Title: Florida dairy news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00082035/00006
 Material Information
Title: Florida dairy news
Series Title: Florida dairy news.
Physical Description: 12 v. : illus. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Dairy Industry Association
Publisher: Cody Publications for Florida Dairy Industry Association.
Place of Publication: Kissimmee Fla
Publication Date: October 1951
Frequency: bimonthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Dairying -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Cattle   ( lcsh )
Milk   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-12, no. 1; Nov. 1950-Spring, 1962.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00082035
Volume ID: VID00006
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01386090
issn - 0426-5696

Full Text
U. S. DEPT. OF AGRICULTURE
Library
Washington 25, D. C.









Florida D & B Dairy


AT ST. AUGUSTINE


DOUBLES PRODUCTION ON

PURINA CYCLE DAIRY PROGRAM


The D & B Dairy not only raises its
own herd replacements but keeps its
old cows in high production under
the Purina program. Below is a 1
year-old cow due to freshen with
10th calf October 3. In !' I. i
she has milked over 35d,, i
milk, and in the 9th la( t'
duced 11,381 lb. milk and


.i/e, condition of this Pur-
J fer, dropped May 8, who
S) pounds at 4 1/2 months
picturee was made.


HEIFERS
1.1 rd replacements on Purina
hii ..1 the ) & B program. The
F. I| ,ler at 23 months of age
,, i-.,l '.10 pounds, is due to calve
i.. -. iths.


High production from a n-i.il I,, ii
of fifty earned for 1) :& 1 I*,' II,.
state efficiency award for '*'* I 1,
above cow is 8 years, I .,.-,iI. .1.1
dropped her sixth calf Sept. 2. Dur-
ing her fifth lactation she produced
13,347 lb. of milk and 783 lb. fat on
twice-a-day milking. She is classified
Good Plus.


The Purina Cycle Dairy Program aims at more milk
and longer life from the dairy herd. J. J. Smith,
herdsman at D & B, says he has increased the average
production from less than 4,000 pounds to more than
8,ooo pounds since 1945, "solely by culling our cows,
raising our own replacements and following the
Purina Dairy Program."
Smith says he has not bought a cow in five years,
and that many of the cows in the present herd are
original members of the herd which have been
brought into increased production under his balanced
feeding program. He has been on the Purina Pro-
gram for the past three years.

RALSTON PURINA COMPANY


Use of grass silage, and careful development of
260 acres of improved pastures (Pensacola and
Common Bahia, Bermuda, Pangola and White Dutch
clover) through use of complete fertilizers is part of
the story, of course. But Purina Calf Startena is fed
until calves are five months old, Purina D and F Chow
is used for raising heifers and conditioning the dry cows,
and Purina Milk Chow is provided for the milking herd,
at the ratio of I pound of feed to 31/ pounds of miilk!
Proper feeding in all four cycles has meant more
profitable dairying at the 1D & B dairy; it can help
produce profits for you. Sec the Putrina man or write
for the "Purina Dairy Book."


* TAMPA


* MIAMI


2 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


VEVEYl III I I CL I rl l











EDITORIALS


VOL. I


OCTOBER, 1951
(Bi-Monthly)


Big Oaks From Little Acorns

From an Editorial in THE ORLANDO STAR August 18, 1951

THE SALE of Datson Dairies Inc. to Borden Co. is an example of the axiom:
Big oaks from little acorns grow.
Those who lived in Orlando around 1914-15, and remember the late
B. C. Datson who started his dairy out on a farm a little east of fern Creek
Ave., on the Conway Road, never thought that within the space of 35
years his heirs would sell their distribution business, not their farms or
pastures, nor herds, for something like three-quarters of a million dollars.
The success of Datson Dairies is a story of hard work and excellent
management. It did not come the easy way, nor without many rough
times when it seemed it was all out-go and little income. But the senior
Datson was a hard worker and his family gave him their whole-hearted
support, from Mother Datson on down to the youngest tot, each of whom
in those early days had his work around the little farm.
In time the city grew out and surrounded the pasture and the land
became too valuable on which to graze cattle, so it was subdivided and
sold and other pastures developed.
Today Clarence Datson has hundreds of acres of improved pastures
in the Pine Castle area and Glen Datson has one of the prize grazing spots
of all Orange County east of the Pine Castle Air Base.
Theodore Datson has a small acreage east of the Glen Datson pastures,
but is not as highly developed. Glen in the past several years has installed
irrigation, and each Fall sows white Dutch clover which has proven to be-
with the application of fertilizer-the equal of clover pastures of the North
and West.
The Datson leadership in dairy pasture development was typical of
the progressiveness displayed by this business firm which kept pace with
growing Orlando.
The success of this family enterprise is an example of what can be
done in Florida where brains and brawn are mixed and there is a will to
forge ahead to success.


Miami Women Boycott Milk

A RECENT Milk Commission order increasing the price of milk in the
Miami area by 1 cent a quart has aroused a protest on the part of a group
of Miami housewives to the extent of a threatened boycott on the purchase
of milk.
These good ladies should be reminded that this protested 1 cent per
quart of milk is only one-half cent per pound of "Nature's most nearly
perfect food"; that food scientists say "Milk is one of the best food invest-
ments at any price; that there is no waste in milk as every drop can be used;
that a quart of milk-four glasses-supplies approximately these percent-
ages of the daily nutritive requirements of an average person: calcium
oo100% plus; riboflavin 93%; phosphorus 61%; protein 49%; vitamin A
31%; thiamin (vitamin B-1) 23%; calories 22%; asorbic acid 17%; nia-
cin 7%; iron 5%.


THE
FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS
E. T. LAY, Editor
AL CODY, Business Manager
CODY PUBLICATIONS, INC.
General Advertising Representatives


Official Publication of
Florida Dairy Industry Ass'n
THEO DATSON, President
E. T. LAY, Executive Director
Florida Guernsey Cattle Club
JOHN SERGEANT, President
Florida Association
of Milk Sanitarians
LEWIS T. SMITH, President

Florida Dairy News
Advisory Board
WVILMER BASSETT, Chairman
THEO DATSON
FRANK B. DOUB
DR. E. L. FOUTS
F. W. DECKLAR
JOHN SERGEANT
LEWIS T. SMITH
Florida Dairy Industry Associa-
tion Directors
Producers
FRANK B. DOUB, Jacksonville
VERNON GRAVES, Limona
C. RAY JOHNSON, St. Petersburg
GEORGE F. JOHNSON, West Palm Beach
LASKEY FOSTER, Contonment
Producer-Distributors
WILMER BASSETT, Monticello
FREEMAN HALES, Opa Locka
HERMAN BURNETT, Bradenton
J. N. MCARTHUR, Miami
H. CODY SKINNER, Jacksonville
Distributors
THEO DATSON, Orlando
L. S. ROBINSON, Jacksonville
GORDON NIELSEN, West Palm Beach
W. J. BARRITT, JR., Tampa
A. E. (JACK) JOHNSON, Jacksonville
Additional Directors
O. L. BOBO, President "Alligator Club"
Jacksonville
SAM SOLOMON, SR., Honorary Director
Quincy
THE FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS is published bi-
monthly by Cody Publications, Inc., at 10
Verona Street, Kissimmee, Florida, for
Florida Dairy Industry Association, 220
Newnan Street, Jacksonville, Florida. Sub-
scription price of $1.00 per year included in
dues for membership in the association.
Entered as second class mail August 8, 1951,
at the Post Office at Kissimmee, Fla., under
Act of March 3, 1879, as amended.
Business office at 10 Verona Street, Kissim-
mee, Florida. Editorial office 220 Newnan
Street, Jacksonville.
Member Florida Press Association and Na-
tional Editorial Association.


FOR OCTOBER, 1951 3


NO. 6


i~r~




































ROSS REYNOLDS
& SON
Dealer in Dairy Cattle
Barns located on Highway 92, east of
PLANT CITY, FLA. Phone 61-248
(Also, Carrollton, Ill., Phone 42-F5)











/NO&PEND0NMCE


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4 FLORIDA DAIRY


The Principles of America
THROUGHOUT OUR history, Americans have believed that every person
has certain rights and duties and responsibilities. Those things that
people believe are called principles.
The Principles of America hold that every man has. ..


1. The right to a good education.
2. The right to live where he pleases.
3. The right to work where he wants to.
4. The right to join and belong to an
organization.
5. The right to own property.
6. The right to start his own business.
7. The right to manage his own affairs.
8. The right to make a profit or to fail,
depending on his own ability.
There are other, similar rights of indi-
vidual action which are Principles of
America, but all of these individual
rights may be combined in these two
broad principles...
9. Every man is entitled to freedom and
equality of opportunity.
10. Every man may earn his living when,
Where, and How he wants to.
There are also limiting principles
Principles of individual freedom some-
times clash with those of individual
equality. Therefore our rights as indi-
viduals must be limtied, and those limi-
tations are themselves principles.
i1. The rights of any individual shall not
interfere with the equal rights of other
individuals.
Your right to swing your arms stops
where the other fellow's nose starts.
12. The rights of any individual shall not
interfere with the welfare of the people
as a whole.
Freedom of speech does not give the
individual the right to shout "fire" in
a crowded theatre.
13. Every individual owes obedience to
the laws under which he lives.

Brands Law Enforcement
THE FLORIDA State Cattlemen's Associa-
tion is to be commended for its action
in voting cooperation and financial back-
ing in connection with enforcement of
the State Marks and Brands Law by the
Commissioner of Agriculture.
Upon complaint by Commissioner
Mayo that his Department had not been
provided with adequate funds for en-
forcement of this law, designed to pre-
vent cattle-stealing in Florida, the Cattle-
men's Association voted to provide the
funds.
It appears that the Attorney General
has okayed the plan and that a stepped-
up program of inspection and enforce-
ment will soon be under way.
The Marks and Brands Law, which
applies primarily to beef cattle, is ad-
ministered by the Commissioner of Agri-
culture through the office of Joln AM.
Scott in Gainesville.


The individual has the right to talk
against a law, to work and vote to
change that law, but NOT to disobey
that law.
There are those who would chip away
our confidence so that their special brand
of tyranny might creep into America.
They must not succeed. So, let us ask
of every plan, or act, or idea...
Is It With or Against The Principles of
America?
-From "Primer For Americans" by
Sigurd S. Larmon. Complete bound copy
will be mailed upon request to "Florida
Dairy News".


The Cover
7WINNERS OF National Herd Honor
Roll Diplomas presented at 1951
Dairy Field Day Banquet. Left to
right:
J. J. Smith, the Dairy Farm Man-
ager of the Florida School for the
Deaf and Blind, St. Augustine; A.
G. Driggers, Gadsden County Agent,
who accepted diploma for A. V.
Brown of River Junction; Walter
Welkener of Jacksonville; W. E.
Goodyear of Ocala; A. S. Lawton
who accepted diploma for J. D.
Robinson at Orange Park; Guy
Wachstetter, who accepted diploma
for Summer Fields Dairy of Sum-
merfield: Carroll L. Ward, Sr.,
(Lakemont Dairy), Winter Park;
William J. Showerman, herd mana-
ger of Methodist Childrens Home at
Enterprise; Carroll L. Ward, Jr.,
(Lakemont Dairy) and George
Baumeister who accepted diploma
for Claude Roberts of Orlando.


NEWS







Two National Conventions in Detroit:


International Ice Cream Manufacturers Will


Meet at Book-Cadillac October 22-24


ICE CREAM'S Big Birthday Convention
plans are near completion. Coincident-
ally, as ice cream closes its first one-hun-
dred year history, Detroit, the site of the
Convention, observes its 25oth anniver-
sary of the founding of the city. These
important birthdays will be highlighted
in all of the activities surrounding the
week-long meetings of the International
Association of Ice Cream Manufacturers
and the Milk Industry Foundation. This
will be stand-by year for associate mem-
bers of the International and members
of the Dairy Industries Supply Associa-
tion during the entire week of October
22nd to 26th.
Activities will begin at the Book-Cadil-
lac headquarters of the ice cream
group, with the opening of the regis-
tration desk at 9:oo a.m. on Sunday, Octo-
ber 21st. At 8 o'clock that night a recep-
tion will be held for President and Mrs.
Ridgway Kennedy, Jr.
Monday, October 22nd, will be given
over during the morning to a meeting of
the Production and Laboratory Council
at io:oo a.m. and a panel on employee-
employer relations. In the afternoon,
the first general session of the Convention
will be held in the Grand Ballroom of
the Book-Cadillac Hotel.
On Tuesday, October 23rd, at 9:3o
a.m. concurrent meetings will begin
under the auspices of the Production and
Laboratory Council, the Ice Cream Mer-
chandising Institute, and the Controller's
Council. These sectional meetings will
be carried on into the afternoon recon-
vening at 2 p.m.
At 6:oo p.m. the Awards Dinner will
take place at which time the prizes for the
Collegiate Students' International Con-
test in judging dairy products will be pre-
sented. The dinner will be sponsored
jointly by the International Association
of Ice Cream Manufacturers, the Dairy In-
dustries Supply Association, and the
American Dairy Science Association.
Wednesday, October 24th, will present
to the Convention goers two outstanding
general sessions held jointly by the In-
ternational and the Milk Industry Foun-
dation. Both sessions will be held in the
Statler Hotel. The morning session will
begin at 9:30 a.m. and the afternoon ses-
sion at 2:15 p.m.
Unusual social events will highlight the
Convention activities during the week.
On Tuesday, at lo:oo a.m., ice cream
ladies will be taken on a tour of beautiful
Greenfield Village and the Edison In-
stitute located at Dearborn, Michigan.


Luncheon will be served to the "rou-' -t
the Dearborn Inn. All ladies must regis-
ter for the trip at the International's Re-
gistration Desk in the Book-Cadillac.
On Wednesday afternoon a unique
feature will be presented when all of the
JAICM ladies take part in a Treasure
Hunt with $5000. worth of fabulous
prizes. There will be fun and excite-
ment galore for all the ladies attending
the Convention.
The culmination of ice cream activities
will take place on Wednesday evening
with the Big Birthday Banquet. The
Banquet will be presented jointly by the
International and the Milk Industry
Foundation. It is a birthday party in
honor of the sooth anniversary of the ice
cream industry. This event will take place
in the public rooms of the Masonic Tem-
ple, dinner will be served in the banquet
rooms and the show presented in the au-
ditorium. All seats for the dinner and
the show are reserved.
In addition to the specialists and indus-
try members participating in the techni-


MANY UNUSUAL features will highlight the
Detroit Convention of the Milk Industry
Foundation this year.
In addition to the acute interest in the
war situation and economic controls, the
fact that this is the first convention in the
middle west for years will insure a record
breaking attendance.
Plans for the 44th convention in the
opinion of President T. Kline Hamilton,
of Columbus, Ohio and other officers will
bring together the largest and most in-
teresting programs ever developed.
With the Hotel Statler as the head-
quarters, members can drive from nearby
cities or easily come by rail and air travel.
Foundation conventions bring milk
dealers from all sections of the United
States, Canada and foreign lands. The
three days of discussions of industry pro-
blems is an investment that pays big divi-
dends.
The daily meetings offer a comprehen-
sive list of speakers and subjects that pro-
vide practical help, according to Col. B.
F. Castle, Foundation executive director.
An outstanding drawing card will be
the joint general session to be held with
the International Association of Ice


cal sessions, outstanding personalities will
be presented at the Convention sessions.
The Hon. Charles F. Brannan, Secre-
tary of Agriculture, will address the joint
session on Wednesday, October 24th.
Three Presidents of Associations of the
dairy industry will make their appear-
ance: Ridgway Kennedy, Jr., of the
IAICM, T. Kline Hamilton of the Milk
Industry Foundation, and Chester R.
Schoby, President of the American Dairy
Association.


