principal lectures and pa-
pers presented at the 1951 Annual Plant
Managers' Short Course at the University
of Florida are still available.
Order from E. T. Lay, Secretary of the
Dairy Association, at $1.25 a copy.


AIRPLANE ACCIDENT
IS FATAL TO
MRS. BRADY JOHNSTON

Her many friends in the Ladies' Auxil-
iary and throughout the Florida Dairy In-
dustry were shocked and saddened by the
tragic death of Bertha E. Johnston, wife
of Brady S. Johnston, Vice-President and
General Manager of Dinsmore Dairies
Company, Jacksonville. Mrs. Johnston is
a past-president of the Auxiliary and was
this year a director from the Jacksonville
area. Her regular attendance at state and
national conventions of the Industry made
her a well-known figure at these meet-
ings.
The above picture was taken while she
was in attendance with Mr. Johnston at
the 1951 Annual Convention of the Milk
Industry Foundation at Detroit.
The death occurred on March 19, while
Mrs. Johnston was playing golf at Timu-
quana County Club with Mrs. Mary S.
Dempsey, wife of William E. Dempsey,
Vice-President of Graze-Dempsey, Inc.
The two women were struck simultane-
ously by the propeller of a Navy Corsair
fighter plane. Eye-witnesses stated that
apparently neither one was aware of the
approach of the plane which, because of
a complete power failure, was coming in
for an emergency landing, unable to make
the run-way of the Navy station which
lies adjacent to the golf-course. The
pilot did not know that he had struck
anyone until the caddy ran to him as he
crawled out of the plane after it had
come to rest in a small thicket of pine
trees at the edge of the fairway.
In addition to her husband, Mrs. John-
ston is survived by her daughter, Mrs.
Harvey T. Skaggs, and a small grandson.
She was a native of Duval County.
Many dairymen attended the funeral
and formed a large group of honorary
pall-bearers. The unusual number of
floral remembrances bore tribute to the
richness of her life in a large circle of
friends.

FOR APRIL, 1952 11


Pictured above are members of the F.D.I.A. Plant Committee uwho attended
the Orlando committee meeting, March 21. Standing, left to right, are,
William J. Harman, Jr., Coates Bull, John Lewis, Clarence Wood, Leon C.
O'Quinn; James F. Beatty, Lonnie Jones, and Donald E. Perret. Seated,
left to right, are; Charles IV. Ankerberg, George Tworoger, Russell Bevan
(Chairman of the Committee), Dr. Leon Mull, Rudy J. Schneider, and
Secretary E. T. Lay.








DAIRY NEWS DIGEST


Members of the Dairy Industry throughout the State are invited to ,please
send to the "Florida Dairy News" all neu's about dairies, dairying and the
good people who devote their time, talent and money to this great industry.
-The Editor.


&ecet


DAN McCARTY

Your Governor

A Lifetime resident of Ft. Pierce.
Family man with 3 children.

LEGISLATURE-Elected three times to
House of Representatives; Speaker
-1941.
LABOR-Fair and impartial record in
business and in Legislature.
BUSINESSMAN- For 20 years has
successfully operated his own
business.
FARMER-Citrus grower and cattle-
man; graduate of University of
Florida; member Florida Farm Bu-
reau.
COMBAT VETERAN 41/2 years
World War II, European Theater;
invasion of Southern France; dec-
orated 4 times.
CIVIC LEADER-Active member of
the American Legion, VFW, Ma-
sons, Scottish Rite, Shrine, O.E.S.,
Elks, Moose, I.O.O.F., W.O.W.,
Rotary, Vestryman Episcopal
Church.
AGRICULTURE: The progress of ag-
riculture in Florida is vital to the
state's growth. My administration
will be dedicated to close coopera-
tion with the agricultural interests
of the state. I will improve our col-
lege of agriculture and expand our
agricultural research. I favor the re-
moval of the state gasoline tax on
gasoline consumed in farm equip-
ment not used on public highways.

(Paid Political Advertisement)
Earl P. Powers, Campaign Manager
J. Wesley Fly, Campaign Treasurer



12 FLORIDA DAI


DAIRY COUNCIL AND NAVAL
HOSPITAL WORK TOGETHER TO
STRESS ORAL HEALTH
The Dental Service of the Naval Hos-
pital, Jacksonville, helped put Dental
Health out in front during February, in
cooperation with Mrs. Arlen C. Jones,
Nutritionist and Assistant Director of the
Dairy Council of Jacksonville.
The institution of a very thorough pro-
gram in oral hygiene, through the use
of models and pamphlets is pointed out.
The importance of a balanced diet to
general oral health has been brought to
the attention of patients through the use
of dental health posters, booklets, and
leaflets, published under the auspices of
the Dairy Council.
The most important materials needed
in the diet according to the report are
(1) Minerals-calcium, phosphorus, iron
and fluoride and (2) vitamins- A, D,
C, and B Complex, most of which can be
supplied from dairy products and an
otherwise balanced menu.

OHIO DAIRY SECRETARY
CHANGES TO BANKERS
"Andy" Anderson, who for many years
has been associated with the Dairy Indus-
try of Ohio, first as Secretary of the Co-
lumbus Dairy Products Association and
then with the Ohio State Dairy Products
Association, has recently become manager
of the Ohio Bankers Association.
Andy, a former chairman of the Na-
tional Conference of Dairy Association
Executives, has been a popular and an
outstanding member of this group. He
was considered one of the Dairy Indus-
try's most capable Association executives.
The President of the Ohio Dairy Prod-
ucts Association, in referring to Andy's
leaving that Association, we are sure ex-
pressed the sentiment of all those who
have worked with Andy Anderson in the
Dairy Industry, when he said, "We all
wish him well in his new endeavor. His
enthusiasm and energy, as has been dis-
played in the past, will certainly assure
him success."
Fred Greiner, secretary of the Colum-
bus Milk Distributors Association, has
been selected to succeed Anderson. Mr.
Griener has been associated with the lo-
cal association for the last two years, and
previous to that spent several years in the
dairy technology department at Ohio
State University.


NEW FOOD TECHNOLOGY COURSE
OFFERED BY UNIV. OF MIAMI
Processing methods and laboratory
techniques of the dairy industry will com-
prise a complete new course in food tech-
nology at the University of Miami this
semester.
J. Arthur Lewis, chairman of the food
technology department, said the new
course will be taught off-campus in lab-
oratories, processing plants and farms of
the principal dairy firms in this area.
Instructor of the course, which is a
basic survey of the dairy industry, is
George Tworoger, production superin-
tendent of Borden's in Miami. A gradu-
ate of the University of Georgia, Tworo-
ger received his master of science degree
in dairying at the University of Wiscon-
sin. His experience in dairy processing
and production includes Europe as well
as the United States.
The course carries two academic cred-
its. Dairy employees may enroll, as well
as University of Miami students, Lewis
stated.

TOUR OF CLOVER PASTURES MADE
A bus tour of clover pastures on four
Orange County dairies was conducted for
any persons interested on March 31.
Dairies toured were Gordon Eunice
Dairy, Fairvilla; Glenn Datson Dairy,
Bearhead Road; B. W. Judge and T. G.
Lee Dairies on Conway Road.
The group inspected overhead and ditch
irrigated clover, grass pastures, and kinds
of clover and grass combinations.

FLORIDA MILK SANITARIANS
HOLD SUCCESSFUL MEETING
The largest attendance in the history
of the Association was reported for the
1952 Annual Conference and three-day
University of Florida Short Course, held
by this group in Gainesville, April 2-3-4.
Complete details of the meeting will
be reported in the Dairy News-May is-
sue.


RY NEWS


VOTE

MAY 6






SANITATION ON

THE DAIRY FARM

by DR. W. H. HASKELL
The approach of spring dictates the
advisability of a discussion of the insect
and rodent problem. Regardless of the
acceptance of the necessity for insect and
rodent control, there has not been an
interest created generally to an extent
sufficient to make control programs a
part of dairy farm activities. Humans,
livestock, milk and other foods should
be given protection against these danger-
ous pests.
Following is a brief summary of some
of the insects and rodents that exhibit
no hesitancy in availing themselves of
the food and shelter used by both man
and animals.
American Cockroach. These insects
eat all kinds of food and destroy many
articles. They breed in moist, dark places
and usually venture forth at night. Lack
of cleanliness usually results in the pres-
ence of roaches. They may contaminate
dairy utensils by crawling over surfaces
with which milk has contact.
House Flies. They breed in manure
piles, open privies or accumulations of
filth. They are the insect most commonly
associated with disease transmission and
contamination. The house fly is not a
biting fly but a lapping insect. It is
equipped with a tube like structure and
regurgitates material from its stomach
to food and equipment. Due to breeding
in filth, as well as its habits, it is not
difficult to realize the potential dangers
to health and food contamination inher-
ent in these insects. Removal of all
breeding places is mandatory in a control
program.