Floridians Are Members
Of I. A. I. C. A. Board
PAUL E. REINHOLD, President of Fore-
most Dairies, Jacksonville, and Henry
Schneider, President of Schneider's
Creamery, Eustis and Chairman of the
Florida Milk Commission, are Directors
of International Association of Ice
Cream Manufacturers and will partici-
pate in the official board meetings to be
held in Detroit, during the 1951 Con-
vention.


Cream Manufacturers all day Wednesday,
The tentative plans for the Foundation
October 24, followed by a joint banquet
of the two organizations. This all-day
session and joint banquet is something
new. It will also help celebrate the iooth
anniversary of the manufacturing of ice
cream.
Convention schedule are:
Wednesday, October 24, Morning and
Afternoon-Joint General Session with
IAICM.
Wednesday evening, October 24-Joint
Annual Banquet with IAICM.
Thursday breakfast, October 25-Round
Table Breakfasts.
Thursday morning, October 25-Gen-
eral Session.
Thursday afternoon, October 25-Six
Technical Meetings.
Friday breakfast, October 26-Round
Table Breakfasts.
Friday morning and afternoon, October
26-Six Technical Meetings.
The annual convention of the Inter-
national Association of Ice Cream Manu-
facturers will be held in the Book-Cadilac
Hotel, October 22 and 23. The Joint
Wednesday sessions will be in the Statler


FOR OCTOBER, 1951 5


Milk Industry Foundation to


Meet at Statler October 24







in the morning and the Book-Cadillac
in the afternoon.
The technical meetings will all be held
concurrently Thursday afternoon and all
day Friday in the Statler and Tuller Ho-
tels. These sessions include:
Laboratory-For Laboratory Directors
and those interested in quality control
and scientific matters.
Plant-For Plant Managers.
Milk Supplies-For Procurement Mana-
gers interested in adequate supplies of
high quality milk.
Motor Vehicle-For the supervisor of
motor vehicle operation and maintenance.
Accounting-For accountants who keep
accurate records and also develop cost
data.
Sales & Advertising-For those respon-
sible for holding and increasing sales.
A special program for ladies has been
arranged by the Michigan dairy industry
with delightful entertainment planned for
the wives and families of convention dele-
gates.
On Tuesday and Thursday the tours
to the famed Greenfield Village which
Henry Ford transformed into historical
buildings and landmarks to preserve for
early American customs and institutions
will be highlights. Luncheon in a colonial
setting will be in the Dearborn Inn.
On Friday the ladies will attend a tele-
vision broadcast with a behind-the-scenes
front row view. The Ladies Registration
headquarters at the Statler will be open
the entire week for visiting and registra-
tion for special events. Programs giving
exact times will be available at the desk.
The Round-table breakfasts are one of
the biggest attractions of the convention.
The opportunity for informal discussions
with fellow milk dealers from other mar-
kets is a popular headliner. The break-
fasts are informal. The signs on tables
provide starting points for discussions.
There are no speeches. Physical facilities
this year are limited, so ticket sales will
be stopped when capacity is reached.
Tables will be assigned for Sales and Ad-
vertising, Plant and Accounting.
The Awards Dinner at which the Col-
lege Students' Dairy Products Judging
Contest winners receive their cups and
medals is a popular event. These stu-
dents come from the dairy colleges
throughout the country. The dinner will
be in the Book-Cadillac Tuesday, October
23.

Three Floridians Get
Convention Assignments
THREE Florida Members have been hon-
ored with assignments on M. I. F. Con-
vention program.
Curry Bassett, Bassett Dairies, Talla-
hassee, and Chairman of the Florida
Association's Accounting Committee,
will speak on the program of the Ac-


BASSETTr NEILSEN


R IL

JOHNSTON LAY

counting Section. Alf Neilsen, Alfar
Creamery Co., West Palm Beach, will
participate in a symposium on "Fluid
Milk Products" in the Sales and Adver-
tising Section. Rex Smith, Foremost
Dairies' General Office, will participate
in the program of the Sales Section as
one of a four-member panel on "Sales
Incentives." Brady Johnston, Dinsmore
Dairy Co., Jacksonville, is a member of
M. I. F. Public Relations Committee,
which will present a special film and
discussion on "What Each of Us Must
Do to Improve Public Relations." Alf
Nielson will participate in a number of
special conferences as a member of M.
I. F. Board of Directors.
E. T. Lay, Executive Director of F.
D. I. A., will participate in a conference
of State and National Dairy Association
Executives.


Sanitarians Convention
Speaker Urges Training of
Food Plant "Housekeepers"
"A CLEAN plant is a source of added
profits because quality is maintained and
losses due to spoilage or condemnation
are reduced to a minimum," M. A.
Williamson, special representative of the
International Correspondence Schools,
told the Fifteenth Annual Meeting of
the National Association of Sanitarians
at Miami Beach, Fla., August 24.
Mr. Williamson, speaking on "Food
Plant Sanitation Education," pointed
out that a clean plant also contributes
to employee morale and will raise, the
standards of production as a result.
"The aggressive processor knows, in
addition, that a clean plant is a real
asset in that it becomes a show place
for visiting buyers and the public," Mr.
Williamson said.


SPECIAL NOTICE
ALL MILK PLANTS
The office of Mr. John M. Scott,
Chief Dairy Supervisor, requests all
Milk Plants please note that mail
from that office of recent date en-
closing new information on milk
bottle cap labels failed to enclose
sample of required label for:
"Grade A Homogenized Pasteur-
ized Milk With and Without Vita-
min Added."
Plants are advised that these sam-
ples will be mailed them at a later
date but sample will be furnished
immediately upon request to John
M. Scott, Seagle Building, Gaines-
ville, Florida.



Milk Sanitarians Group
Announces Committee
MR. L. T. SMITH, State Dairy Supervisor,
Jacksonville, who is the current president
of the Florida Association of Milk Sani-
tarians, recently appointed the following
Permanent Committee on Sanitary Stan-
dards (Florida):
W. H. Brown, Director, Food and
Laboratory Division, Jacksonville
J. F. Koger, Chief Dairy Inspector,
Dade County, Miami
A. G. Shaw, State Dairy Supervisor,
Tallahassee
H. H. Wilkowske (chairman), Asst.
Dairy Technologist, Florida Ag-
ricultural Experiment S t a t i o n,
Gainesville.
This move was made at the request of
the president of the International As-
sociation of Milk and Food Sanitarians.
The Florida Association of Milk Sanitar-
ians is affiliated with this International
group. The Florida committee will work
directly with the International Associa-
tion Committee on Sanitary Procedure on
problems relating to sanitary procedures,
sanitary standards and sanitary equip-
ment design.


Executive Committee Meet
THE EXECUTIVE committee of the Florida
Association of Milk Sanitarians will meet
in Jacksonville, Florida on November io,
1951, in order to set the date and plan
the program of the next annual meeting.
All members and interested persons are
urged to notify any one of the officers of
the Association prior to this meeting of
any new topics or speakers they would
like to have appear on the next annual
program. Information regarding good
speakers not generally known to the entire
membership is especially desired by the
program committee.


6 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS







749 ~9,**


fo %?WJ4i~a/e -


Whether you're growing beef or milk,
there's one profitable combination of ferti-
lizer and grass that makes you more profit.
IDEAL Pasture Fertilizers have made a
good name for themselves over the years
through paying out in dollars.
One reason IDEAL products make such
a hit is that the Wilson & Toomer repre-
sentative takes your varying soil and water
conditions into his recommendations. The
result-a better balanced pasture for your
requirements.


NEW
TEAM
MEMBER

Harvey A. Page has joined the Wilson & Toomer
team of specialists whose aim is to help you grow
bigger and more profitable crops.
Mr. Page is our pasture consultant. He is a
graduate in animal husbandry, University of
Florida, and will devote his entire time to the
pasture problems of the increasingly important
dairy and beef cattle industry.


The Right Combination For Profitable Pastures

iWILSON & TOOMER
FERTILIZER COMPANY
and Divisions
FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL SUPPLY COMPANY
Peninsular Fertilizer Company Tampa Cartledge Fertilizer Company Cottondale
G EN E R A L OFFICES JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA


FOR OCTOBER, 1951 7


'I IBI






Guiding hand through two decades of progress in dairying in Florida's County Number two:




A Tribute to Albert Lawton


DAIRYMEN IN Florida's l)uval County
look upon herd improvement as a serious
job which requires a definite plan for
developing better stock. And their
progress of the past two decades prove
the theory.
When A. S. Lawton became county
agent there 22 years ago, rolling pasture-
lands were not very plentiful. I)Dairy
farmers were crowding grade cattle into
lo or o2 acres of land. The only grass
of any economic importance was carpet,
and pasture fertilization was unknown.
The majority of dairymen were on pure-
ly a "feed out of the bag" program.
Today, the picture is different. Since
Lawton's arrival in 1929, dairymen have
become interested in getting the best
stock and the best condition for their
stock. Their prime consideration has
been to improve. their herds by providing
more nutritious feed and through better
breeding.
Feed was the first problem Lawton
took up with the dairymen. In 193o,
B. H. Carlton, with Lawton's assistance,
started a demonstration on the growing
of White Dutch clover on his farm. It
was the first clover grown for cattle feed
in Florida.
Noticing the growth of clover along
highways where oyster shell was used, the
two men set up the test to include liberal
amounts of this material as well as vari-
ous levels of phosphate and potash in
the form of complete fertilizers, bag
screenings and other methods.
After three years of this development,
the University of Florida Agricultural
Experiment Station, on recommendation
of work there, established test plots in
the county. On these plots various levels
of phosphate, potash and lime were used
over a period of five years, definitely
determining the minimum amounts of
these materials needed for the successful
growing of the clover.
From that pioneer beginning, planting
clover as a pasture crop has increased
in Duval County to the present time
when more than 8,ooo acres of White
Dutch clover means approximately
three-quarters of a million dollars annu-
ally. And with the establishment of
these permanent pastures came the prac-
tice of fertilizing them once a year. The
result is a much more nutritious and
palatable grass-and fatter, healthier,
better-producing cows.
To obtain improved pastures, Lawton
inaugurated a program to acquire suit-
able acreage on which to operate a


LAWTON


dairy. Today, all dairymen in the
county have adequate-sized farms located
on soils good for growing grasses and
feed crops.
Growing sugar cane as a winter supple-
ment was started about three years back.
Already this crop has proved so popular
that about 300 to 400 acres are planted
to feed cattle, both beef and dairy.
In 1930, about the same time experi-
ments with feed got under way, Lawton
also devoted part of his efforts to breed-
ing better cattle. At that time, he insti-
tuted a program to obtain better sires,
and, by 1932, not a grade dairy bull was
left on a dairy farm in Duval County.


Between 1930 and 1941, this program
was responsible for the raising of some
o1,ooo high grade replacements. Then
came World War Il and the extremely
high price of milk. Dairymen's interest
in growing calves waned somewhat and
many of them got rid of their purebred
bulls.
In 1949, interest in breeding better
cattle was revived-but by that time most
of the purebred bulls were gone from
the farms. Again, County Agent Lawton
had the answer. With 24 farmers co-
operating, he organized the Artificial
Breeding Association, which bred 2,496
cows last year, the first full year of
operation. Today, 45 Duval County
dairymen are members of the organiza-
tion and they plan to breed about 4,000
cows this year.
Another phase of the current interest
in breeding better cows artificially is the
definite swing to purebred females-
mostly Guernsey and Jersey. During the
past five years, 11 dairymen have started
raising purebred herds, bringing the
county's total to 19 purebred breeders
owning almost 2,000 head of registered
cattle.
The first organization of dairymen in
the interest of securing better milk pro-
ducers was the Duval Dairy Herd Im-
provement Association, started in 1939
with four members. The group now has
23 members with 1,774 of the county's
dairy cows.
In continual operation for 13 years,


Jerseys in Walter Welkener's Holly Hill Dairy, 7acksonville, one of the best in the
country, also have some of the best pasture in the country. This white clover had been
grazed continuously since January 3r, 1949.


8 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS







the D. H. I. A. program is credited with
material decrease in the cost of milk pro-
duction in Duval County. And, at the
close of the last test year, the organiza-
tion's top herd had a per cow average of
512 pounds of butterfat-more than
double the state average.
This association also boosts four dairy
bulls proven in the county and sold to
artificial breeding studs throughout the
country. They employ two full-time
testers.
In 1947, the county's dairy industry
met still another situation with a third
organization the Ja(ksonville Dairy
Council. Composed of producers and
distributors, this group is doing a good
job of creating good will and cooperation
between tle two groups. And, under the
guiding hand of the county agent, who
has been president since its beginnings.
the Council is carrying on an educational
program as to the value of milk.
But despite the progress of Duval
County's dairy industry during the past
22 years, Lawton still sees room for im-
provement and other problems to be
solved.
One of the biggest of these problems
still facing dairymen in that area is that
of raising dairy cows free of parasites.
In the experimental stage are various
types of sheds and pens, which have been
built in an effort to obtain this result.
Practically all farmers keep their dairy
caloves confined for the first six months.
This way, the calves are kept free of
parasites at least until they get a good
start.
But, if their record of the past 20
years or so is any criteria, the Duval
dairymen, with the aid of County Agent
Lawton, will find the solution to the
parasite condition and go on improving
their herds and making them even more
profitable during the next couple of
decades. (The FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS ex-
presses appreciation to the "Florida Agri-
cultural Extension Service" for much of
the above information).

Florida Experiencing
Milk Shortage
FLORIDA, LIKE many areas of the nation, is
experiencing a near-acute milk shortage.
A number of Distributors have reported
their inability to supply the current de-
mand for milk and that supplies from
other areas are very hard to get.
The long season of dry weather alfec-
ted the Florida milk supply although not
as seriously as in areas of extreme drought
conditions.
Dairymen believe the Florida supply
should be back to normal within about
sixty days so that the Florida fluid milk
demand can be supplied with home-pro-
duced milk.


Less Labor Milks More Cows and Handles


More Milk with the Flexible Model F



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dairies using the De Laval Combine
Milker installed in a separate milking
room in connection with either a loose
housing or stanchion-type barn. Stoop-
ing, squatting, walking from cow to
can and carrying milk are eliminated.


Ron Directly into Cans...
Most Combine users have
installations which auto-
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and fill the 40 qt. cans in
the adjacent milk house.
Carrying and pouring
are eliminated.


OR IN YOUR
DAIRY BARN OR MILKING SHED
Dairymen are enthusiastic about the
wonderfully efficient results obtained
with the De Laval Combine Milker in-
stalled in the barn or milking shed. One
man milks 50 or more cows perhour.The
teat cups are moved from cow to cow
and the milk is conveyed through
sanitary pipe to the milk room.


Aerate, Cool and Can...
In some sections, such as
California, the installa-
tion is arranged to filter
and convey the milk and
discharge it over a sur-
face cooler, thence into
the 40 qt. cans.


Discharge into Farm Tank
The De Laval Combine
discharges the milk into
the refrigerated farm
tank, from which it is
either "canned off" or
pumped directly into the
milk tank truck.


r TheDe Lovel Separator Co., Depl. N-27
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mmmmmm mmmmm


FOR OCTOBER, 1951 9









Fall 4-HDairyShows Announced


STHE WEST Florida 4-H and FFA Dairy
Show held at Chipley August 16 started
the series of Fall Dairy Shows for young-
sters carrying dairy projects. Other dis-
trict dairy shows scheduled during the
Fall are as follows:
4-H and FFA Livestock Show-Ocala,
September 25-26.
North Florida 4-H Area Show and Con-
test-Quincy, October 17.
Central Florida 4-H Area Show and
Contest-Orlando, November 17.
Two other district shows are commonly
held in January. These are the Florida
West Coast 4-H and FFA Dairy Show at
Tampa and the Northeast Florida 4-H
Livestock Show at Jacksonville. The State
FFA Dairy Show is held at the State Fair
in Tampa while the State 4-H Dairy Show
is held in connection with the Central
Florida Exposition in Orlando in Feb-
Suary.
County 4-H Dairy Shows and Contests
will be held preliminary to the North
Florida 4-H Area Dairy Show and the
Central Florida 4-H Area Dairy Show as
outlined below:
North Florida
Leon County 4-H Show-Tallahassee,
September 24-AM
Jackson County 4-H Show-Marianna,
September 24-PM
Gadsden County 4-H Show-Quincy,
September 29
Jefferson County 4-H Show-Monti-
cello, October 3-AM
Madison County 4-H Show-Madison,
October 3-PM
Central Florida
Orange County 4-H Dairy Show-Or-
lando, October 17-AM
Volusia County 4-H Dairy Show-De-
land, October 17-PM
Lake County 4-H Dairy Show-Lees-
burg, November 3
Brevard County 4-H Dairy Show-
November 3
Osceola County 4-H Dairy Show-Kis-
simmee, November 10
Polk County 4-H Dairy Show-Bartow,
November 1o.
The dairy club members in this pro-
ject will be judged as follows: Animal 40
points, fitting 20 points, showmanship 20
points, and record book 20 points. The
five members with the highest overall
scores on their dairy projects will repre-
sent their respective counties in the Area
Contests at Quincy on October 17 or Or-
lando on November 17.
The largest livestock show put on by
farm boys and girls in one county is the
Polk County Youth Show. It is scheduled


for December 7 and 8 at Bartow. Many
other counties will hold livestock shows.
Dairy shows will be held in connection
with a number of fairs over the state.
The dairy shows provide an annual
climax and reward for the year's work.
Some of these shows are part of a contest
in which the 4-H members are scored on
several items besides the animal exhibited.


In all cases the show or contest is conduc-
ted to provide a stimulus or inspiration
for better dairy husbandry.
Two statewide 4-H contests are provi-
dted in dairy production and not con-
nected with any show. The Efficient
Dairy Production Contest and the Dairy
Achievement Contest are based on the
member's overall dairy record.


A pair of Future Farmer of Amierica youngsters from Jackson and Gadsden counties
showed the top breed animals in tlhe Sixth Annual Il'est Florida Dairy Show held
recently in City Park, Chipley. (Geoge Ford (left) of Quiincy is sltaning with his
Jersey cow, judged the best animal of that breed entered in the show. Calvin Craw-
ford (right) /won tle award for showing the top G(;ernsey animal.



Three Counties Lead in West


Florida Dairy Show Premiums


JACKSON, GADSDF.N, and Holmes coun-
ties placed most of the winners in the
Sixth Annual West Florida Dairy Calf
Show, held August i4th at Chipley's
city park.
The show's champions were entered
by George Ford, 15, Quincy, and Cal-
vin Crawford, 14, Marianna. Both are
members of the Future Farmers of
America.
Ford's cow was judged the top animal
in the Jersey class. The Guernsey cham-
pionship went to a nine-month-old
heifer owned by Crawford. Ford was
awarded a Jersey bull calf, and Craw-
ford a Guernsey bull calf, gifts from the
Florida Jersey and Guernsey clubs.
Hilton Sims, 17, of Bonifay, a 4-H
club member, edged out two other 4-H
youngsters in individual judging com-
petition. Sims had 88 points, good
enough to win a trophy from the Flori-
da Times-Union. Only a point behind
was Edwin Duce of Jackson County.


Julian Weblb of Washington County
placed third, just one point behind
Duce.

Jackson County Squad Second
Jackson County won judging contests
both in the FFA and 4-H classes. Mem-
bers of the winning FFA team were Cal-
vin Crawford, James Rehberg, and Well-
born Rehberg. The top 4-H team con-
sisted of Edwin Duce, William Schack,
and Charles Crutchfield. Each team
won a prize of $15.
A team from Quincy placed second
in FFA judging. Others finished in
this order: Paxton, Graceville, Laurel
Hill, Campbellton, Malone, Cottondale,
Poplar Springs and Baker.
A Washington County squad was
runner-up in the 4-H judging event.
Teams from Holmes, Bay, Jackson, and
Washington followed, in that order.
W. L. Ford of Quincy, father of the
champion Jersey exhibitor, won the


10 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS






adult judging contest. He was awarded
seed, lime, and fertilizer to produce an
acre of pasture.
J. D. Fuqua of Altha, Lee Stanton
of Chipley, and E. A. Curry of Bonifay
were runners-up in the judging event.
Each was awarded to pounds of Pensa-
cola Bahia grass seed.
Joe Revis, a Chipley farmer showed
the winning animal in the family cow
contest. His prize was 500 pounds of
dairy feed. Martin Harrell of Chipley
and Howard Bruner of Vernon were
second and third.
Nearly fifty animals were entered in
the show, according to Washington
County Agent H. O. Harrison, general
chairman.
Paul Thomas, herdsman with Sani-
tary Dairy, Dothan, Ala., judged the
animal entries. T. MI. Love of Chipley
was the ringmaster.
Other show officials were W. W.
Brown of Gainesville, State Boys' 4-H
Club agent, T. L. Barrineau of Talla-
hassee, State Department of Vocational
Agriculture Education, J. Lee Smith of
Gainesville, district extension agent,
and Holmes County Agent Stuart C.
Bell of Bonifay.
Entries of 4-H and FFA members
were judged together this year for the
first time. Formerly separate prizes
went to winners in each group.
Animals were placed in three classes:
junior heifers, yearling heifers, and
cows. Each entrant was assigned a
blue, red, and white ribbon. Breed
champions were then selected from
blue-ribbon winners.
Every youngster who entered an ani-
mal came away with an award, received
$15, owners of red-ribbon animals Slo.
and owners of white-ribbon animals
6.50o.
Blue-ribbon winners included Billy
Oswald, William Schack, and Edwin
Duce, all Jackson county 4-H members;
Calvin Crawford, FFA, Marianna; Julian
Webb and Glenn Chance, FFA, Chipley;
and Lloyd Dubroff, Frink.
A total of $6oo in prize money was
awarded. Cash awards were presented
by J. Cecil Scroggin, president of the
Florida Bank at Chipley, who served as
the show's finance chairman.
The show is sponsored annually by
the State Department of Agriculture,
The Agricultural Extension Service,
and Chipley businessmen.
Washington County Show
PRIZES WON by Washington County
FFA and 4-H club members and farm-
ers in the Sixth Annual West Florida
Dairy Show included:
Family Cow Contest
First place Joe Revis, Chipley, 500
pounds of dairy feed.
(Continued on page 18)


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FOR OCTOBER, 1951 11


Reach the FLORIDA

DAIRY INDUSTRY

through the FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS








We Consign
TO THE LARGO
GUERNSEY SALE,
NOVEMBER 9

One service-age bull of
choice breeding

Three young AR cows
due with second calves
this fall.
From our herd of 300 registered
Guernseys we are consigning to t he
Florida Sale for the first time in
several years. Our bull is old
enough for service and is out of a
cow with an AR record of 14460
Milk 716 Fat as a 4-year old. The
three cows are just finishing their
first-calf records and are bred to
freshen this fall. All have AR re-
cords and are out of AR dams. We
believe they will be profitable for
their buyers. We invite you to look
them over carefully.


QUAIL ROOST FARMS
Rougemont, N. C.




For Better Beef


POUNDS+GRADE

GROW BETTER GRASS

Use time tested

"FFF" BRANDS

to add


I


F ORIDA


OR E


INC.


FE


LAKELAND, FLORIDA


Guernsey Sales November 7, 9

Are Announced by Breeders


THE FLORIDA Guernsey Cattle Club is spon-
soring two Sales of purebred Guernsey
Cattle. The East Coast Sale will be held
at Boutwell's Dairy, Lake Worth, Florida
on November 7th. The Florida State Sale
will be held at the Fair Grounds, Largo
November 9th. Col. Tom McCord of
Montgomery, Alabama will serve as Auc-
tioneer and Ralph Coarsey, Manager of
Riegeldale Farms, Trion, Georgia will
read pedigrees at both Sales.
The consignors are outstanding Guern-
sey breeders from Florida, Georgia, North
and South Carolina as listed below: Bray
Island Plantation, Inc., Yemassee, South
Carolina; Clear Springs Farm, Concord,
North Carolina; John Cone, Plant City.
Florida; Thomas Haselton, Lake View
Dairy Farm, Eustis, Florida; Carroll L.
Ward & Son, Winter Park, Florida; Mae-
geo Farms, Lexington, North Carolina;
Brookberry Farm, Winston-Salem, North
Carolina; John Sargeant, Lakeland, Flori-
da; Boutwell's Dairy, Lake Worth, Flori-
da; Eskdale Farms, Tryon, North Caro-
lina; F. E. Lykes, Milton Farms, Arden,
North Carolina; Dinsmore Dairies, Dins-
more, Florida; Riegeldale Farms, Trion,
Georgia; Belmont View Farm, Franklin,
North Carolina; Leon Sellers, St. Peters-
burg, Florida; Ben-Bow, Quitman, Geo-
rgia; D. I. Parker, Dublin, Georgia; Ne-
jasco Farm, Canton, Georgia; Shoal Falls
Farm, Inc., Hendersonville, North Caro-
lina; C. L. Bodden, Dinsmore, Florida;
Clarence O. Knight, Guilford College,
North Carolina; Quail Roost Farms,
Rougemont, North Carolina; Wilbur J.
and Kathryn W. Casey, Largo, Florida;
Robert Crow, Dunedin, Florida; Edisto
Farms, Denmark, South Carolina; Gippy
Plantation, Moncks Corner, South Caro-
lina; Pleasant View Farm, Jonesville,
South Carolina.
There will be approximately 35 ani-
mals sold at Lake Worth and 45 at the
State Sale in Largo. The Sales Committee
of the Florida Guernsey Cattle Club have
selected the animals very carefully. Mem-
bers of the Committee are: Earl Johnson,
Dinsmore, Florida, Chairman; R. R. Jen-
nings, Jacksonville, Florida; Carroll L.
Ward, Winter Park, Fla.; Leon Sellers, St.
Petersburg, Florida; J. McK. Jeter, Union,
South Carolina and J. H. Logan, Largo,
Florida.
Dairymen, 4-H Club boys and girls, Fu-
ture Farmers and all other interested in
good cattle are cordially invited to attend
the Sales. The cattle will all be negative
to Bang's and T.B. and guaranteed to be
sound in every respect. A large number
of them will be calfhood vaccinated.


Catalogs of the two Sales will be avail-
able prior to Sale time and may be secured
by writing to J. H. Logan, Secretary,
Florida Guernsey Cattle Club, P. O. Box
267, Largo, Florida.


Dairy Plant Short

CourseScheduled for

September 27-29
THE UNIVERSITY of Florida Annual Short
Course in Dairy Manufactures has always
been a popular one. The 1951 program,
just released by Dr. Leon Mull of the
University Dairy Science Department,
promises to be one of the best.
Planned jointly by the Dairy Depart-
ment Staff and the Plant Committee of
the Florida Dairy Industry Association,
headed by Russell Bevan of St. Peters-
burg, the program opens at 1:30 p.m.,
Thursday, September 27.
The Thursday afternoon and Friday
morning sessions will be devoted to sub-
jects on "Milk and Milk Products". The
Friday afternoon and Saturday morning
programs are devoted to "Ice Cream"
subjects, including an Ice Cream Clinic on
Chocolate Ice Cream.
On Friday evening, a fellowship hour
is scheduled for 6:30 p.m. at the Hotel
Thomas and the Annual Dinner for 7.30
p.m. at the U. of F. Cafeteria.
The Program sessions end Saturday
noon and all who can are expected to see
a University of Florida football game with
Georgia Tech at 8 p.m. at the U. of F.
Stadium.
Hotel reservations should be sent to Dr.
Leon Mull, Dairy Laboratory, Univer-
sity of Florida, Gainesville.

Premier Dairy Exhibitor Award
For 1952 Tampa State Fair
FLORIDA PUREBRED Dairymen will com-
pete for a new award at the 1952 Florida
State Fair in Tampa, February 5-16.
The Florida Dairy Industry Association
Board of Directors has announced spon-
sorship of a new revolving trophy to be
awarded the "Premier Dairy Exhibitor".
The award will be made to the Florida
exhibitor of Dairy Animals winning the
most money in premiums in open single
classes. To qualify, the winner must com-
pete in five or more open single classes.
The winner of this handsome engraved
trophy will receive a permanent minia-
ture of same if and when he loses it to
another exhibitor.


12 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS











pure Hired GUERNSEY CATTLE

For Sale at Public Auction


BoutwejI's Dairy, Lake Worth, Florida, November 7, 1951 at 12:30 p.m.

Fair Grounds, Largo, Florida, November 9, 1951 at 1:00 p.m.


Cattle consigned by outstanding Guernsey Breeders in North Carolina,
South Carolina, Georgia and Florida. Featuring Heavy Springers, Bred
Heifers and Bulls of serviceable age.