C


Horn Flies. Found around head and
shoulders of cattle. They are biting flies
and create a pasture problem. Due to
biting and blood sucking the horn fly
causes a considerable economic loss due
to decreased milk consumption.
Stable Flies. The stable fly is another
biting and sucking fly, usually found in
pastures and barnyards. They usually at-
tack the legs, flanks and bellies of cattle,
causing considerable annoyance and loss
of milk production.
Blue Bottle and Green Bottle Flies.
These flies lay their eggs on dead ani-
mals, in garbage and in the open wounds
of animals. Rapid hatching of eggs and
quick maturing of these insects in open
skin lesions creates extremely obnoxious
conditions, even death of animals.
Lice. These disease carrying insects
live by sucking blood from the host
(dairy cow). They have mouth parts that
suck and clawlike parts on legs for cling-
ing to animals. Lice infestations may
prove serious to the health of the animal
and economic loss by reducing milk pro-
duction.
Rats. Wherever man has migrated the
rat has gone with him. Both black and
brown rats are common. The black rat
carries fleas that may spread bubonic
plague. The brown rat may be responsi-
ble for certain food infections. Rats take
full advantage of all harborages on the
dairy farm. They destroy chickens, eat
and spoil food and may carry infection
and contamination on to dairy farm uten-
sils. Safe food and shelter is unlikely as
long as rats are on the premises.
In the control and eradication of in-
sects and rodents it is advisable to do
two things, (1) consult individuals
trained in the application of programs
designed to control these pests and, (2)
follow the instructions given to the last
detail.


K


HORN. FLY
AREAAROUND
HORNS

BITING &
SUCKING


PAIURBEM LEGSLS FLANKS,
SPROLM BELLIES


HOUSE FLY

BARN, MILK HOUSE,
FEEDROOMKITCHEN,
ETC.
LAPPING OR
MOUTHING
SANITATION


-I
Alto Adams, former chief justice of the
Florida Supreme Court and candidate for
governor, is a native Floridian born on
a small farm in Walton County. A pro-
minent Ft. Pierce rancher, Adams knows
the need of Florida's cattlemen and
farmers...

What Alto Adams
Says About . .

AGRICULTURE AND LIVESTOCK
"As a fairly old hand at the agricul-
ture and livestock business, I think I am
familiar with our needs. We need great-
er emphasis on experimental research
and extension aid in order to extract
the greatest possible utility from our
soil and climate . We not only need
it, Florida's future demands it!"

NATURAL RESOURCES
"Any state that persists in wasting its
God-given resources is slowly but surely
wasting its future .. The answer lies in
a sound, long-range NON-POLITICAL
program for the restoration and protec-
tion of our soil, waters, forests, fish and
wildlife."

CITRUS
.the present citrus laws have ac-
complished a great deal. I shall recom-
mend only stich adjustments as are ne-
cessary to insure a stable market and
profitable returns."

TAXES
"We've got enough."

Do Yourself and
Florida a Service

Vote for Alto Adams
FOR GOVERNOR

(Paid political advertisement)
Jack W. Simmons, campaign treas.
Ed Straughn, Campaign Manager


FOR APRIL, 1952 13


STABLE FLY

PASTURE &
BARNYARD
BITING &
SUCKING
























A Preview of the Many Attractions to be seen at Miami Beach. Bring your bathing suit!




MIAMI BEACH IS SITE OF 1952 CONVENTION


Florida Dairy Industry Asso


OUTSTANDING PROGRAM IS PLANNED
Plans for an outstanding program for the 1952 Florida State
Convention are practically complete, according to General Program
Chairman Wilmer Bassett. The information, in-
spiration and recreation which is being planned
for the three-day program, when combined with
the beautiful and comfortable surroundings of
the Casablanca Hotel, Miami Beach, and Miami,
should certainly be appealing to every one
connected with the Florida Dairy Industry and
Sits Allied and Advisory groups.
W. Bassett
MAKE HOTEL RESERVATIONS NOW
The Casablanca should have an adequate number of rooms
and suites with air-conditioning optional in every room. However,
it is advisable that all reservations be made as early as possible.
If you wish the oceanfront side, please specify this.
Special low summer rates will apply for all Convention dele-
gates with a special rate for child's bed extra in your room. All
rooms will be on European plan. The same rates apply for any
extra time before or after the Convention.
Write F.D.I.A. Secretary E. T. Lay if any question arises with
reference to reservations.
Please make your reservations direct to Mr. Jack Parker, Man-
ager, Hotel Casablanca, Miami Beach.


ciation


- June 11 -13


CONVENTION PROGRAM SCHEDULE

Tuesday Evening-June 10
7:00 P. M.-President's and Secretary's Open House for "Early
Birds".

Wednesday-June 11
10:00 A.M.-Opening Registration-Hotel Casablanca.
12:30 Noon-"Early Bird" Luncheon.
2:15 P. M. to 5:30 P. M.-First Business Session-Casablanca,
Joint Plant and Producer Program.
3:00 P. M.-Ladies Special Boat Cruise.
6:15 P. M.-Allied Trades "Alligator Club" Reception and Social
Hour (All Delegates Invited).
7:30 P. M.-Buffet Dinner, Informal Program and Barn Dance,
Hotel Casablanca.

Thursday-June 12
9:15 A.M.-Opening Second Joint Business Session.
10:00 A.M.-Plant Program at Casablanca.
10:00 A.M.-Producer Tour of Dairy Farms-Starting from Hotel
Casablanca.
10:30 A.M.-Ladies Sightseeing Tour and Luncheon Party.
12:30 Noon-Plant Luncheon Program-Casablanca.
12:30 Noon-Producer Barbecue Lunch and Program-Location to
be announced.
2:00 P. M.-Farm and Plant Tour.
2:00 P. M.-Program of Recreation: Golf Tournament, Boating,
Fishing, Sightseeing, Swimming, Etc.
6:30 P. M.-Reception and Fellowship Hour-Honoring Assn. Offi-
cers and Directors-Courtesy, Allied Trades "Alligator
Club" (All Delegates Invited).
8:00 P. M.-Annual Dinner and Program-Floor Show. Entertain-
ment and Dancing-Courtesy, "Alligator Club".

Friday-June 13
9:30 A.M. to 12:00 Noon-Third Joint Business Session.
10:30 A.M.-Ladies Auxiliary Annual Business Meeting (Separate
from the Regular Business Ssession).
10:30 A.M.-"Alligator Club"-Annual Business Meeting (Separate
from the Regular Business Session).
12:45 P.M.-Final Luncheon Meeting (All Delegates and Ladies).
Installation of All Officers and Directors. Special
Guest Speaker.
2:00 P. M.-Adjournment of Convention.
2:30 P. M.-New Directors' Meeting.




A sightseeing cruise through Miami Beach's 30 miles of inland water-
ways and Biscayne Bay will provide Dairy Convention visitors with
fine opportunities for viewing the city's tropical scenic charms.

























These Oceanfront and Street Views Show the Attractiveness of the Casablanca Hotel.




CASABLANCA PLEDGES FINEST FACILITIES


For Convention Comfort, Convenience and Service


F.D.I.A. PRESIDENT URGES ATTENDANCE
In urging attendance of all Florida Dairymen, Dairy Plant
Owners and Executives and their wives and families, F.D.I.A. Presi-
dent Theo Datson states that: "There is no more important business
during the entire year for those who have their time and money
invested in the Florida Dairy Industry than attendance and pratici-
pation in the Industry's Annual Meeting program."

FARM TOUR PLANNED
The Miami Area, comprising about one-
third of the Florida Dairy Industry, has some
of the nation's finest dairy farms as well as
the world's largest. The Annual Meeting
Committee has planned one day of the
Convention, June 12th, in two sections. One
group will make an all-day tour of dairy
farms with a barbecue lunch at one farm.
The other group will have a program Theo Datson
on plant management and distribution prob-
lems at the Casablanca Hotel. A visit to
some of the Dairy Plants of the area will
also be made.

National Dairy Officials To Speak
National producer and dairy plant execu-
tives will be heard on the program including
Mr. C. R. Schoby of Iowa, President Ameri-
can Dairy Association, Col. B. F. Castle of B. F. Castle
the Milk Industry Foundation, and George
Hennerich of the International Ice Cream As-
sociation.
Other well-known speakers on the pro-
gram will come from the University of Illi-
nois, University of Florida, University of
Miami, and National Dairies, New York.
Your friends will all be there. No dairy-
man can afford to miss the opportunity of-
fered by this once a-year program for the
benefit of all in the Florida Dairy Industry. C. R. Schoby


SPECIAL SIGHTSEEING TRIPS AVAILABLE
Convenient extra sightseeing trips are available from Miami to
Havana or Nassau by either airline or steamer to any Florida Con-
vention Delegates who are interested.
Write Secretary E. T. Lay if interested.


LADIES ENTERTAINMENT PLANNED
F.D.I.A. Ladies' Auxiliary President, Mrs. Ruth Graves, and Mrs.
Bob Hall, Miami, Ladies' Auxiliary Director and Ladies Convention
Program Committee Chairman, have issued a special request for
attendance of all ladies of the Florida Dairy Industry.
Mrs. Hall advises that the Ladies' program will include many
oF the special attractions for sightseeing and entertainment which
are available in the Miami and Miami Beach areas.


Palms and colorful flowering shrubs add charm to Miami Beach's
two popular golf courses, Bayshore and Normandy Shores, which
will be available to Dairy Association delegates during convention
days. Bring your golf clubs!










FLORIDA'S 8-POINT

DAIRY PROGRAM


For many years Florida dairymen have
paid too little attention to one of the
most important fundamentals in milk
production. When dairying started in
Florida, little or no thought was given
to the production of feed or pastures of
any kind. Only those grasses that were
native to the community in which the
dairyman operated were used. I think
I would be safe in making the statement
that prior to 1934, very little or no pas-
tures were fertilized. Since that date there
has been a very great swing in the direc-
tion of pasture fertilization.
From 40% to 50% milk production in
Florida is the cost of feed. The most
economical feed for your dairy cow is
your improved pasture and roughage.
Too often, pastures are the most neg-
lected acres on the farm. Many so-called
pastures are exercise lots.
From experiments conducted at the
University of Florida, and from informa-
tion gathered from local dairymen
throughout the state, it has been defin-
itely determined that fertilization of pas-
tures is as necessary as the purchase of
any equipment that might be essential
for the production of milk. The old idea
of putting three strands of barb-wire
around a given area of land and calling
this a pasture is practically relegated to
the background with the new grass plants
that are now available; the improving
of pastures is becoming easier.
From D.H.I.A. records that have been
made in Duval County we can definitely
say that one acre of pasture, planted to
proper legumes and grasses on soil that
is suitable, will yield $75.00 per acre
profit after expenses of care and mainte-
nance have been deducted. With the in-
creasing interest of pasture development,
greater amounts of milk for processing
are being produced.
The aim of dairy producers of Florida
is to produce the best and cheapest quart
of milk from the standpoint of nutrition
and quality for the consuming public.


16 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


This goal can only be obtained by ade-
quate pastures and feed growing pro-
gram. Florida can boast of as high qual-
ity of milk as any state in the union, and
when compared in nutritive value, it is
not out of line with costs when it is real-
ized that a quality product is given to
consumers with an exceptionally high
butterfat content.
Not only are strides being made in
pasture development but in sections of
the state where farm crops can be suc-
cessfully grown, great strides are also
being made in the production of hay
crops, silage and temporary grazing crops.
The cow being a large consumer of
roughage, the production of good pas-
ture, ensilage, hay, or any grass crop,
becomes more necessary. By the fertiliza-
tion of these various roughages, the prod-
uct is made more palatable and nutritious
and many more animals can be pastured
on an acreage basis-in addition to the
fact that greater quantity is produced.
In summing up the importance and
methods in improving dairy pastures, and
feed production, a dairy farm should be
located on soil that is suitable to the pro-
duction of that crop that is being pro-
duced. Never try to grow good pastures
on dry, thirsty land, and never try to
(Continued page 17)


FOR

1952


EfcCCecy and 2u&aa#y Pay


First of a series of articles on the Florida 8-Point Dairy Program for 1952.
This article is sponsored by the F.D.I.A. Pasture Development Committee,
Glenn S. Datson, Chairman.

IMPROVE DAIRY PASTURE AND FEED PRODUCTION
Prepared by
ALBERT LAWTON, Duval County Agricultural Agent


8-POINT FLA. DAIRY PROGRAM
ADOPTED BY DAIRY ASSOCIATION
As a guide and aid to Florida Dairy-
men and Dairy Plants in more efficient
and successful operation, the Board of
Directors of the Florida Dairy Industry
Association adopted at their last meet-
ing an 8-point efficiency program for
recommendation to all the Florida Dairy
Industry for 1952.
The 8-points which are based on rec-
ommendations from various active com-
mittees of the Association are as follows:
1. Improve dairy pasture and feed pro-
duction.
2. Practice individual and improved
feeding system.
3. Keep adequate indi-
vidual and herd records.
4. Follow definite
herd improvement pro-
gram.
5. Strive for top qual-
ity.
I 6. Work for improve-
IR ment of herd health.
7. Use efficient proc-
essing and distribution
methods.
8. Give more attention to "Public Re-
lations".
The purpose of the 8-Point Program
is aimed at efficient, economic production
and marketing of high quality milk and
milk products. The slogan of the pro-
gram is "Efficiency and Quality Pay".


A typical Florida white clover pasture grazed continuously since 1949.







Guernsey Cattle Club

Directors Announced


The Directors of the Florida Guernsey
Club for 1952, as elected at the Annual
Meeting held in January, are:
Mr. Earl Johnson
of Dinsmore Farms,
Jacksonville, presi-
dent, W. A. Bout-
S well, Sr., Lake
Worth, vice presi-
dent; J. H. Logan,




drep, Miami; Dr. Roberto Parajon, Ha-
vana, Cuba; T. Stin Haselton, Eustis; and
Leon H. Sellers, St. Petersburg.
Mr. Earl A. Johnson, President, has
announced the membership of the fol-
lowing committees for 1952:
SALES COMMITTEE: W. A. BouT-
WELL, SR., Lake Worth, Chairman; R. R.
JENNINGS, Jacksonville; J. H. LOGAN,
Clearwater; J. McK. JETER, Union, South
Carolina; C. W. REAVES, Gainesville; and
CHARLES JOHNSON, Jacksonville.


8-Point Program
(Continued from Page 16)
put farm crops on land that is too wet.
Be sure that there is adequate acreage
for the production of an abundance of
roughage for your animals. In growing
permanent pasture it is always necessary
to have a legume growing with grass
that is suitable to the type soil that is
being used. Fertilization is the basis of
all success with any pasture or row crop
from the standpoint of nutrition, quality
and quantity.
Bulletins as to details of pasture de-
velopment and maintenance, as well as
bulletins on growing various feed crops
can be obtained from any County Agent's
office in Florida, as well as the Univer-
sity. Bulletins suggested that you obtain
are: No. 464, Management of Dairy Cat-
tle in Florida; No. 453, Carpet Grass and
Legume Pastures in Florida; No. 484,
Grass Pastures in Central Florida; No.
477, Artificial Drying of Hay and Seed
with a Slatted-Floor System; Circular
S-33, Costs and Methods of Pasture Es-
tablishment and Maintenance; C-S-18,
Southland Oats-A new Variety; C-63,
Grazing for Florida Livestock.


SHOW AND FAIR COMMITTEE:
EARL JENSEN, Lake Worth, Chairman;
MRS. L. H. SELLERS, St. Petersburg; C.
W. REAVES. Gainesville; and CARROLL
WARD, JR., Winter Park.
BREED, PROMOTION AND PUB-
LICITY COMMITTEE: V. C. JOHN-
SON, Jacksonville, Chairman; CARROLL
WARD, SR., Winter Park; C. W. REAVES,
Gainesville; DR. SIDNEY P. MARSHALL,
Gainesville; JOHN CONE, Plant City; and
W. P. WALDREP. Miami.
FIELD DAY COMMITTEE: JOHN
SARGENT, Lakeland, Chairman; C. E.
DONEGAN, Largo; L. H. SELLERS, St.
Petersburg; T. STIN HASELTON, Eustis;
and P. T. Dix ARNOLD, Gainesville.