Sponsored by the
FLORIDA GUERNSEY CATTLE CLUB


For catalogs write J. H. Logan, Secretary


P. 0. Box 267, Largo, Florida


DINSMORE FARMS
CONSIGN TO
FLORIDA
GUERNSEY SALES,

To the Florida East Coast
Sale, Lake Worth, Nov. 7
Two Daughters of:
"Quail Roost Noble Yeoman" (pictured)
DINSMORE NOBLE BLANCHETTE
Due December 20, 1951 to service of
Quail Roost Master Mac
DINSMORE NOBLE JONQUIL
Due to calve just before sale day
Quail Roost Noble Yeoman
To the Florida State Guernsey Sale at Largo, Nov. 9
A TOP A-R COW-DINSMORE GARFIELD JUSTINE, 12000-580-Sr3-365c (Pending). Sired by a son
of Quail Roost Maxmost and out of a VERY GOOD half-sister of Dinsmore Royal May, EXCELLENT
($10,000) Grand Champion at five State fairs. 01B.i.
*A BRED HEIFER-DINSMORE NO MAX LOLA, out of a VERY GOOD daughter of Quail Roost
Maxmost. She is due January 18, 1952 to service of the bull pictured above.
Federal Accredited 57790 J. B. LANOUX, Herdsman Negative to Bang


1'
Dinsmore Farms
V. C. JOHNSON EARL A. JOHNSON


Smiles north
Jacksonville
Near U. S. 1.


o' Dinsmore, Florida
CHARLES F. JOHNSON BRADY S. JOHNSTON


FOR OCTOBER, 1951 13


'S


L











Our


Conjiinment


to

THE FLORIDA JERSEY

CATTLE CLUB SALE

Tuesday, Nov. 6, 1951 12:30 E.S.T.


Bartow, Fla.


X. STANDARD IVY CLAUDIA
1522779, Classified Very Good.
Dropped October 18, 1945
2-5 305 8894 Milk 5.6% 496 Fat
-Silver Medal.
3-7 305 9324 Milk 5.9% 550 Fat
-Silver Medal.

OBSERVER DESIGN BRIDGET
1649268, Classified Very Good.
Dropped January 20, 1947
1-11 305 6788 Milk 5.8% 394 Fat.
2-11 305 8762 Milk 5.9% 520 Fat.

X. STANDARD IVEY POMPEY
524807 5 STAR BULL
Dropped: January 13, 1950
A son of BILTMORE IVY BUT-
TERKING 451141, Ex. Superior
Silver Medal Tested Sire, out of
SYBIL POMPEY LOUISE
1471758, Gold & Silver Medal,
TON OF GOLD cow.





HOLLY HILL




FARM

Gold Star Herd
Rt. 3, Box 612,
Constructive Breeder 6X.
Jacksonville, Fla.

Herd T.B. & Bangs Accredited.

INIIMMNNINI


Florida Jerseymen Plan Annual

State Sale, Bartow, November 6


THE FLORIDA Jersey Cattle Club is hold-
ing its annual state sale on November 6
at Bartow. Forty-three registered Jersey
cattle have been consigned. The sale
will be held at Bartow instead of Orlando
where it has been held the last four years
in recognition of the large amount of
Jersey interest in Polk County. Taking
the sale to different areas stimulates in-
terest by providing an opportunity for
people in those areas to attend and see
the outstanding dairy cattle offered.
The State Sale is designed to make
available some of the best blood of top
herds of the state to new breeders or
dairymen desiring foundation animals to
start a herd or add to their present herd.
It includes 32 head of milk cows or spring-
ers, 8 bred or open heifers, and 3 well-
bred young bulls. William Nolan, Jr. of
Jacksonville is Chairman of the Sale
Committee.
The Annual Meeting and Jersey Ban-
quet will be held the afternoon and even-
ing of the day before the sale.
Herds consigning cattle are Alpine
Dairy, A. T. Alvarez, Skinners' Dairy, and
Walter Welkener of Jacksonville, Frank
DeBord of Quincy, Florida School for the
Deaf and Blind of St. Augustine, Summer
Fields of Summerfield, George Sixma of
Lake Helen, J. K. Stuart (Club President)
and Board of Polk County Commissioners
of Bartow, and Pennock Plantation of
Jupiter and 4-H Club Members Joseph
Brady and Paul Thornhill.


Coming Events of Interest
September 27-29-Plant Supt. Short Course in
Dairy Manufacture, Univ. of Fla., Gaines-
ville; Sponsors: F.D.I.A. & Univ. of Fla.
October 4-6-Fla. Public Health Assn. Annual
Meeting Miami Beach (Entertainment by
F.D.I.A.)
October 22-24-International Assn. of Ice
Cream Mfrs. Book-Cadillac Hotel, Detroit.
October 24-26-Milk Industry Foundation
Annual Convention, Statler Hotel, Detroit.
October 24-Dairy Association Executives An-
nual Conference, Detroit, Michigan.
October 28-30-Fla. Veterinary Medical Assn.
Annual Meeting, Tampa.
October 30-Dairy Herdsmen's Short Course
University of Florida, Gainesville. Spon-
sors: F. D. I. A. and University of Florida.
November 5-6-Annual Convention, Florida
Retail Farm Equipment Ass'n Orlando.
November 5-Annual Meeting and Banquet,
Florida Jersey Cattle Club, Bartow.
November 6-Florida State Jersey Sale, Bartow
Livestock Pavillion.
November 7 Florida State Guernsey Sale,
Boutwell's Dairy, Lake Worth.
November 8-9-Feed Dealers Nutritional Con-
ference, University of Florida, Gainesville.
November 9-Annual Guernsey Sale, Largo,
Florida.
November 15-17-International Assn. of Milk
Control Agencies, Miami, Fla., L. K. Nicho-
las, Jr., President.
November 16-17-Board of Directors, Florida
Industry Association, Miami.
November 27-29-Southern Assn. of Ice Cream
Mfrs.; Vinoy Park & Soreno Hotels, St.
Petersburg, Fla.


Each of the above herds, except the 4-H
Club Members, are on production test and
all but one have classified for type.
Another state classification is being sched-
uled just before the sale.
Florida is fast becoming a state of top-
flight Jerseys. Despite its relatively small
number of herds, in 1950-51 year it ranked
eleventh among all the states in num-
ber animals classified for type, thirty-first
in number of cows on H.I.R. test, and
fourth in cows on Register of Merit test.
A total of 436 transfers of registered Jer-
seys were recorded last year with a larger
number of new registrations.
Several Superior Sires have been de-
veloped in the state. Florida records are
prominent in the Jersey Bulletin, nation-
al publication of the American Jersey Cat-
tle Club. Each month it contains records
of Florida cows in the lists of high cows
and in the list of high herds in production
of the nation. A number of new registered
Jersey herds were started during the past
year and many 4-H and FFA members
have secured registered animals.

Florida Dairymen Receive
Herd Honor Roll Diplomas
by C. W. REAVES, Extension Dairyman,
University of Florida
TEN FLORIDA herds qualified for the Na-
tional Herd Honor Roll during 1950 and
were presented diplomas at the Annual
Dairy Field Day at the University of Flori-
da by Mr. H. G. Clayton, Director of the
Agricultural Extension Service. The re-
quirement for the National Herd Honor
Roll is an average of 350 or more pounds
of butterfat per cow for all cows in a herd
in a year's DHIA test. The Honor Roll
Diplomas are provided by the National
Purebred Dairy Cattle Association on the
approval of the State Extension Dairyman
in each state, who signs the diplomas.
The Walter Welkener Dairy, Jackson-
ville, had the highest average volume of
milk and butterfat with 9439 lbs of milk
and 512 lbs. fat. The John Robinson
Dairy, Orange Park, was second with 8899
lbs. of milk and 453 lbs. fat.
Highest average butterfat test was won
by the Fla. D. & B. Dairy at St. Augustine
with 5.5 percent. (See Cover Picture)

Dairy Science Club
Open House, Oct. 4
THE UNIVERSITY of Florida 'Dairy Science
Club has issued an invitation to all new
students and others interested, to at-
tend Open House at the Dairy Products
Laboratory the evening of October 4th.


14 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS







1 FLORIDA JERSEY CATTLE CLUB
12th ANNUAL STATE SALE m.
Tuesday, November 6, 1951 12:30 E.S.T.

STATE LIVESTOCK PAVILION-BARTOW

43 Head Registered Jerseys

Carefully Selected Cattle-Mostly Cows, Springer or Fresh-3 Outstanding
Young Bulls by Superior Sires-A Nice Group of Well Bred Heifers.
This is a splendid opportunity to buy heavy producing animals of excel-
lent blood lines.
For catalog write-F. E. Baetzman, Secretary, Court House, Orlando, Fla.
REMEMBER THE PLACE AND DATE OF SALE-BARTOW, NOV. 6, 1951
ANNUAL MEETING AND BANQUET THE AFTERNOON AND EVENING BEFORE SALE


WE ARE CONSIGNING TO THE FLORIDA STATE GUERNSEY SALE
AT LARGO, NOV. 9:
A Top Bull Prospect
BROOKBERRY JESTER
By Fairlawn Performer's Peer
Out of Stadacona Joyful
Record: 16227-698-8yr.

WE ARE CONSIGNING TO THE FLORIDA GUERNSEY CATTLE CLUB EAST COAST SALE,
LAKE WORTH, NOV. 7:
A BULL
By Fairlawn Dairymaid's King
Out of Two Brooks Model
Record: 8160-438-Jr.2-305C-2X
On retest 136 days 5009-236-Jr.4


BROOKBERRY FARMS
Winston-Salem, North Carolina
Bowman and Gordon Gray, Owners; M. J. Dickens, Herdsman; James A. Dickens, Mgr.

FOR OCTOBER, 1951 0 15





Your

Opportunity



THE FLORIDA JERSEY

CATTLE CLUB SALE

Bartow

Nov. 6,1951


to get a future Herd Sire
combining the two most
popular blood lines in
the South today -the
Standard-Jester a bull
calf dropped in June by
Xenia Draconis Standard,
our own Senior Superior
Sire, and out of a Very
Good daughter ofBramp-
ton Jester Basil.

We are also offering two
daughters of the Tested
Sire, Magnolia Standard
Stan, one a yr-old and the
other, a springing 4-yr.
old.

Also, two springing 2-yr.
old Tennessee heifers.




ALPINE DAIRY

W. J. Nolan

Jacksonville


By C. W. REAVES,
Florida Extension Dairyman
THE QUESTIONS are sometimes asked in
sincerity as to whether purebred cows
will produce as much as good grades and
whether they will produce as economical-
ly.
The history of the dairy cow is that
the earliest cows produced only enough
milk to feed their calves. Following their
domestication, their production was in-
creased by some selection and better feed.
The rapid progress did not occur until
breeds of specialized milk strains were
developed.
Herd books were established for the
various breeds about ioo years ago to
record these cattle that had been selected
and bred up for specialized milk and
butter production. This protected the
breed from mixture of other types or
breeds of cattle. Thus the purebred
breeding associations were organized.
Use of sires of these pure breeds of
dairy cattle in the dairy herds of the
nation have almost eliminated the scrub
or "native" dairy cow from our dairy
herds. Use of purebred dairy bulls on
scrub cows result in grade cows in one
generation. Successive use of purebred
bulls in a herd give high grades possess-
ing almost 1oo percent of pure breeding
with only a small percent of the blood of
the old scrubs.
Thus, it should not be surprising that
many of the high grades approach the
production of the purebreds. They
should, for much pure breeding is repre-
sented in their blood. Certain good
grades will out-produce certain pure-
breds. But it should be remembered
that the fountain head of high produc-
tion of the grade cow lies back in her
high-production purebred ancestry.
It is true not all purebreds are high
producers. In an individual case it may
be that for some reason the animal did
not grow off properly, is not thrifty, is
not well-fed or properly managed or it
can be that she does not have the in-
herent capacity to produce. Breeders
have long since learned that good type
and registration papers do not guarantee
high production. Outstanding produc-
tion comes as a result of a long-time
breeding program based on production
records of milk and butterfat of all cows
in a herd. Where purebred breeders
have followed this program, they have
high production bred into their cows,
which given a chance, will produce
profitably.
The fact remains that in this state, as


in the other states, the highest records
have been made by purebred cows. Note
the following records made in Florida.
A registered Guernsey cow produced
17,354 pounds milk and 930 pounds
butterfat in one year. A registered Jersey
cow averaged 75 pounds milk per day for
the first six months of her lactation on
three times a day milking. Another
great Florida Jersey cow produced a total
of 60,717 pounds milk and 3,696 pounds
butterfat in five years, calving every
twelve months. This was an average of
four and one-half gallons per day of 6.1
percent milk for every day for io months
each year for five years. A registered
Jersey herd in Florida averaged 9439
pounds milk and 512 pounds butterfat
for each of 64 cows on DHIA test last
year. This was an average of 3.6 gallons
milk per day for each cow in milk for
the year.
I Records of large numbers of cows
show that purebreds make more profit
than grades. In a study of over 1oo,ooo
cows on DHIA test, representing both
grades and purebreds, the Bureau of
Dairy Industry found that the purebreds
showed o1 percent greater value of
product above feed cost than the grades.
There is additional profit due to the
increased inventory value of a purebred
herd.
The obligation of purebred cattle
owners is to improve their own herds and
thus help build a better dairy industry
and make dairy farming more profitable.
They must supply the seedstock for new
and better herds.

Herdsmen's Course
At Gainesville

Oct. 30-Nov. 1
"HERD MANAGEMENT" is the subject theme
selected for the 1951 Herdsmen's Short
Course by the University of Florida Dairy
Department and the Florida Dairy In-
dustry Association, co-sponsors of this im-
portant program.
This special 3-day Short Course is plan-
ned to be of value to both herd owners
and Dairy workers.
Experienced dairymen, as well as herds-
men in training, can profit by attendance
at this 3-day special training session.
The program in detail will soon be
available from the University Dairy De-
partment, Gainesville; the Florida Dairy
Industry Association, Jacksonville, or
from your County Farm Agent.


16 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


Reaves Ponders the Question:


,Are Purebred Cows Profitable?















Above is our barn and some of our cattle as seen from Highway 92 a quarter mile east of Plant City.
OFFERING ALL KINDS OF DAIRY CATTLE
AT OUR BARN NEAR PLANT CITY
Before buying your dairy cattle, see our selection at Plant City-springer cows
and heifers, Holsteins, Guernseys, Jerseys and Ayrshires-grade or registered.
We are in a position to furnish a limited number of registered Canadian
Ayrshire springers. Telephone for appointment.


ROSS
RFD 2-Telephone 42-F5
CARROLLTON, ILLINOI


REYNOLDS & SON
Ross Reynolds T
C Lyndel Reynolds PT ANT (


telephone 6-1248
CITY, FLA.