Vote-May 6


J. P. BOYCE
519 E. Giddens, Tampa, Florida
E. E. FULTON
P.O. Box 374, Jacksonville 1, Florida
J. E. ORRIS
200 N.W. 129th Street, Miami 38, Fla.


FOR APRIL, 1952 17


Why not buy your...



CIaTRUS PULP

NOW?
Yes sir, the "early bird catches the worm" and with the current demand
for Florida Citrus Pulp, Citrus Meal, Citrus Pellets and Citrus Molasses at
such a high level, we must all anticipate our needs and place our orders
early for these fine products . so rich in carbohydrates and essential
minerals necessary to stimulate milk production!


For full particulars, write Citrus Processors
ciation, P. O. Box 403, Tampa, Florida.







Classified Advertising

FOR SALE-2 Heil Bottle Washers, Model HRE8
Ser. No. 1386 and Ser. No. 1387. 8 wide Model
E, Heavy Duty Bottle Washers, purchased from
Heil Co., Washington, D. C., August 31, 1945.
Price $2,500.00 each. 1 Cherry-Burrel Gray Vac
16, Bottle Filler and Capper with Vacuum, Serial
No. 349R (right hand) purchased June 31, 1944.
Price $1,400.00. This equipment is in good con-
dition and may be seen at Southern Dairies, Inc.,
62 N. E. 27th Street, Miami, Fla.

NEW BOOK ON DAIRY PROCESSING
A valuable source of information about Dairy
Plant Products and Processes By
DR. E. L. FOUTS and DR. T. R. FREEMAN
$3.50 Postpaid.
Order from Florida Dairy News
220 Newnan St., Jacksonville, Fla.


We know that

Most All Dairymen

DON'T

DELAY

Until the last minute to order the
supplies they need now, but some-
times it is unavoidable. If you find
yourself in this situation, write or

CALL

us

TODAY


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CHEI. & SUPPLY CO.

Jacksonville, Fla.

will ship promptly in order that your
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and

REMEMBER

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P. 0. BOX 2328 PHONE 4-5606



18 FLORIDA DAIR


Milk Laboratory Technicians

Program Completed For June 9

A most worthwhile five days' short course for Milk Laboratory Technicians has
been arranged for the June 9-13 session of Florida laboratory technicians, accord-
ing to the program just released by the program committee, Mr. Hugh Butner of
the State Board of Health and Prof. Walter Krienke of the University of Florida
Dairy Department.
The program subjects for each day are as follows:
Monday, A. M.-Collecting, storing, shipping and preparing samples for analysis.
P.M.-(a) Physicial condition of butterfat in various dairy products; (b) Cleaning
of laboratory testing glassware.
Tuesday, A.M.-Babcock tests for butterfat in fresh, homogenized and preserved
samples of milk-Dr. E. O. Herreid, University of Illinois. P. M.-(a) Laboratory
Practice period on testing butterfats; (b) Demonstration on Gerber butterfat tests.
Wednesday, A.M.-Lecture and laboratory practice period on modified Babcock
tests for cream, skimmilk and chocolate products. P.M.-Lecture and practice period
on Babcock tests for frozen desserts.
Thursday, A.M.-Lecture and practice period on phosphatase tests of pasteuriza-
tion. P.M.-Lectures on tests for alkalies, chlorines and quataranary ammonium sana-
tizing compounds. Lecture on acidity and pH tests.
Friday-Lectures and laboratory practice on testing of milk solids.
The program is sponsored by the University of Florida and F.D.I.A. Plant
Committee.


t-in


I..
**'J:


- .
Miss Vivian Guagliardo, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. S. F. Guagliardo, whose
family are owners and operators of the Florida Dairy in Tampa, was married in
February to Dr. J. P. Palori, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Palori of Tampa, and a
promising young dentist of that city.
Vivian, a graduate of F.S.U., is well known to members of the Florida dairy
industry because of her active service for the past several years as office manager
for the Florida Dairy. She has also been a regular attendant with Mr. and Mrs.
Guagliardo and other members of her family at F.D.I.A. Annual Conventions.
Following a honeymoon in Jamaica and Cuba, Dr. and Mrs. Palori are at
home at 2 Adalia Avenue, Tampa.


Y NEWS


P-









Marianna

Jersey Sale

The third West Florida Jersey Cattle
Club Promotional Sale, which was held
April 3rd at the Marianna Fair Grounds,
was beneficial both to the buyers and
those who were selling the animals, ac-
cording to W. W. Glenn, Jackson County
Agent who was in charge of the Sale.
On Wednesday night preceding the
sale, about 175 people enjoyed a delic-
ious Bar-B-Q which was furnished by
the Cartledge Fertilizer Company and
the Jackson Packing Company in coop-
eration with the Marianna-Jackson Coun-
ty Chamber of Commerce. Doyle Mor-
gan had charge of arrangements. This
Bar-B-Q was attended by the breeders
who were selling the animals, Dairymen
from Jackson County and surrounding
areas, and businessmen who were inter-
ested.
The Sale averaged $377.75 per animal.
The animal that brought the most money
was owned by Mr. J. K. Stuart of Bar-
tow and brought $600.00. Nine of the
20 animals sold stayed in Jackson County.
The biggest buyer was M. T. Crutch-
field of Altha with a purchase of four
females. S. H. Solomon and Clay Coun-
ty Farms were the next largest buyers
with three each. Henry T. Hey, Sani-
tary Dairy, and W. R. Crutchfield bought
two each. W. L. Ford, M. A. Schack,
A. T. Alvarez and Frank DeBord bought
one each.
This is the third such sale that has
been held in Jackson County by the
Florida Jersey Cattle Club and the Club
was very much satisfied with the results.

FOREMOST PLANT ADDS STAFF
FIELD WORKER IN CHIPLEY
Foremost Dairies has transferred R. F.
Sendelbach to the Chipley plant to be
field representative.
His job will be that of a "go-between"
among county dairymen. He expects to
help them with feed production, herd im-
provement, and the other items that go
into making the dairy business pay off.

In 1950, more than three million cows
were produced in the United States by
artificial insemination. This was fifteen
per cent of all dairy cows produced.
-GOOD HOUSEKEEPING (April, 1952)

"BELIEVE IT OR NOT" by Ripley
FLORIDA TIMES-UNION (April 1, 1952)
"THE MILK produced annually in this
country would fill a river 40 feet wide,
3 feet deep and 3,000 miles long!"


The Sprinkman Dairyman Producer's Plate Filter
affonds a positive check . an actual sediment
test of your entire run right on the farm. With
the Sprinkman in your line, a clean, sediment-free
milk supply Is always your . a rejection-proof
milk supply that will always have a quality market
at highest prices. SEE YOUR JOBBER.
USES ALL COTTON MEDIA
In using ALL COTTON media, the Sprink-
man provides TRUE FILTER action in re-
moving smallest particles . particles
impossible to remove with the strainer
action of woven flannel media.


For 6, 8. 10
and 12 Plates


Bulk cooling and tanker pickup of milk
have increased milk checks and reduced
power bills on dairy farms in all parts of
the country. Milk is weighed and sampled
in milk house, eliminating stickage, spill-
age, and fat losses. Lower hauling costs
are often possible.


Bulk Cooler compressor runs only during
milking; less power is used. Fast cooling
to 38' F. protects milk quality, and much
labor is saved. Get the money-saving facts
about Bulk Cooling. Write for Mojonnier
Bulletin 240 "The Bulk Cooling Story."
Address:


Mojonnier Bros. Co., 4601 W. Ohio St., Chicago 44, Ill.
Florida Representative
Lee P. Bickenbach
P.O. BOX 2205
LAKELAND, FLA.


FOR APRIL, 1952 19


SPRINKMAN pa DdW4
e, S MODEL E ,
E/ -* iFor 2. 3 and 4
IPdle,

C. S. MEANS CONTROLLED SUSPENSION'.. .
Media is suspended between two horizontal stain-
less plates. A "spider" resting on media prevents
pad from stretching and contacting plate. Con-
trolled Suspension assures positive filtration, large
capacity and long media life.
PAT. NO. 2452486. OTHER PATENTS PENDING.





W. D. Hahn, Ceresville,
Md., in milk house of I
of his 2 farms, watches
driver of pick-up tank-
or "weigh" milk.




SAVE MONEY ,
with





BULK MILK SYSTEM
*S!0' SS


Tro^t/ua ^^ In




















40, `-" MEANS EASIER
CLEANING. LOWER COUNTS.
AND HIGHER QUALITY MILK
Simplify your cleaning and sanitizing with
the tested and proved Klenzade Farm
Quality Program-Nu-Kleen to remove and
prevent milkstone-Kleer-Mor to emulsify
and rinse away heaviest fats and grease-
Klenzade X-4 Sodium Hypochlorite Solution
ior rapidly destroying
bacteria. Here is
dairyland's most pop- iETTER METOD
ular and best bal-
anced cleaning pro- E TTE MIL
gram used daily
coast to coast. Ask rIGGER CHECKS
your dealer.






FLORIDA owned and operated . .
Supporters of Florida Cattlemen,
Poultrymen and Dairy Producers
LOVETT'S Food Stores
Operated by the
WINN & LOVETT GROCERY CO.
General Offices: Jacksonville



ROSS REYNOLDS
& SON
Dealer in Dairy Cattle
Barns located on Highway 92, east of
PLANT CITY, FLA. Phone 61-248
(Also, Carrollton, Ill., Phone 42-F5)




Headquarters for


PASTURE

IRRIGATION

Systems and Supplies


From one room to two modern plants
and forty four branch offices and ware-
houses . that's the industrial miracle
of Klenzade now celebrating its twentieth
anniversary.
In 1932, Arthur Louis Shogren began
manufacturing sodium hypochlorite and
sanitation chemicals. A few years later
he was joined by his brother Claire B.
Shogren as sales manager. Shortly there-
after the famous "Klenzade Fleet" was
established which now numbers over 50
trucks and semi-trailers serving thousands
of square miles of territory throughout
the heart of the nation. Training schools
for Klenzade field men were begun. The
present day Klenzade staff of national
sales representatives constitutes one of the
largest and most highly trained technical
commercial groups in sanitation engineer-
ing. In 1936, the Klenzade Annual Edu-
cational Seminar was founded. Through
the years, this important contribution to
the advancement of sanitation procedures
has grown into nation-wide prominence.
At the 1951 Seminar meeting, held in
Pennsylvania, more than 45 nationally
known bacteriologists, scientists, sanitari-
ans, and public health officials were on
the program. Over 400 representatives
from the nation's leading colleges, uni-
versities, dairy plants, food processing
and food serving industries, govern-
mental and municipal health and sanita-
tion bureaus, were present. Production
control is maintained by a fully staffed
plant laboratory. Recently, upon comple-
tion of the new Klenzade administration
building, a research chemical and bacteri-
ological laboratory was instituted for field
collaboration and special development
work.

"Experience is a strenuous teacher-
no graduates, no degrees, some surviv-
ors."-John Carter.
*
Tainted money . .Money which
'taint yours and 'taint mine.


FOREMOST DAIRIES
ANNOUNCES PURCHASES
Paul Reinhold, President of Foremost
Dairies, Jacksonville, has announced the
purchase of Gunn Ice Cream Co. of
Pensacola and Superior Dairies of Or-
lando.
Gunn Ice Cream Co., manufacturer of
Freezi Ice Cream, was first organized in
1927. It has been at the East Govern-
ment Street location since it was first
started.
The present staff of employees will
remain with the Pensacola Foremost
plant, Reinhold said. Gunn will be man-
ager. Charles Wamble will serve as sales
manager while J. D. Foy, Jr., will be
office manager.
In announcing the merger of Superior
Dairies of Orlando with Foremost Dai-
ries, Mr. Reinhold said the move will
mean a greatly expanded market for milk
producers in the Orlando area. He also
announced immediate plans for expand-
ing the Superior Dairies facilities and
stated that fluid milk products will be
marketed under the Foremost-Superior
brand name. The plans call for the mov-
ing of the Foremost ice cream plant at
714 Franklin St., to the new location on
the Trail, present location of Superior
Dairies.
The milk plant will be in charge of
H. H. (Pete) Parrish, the former Su-
perior Dairies owner, who is a veteran
milk producer and processor. The ice
cream department will continue under
management of D. K. Middleton.

A formal opening of the Velda Ice
Cream Co., Lakeland, was held March
11, according to George Haworth, dis-
tributor in charge of the new plant.
The Lakeland plant, a branch of the
main manufacturing operation in Uleta,
Plantation Foods, Inc., serves as a dis-
tributorship for Polk, Pasco, Hardee and
Highlands counties.
The company deals in insulated dice
packages, which Velda claims is the only
one of its type in Florida.


20 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


-,"'? ''l`vl~' ib:-:


KLENZADE CELEBRATES TWENTY

YEARS OF PROGRESS
































Ayrshire Sets Butterfat Record


Neshaminy Miss Phett, a Registered
Ayreshire owned by Windrow Farms of
Oxford, Michigan, has broken all 305
day butterfat records over all breeds on
twice daily milking, according to the
Ayrshire Breeders Association at Bran-
don, Vermont. The new World's Record
is 20,946 pounds of milk, 1,036 pounds
of fat made at 8 years 3 months of age.
The test was supervised throughout by
Professor Larry Johnson, head of official
testing at Michigan State College. She
was milked during her test by Charles
Miles, Manager of Windrow Farms.
Neshaminy Miss Phett had twice be-
fore been declared a National Breed
Champion with her records at three and
four years of age of 15,029 pounds of
milk, 703 pounds of fat, and 15,681
pounds of milk, 691 pounds of fat
respectively. In addition to these she
has completed two more records, each
exceeding 800 pounds of fat. Her life-
time total exceeded 100,000 pounds of
milk before she was nine years of age,
making her the youngest Fifty Ton Pro-
ducer of the Ayrshire Breed.
During her test year "Miss Phett"
consumed 2,800 pounds commercial grain
mixture, 1,800 pounds crushed oats and
1,000 pounds beet pulp. She is a terrific
grass and hay consumer and it is esti-
mated that she ate some 9,000 pounds of
hay and 5,000 pounds of silage.
The new World's Record Producer is
classified Excellent and is sired by the
Approved Sire Neshaminy Kingfish. Her
dam is Neshaminy Scarlet O'Hara, an
Approved Dam with three daughters


averaging 11,450 pounds of milk, 515
pounds of fat. She traces five times to
Auchenbrain Brown Kate 4th, four times
to Garclaugh May Mischief. Both were
former World's Record Ayrshires, the
first named with 23,022 pounds of milk,
the second with 25,329 pounds of milk.
"Miss Phett" has several paternal sis-
ters in the Windrow herd including
Neshaminy Katie, Excellent 100,000
pounds of milk producer and the dam
of their Senior herd sire Storm Cloud of
Windrow. The Junior Herd Sire is a
son of the new World's Champion, offi-
cially named Windrow Stylemaster.
Miss Phett not only finished safe in
calf, but will freshen about seventy days
after completion of her test year. Her
calvings are indicative of her practical
dairy cow worth. She freshened first as a
two year old December 17, 1946. Her
subsequent calvings in order were De-
cember 29, December 29, December 25,
March 5 and March 25.
Neshaminy Miss Phett was bred by
Dr. E. C. Deubler of Pennsylvania and
raised to a yearling by Art Yonkers of
Neshaminy Farm. She was purchased by
Windrow Farms in the 1946 Blue Rib-
bon Sale.

Tampa's Oldest Feed & Fencing Store
Feeds, Barb Wire, Hog Fence, Galvanized
Roofing, Poultry Fencing, Etc.
STALNAKER
BROTHERS
P. O. BOX 1468 TAMPA, FLA.
EAST BROADWAY AT 33RD STREET
37 Years at this Location


STOP

Bottle Breakage!