30 Years of Furnishing

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ENGINEERED TO MEET YOUR PARTICULAR NEEDS
FOR MOST ECONOMICAL OPERATION


MILLER MACHINERY

and SUPPLY COMPANY

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"CHERRY-BURRELL"
Coolers
Pasteurizers
Ice Cream Machinery

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"DE LAVAL"
Milkers
Separators
Clarifiers

127 N.E. 27th St., Miami


FOR OCTOBER, 1951 17


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Contact By-Products Division-87-061 Auburndale


Dairy Show Backers
by H. O. HARRISON
Washington County Agent
FOREMOST DAIRIES of Chipley, the
State Department of Agriculture,
and a group of interested citizens
and business concerns of Chipley
and nearby towns made $600 in
cash and other valuable prizes avail-
able to the 4-H and FFA boys and
farmers who entered this year's
Dairy Show.
Business and individual contrib-
utors who helped make the show
possible and demonstrating inter-
est from the entire area, were from
Graceville, Cottondale, Marianna,
De Fuinak Springs, Westville,
Blountstown, and Dothan, Ala.
Of the individual contributors
the local Foremost plant topped
the list with $loo in cash. The
State Department of Agriculture
donated $3.00.
The Florida Jersey Club donat-
ed a purebred bull calf and the
Florida Guernsey Club donated a
purebred Guernsey bull. Sanitary-
Dairy of Dothan donated a pure-
bred Jersey heifer calf.


West Florida Show
(Continued from page 11)
Second place Martin Harrell, Chip-
ley, 300 pounds of dairy feed.
Third place Howard Bruner, Vern-
on, 200 pounds of dairy feed.
Adult Judging Contest
Third place Lee Stanton, Chipley,
o1 pounds Pensacola Bahia grass seed.
Ribbon Awards
Blue Ribbons Julian Webb, FFA,
junior calf; Glen Chance, FFA, junior
heifer.
Red Ribbons Julian Webb, 4-H
junior calf; Cordell Harrison, 4-H heifer;
Ralph Carter, 4-H heifer; John Deal
and Glen Chance, FFA junior calves;
James Grimes and Kenneth Gainer, FFA
heifers; James and Kenneth McFatter,
FFA cows.
White Ribbons Joe Earl Collins,
4-H junior calf; Earl Cushing, Glen
Chance and Julian Webb, FFA junior
calves; Max Wells, Glen Smith and
Gerald Hudson, FFA junior heifers.
Team Judging
Washington County's team composed
of Joe Earl Collins, Julian Webb, and
Gene Cobb placed third.
Individual Judging
Julian Webb placed third, two points
behind winner.
Of the $600 in cash prizes, $119 was
won by Chipley FFA contestants and
exhibitors. Highest individual winner
was Glen Chance, who had a blue, red,
and white ribbon entry for winnings of
$31.50


18 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS







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FOR OCTOBER,


Now, 8 DAIRY
.i '' '


1951 19










DAIRY ASSOCIATION ACTIVITIES


Dairymen Will Entertain
Public Health Group

THE FLORIDA Dairy Industry Association
"Public Health Committee' will entertain
the Florida Public Health Association An-
nual Convention for the fourth consecu-
tive year on Friday evening, October 5th,
at the Casablanca Hotel, Miami Beach.
The program will be in the nature of a
Reception, "Fellowship Hour" and Enter-
tainment.
Chairman Brady Johnston of the As-
sociation Public Health Committee urges
all members of the Committee to partici-
pate in this "good will" gesture and in-
vites other members, particularly those
in the Miami area, to attend and have a
part in the Committee's reception for
these 400 leaders of Florida Public Health
groups.

Junior Dairy Association
Recommended by Committee
THE BOARD of Directors of the Florida
Dairy Industry Association will have be-
fore it for final consideration at its next
meeting, Nov. 16, a report by a special
Committee which recommends sponsor-
ship by the Association of a "Junior Dairy
Association".
The idea for formation of such a group,
originally presented to the Board about a
year ago by Secretary Andy Lay, resulted
in the appointment of an original Com-
mittee consisting of Wilmer Bassett, V. C.
Johnson and Sam Solomon, Sr.
This Committee secured a place on the
1951 Annual Meeting Program for dis-
cussion of the subject and the Secretary
of the Wisconsin Junior Dairy Association
(the only one known to be active), Mr. B.
R. Dugdale, as a speaker on the Annual


President-elect Theo Datson of F.D.I.A. is presented with the president's gavel by re-
tiring president Vernon Graves at the close of the 1951 Annual Convention in St.
Petersburg, June 15. Standing by are Ist Vice-president Wilmer Bassett, right, 2nd
Vice-president Frank Doub, left, and Executive Director E. T. (Andy) Lay, second
from left.


Meeting Program. Representatives of the
University of Florida Dairy Department.
State F.F.A. and 4-H Chapters, County
Agents and Dairy Extension Service were
requested by F.D.I.A. president to join
the previously appointed Committee of
three under the Chairmanship of Vice
President Wilmer Bassett to join the Com-
mittee in considering the merits of a Jun-
ior Dairy Association.
This Committee held a final meeting
and adopted its favorable report at the
time of the Annual Field Day Meeting in
Gainesville, July 13th. The report out-
lines reasons for the need, suggested ob-
jectives and a basic plan of organization.
Membership would be confined to F.F.A.
or 4-H Club members, actively conducting
Dairy training projects. The organiza-


tion would be considered an affiliate of
the Florida Dairy Industry Association
and supervised by an Advisory Board re-
presenting the F.D.I.A., F.F.A., 4-H, U. of
F. and County Farm Agents.

Executive Committee Meeting
Charts Association Plans
THE SIX-MEMBER Executive Committee
of the Florida Dairy Industry Associa-
tion was called together by President
Theo Datson for a one-day session in
Jacksonville, July 28th.
In addition to considering various
Committee and Activity Reports, the
principal action taken was the naming
of Standing Committee Chairmen and
the membership of the Association's
twenty Committees.


1951-52 COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN
FLORIDA DAIRY INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION, INC.


ADVISORY MEMBERS-Dr. E. L. Fouts, University of
Florida, Gainesville.
ALLIED TRADES (Alligator Club)-O. L. Bobo, Li-
quid Carbonic Co., Jacksonville.
ANNUAL FIELD DAY-Herman Burnett, Burnett's
Dairy Farms, Bradenton.
ANNUAL MEETING-Wilmer Bassett, Bassett's Dairy,
Monticello.
DAIRY HUSBANDRY-V. C. Johnson, Dinsmore
Farms, Dinsmore.
EXECUTIvE-Theo Datson, Borden's Datson Dairies,
Inc. Orlando.
FINANCE-J. N. McArthur, McArthur Jersey Farms
Dairy, Miami.
FLORIDA DAIRY NEws-Wilmer Bassett, Bassett's
Dairy, Monticello.


LADIES' AUXILIARY-Mrs. Ruth Graves, Beach Park
Dairy, Limona.
LEGISLATIVE-Wellington Paul, Foremost Dairies,
Jacksonville.
LONG RANGE DAIRY PLANNING-Alf R. Nielsen, Al-
far Creamery Co., West Palm Beach.
MEMBERSHIP-Frank Doub, Co-Chairman for Pro-
ducers, F. B. Doub Dairy, Jacksonville.
Wilmer Bassett, Co-Chairman for Producer-Dis-
tributors, Bassett's Dairy, Monticello.
Gordon Nielsen, Co-Chairman for Distributors
and Allied Trades, Alfar Creamery Co., West
Palm Beach.
MILK & ICE CREAM PLANT-Russell Bevan, Borden's
Dairy, St. Petersburg.
MILK PRODUCTION-W. J. Harman, Jr., Southern
Dairies, Gainesville.


PAST PRESIDENTS ADVISORY-VernoIi Graves, Beach
Park Dairy, Limona.
PASTURE DEVELOPMENT-Glenn Datson, Glenn Dat-
son Dairy, Orlando.
PLANT ACCOUNTING & COST-Curry Bassett, Bassett
Dairies, Tallahassee.
PUBLIC HEALTH-Brady Johnston, Dinsmore Dairy
Co., Jacksonville.
PUBLIC RELATIONS-W. J. Barritt, Jr., Borden's
Dairy, Tampa.
STANDARDS, REGULATIONS and INSPECTIONS-Tom G.
Lee, T. G. Lee Dairy, Orlando.
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA-Alf R. Nielsen, Alfar
Creamery Co., West Palm Beach.
VETERINARY MEMBERS-Dr. Karl Owens, D. V. M.
Gainesville.


20 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS







The budget for the remainder of the
calendar year 1951 was considered and
certain amendments adopted to the or-
iginal 1951 budget.
The Chairman of the Public Relations
Committee, Mr. W. J. Barrit, Jr., was
requested to call his Committee into
action just as soon as possible for the
purpose of considering and preparing a
recommended Public Relations Pro-
gram for the balance of the Association
fiscal year.
The next Directors' Meeting date was
set for November 16-17 in Miami, when
in addition to holding a one-day busi-
ness session, the Directors with F.D.I.A.
Committee Chairman also plan to at-
tend the Annual Dinner of the National
Convention of Milk Control Agencies
of which the Florida Administrator, L.
K. Nicholas, Jr., is President. The
Miami Meeting will be at the New Bis-
cayne Terrace Hotel on Biscayne Boul-
evard. Any members interested should
please advise Secretary E. T. Lay.

Attendance Prize Winners
At Annual Dairy Field Day
VALUABLE ATTENDANCE prizes awarded at
the 1951 Annual Dairy Field Day in-
cluded three purebred Jersey and Guern-
sey Bull Calves, valued at $300.00 each
and contributed by the State Dairy In-
dustry Association, the Florida Guernsey
Cattle Club and the Florida Jersey Cat-
tle Club.
Winners of the grand prizes: Jersey
calf from University of Florida Herd,
contributed by the F.D.I.A. was won by
Wilbur J. Casey, Largo; Jersey calf from
Holly Hill Dairy, Jacksonville, contri-
buted by the Fla. Jersey Cattle Club, was
won by Theo Datson, Orlando, who
gave the calf to Billy Nelson, a 4-H Club
son of Datson Dairies' producer Glen
Nelson, Orlando; Guernsey calf from
Boutwell's Dairy, Lake Worth, contri-
buted by the Fla. Guernsey Cattle Club,
was won by Herman Burnett, Bradenton.
The group was quite amused when
Casey, a prominent Guernsey breeder,
won and accepted the Jersey calf.
Winners of the special prizes were: 5
gallons of "Tesco Wood Preservative"
given by Tesco Chemicals of Atlanta,
Ga., was won by John Cone, Plant City;
50 lbs. "Special Calf Feed" given by
Jackson Grain Co., Tampa, was won by
Thomas O. Haselton, Lakeview Dairy
Farm, Eustis; 50 lbs. "Calf Feed", given
by Jackson Grain Co., Tampa; was won
by Jerry Knop, St. Augustine, nephew
of J. J. Smith of the Fla. D. 8c B. Dairy;
a large rubber utility bucket, donated
by General Mills, was won by H. B.
Thomas, Southern Dairies, West Palm
Beach; 5 gallons "Diversol" given by
The Diversey Corporation, was won by
Curry Bassett, Tallahassee; Complimen-


Additional 1951 Membership Dues Received

The Membership Committee wishes to express appreciation to the follow-
ing members whose 1951 membership dues have recently been received.-
Frank Doub, Wilmer Bassett and Gordon Nielsen, Co-Chairmen, Assn.
Membership Committee.
Dairies' Dues Received

A. J. Chestnut Dairy, Lakeland W. H. Kirton Dairy,


W. J. Gaines Dairy,
Fernandina

Gustafson's Dairy (Green
Cove Springs)


Boynton Beach
S. R. McAteer Dairy, Ocala

L. H. Sellers Guernsey Farm
Dairy, St. Petersburg


Highview Farms Dairy, Ocala Wieselthaler Dairy, Lake City


New Allied Trades Member

Diamond Alkali Chemicals Co., Cleveland, Ohio
Jim Jennings, Mfrs. Representative, Jacksonville, Fla.


Mr. Theo Datson, President of the Flor-
ida Dairy Industries, presents Arlen
Wetherington, Turkey Creek, the Florida
Dairy Industries Rotating Cup. Wether-
ington has received the cup for the sec-
ond straight year. He showed the Cham-
pion F.F.A. Dairy Guernsey cow and won
several other places at the Florida State
Fair in Tampa.

tary Registration for the 1952 Annual
Dairy Field Day was won by Dairyman
M. B. Carr of Jacksonville; Complimen-
tary Registration for the 1952 Annual
Meeting was won by Cecil Jerigan,
Dairyman of Pensacola; the special
Machinery Exhibit prize, a $1o.oo bill,
was won by Jerry Knop of St. Augus-
tine; and $5.oo bills were won by each of
the following: Dr. S. P. Marshall, Univ.
of Fla., Gainesville; Al Cody, Cody Pub-
lications, Kissimmee; Sam O. Noles,
State Board of Health, Milk Consultant,
Jacksonville; Mrs. James Price, White-
hurst Dairy, Gainesville, and Jack Rose,
International Harvester Co., Jackson-
ville.

"THE SWEETEST sound in anyone's ear is
the sound of his own name."


Dairies Reward
Future Farmers

THE FLORIDA Dairy Industry Association
and Southern Dairies, Inc., have very
appropriately given recognition to the
fine work of the Florida F.F.A. Program
and those who have done good work in
Dairy training.
The following awards to F.F.A. mem-
bers for their top ratings in Dairying
were presented at the 1951 Annual Con-
vention of the Florida Association F.F.A.
held June 18-22, at Daytona Beach.
Arlen Wetherington of Turkey Creek
(Hillsborough County) was awarded the
Florida Dairy Industry Association revolv-
ing trophy for the second straight year for
outstanding proficiency in his Dairy pro-
jects.
Arlen Wetherington also received the
$1oo Future Farmer Foundation Award
and the top Dairy Efficiency Plaque from
Southern Dairies.
Bill Gunter, Suwannee F.F.A. Chapter
at Live Oak, received the top District
Dairy Efficiency Plaque and $25 from
Southern Dairies.
Joe Register, Graceville; John R. Hey,
Greenwood; Edward Goodyear, Ocala:
Lloyd Harris, Bartow; and Buddy Sloan,
Ft. Pierce, were the other district winners
who were presented $25 each by Mr. W.
J. Harman for Southern Dairies.

Accounting Conference Is Postponed

THE F.D.I.A. Plant Cost and Account-
ing Committee has announced post-
ponement of a special two-days' cost and
accounting conference which had been
scheduled and announced to have been
held September 27-28 in Orlando.


FOR OCTOBER, 1951 21











Laclle6 JAuxlio


MRS. VERNON L. GRAVES, President Edited by MRS. E. T. LAY, Secretary


Ladies Enjoy Annual Dairy Field Day
Meeting Activities in Gainesville


by MRS. BETTY HARMAN
LADIES, DID yOU miss Gainesville's AIR-
CONDITIONED Field Day, July 12-13?
If so you missed a real treat and we'll
look for you next time.
The weather man, the air-conditioned
Hotel Thomas (partially anyway) and the
beautiful University of Florida's air-con-
ditioned cafeteria all cooperated to make
the social functions of the Florida Dairy
Industry 1951 Field Day a big success.
Thursday afternoon the Ladies Auxil-
iary entertained at a Coke Party in the
west wing of the University Cafeteria.
Mrs. Howard Wilkowske, Gainesville,
took top honors with two prizes, one for
Canasta and one for Bingo. Mrs. Walter
Krienke, Gainesville, Mrs. Earl Johnson,
Jacksonville and Mrs. Wilbur Casey, St.
Petersburg also won Canasta prizes.
The ladies even took over the banquet
and eight femme fatales put on a fast
hula under the direction of Jack Dew and
Nell Wilmot, super-hula-dancer from
Jacksonville, which, judging from the
whistles was much appreciated by the men.
(See picture). Mrs. Frank Doub, Jr., Jack-
sonville was awarded high prize for the
best amatuer wiggling, a beautiful com-
pact and all participants shared in the
folding money so generously handed out
by Mr. Dew who was practically over-
whelmed.
Entertainment at the banquet also in-


cluded the popular pianist Russell Dan-
burg, a splendid color movie made in
Gainesville and Miss Wilmot who
modled bathing suits from 1925 to 1951,
as well as doing some very entertaining
Hawiian dancing. In spite of many re-
quests for a view of 1960, this was not
available as Mr. Dew felt the shock might
be too much for the Dairymen to take.
Friday morning the Ladies Auxiliary
held their meeting on the cool (and this is
no bull, not even Jersey) veranda of the
Hotel Thomas. As it is the chief fun-
ction of this Ladies organization to have
a good time, the meeting consisted almost
entirely of catching up on all the news
and awarding prizes. Mrs. Wilbur Casey,
Mrs. Al Cody, Mrs. Bill Harman, Mrs. V.
C. Johnson and Mrs. Sam Solomon, Sr.
were the lucky ladies at this meeting.
Secret correspondence partners were
again drawn as was done at last year's
Field Day Meeting and at the last two
regular Association Annual Conventions.
All who had participated in the Secret-Pal
Club during the past year were highly
pleased and those present were keenly
interested in learning who their corres-
pondence and special remembrances had
been coming from during the past year.
The special Ladies' Auxiliary pledge of
cooperation in boosting for the Dairy
Industry was renewed.
Ladies who attedned the annual con-


From top: Mrs. Jim 7ennings loves to sell
convention hats. She is official hat saler-
man at Florida Dairy Meetings. Ladies
who participated in the 1951 Field Day
Program at the University of Florida
Dairy Farm. Eight ladies competed for
dancing awards at the Annual Field Day
Dinner. Winner was Mrs. Frank Doub,
Jr. Extreme left. Tying for second were
Mrs. John DuPuis and Mrs. Bill Fifield.

Wanna Reduce?
"A GOOD reducing exercise consists in plac-
ing both hands against the table edge and
pushing back."

22 FLORIDA DAIRY


The Ladies' Auxiliary enlarged its Board of Directors at the 1951 Annual Meeting,
electing eight instead of five. Among the additional directors elected are Mrs. Herbert
Hill (left) of Tampa and Mrs. Bill Harman of Gainesville.


NEWS


U


I








vention in St. Petersburg include the fol-
lowing:
Mrs. Hoyt Barnebey, Tampa; Mrs. J. D. Barritt,
Tampt; Mrs. Nathan Bear, Pensacola; Mrs. Russell
Bevan, St. Petersburg; Mrs. George Boutwell, Lake
Worth; Mrs. W. H. Boyd, Miami; Mrs. Herman
Burnett, Bradenton; Mrs. W. J. Casey, St. Peters-
burg; Mrs. Guy Crews, St. Petersburg; Mrs. E. F.
Froelich, West Palm Beach; Mrs. George Frye, St.
Petersburg; Mrs. Vernon Graves, Limona; Mrs. Joe
C. Gaugliardo, Tampa; Mrs. J. R. Gaugliardo,
Tampa; Mrs. Robert Hall, Miami; Mrs, W. J. Har-
man, Jr., Gainesville; Mrs. 0. D. Hatch, Live Oak;
Mrs. G. R. Heine, Tampa; Mrs. James H. Hendrie,
Miami; Mrs. Julian Herndon, Orlando; Mrs. Her-
bert Hill, Tampa; Mrs. Lester Hood, St. Petersburg;
Mrs. Paul M. Hood, St. Petersburg; Mrs. E. M.
Hood, St. Petersburg; Mrs. John M. Hood, St.
Petersburg; Mrs. Geo. F. Johnson, West Palm Beach:
Mrs. C. Ray Johnson, St. Petersburg; Mrs. V. C.
Johnson, Dinsmore; Mrs. Brady Johnston, Jackson-
ville; Mrs. Chas. E. Landreth, St. Petersburg; Mrs.
Harry B. Matthews, Miami; Miss Bettye Jane Mat-
thews, Miami; Miss Mary Lou Matthews, Miami;
Mrs. S. J. McInnes, Seffner; Mrs. J. O. Martin,
Tampa; Mrs. E. M. Mora, St. Petersburg; Mrs.
Marion Murray, St. Petersburg; Mrs. E. L. Reagan,
St. Petersburg; Mrs. R. D. Saunders, Tampa; Mrs.
Wm Seeburger, Orlando; Mrs. L. H. Sellers, St.
Petersburg; Mrs. S. H. Solomon, Sr., Quincy; Mrs.
H. B. Thomas, West Palm Beach; Mrs. W. R.
Thomasson, Valrico; Mrs. R. B. Wills, Winter
Park.
Allied Trades
Mrs. Hans Ahlefeldt, Jacksonville; Mrs. A. G.
Blanding, Decatur, Ga.; Mrs. Aaron Block, Jack-
sonville; Mrs. Stan Brumley, Atlanta, Ga.; Mrs. A.
C. Dickson, Atlanta,Ga.; Mrs. J. L. Hammons, De-
catur, Ga.; Mrs. Jim Jennings, Jacksonville; Mrs.
Mildred Johson, Tampa; Mrs. Val A. Lee, Jackson-
ville; Mrs. John Lowry, Atlanta, Ga.; Mrs. J. H.
Page, Jr., Jacksonville; Mrs. J. W. Radke, Atlanta,
Ga.; Mrs. Wm. Romaine, Columbia, S. C.; Mrs. P.
R. Rossingnol, Albany, Ga.; Mrs. W. M. Scott, At-
lanta, Ga.; Mrs. Bob Slye, St. Petersburg; Mrs.
Richard P. Slye, Decatur, Ga.; Mrs. R. G. Smith,
College Park; Mrs. Perry Walley, Jackson, Miss.:
Mrs. Geo. A. Weill, New Orleans, La.; Mrs. W .G.
Wright, Venice, Fla.
Advisory Members
Mrs. Clayton Avriett, Jasper; Miss Peggy Avriett,
Jasper; Miss Babs Avriett, Jasper; Mrs. Bertha M.
Elliott, Jacksonville; Mrs. C. L. Campbell, Talla-
hassee; Mrs. Lyle Chaffee, St. Petersburg; Miss
Beverly Hicks, St. Petersburg; Mrs. F. W. Risher,
Jacksonville; Mrs. J. M. Scott, Gainesville; Mrs.
Lewis T. Smith, Jacksonville; Mrs. Ronald Stanley,
Gainesville.
Miscellaneous
..Miss Stephne Ambrose, Jacksonville; Mrs. E. T.
Lay, Jacksonville; Mrs. Myrtle Matheny, Champaign,
Ill.; Mrs. Elsie Remsen, Jacksonville; Miss Muriel
Washburn, Jacksonville.

Dairy Ladies In Evidence
At Field Day Meeting

Ladies attending the field day program
include the following:
Mrs. A. Ted Alvarez, Jacksonville; Mrs. Carl
Barber, Pine Castle; Miss June Boutwell, Lake
Worth; Mrs. John G. Dupuis, Jr., Miami; Mrs. W.
J. Casey, Clearwater; Mrs. Paul M. Hood, St. Peters-
burg; Mrs. V. C. Johnson, Dinsmore; Mrs. Earl
A Johnson, Dinsmore; Mrs W. J. Harman, Jr.,
Gainesville; Mrs. W. P. Potier, Delray Beach; Mrs.


4A>LIC


"A BAKER'S DOZEN OF ROLLS MUST WEIGH
A FIXED AMOUNT. IF NOT, THE
BAKER WILL BE BEHEADED!"

t THAT DECREE BY HENRY VIII
CAUSED BAKERS TO BEGIN-TO
ADD AN EXTRA ROLL AS
HEAD INSURANCE



EXPERTS FROM --
ALL OVER THE WORLD COME TO
THE U.S. TO STUDY OUR SYSTEM
OF LOW COST MILK DISTRIBUTION,
SANITATION AND PASTEURIZATION






your best f d buy

your best food buy!


No. 1 of a series of fifteen advertisements, reprints or mats for which are available from:

FLORIDA DAIRY INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION, INC.
220 Newnan St. Jacksonville 2, Florida


Burdette Schee, Miami; Mrs. Louis Sheffield, Jack-
sonville; Mrs. Sam Solomon Sr., Quincy; Miss
Doraine Smith, St. Augustine; Mrs. Guy Wachstetter,
Delray Beach; Mrs. Walter Welkener, Jacksonville.
Allied Trades
Mrs. Jim Jennings, Jacksonville.
Advisory Members
Mrs. Hugh F. Butner, Jacksonville; Mrs. K. S.
McMullen, Gainesville; Mrs. L. E. Mull, Gaines-
ville; Mrs. M. M. Fifield, Gainesville; Mrs. Frank
B. Doub, Jr., Jacksonville; Mrs. H. H. Wilkoske,
Gainesville; Mrs. C. V. Noble, Gainesville; Mrs. J.
W. Reitz, Gainesville; Mrs. C. W. Reaves, Gaines-
ville; Mrs. D. A. Sanders, Gainesville; Mrs. J. M.
Wing, Gainesville; Mrs. S. P. Marshall, Gainesville;
Mrs. W. A. Krienke, Gainesville; Mrs. P. T. Dix
Arnold, Gainesville; Mrs. E. L. Fouts, Gainesville;
Mrs. H. G. Clayton, Gainesville.
Miscellaneous
Mrs. E. T. Lay, Jacksonville; Mrs. Elsie Remsen,
Jacksonville.

Word Picture
STUDENT IN ART CLASS: "That, sir, is a cow
grazing."
PUZZLED ART TEACHER: "Indeed? Where is
the grass?"
STUDENT: "The cow has eaten it."
ART TEACHER: "But where is the cow?"
STUDENT: "You don't think she'd be silly
enough to stay there after she'd eaten
all the grass, do you?"
-Exchange (Fla. Times-Union)


Public Opinion Polled
On Food Prices

AGAIN MILK and Dairy products are ac-
cepted for their true worth. A recent
Gallup poll showed the reaction of the
public to present prices:
Voters in the survey-from Maine to
California-were asked: "CONSIDER-
ING THE ITEMS YOU BUY FROM
DAY TO DAY, WHICH ONE ANNOYS
YOU THE MOST BECAUSE OF THE
HIGH PRICE YOU HAVE TO PAY
FOR IT?"
Here are the results:
Meat 6o%
All groceries 13%
Coffee 8%
Clothing 4%
Butter, cheese, eggs 2%
MILK .................. .. 2%
Other items 11%
Don't know 5%

lo51%
(Above table adds to more than zoo per-
cent because some persons named more
than one item.)


FOR OCTOBER, 1951 23










pForlda Dairy I

Industry Assn.





The Welcome sign; The U. of Fla. Research Unit staff Alf Nielsen, Dr. R. B. Becker and Sam Solomon, Sr. inspecting dairy
barn Dr. R. B. Becker and Dr. H. B. Henderson inspect facdities Nathan Mayo, Theo Datson and Dr. Fonts look over
the program.


1951 Annual Dairy Field Day at Gainesville

Hailed as Biggest and Best in 16-Year History


DAIRYMEN GATHERED from every part of
Florida to take part in the i6th Annual
Diary Field Day at the Dairy Research
Unit, Gainesville, on July 12-13, 1951.
"Bigger and better" is an accurate des-
cription as can be verified by the accom-
panying pictures.
This event, co-sponsored by the Agri-
cultural Experiment Station and the
Florida Dairy Industry Association, has
come to be recognized as one of the two
outstanding Dairy Industry events of the
year along with the Annual Convention
of the Dairy Industry Association.
Details of the Field Day Program were
planned and developed by a Committee
of the Faculty of the College of Agricul-


ture and the Agricultural Experiment
Station, headed by Dr. R. B. Becker, and
a Committee of the Dairy Industry As-
sociation, headed by Herman Burnett of
the Burnett Dairy Farm, Bradenton.
These two, serving as Co-Chairmen for
the second year, and their Committees re-
ceived the praise and thanks of Dean
Noble of the College of Agriculture, Dir-
ector Fifield of the Agricultural Experi-
ment Station and President Theo Datson
of the Dairy Industry Association.
All sessions of the two-day program
were held at the Dairy Research Farm ex-
cept the Annual Dinner held at the Uni-
versity Cafeteria.
The pine grove open-air auditorium


adjacent to the Dairy Research Buildings
and the spotless milking barn provided
ideal settings for the Thursday afternoon
and Friday morning sessions.
In response to a "Welcome" by Dir-
ector Willard M. Fifield, President Theo
Datson mentioned the need for close con-
tact between the University of Florida
staff with dairymen of the State and
their problems of immediate and long-
time nature. Mr. Datson mentioned par-
ticularly that a supply of homegrown feeds
could reduce some of the costs of pro-
duction and assure a milk of good flavor
and quality.
The first industry topic discussed was
"High Quality Buttermilk", by Dr. L. E.


Registration for Field Day Sam Noles, State Board of Health, and Doc Phillips of Hillsborough County Health Dept. *
Group inspects the U. of Fla. Dairy Laboratory F. D. I. A. Secretary, Andy Lay, hands out programs The pictures below
show the splendid attendance and keen interest in the Field Day program sessions at the University of Florida Dairy Research
Farm.


24 FLORIDA


D AI RY N E W









Appreciation
THE FIELD Day Committee, on be-
half of the Association, wishes to ex-
press our sincere appreciation to the
Florida Retail Farm Equipment As-
sociation and to each of the follow-
ing companies participating in the
"Dairy Farm Equipment Exhibit"
for the 1951 Annual Field Day:
J. I. Case Company
The Oliver Corporation
John Deere Plow Company
Florida Ford Tractor Co.
Intrenational Harvester Co.
Florida Farm Equipment Co.
Bent Equipment Co.