WET SOAP LUBRICATION of
bottle conveyor chains is without
doubt today's best bet for stopping
bottle breakage; cutting cleaning
time. That's why more dairymen are
specifying:

Oakite Composition No. 6
This scientifically designed wet soap-
lubricant stops bottle breakage by
providing ideal slippage to eliminate
bottle pressure. Oakite Composition
No. 6 reduces power costs by pro-
viding free-flexing of chains around
sprockets to cut down motor drag
and to minimize chance of motor
burn-outs.
Oakite Composition No. 6 cleans as
it lubricates. This means less down-
time for cleaning equipment. Means,
too, clean bottoms for your bottles.
For complete story write nearest ad-
dress below:
OAKITE PRODUCTS, INC.
R. L. Jones, East Union & Ionia Sts., Jacksonville
M. E. Withers, 7580 N.E. 4th Court, Miami
G. Tatum, 3607 So. Court St., Montgomery, Ala.
INDUSTRIAL Cly


OAKITE
4Ls METHODS *L
Q)aeUv SRe:eatcA Srev,



For Better Pastures,
Orchards, Crops . .


MASSEY- HARRIS
FARM EQUIPMENT

Tractors Combines
Implements
See Your Local Dealer, or Write
FLORIDA FARM
EQUIPMENT CO.
STATE DISTRIBUTOR
Jacksonville, Florida
Ask for information on open
territories.


FOR APRIL, 1952 21







Florida June Dairy Month Committee
Named by State Association
Appointment of Jack Dew of Southern Dairies, Jacksonville as State Chairman
for the 1952 Florida June Dairy Month program, has just been announced by Mr.
Theo Datson, president of the Florida Dairy Industry Association.
Local Committee Chairmen for each principal city in Florida were also an-
nounced. This group which constitute the State Dairy Month program committee
are as follows: E. L.
Mo r g a n, Arcadia;
Herman Burnett, Brady Johnston
Bradenton; Charles Appointed Southeastern
J. Wamble, Chipley;
S Lamar Garrett,Crest- Dairy Month Chairman
View; J. A. Taylor, The National Dairy Month Committee
Daytona Beach;
Claude Kelly, De- has announced appointment of Brady
L Land; Rudy Schneid- Johnston, Vice Pres. and Manager, Dins-
JACK DEW er, Eustis; H. C. For- more Dairy Co., Jacksonville, as South-
man, Ft. Lauderdale; Hilton Hart, Ft. eastern region
Myers; W. D. White, Ft. Pierce; John Dairy Month Chair
Townsend, Gainesville; M. A. Smith,
Inverness; Paul Zarda, Jacksonville; man.
Dewey Bullard, Lake City; John Sar- Mr. Johnston has
gent, Lakeland; George Boutwell, Lake 9Lm previously served a
Worth; O. Donald Hatch, Live Oak; number of times as
Ben S. Waring, Madison; Harold J. Tur- Jacksonville a r e a
ner, Marianna; J. N. McArthur, Miami;
F. D. Yaun, Moore Haven; Bill Pickens, chairman and has al-
Ocala; T. G. Lee, Orlando; E. C. Gunn, JOHNSTON so served as Florida
Pensacola; John Hentz, Panama City; State Chairman.
Wm. Lamar Rose, Punta Gorda; Sam
Solomon, Jr., Quincy; A. J. Moulds, St.
Augustine; John Hood, St. Petersburg;
Dan Ballinger, Sanford; John O. Binns, Florida Dairy Month
Sarasota; J. R. Ramer, Sebring; C. W. Chairman Urges All-Out
Moore, Stuart, Curry Bassett, Tallahassee; Dairy Participation
Joe C. Guagliardo, Tampa; John Tripson,
Vero Beach; Gordon Nielsen, West Palm In a special letter to all Florida dairies,
Beach; C. O. Gerber, Winter Haven. Mr. Dew, as State Chairman, has called
Members at large, Florida "Dairy for active participation of everyone in-
Month" Committee, are: W. J. Barritt, terested in the Dairy Industry of the
Jr., Tampa; Ed Volkwein, Jacksonville; state to make the 16th annual observance
Theo Datson, Orlando; George F. John- of June as "Dairy Month" in Florida,
son, West Palm Beach; Frank B. Doub, and throughout the nation, a big success.
Jacksonville; and Wilmer Bassett, Jr., The 1952 Dairy Month program, Mr.
Monticello. Dew said, is planned on a larger scale
than ever before and offers a wonderful
opportunity for the Florida Dairy In-
dustry to improve public relations, pro-
mote public good will, spread important
information about milk and dairy prod-
ucts and promote a greater consumer de-
mand for milk, acknowledged to be na-
ture's most nearly perfect food and even
at today's seemingly high prices the
housewife's "best and most economical
food buy".
The "Dairy Month Program", pro-
claimed by the Governor, concurred in
by both House and Senate of the State
Legislature, and endorsed by the State
and local Chambers of Commerce and
by mayors of principal cities, presents an
opportunity which no other food indus-
try enjoys and will certainly be a defi-
nite contribution to the welfare of all
the Florida Dairy Industry and beneficial
to every individual dairy.


Soy thifik yow ri *Vdrwi5











IT'S YOUR MONEY-
GET THE MOST FOR IT!
Use Ideal Fertilizers and our special
pasture consulting service for bet-
ter pastures-better profits

WILSON & TOOMER
FERTILIZER COMPANY
and Divisions
Peninsular Fertilizer Works-Tampa
Cartledge Fertilizer Company-Cottondale
Florida Agricultural Supply Co.-Jacksonville
GENERAL OFFICES JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA



A Must for the Florida
Livestock Industry
"A well staffed and equipped Ani-
mal Disease Research Center,
housed in a new Veterinary Build-
ing-at the University of Florida."


Every Florida Dairy
Should Be An Active Member


An Organization of those engaged in the
Florida Dairy Industry, for service to the
membership and advancement of the wel-
iare of the Dairy Industry.
220 NEWNAN ST.
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA


22 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS








Request Removal of Dairy Products

From O.P.S. Ceiling Price Control


The threat of serious scarcity of dairy
products in the United States in the near
future is proved by the cold figures of
government statistical agencies, accord-
ing to M. H. Brightman, Executive Secre-
tary of the National Dairy Industry Com-
mittee, which is asking Congress to term-
inate federal price controls on dairy prod-
ucts in order to encourage production.
The committee has asked the Senate
Banking & Currency Commmittee to
eliminate dairy products from price con-
trols in any bills reported for reenact-
ment as part of the Defense Production
Act.
"Unbalancing of our agricultural econ-
omy due to bureaucratic tinkering is a
leading cause of this growing shortage,"
the Dairy Industry Committee statement
says. "If controls cause this trend to
continue, we shall be short of dairy prod-
ucts even for use at home and rigid ra-
tioning would be inevitable in event of
war.
Here are the facts from government
sources submitted by Mr. Brightman!
"A recent press release by Dr. Roy V.
Peel, Director of the Census Bureau,
stated, for instance, that the populous and
important dairying Great Lakes states of
Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Michigan and
Wisconsin face a possible future short-
age of milk produced in those areas.
Population is outstripping milk produc-
tion. There has been a decline in total
milk production and a much greater de-
cline per capital. Industrial competition
has taken labor from farms and farmers
have turned to crops and other livestock
production requiring less labor and which
are more profitable than dairying.
"Using government figures, Represent-
ative August H. Andresen testified be-
fore the Senate Banking & Currency
Committee that the number of milk cows
on farms in the United States had de-
clined from 27.7 million in 1945 to
23.4 million in 1952, while our human
population has grown from 139.5 million
to 150.8 in 1952.
"The U. S. Bureau of Agricultural
Economics in "Demand and Price Situa-
tion" of February, 1952, states that with
the generally better real income to farm-
ers from production of other livestock
and grains for cash sale, milking cows
has appealed less to them."
The way to reverse this trend, says
the National Dairy Industry Committee,
is to release dairying from federal price
controls and encourage this kind of ani-
mal husbandry so vital to the nutrition
of the people. This should be done im-
mediately for it takes three years to grow
a producing cow.