Mull, who demonstrated by serving an
excellent culture buttermilk made by the
method he described. This was popular,
as it preceded a trip to see the buildings,
pastures, and dairy herd.
Farm Tour and Machinery Exhibit
The dairymen toured the farm by bus,
with one of the farm staff in each group to
answer questions on production of the
clover-and-dollis, Bermuda, Pangola, and
other pastures. The new Southland oats
had been grazed rotationally by heifers
during the winter and yet yielded 25
bushels per acre of heavy oats for feeding
purposes.
Secretary Allen Hutchinson and mem-
bers of the Florida Retail Farm Equip-
ment Association gave a two-hour demon-
stration of Dairy farm equipment in-
cluding discs, mowers, hay balers, tractors
and other equipment. A number of dairy-
men came particularly for this feature and
many expressed regret that more time was
not provided to view more of the mac-
hines in operation. A special milking
stall was exhibited under a tent. Security
Mills' loud speaker with Bill Kendall an-
nouncing, aided greatly with the machin-
ery display and demonstrations.
At the close of the afternoon program,
Dr. E. L. Fouts and staff sreved as hosts
for a brief tour of the newly installed pro-
cessing equipment in the Dairy Products
Laboratory at the University of Florida.
Sampling of the Dairy Lab's best ice
cream and milk drinks was an exception-
ally satisfying feature of this part of the
program especially to all who had taken
part in the afternoon farm tour and mac-
hinery demonstrations.
The Annual Reception and fellowship
hour at the Hotel Thomas, sponsored by
the Dairy Association's Allied Trades
members and Field Day Committee, was,
as usual, a most enjoyable event.
Highlights of the program was the An-
nual Field Day Dinner held at the Uni-
versity air-conditioned cafeteria and spon-
sored by the Florida Dairy Industry As-
sociation. Presided over by Toastmaster


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STATE DISTRIBUTOR
Jacksonville, Florida
Ask for information on open
territories.


FOR OCTOBER, 1951 25




















Dairymen and wives enjoy reception and fellowship hour sponsored by the Field Day Committee and Allied Trades Club of the
Dairy Association in panel above. Panel below shows Annual Field Day Dinner speakers: Director Fifield Dr. C. V. Noble,
Dean of the College of Agriculture H. G. Clayton, Extension Service Director, presents Herd Honor Roll Awards *
Clarence Reaves, Extension Dairyman, presenting D. H. I. A. Efficiency Awards Jack Dew, presenting Southern Dairies
Producer Award.












I N'5


Bill Fifield, director of the Agricultural
Experiment Station, this program was one
of exceptional fellowship, entertainment,
and inspiration. In addition to a record
attendance by the state's outstanding
dairymen, this event was attended by the
board of directors of the Dairy Industry
Association, practically the entire staff
of the College of Agriculture, the Agricul-
tural Experiment Station, and the Florida
Agricultural Extension Service.
Among the outstanding speakers in ad-
dition to toastmaster and Experiment
Station director Bill Fifield, were Dr. C.
V. Noble, dean of the College of Agricul-
ture, director H. G. Clayton of the Agri-
cultural Extension Service, Dr. E. L.
Fouts, head of the Dairy Department,
Harry Wood, state department of educa-
tion director of Florida's Future Farmers
of America program, Hon. Doyle Con-
ner, a past national president of the Fu-
ture Farmers of America, and Mr. Theo-


dore Datson, president of the Florida
Dairy Industry Association.
National Honor Awards Presented
Adding to the interest and inspiration
of the occasion was the announcement
and presentation of awards to the Florida
winners' of the annual contests in "Milk
Production Efficiency", "National Herd
Honor Roll", and D.H.I.A. Supervisor's
Efficiency". A report and pictures of
these winners is shown separately from
this review.
Entertainment Is Enjoyed
Mr. Jack Dew of Southern Dairies, Jack-
sonville, was voted the special apprecia-
tion of the group for his services as chair-
man and master of ceremonies of the
Field Day entertainment. A variety of
numbers including a concert pianist, a
harmony quartette and group singing,
featured a chorus of grass skirt dancers
chosen impromptu from among the
younger ladies present.


Prominent Speakers Close Program
The Friday morning session, at the su-
ggestion of the presiding chairman Dean
C. V. Noble, moved from the open-air
auditorium into the Dairy Unit Milking
Barn which provided more shade. Some
three hundred dairymen, the largest
group to participate in any Field Day
program, sat attentively through a two
hour program highlighted by Dr. R. B.
Becker's discussion of "Milk Butterfat
Content". A panel discussion on "The
Mastitis Problem" participated in by Dr.
S. P. Marshall, Dr. D. A. Sanders, and
Prof. Walter Krienke an address on "Mar-
keting Milk" by guest speaker Dr. H. B.
Henderson, head of the Dairy Depart-
ment of the University of Georgia; and
an address by Hon. Nathan Mayo, Florida
Commissioner of Agriculture, closed the
program.
Mr. Mayo reviewed the extraordinary
development of the Florida dairy industry


Group of over 300 see the farm machinery exhibit at the University Dairy Farm. This event was sponsored by the Florida Retail
Farm Equipment Association Seen in the close up group of three are, left to right, John Allen, University vice president,
Allan Hutchinson, executive secretary of Fla. Farm Mach. Ass'n, and Dr. E. L. Fouts, head of the University Dairy Dept.


26 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS







within the brief period of twenty to
twenty-five years and paid tribute to the
team work and hard work of Florida
dairymen. He also praised the various
experimental, educational, and extension
services of the state, which he credited
with the industry's rapid progress.
A special buffet luncheon in the Dairy
Unit Milking Barn concluded the 1951
Field Day Program.
Note: The Dairy News will carry reviews
of the papers presented by Dr. Becker on
Milk Butterfat Content, by Dr. Hender-
son on Marketing Milk, and of the panel
discussion on Mastitis in the November-
December issue.

Cattle Are Not Affected
By Horse Killing Sickness
DAIRYMEN ARE reassured by Dr. J. G.
Fish, prominent veterinarian of Jackson-
ville and past chairman of the F.D.I.A.
Veterinary Committee, that the, current
outbreak of Horse Sleeping Sickness does
not affect cattle.
Recent news of the death of 11 horses
in the Fort Lauderdale area within a
week from sleeping sickness and indica-
tions of a threatened outbreak in other
areas, has given Florida livestock owners
a case of the jitters.
Answering inquiries to the Dairy As-
sociation's Veterinary Committee, Dr.
Fish states that cattle are not suspectible
to the disease.
Dr. Fish advises, however, that horses
be promptly treated as a preventative
measure.
Dr. Paul Hughes of the Broward
County Health Department has warned
that the disease is communicated by
mosquitoes to human beings. No human
victims have been reported in Florida,
although recent cases have been reported
in Virginia.

Milk Commission Hearings
Consider New Areas
COMPLYING WITH petitions from producer
Dairymen, the Florida Milk Commission
has held recent public hearings in Moore
Haven, Sanford, Marianna and Cross City
for the purpose of considering the exten-
sion of Milk Commission supervision of
milk prices to these areas.
No decision has been announced by the
Commission which requires the filing and
analysis of milk production costs and
other operating conditions before deci-
sions are made for the supervision of an
area.

AUSTIN, TEXAS-Milk prices advanced 10 a
quart in the Austin area Sept. i, boosting
pasteurized milk to 240 and homogenized
milk to 250. Distributors blamed the hike
on increased feed costs.


NEWS


DIGEST


Farm Machinery Meeting
November 5-6 in Orlando
ANNOUNCEMENT HAS just been made by
Allen Hutchinson, Secretary, Florida Re-
tail Farm Machinery Association, that the
1951 Annual Convention of the organiza-
tion has been scheduled for November
5-6 at the Orange Court Hotel, Orlando.
Outstanding speakers on the program
are T. B. Hale, Vice-Pres. International
Harvester Co., Chicago; Paul Mulliken,
Managing Director, National Retail Farm
Equipment Association, St. Louis; Arthur
Horrocks, Public Relations Director.
Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co., Akron;
and Honorable Spessard L. Holland, U.
S. Senate, Washington.
The Farm Equipment Association ex-
tends an invitation to all interested Farm
Equipment users to attend, Mr. Hutchin-
son said.


Foremost Contest Winners
Entertained in Florida
TWENTY FOREMOST Dairies' sales em-
ployees, winners of a one-week vacation
tour in a company sales contest, were
welcomed and entertained in Jackson-
ville recently by Foremost President Paul
E. Reinhold and the Foremost home
office staff, with a visit and tour of the
home offices and Jacksonville plant on
College Street and a banquet. The
winners of the tour, which took them
from Jacksonville to Miami, the Bahamas
and Nassau, represented Foremost plants
in eight cities of the South and North-
east.


Hood Appointed Inspector
Pensacola Milk Shed
CHIEF DAIRY SUPERVISOR John M. Scott
of the State Department of Agriculture
has announced appointment of Mr. R. R.
Hood of Pensacola to succeed Dr. F. M.
DeWees of Tampa on his Department's
Dairy inspection staff.
Dr. DeWees resigned effective July ist.
Hood, whose appointment became effec-
tive Sept. 17th, served for many years as
milk inspector for the Escambia County
Health Department and prior to that
was manager of the Quality Dairies of
Pensacola.


FOR OCTOBER, 1951 27


DAIRY CALF RATION

SHOW CATTLE FEED

RANGE PELLETS

HORSE FEED

MINERALS




LAKELAND

CASH FEED

COMPANY







Solid brass tags and
brass-plated chain.
No. 21--FOR NECK. Ad-
ju-iable. Tap r. num-
ber,- both iide,. 213.25
No. 17-F1OR HORNS.
AdJdtable. $9.20 per -
dozen.
No. 8s-DOUBLE PLATE NECK CHAIN.
Upper portion strap, lower portion chain.
$14.50 per dozen.
Write for catalog. Sample mailed for $1.00.
GOLDEN ARROW FARMS
Dept. 53 Box 7 Huntington, Indiana










DAIRY NEWS DIGEST



Members of the Dairy Industry throughout the State are invited to please send to
the "Florida Dairy News" all news about dairies, dairying and the good people uhlo
devote their time, talents and money to this great industry.-The Editor.


Obenshain New President
Of Southern Dairies
ELECTION OF Wiley S. Obenshain as Presi-
dent of Southern Dairies, Inc., which
operates 61 Sealtest plants in the South-
east, was announced
by E. J. Mather,
Chairman of the
Board, with head-
quarters in Wash-
ington, D. C.
Mr. Obenshain's
selection by the r
Board of Directors
climaxes his 36 years 10
of service with the OBNSHAIN
Company, which this
year celebrated its 50th anniversary. For
the past four years, he has served as Ex-
ecutive Vice-President. He began with the
Southern Dairies plant at Jacksonville,
Fla., in 1915, and has held a number of
executive positions in this important milk
industry. He is a Rotary Club past
president, 32nd degree Mason, a Shriner
and active in civic work besides being a
director of the North Carolina Dairy
Foundation and the International Assn.
of Ice Cream Manufacturers.

Florida State Fair Invites
Purebred Dairy Exhibitors

THE FLORIDA State Fair (Feb. 5-16,
1952) and a special Dairy Show Com-
mittee of twenty members, have set a
goal of 3oo entrees for the 1952 Dairy
Show which is set for the first week of
the Fair.
The Dairy Show had 188 entrees in
the 1950 Fair and this was an encourag-
ing increase over previous years, accord-
ing to J. C. Huskisson, Assistant Fair
Manager.
The Florida Dairy Industry Associa-
tion Directors voted at their last meet-
ing to encourage Florida's leading breed-
ers of registered Dairy Animals to par-
ticipate in the State Fair Dairy Show
and will offer an outstanding trophy to
the premiere exhibitor. Many other
fine trophies are offered in addition to
approximately $2,ooo.oo in cash awards.
Prospective exhibitors may secure all
desired information as to classes and
regulations by writing "Manager, Florida
State Fair Dairy Show, P. O. Box 1231,
Tampa".

28 FLORIDA DAIRY


Florida "Right-to-Work
Law May Be in Jeopard

S. 1973, a bill now before the U
Labor committee, contains
which would vitiate state righth
laws, in the opinion of many st
labor legislation.
The bill deals with union se
rangements in the building and
tion industry and was introduced
tors Taft(R.-Ohio), Humphrey (
Cain (R-Wash.), and Nixon (R
It is believed that inclusion
words "...or any other section
Act..." in the first sentence c
would render inoperative Sectii
of the Taft-Hartley Act.
A subcommittee of the Sena
committee held brief hearings i
and at the moment no addition
scheduled. Because of the spons
the bill, however, favorable acti
committee is likely.
Any attitude you have towar
gislation should be transmitted
bers of both the U. S. Senate a;
Labor committees and to your
Senators and Congressmen.


Informers Are Rewarde
FLORIDA CATTLEMEN'S Associ;
wards of $300.oo and $200.00
recently to two Ft. Lauderdale
one a city employee, for their
tion which resulted in the det
persons stealing cattle from the
Sanitary Dairy, Ft. Lauderdale.

Animal Nutrition Conference
Scheduled By Feed Dealers
THE FLORIDA Feed Dealers A
announces the 1951 "Animal
Conference" sponsored by that
tion in cooperation with the De
of Animal Nutrition of the I
of Florida, is scheduled to be
vember 8 and 9 in Gainesvill
The Annual Meeting of
Dealers Association will be
evening of November 8th, also i
ville. Mr. Francis J. Davis o
Mills, Tampa, is President of
sociation. Dr. George K. Da
mal Nutritionist, University of
is chairman of the Nutrition Cc
Program.


Milk Shortage Seen
In Georgia Schools
ATLANTA, SEPT. 6 (INS)--Georgia Milk
Control Director Charlie Duncan today
said a serious milk shortage will be
caused by the Fall opening of Georgia
schools.
Duncan pointed out that Agriculture
Commissioner Tom Linder is sending
",, men to other states to look for milk
supplies. Unless other sources are loca-
ly ted, there will be a 15 per cent shortage,
the milk control director stated.
S. Senate
language
t-to-work" State Milk Consultant
udents of On Educational Leave

curity ar- SAM NOLES, Milk Consultant with the
construc- State Board of Health for the past two
I by Sena- years, has been granted special leave to
D-Minn.), take a year's advanced work in Milk Sani-
-Calif.). station at the University of Minnesota.
n of the Dr. J. E. (Jim) Scatterday, Veterinary
n of this Advisor to the State Board in the Depart-
af S. 1973 meant of preventable diseases, has assumed
on 14 (b) the additional duties of Milk Consultant
until Sam's return at the end of the 1951-
te Labor 52 school year.
n S. 1973
I action is Milk Board Administrators
sorship of National Meeting in Miami
on by the THE 1951 Annual Conference of Ad-
ministrators and Members of State Milk
Sthis le- Control Agencies will meet in Miami,
to mem- November 15-16-17.
nd House Florida Milk Commission Administra-
wn U. S. tor, L. K. Nicholas, Jr., is president
of the group and Chairman for the three-
clays' program.
d Among the principal speakers on the
program are: Mr. E. W. Tiedeman,
ition re- Chief Dairy Branch, O.P.S., Washing-
were paid ton, D. C.; Mr. H. L. Forrest, Deputy
negroes, Director, Dairy Branch, U. S. Dept. of
informa- Leland Spencer, Cornell University, New
section of York; Hon. Farris Bryant, Ocala, Flori-
Forman's da, Speaker-Designate for the 1953 Flori-
da House of Representatives; and Mr.
Richard J. Werner, Asst. Executive Di-
rector, Milk Industry Foundation, Wash-
ington, D. C.
association
Nutrition Orange County Soil Body
organiza- Names Orlando Dairyman
apartment GORDON EUNICE, prominent dairyman of
University Orlando, was recently elected supervisor
held No- of Orange Soil Conservation District.
e. Supervisors are elected by land-owners in
the Feed the Soil Conservation District and serve
held the for a period of three years.
n Gaines- Eunice, now 47, was born and reared
f Purina on the dairy farm which he now operates
the As- with three brothers. His dad was also
vis, Ani- born on the same place.
Florida, Gordon has served two terms as a
conference Director of the Florida Dairy Industry
Association.