NEW CHIEF OF O.P.S.
Ellis Arnall, new O.P.S. administrator,
took over responsibilities formerly han-
dled by Michael Di Salle. He is a liberal
(former governor of Georgia) but has
a good reputation for honesty. He knows
cotton and tobacco problems, and should
deal fairly with dairy products.


you can doALL THREE


with the


SHARPLES


1. STANDARDIZE

2. CLARIFY and

3. SEPARATE hot or cold milk


in ONE machine
* Real Standardization within close limits (1/10
of 1% butter fat). Not just part standardiza-
tion, but to any desired butter fat content
below that of incoming milk.
* Adjust butter fat content of cream to any
desired percentage up to 40% while standardizing.
* Standardize regardless of the temperature of
the milk in the range of 40 to 1600F, and
clarify at the same time.
* The same MP will clarify without standardizing.
* The same MP will separate hot or cold milk as
efficiently as the Sharples Cold Milk Separator.
All of this is accomplished merely by making
simple external adjustments-


-MP

(M*^ulti- ^^


NO BOWL CHANGES ARE
REQUIRED! THE NEW SHARPLES
PRESUR-SEALD MP IS THREE
MACHINES IN ONE ...

It's money in your
pocket write for
Bulletin 1265 or call
your Sharples Dealer.


DISTRIBUTED BY

General Mills
2 Riverside Drive 77 W. Livingston St. 7275 N. W. Avenue 711 W. Cass Street
Jacksonville, Florida Orlando, Florida Miami, Florida Tampa, Florida


FOR APRIL, 1952 23


Right or Wrong?








QUESTION: A milk bo:l!s is used for 30 to 35
trips
ANSWER: Rightl The average is 30 to 35
rips, although occasionally one is used for
70 trips.


- ,'














..t with Portable

'm IRRIGATION
EQUIPMENT
Progressive cattle-
men are improving
their cattle as they
improve their pas-
tures with FMC
LOCKJOINT or
FMC SHUR-RANE
portable aluminum
irrigation systems- -
the result is better
cattle and better
pastures !
Choose either
LOCKJOINT or
SHUR- RANE for
long lasting, trou-
ble-free service .
FMC LOCKJOINT heavy-duty cast alu-
minum couplings are permanently at-
tached to Aluminum pipe you can't lose
coupling !
FMC SHUR-RANE
heavy -duty aluminum
couplings are detachable
their flexibility, dura-
bility and efficiency have nT
been proven by 20 years
actual use in the field
For full par-
Drawer FD-1









For Better Beef
to add

POUNDS+GRADE
GROW BETTER GRASS

Use time tested

"FFF" BRANDS


F ORIDA


OR E







FE INC


University of Florida Dairy Department

Provides Modern Dairy Training

and Research -
(Continued from Page 7)


Bulletins are available on request on
many of the subjects mentioned, and if
information is not available in bulletin
form a personal letter from an informed
person in the department will supply the
best information available covering any
questions asked on the general subject
of dairying.
In addition to these teaching and re-
search activities many other functions re-
lated to dairying are entered into each
year by members of this group. A series
of meetings, conferences, and short
courses are held annually, including
Dairy Field Day, a two-day meeting usu-
ally attracting 200 to 300 dairy people
from all parts of the state. At this meet-
ing dairy problems are discussed and an
opportunity is afforded visitors to look
over current projects and developments
of interest to them. A dairy herdsman's
short course, five days in length, is of-
fered in the fall, at which time modern
methods of feeding, breeding, and dairy
cattle management are demonstrated and
taught. Also, in the fall, the Dairy Plant
Operators Short Course is held, at which
time dairy plant workers from Florida
and some of the neighboring states meet
here for several days of discussion of
plant problems. A conference for milk
sanitarians is held in the spring, at which
time Federal, State, County, and City san-
itarians meet on a common ground in an
effort to unify their inspection services
and to avoid duplication of work. A five-
day course is held for laboratory workers
from state, county and city organizations
and from dairy plants to aid in standard-
ization of laboratory procedures and tech-
niques.
The staff members take great pride in
the pleasant associations and personal
friendships of hundreds of fine dairy
people throughout the state and in the
friendly manner that the members of the
Florida Dairy Industry Association have
taken this group into their confidence.
The Florida Dairy News, a publication
of the Association, has opened its pages
to the staff and substantial contributions
have been made by staff members to the
publication during the first year of its
existence.
The Guernsey Cattle Club and the
Jersey Cattle Club and individual breed-
ers have rendered valuable assistance, and
it is with pleasure that the Department
and its individual members reciprocate
fully at every opportunity.


The Price of iberty
is Eternal vigilance

P EOPLE do not have to
be conquered by an
army to lose their freedom.
It can slip away-painlessly
-through mistrust and hate
and surrender of their rights.
Freedom can be traded for
pretty-sounding guarantees
of a better life-without
working for it. It can disap-
pear before you know it
through greed, prejudice, or
just plain laziness.
That must not happen to
America, as It has happened
throughout the world,
throughout history. We must
fight for freedom in our
daily lives...by taking the
time and trouble to vote
wisely ... by protecting our
own rights and the rights of
others... and by showing
our faith in America by
everything we think, say,
nd do.


The staff members are called on fre-
quently to judge fairs, conduct tours and
to aid in other dairy programs. Visitors
are always welcome and receive a cordial
reception when visiting the Department
of Dairy Science, either at the Dairy
Products Laboratory or at the Dairy Re-
search Unit. If you have never visited
the Department of Dairy Science, plan
to attend one of the various meetings, or
just come for a visit. If you have been
here before, come agin; there may be
something new to see. Every person in
the department has been carefully se-
lected for the job he or she holds, and
each one takes a special interest in the
particular activities with which he or she
is associated.
The milk sanitarians working in the
state from the State Department of Ag-
riculture, the State Board of Health, and
from the many county and city inspection
agencies have all cooperated in every way
to keep us informed and to permit us to
have a hand in maintaining dairy prod-
ucts of the highest possible quality for
the consuming public in the state.
Any progress that has been made in
the Department of Dairy Science has
been because of the fine cooperation of
all of the dairy groups and individual
dairymen in the state.


24 FLORIDA DAIR


LAKELAND, FLORIDA


Y NEWS







Rural Electrification

Expanded in Florida

A record 2,768 miles of rural electrifi-
cation lines have been built during the
past six years by Florida Power & Light
Company, President McGregor Smith an-
nounced recently.
Smith said the new lines, if laid end-
to-end, would reach from Miami to San
Francisco.
During the past year, the utility com-
pany extended its rural lines by 483
miles, eclipsing its 1948 figure of 354
miles, its 1949 figure of 366 miles, and
its 1950 figure of 388 miles.
Smith said his company during the
past year added 10,148 rural customers
to its lines, an increase of 15 per cent.
"During the past six years, our service
territory which extends along most of
Florida's east coast and includes major
portions of central and west coast areas,
jumped in population from 800,000 to
1,600,000 persons. That's an increase of
50 per cent.
"During this time, the number of
rural customers has been tripled. Actu-
ally, in December, 1945, we had in our
present service area 25,226 rural meters
while now we have 77,122.
"This increase of 51,896 rural meters
represents an increase of 206 per cent.
"Counting three and one-half persons
to a meter, we find that, during the six
year period, we made rural electric serv-
ice available to approximately 181,636
persons. That's comparable to adding a
city larger than the combined populations
of St. Augustine, Sanford, Daytona
Beach, West Palm Beach, Bradenton,
Sarasota and Miami Beach to our lines."
To do this, the company pushed its
rural electric lines to a present total of
5,095 miles, an increase of 110 per cent,
Smith said.
"Florida as a whole has made rapid
strides in rural electrification," Smith
said. "Of its 50,764 occupied farms, the
Census of Agriculture shows that 40,297
have become electrified from central
power stations.
"Florida, with 79.4 per cent of its oc-
cupied farms electrified from central
power stations, is ahead of all the other
nine southeastern states.
"We can appreciate Florida's achieve-
ment better when we realize that Mis-
sissippi, for instance, has only 57.4 per
cent of its occupied farms electrified
from central power stations, and Tennes-
see, despite its government financed
TVA, has 73.9 per cent of its occupied
farms electrified, or well below Florida."


V-C FERTILIZER

P uON YOUR PASTURE

PUr V- ERIIZI
vI~


MORE MILK

OR MEAT FROM

TAKE YOUR PASTURE


V-C PASTURE FERTILIZER helps grasses and legumes to make
quick, vigorous growth, rich in proteins, minerals, vitamins and
other nutrients. Grazing this high-quality, appetizing green for-
age, dairy cows increase milk production and meat animals rap-
idly put on valuable weight. Pastures, fertilized with V-C, yield
more and better grazing and also furnish many extra grazing days.
V-C factories, at Nichols and Jacksonville, formulate pasture
fertilizers suited to all Florida soil types, pasture grasses and
legumes. Ask a trained V-C Field Representative for advice in
improving the quality of your pasture.


VIRGINIA- CAROLINA
CHEMICAL CORPORATION
FERTi Li Z ERS
P.O. BOX 2311
ORLANDO, FLORIDA

FOR APRIL, 1952 25









Florida Dairy Industry Ass'n
ALLIED TRADES MEMBERS
Special Advertising Section


ADAMS PACKING ASSN., INC.
Citrus Pulp. Citrus Meal, Citrus Molasses
Jim Coates, Sales Mgr., By-Products Div.
Auburndale, Fla. Phone 8-7061

AMICA-BURNETT CHEM. &
SUPPLY CO.
Dairy Equipment and Supplies
Carl B. Caudill-Phone 4-5606
P. O. Box 2328, Jacksonville, Fla.

CHARLES DENNERY, INC.
Ice Cream Coating, Fruits and Flavors
Ira Stone-Hotel Riviera Plaza
Miami Beach, Fla.

DIAMOND ALKALI COMPANY
Dairy Cleaner & Alkali
Flori.,a Distributors:
Miller Machinery & Supply, Jax.
Industrial Chem. & Supply Co.,
Tampa

GENERAL MILLS, INC.
Dairy Equipment and Supplies
John W. Manning, Phone 9-4586
1601 Congress Bldg. Miami

GULF PAPER COMPANY, INC.
Ice Cream (Linerless) Cartons, Butter Cartonl
J. H. McVoy
50 E. Magnolia St., Pensacola, Fla.

DOUGLAS J. HEADFORD
FLA. REPRESENTATIVE
Green Spot Orangeade Concentrate
Krim-Ko Chocolate Flavorings
616 Jessamine Ave. Phone 4356
Daytona Beach, Fla.

INTERNATIONAL PAPER CO.
Single Service Division
Purepak Milk Containers
W. M. Scott
134 Peachtree St., Atlanta 3, Ga.

JIM JENNINGS,
MFRS. REPRESENTATIVE
Morning Glory Milk Powder
Kalva Chocolate Syrup-Bar Coating
"Eze" Orange Concentrate
Route 9, Box 356, Jacksonville, Fla.

JIFFY MANUFACTURING CO.
Insulated Bags and Liners
Southern Representative-William Romaine
Box 5463, 5 Pts. Sta., Columbia, S. C.

ROBERT A. JOHNSTON CO.
Dairy Chocolate e Cocoa Products
J. L. Hammons Ph. Dearborn 2811
507 Nelson Ferry Rd., Decatur, Ga.


KIECKHEFER CONTAINER CO.,
Pure-Pak Paper Milk Bottles
R. J. Evans-M. A. Knowles
4700 Pearl St., Jacksonville, Fla.


26 FLORIDA DAIRY


Allied Trades Invited
To Florida Convention

O. L. Bobo, President of the Allied
Trades Membership of the Florida Dairy
Industry Association, has issued an invita-
tion to all Allied Trades Members and
representatives to attend and participate
in the Florida State Convention, June 11-
13 at the Hotel Casablanca, Miami Beach.
Mr. Bobo suggests that hotel reservations
be made at once.



Sales Tips

NAME-REMEMBERING IS GOOD
SALESMANSHIP.
YOUR CUSTOMER expects you to know his
name. Many salesmen often favorably
influence a customer by merely showing
respect for the customer's name . his
own name is the one thing which is dear
to every man.
Most successful salesmen are gifted by
a good memory, or
else make a definite
ij % effort to remember
. most of them,
we believe, "make a
definite effort to re-
member."
Whether in sell-
ing, or in other deal-
ings with your fellow
man, you win the
goodwill and admira-
tion of any man when you remember his
name; it will pay you well to cultivate
the habit of "remembering to remember".
Many simple systems for remembering
names have been outlined by famous
"name rememberers" such as James Far-
ley, Andrew Carnegie, Theodore Roose-
vent and even Napoleon. The one we
like best is outlined below:
1. Understand the name You can't
remember a name you don't understand.
Ask that the name be repeated if you
failed to hear the name clearly during an
introduction.
2. Repeat name over and over-after
the introduction and during the follow-
ing conversation address the gentleman
by his name at least three times.
3. Tie name to simple object-Associ-
ate the name with some simple object-
Mr. Picket would almost automatically
suggest "picket-fence".
4. IFrite it down-Writing a name
down seems to imprint each letter in your
memory. Besides, the written name on a
handy card will be helpful while you are
still cultivating the habit of "remember-
ing to remember".
Name-Remembering is good salesman-
ship From "Sales Tips"-Strong Bag
Co.


Florida Dairy Industry Ass'n
ALLIED TRADES MEMBERS
Special Advertising Section

F.D.I.A. ANNUAL MEETING
June 11-13
Casablanca Hotel Miami Beach
Low Summer Rates
Make Reservations Direct to Hotel

KLENZADE PRODUCTS, INC.
(hemirals for Dairy and Food Plant
Sailation H. B. Ahlefeldt
Union Term'I Whse., Jacksonville, Fla.

S. H. MAHONEY EXTRACT CO.
Vanilla Products
D. C. Mulligan, Florida Representative
221 E. Cullerton Rd., Chicago 16, Ill.

NATIONAL PECTIN PRODUCTS CO.
Ice Cream Stabilizers & Emulsifiers.
Pectin Stabilizers for ices, sherberts & fruits.
J. C. Head, Phone Norfolk, Va. 2-8385
RFD No. 1, Box 48, Bayside, Va.

OWENS-ILLINOIS GLASS CO.
Duraglas Milk Bottles
C. W. Parmalee C. N. Comstock
1102 Barnett Bldg., Jax. 2, Fla.
Phone 6-8868

PAUL-LEWIS LABORATORIES, INC.
Lartivase-For the Prevention of oxidized flavor
in bottled milk, ice cream, storage cream
Also Rennet Extract-Sir Sirloin, Inc.
765 N. W. 54th St., Miami 37, Fla.

RIVERSIDE MANUFACTURING CO.
MOULTRIE, GA.
Masterbilt Uniforms
James M. Stewart Phone 3-3287
306 Lakeview Ave., Apt. 406, Orlando

SCHAEFER INC.
Ice Cream Cabinets, Frozen Food Cabinets
W. G. Wright Phone 4201
333 Harbor Drive, Venice, Fla.

STANDARD CAP & SEAL CORP.
Tamper Proof Seals-Flexible Vacuum Packages
Liner Materials
Larry Hodge
1121 duPont Bldg., Miami, Fla.

THATCHER GLASS MFG. CO., INC.
Glass Milk Containers
W. T. LOVE, Florida Representative
3126 Westfield Rd.-Charlotte 7,N.C.

UNIVERSAL MILKING MACHINE
DIVISION
Pail-less (Pipe line) Milking Machines
R. D. Archer-Factory Rep.-Ph. 84-7467
1100 N.E., 134 St., No. Miami, Fla.



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In The Dairy News


NEWS












Equipment


and Skilled


Personnel


TO GIVE YOU . .


Prittiqg that's better r


* FOLDERS BOOKLETS BROCHURES

PRINTED AND ENGRAVED BUSINESS STATIONERY

OFFICE FORMS BOOKKEEPING FORMS

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DESIGNING LAYOUTS ART






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Telephone 3-3907


JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA


Finest


We are the new publishers of your Florida Dairy News, beginning
with this issue. It is hoped that it will be a long and happy associa-
tion. We shall do our utmost in cooperation with your fine Editor
and Executive Director Mr. E. T. Lay, to give you a good, readable,
interesting magazine.


I -~






0 0 0 o) 00) no00 0)n


I


BORN TO PRODUCE
Yes, this vigorous youngster has a wonderful start toward a
production career. Out of a high producing cow, properly
conditioned during the gestation period, she is ready for
SECURITY CALF STARTER and a bright future.
As a result of improved breeding programs by Florida dairy-
men, more and more calves are "born to produce" and to
obtain greatest benefits From sound breeding programs, dairy-
men must follow sound feeding and management programs
from "calf to calf".
There is a SECURITY FEED for each step in your program.
Build a better herd with SECURITY.




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