NEWS








In Memoriam
LESTER W. "RED" SLYE, manager of
Foremost Dairies in St. Petersburg,
before his transfer two months ago
to Charlotte, N. C., died unexpected-
ly August 16th in Miami on a busi-
ness trip.
Mr. Slye was a native of Wiscon-
sin and came to St. Petersburg from
Charlotte, where he had been a city
councilman for eight years. Among
his many and varied interests, Mr.
Slve had attended most of the Dairy
meetings in recent years. He was a
Shriner, was active in Boy Scout
work in St. Petersburg, member of
several civic and social clubs of St.
Petersburg and attended the Metho-
dist Church.
Survivors include his wife, Mrs.
Dora Slye; two sons, Robt. F. of St.
Petersburg; and Richard P., Decatur,
Ga.: and two daughters, Mrs. Helen
DeLegao of St. Petersburg, and Miss
Ann Slye of Charlotte; all of whom
have attended the F.D.I.A. meetings.
Their two sons at the present time
sell supplies to the Dairy Industry.



16% Price Increase
For Florida Newspapers

THE BRADENTON. HERALD announced (July
7-AP) that it was joining several other
Florida newspapers in raising subscrip-
tion prices in amount of 16%.
The Herald explained that the in-
crease was brought on by "rising costs in
production and distribution" of the news-
paper.
The above explanation, brief and to
the point, not only explains the reason
why newspapers must charge more for
their services and products but is a per-
fect answer to the question of "why many,
in fact, most everything essential to the
American home" including "milk" has
found it necessary to increase prices.
It appears that Uncle Sam has even
found it necessary to increase the cost
of mailing a letter by 33 1/3% and the
lowly postcard, by ioo%.
The simple story of why the cost of
a newspaper must be increased is the story
of "why the price of milk has been in-
creased." Yet, there seem to be those
who think the milk man is a thief and a
chisler because he has found it necessary
to add some of the increased cost of pro-
duction and distribution to the price of
milk.
It should be noted that to the credit of
the American Dairy Industry, the aver-
age increase in the price of milk since the
beginning of World War II is much less
than the price increases of all other major
food items. (All Foods average increase
since 1939. .. 145%-Milk average in-
crease since 1939...81%).


Bowen to Preside at
Ice Cream Convention
J. 0. BOWEN, President, Southern As-
sociation of Ice Cream Manufacturers,
will preside at the
1951 Convention to
be held Nov. 27-2()
at the Vinoy Park
BWE Hotel in St. Peters-
burg. Mr. Bowen,
now Vice-President
of Southern Dairies
with offices in Wash-
ington, D. C., was
BOWEN born in Tallahassee,
Florida and served
as manager of Southern Dairies at West
Palm Beach and Miami. He also served
two terms as President of the Florida
Dairy Products Association.

Borden's Acquires
Datson Dairies
ANNOUNCEMENT WAS made August 16 by W.
J. Barritt, Jr., Florida District Chairman
of the Borden Company, of the purchase
of the Datson Daries Plant of Orlando
The Datson Dairy, largest in Central
Florida, was a pioneer plant in this sec-
tion of Florida and operated in an area
of six counties.
The Datson brothers-Clarence, Theo
and Glenn, who were the principal
owners of the Dairy-retained their in-
terest in a number of Dairy Farms which
they own and operate.
Mr. Barritt announced that Theo Dat-
son, who was Vice-President and Manager
of the Orlando plant, is retained as Gen-
eral Manager and no personnel changes
are anticipated.

Central Florida Milk Men
Meet in Orlando
THE 1951 Annual Meeting of the Central
Florida Milk Producers Association was
held at Orlando Country Club recently,
ad features barbecued hamburgers made
with the expert touch of J. C. Trice,
dairyman president of the group and chefs
from the General Mills Farm Service.
Dozens of watermelons also helped the
dairymen to get in shape for discussing
how they could improve their local associa-
tion.



WANTED
Full-time Sales Representative
wanted to handle complete line of
dairy equipment and supp ies.
Northeast Florida territory, Jackson-
ville headquarters. Reply Box C,
Florida Dairy News, 22o Newnan
Street, Jacksonville, Florida.


MINERALS
for the

DAIRY HERD
as close as your
Eshleman dealer!
Hundreds of commercial beef
producers use MAXCY'S RANGE
MINERAL regularly as a com-
plete, balanced mineral supple-
ment for their herds.
Dairymen, too, can profit from
the experience of Latt Maxcy on
his own herds-experience em-
bodied in the scientific com-
pounding of MAXCY'S RANGE
MINERAL and MAXCY'S CATTLE
DRENCH. Write for our folder
or ask your Eshleman dealer
for information about these
products. The MINERAL is packed
in 50 pound bags, the DRENCH
in gallons or dose-size bottles.


MAXCY

FERTILIZERS, INC.
E. R. JOHNSTON, Manager
FROSTPROOF FLORIDA


Tampa's Oldest Feed A Fencing Store
FEEDS, BARB WIRE, HOG FENCE, GALVANIZED
ROOFING, POULTRY FENCING, ETC.

STALNAKER

BROTHERS
P. O. BOX 1468 TAMPA, FLA.
EAST BROADWAY AT 33RD STREET
37 Year s at th Location


I SEE THE NEW


It's self-propelled... you just guide
it. Cuts tough weeds, lawns, even
saplings! Save hours of toil with a
Jari. See it now.


TAMPA ORLANDO


FOR OCTOBER, 1951 29















Extension Service
Dairy Farm Research Unit


University Has Much to Offer St
Seeking to Specialize in Dairyin
by DR. E. L. FOUTs
Head Dairy Science Department
University of Florida
The Lower Division:
The University College
IN A reorganization at the University of
Florida in 1935, all freshmen and sopho-
mores were placed in one college. The
University College administers all the
work of the Lower Division, which in-
cludes the preprofessional work for the
Upper Division Schools and colleges and
a core program of basic education for all
students. In 1944 the American Council
on Education defined this program:
"General educa-
tion refers to those
phases of nonspec-
ialized and nonvo-
cational education
that should be the
common denomina-
tor, so to speak, of
educated persons .
-the type of educa-
DR. FeOUTS tion which the ma-
jority of our people
must have if they are to be good citizens,
parents, and workers." During his fresh-
man and sophomore years at the Uni-
versity, a student's time is about evenly
divided between these objectives of gen-
eral education and those of preprofes-
sional or professional preparation.
While fully accepting its responsibility
toward the professional training of her
students who remain four years or longer
and earn degrees, the University of Flori-
da as a state institution also accepts its
civic responsibility to help those who
spend only one or two years at the Uni-
versity. These students-more than two-
thirds of all enrolled-are not "failures"
because they do not continue and earn
degrees, and they probably deserve more
from the state university than an odd as-
sortment of only "introductory courses."
Consequently at the University of Florida
a group of comprehensive courses have
been worked out to give some unity and
meaning to a beginner's program. These
comprehensive courses that make up the
core program are:
1. American Institutions (known
hereafter as C-i)
2. The Physical Sciences (C-2)

30 FLORIDA DAIRY


Dairy Products Laboratory
Agricultural Experiment Station


3. Reading, Speaking and Writing:
Freshman English (C-3)
4. Practical Logic: Straight Think-
ing (C-41)
Fundamental Mathematics (C-42)
5. The Humanities (C-5)
6. Biological Science (C-6)
Guidance
If a freshman is still undecided about
his life's work, he is not urged to guess
on registration day. His program may
be made up largely from the compre-
hensives which help him direct his think-
ing toward a desirable objective, togeth-
er with approved electives that may
further enable him to explore interests
and needs. But whether the student is
decided or undecided about his life's
work, these comprehensive courses pro-
vide basic preparation that every educa-
ted person should have.
Thus since the purpose of general
education is to replace fragmentation,
the program absorbs much of the re-
sponsibility for guidance. Every subject
or course of the University College pro-
gram is designed to guide the student.
During the time that he is making tenta-
tive steps toward a profession by taking
special subjects to test aptitudes, interests,
and ability, he is also studying the several
great areas of human understanding and
achievement. The work in the Univer-
sity College presents materials which are
directly related to life experiences and
which will immediately become a part
of the student's thinking to guide him to
making correct next steps. Thus the
whole program-placement tests, progress
reports, vocational aptitude tests, basic
vocational materials, selected material in
the comprehensive courses, student con-
ferences, adjustments for individual dif-
ferences, election privileges, and compre-
hensive examinations-all are parts of a
plan designed to guide students.
Upper Division Cooperation
While the necessary correlation and
unification is attempted at the University
College, throughout the University Col-
lege period students consult Upper
Division deans and department heads to
discuss future work. During the last
month of each school semester these
informal conferences are supplemented
by a scheduled formal conference at


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


DAIRY REVIEW


NEWS


ra_--


which each student fills out a pre-regis-
tration card for his prospective Upper
Division work.
University College Counsellors
The University College Counsellors do
not assume the responsibility that every
student himself must take, but they help
in every way possible as he assumes a
greater and greater share of responsibility
in his University education. The coun-
sellors are located in the University Col-
lege Office.
Every spring the university is privi-
leged to give placement tests to all seniors
in every high school of the state. Since
many high schools are also trying to
acquaint the student with the common
body of knowledge so needed by all,
their records along with the placement
test results indicate the variation that
may be made in the general program.
A'student who has had three or four
years of preparatory school study in any
one of the subject areas of the compre-
hensive courses, and his placement tests
or progress tests indicate superior
knowledge and understanding at this
level may consult one of the counsellors
for subsequent needed program adjust-
ment.
Agriculture
The program for freshmen and sopho-
mores expecting to earn a degree in the
College of Agriculture, with a specializa-
tion in dairy production or dairy manu-
factures, should be:
Freshman Year Hours
I. C-6, Biological Science, and/or BTY.
101-102 ....................... 6-12
2. C-3, Reading, Speaking and Writing:
Freshman English................. 8
3. CY. 101-102, General Chemistry.... 8
4. Electives in Agriculture or Basic
Sciences .................... . 0-6
5. Military Science; Physical Fitness... 2
30-36
Sophomore Year Hours
1. C-l, American Institutions .........8
2. C-4, Logic and Mathematics....... 6
3. C-5, The Humanities ............ 8
4. Electives in Agriculture or Basic
Sciences ........ ............. 6-12
5. Military Science; Physical Fitness... 2
30-36

Upper Division: College
Of Agriculture-Dairying
Dairy Husbandry
For students interested in technical
and practical dairy husbandry and milk
production, a course of study has been
planned which provides for a basic
knowledge of dairy farming, dairy cattle
breeding, feeding, management and milk
production.
Courses for the junior and senior years
in dairy husbandry include:
JUNIOR YEAR
Course First Semester Hours
ACY. 208-Agricultural Bio-chemistry 3
BCY. 301-General Bacteriology...... 4







VY. 301-Veterinary Anatomy and Phy-
siology .......................... 3
SLS. 301-Soils. ................... .. 3
Electives ....................... 3
17
Course Second Semester Hours
AS. 306-Farm Management ......... 3
AL. 312-Feeds and Feeding......... 4
BCY. 402-Dairy Bacteriology ........ 4
AY. 324-Forage and Cover Crops.... 3
Electives ....................... 3
17
SENIOR YEAR
Course First Semester Hours
AY.329-Applied Genetics ........... 3
AY. 331-Laboratory Problems in Gen-
etics ............................. 2
DY. 413-Market Milk and Milk Plant
Products ......................... 3
DY. 410-Dairy Cattle Judging and
Breeds .......................... 2
DY. 411-Dairy Cattle Management... 3
DY. 421-Seminar ................... 1
DY. 424-Advanced Dairy Breeds ..... 3
17
Course Second Semester Hours
AY. 436-Pastures ................... 2
DY. 318-Grading and Judging Dairy
Products ........................... 1
DY. 412-Milk Production ........... 3
DY. 422-Milk Secretion ............ 2
IY. 408-Dairy Industry Review. ..... 1
Electives ................... .. 8
17
In addition to dairy courses, the
student is required to take courses which
lead to a better understanding of dairy
farming. These include bacteriology,
nutrition, feeds and feeding, pasture,
forage and crop production, soil fertility
and fertilizers, agricultural economics
and veterinary science.
Dairy Farm Research Unit
The Dairy Research Unit at Hague,
comprising of a herd of cattle (2oo head)
and 1200 acres of land, is used for a
laboratory in all aspects of dairy hus-
bandry and dairy farming to provide
practical application and experience in
addition to the classroom work.
After having satisfactorily completed
the required work the student is granted
a degree of Bachelor of Science in Agri-
culture. With additional undergraduate
work, dairy majors may qualify as voca-
tional agricultural teachers or county
agricultural agents.
Opportunities in the field of dairy
husbandry for the college graduate may
be in one of the following phases of the
dairy industry:
1. Own and operate a dairy herd.
2. Herdsman in an established herd.
3. Manager of a dairy farm or breed-
ing estate.
4. Fieldman for a dairy plant.
5. Feed salesman.
6. Dairy extension work.
7. Fieldman for mastitis control pro-
gram.
8. Technician for artificial breeding
association.


Here are the 1951-52 leaders of two of
Florida's farm youth organizations They
are Miss Carolyn Black, Lake City, State
President of the Future Homemakers of
America and treasurer of the national or-
ganization: and Copeland Griswold,
Chuimuchla, president of the Florida As-
sociation Future Farmers of America.

9. Teaching and research in colleges
and universities.
Dairy Manufactures
The curriculum in Dairy Manufactures
is planned for students interested in the
technical aspects of dairy manufacturing.
It provides training which qualifies grad-
uates for responsible positions in the
several phases of its activities. A modern
and well equipped dairy industry build-
ing provides good facilities for laboratory
work as well as actual dairy plant experi-
ence.
After completing the first two years of
study, a small portion of which is taken
in dairying, the student concentrates his
efforts in dairy manufacturing subjects
and those in related departments.
Courses for the junior and senior years
are as follows:
JUNIOR YEAR
Course First Semester Hours
ACY. 208-Agricultural Bio-chemistry 3
ACY. 203-Analytical Chemistry ...... 3
BCY. 301-General Bacteriology...... 4
DY. 318--Grading and Judging Dairy
Products ......................... 1
E lectives ....................... 6
17
Coiuse Second Semester Hours
AS. 308--Marketing ................. 3
AL. 312-Feeds and Feeding ......... 4
DY. 316-Condensed and Dry Milk... 3
DY. 318-Grading and Judging Dairy
Products ......................... 1
E lectives ....................... 6
SENIOR YEAR
Course First Semester Hours
AG. 406-Dairy Engineering ........ 3
DY. 413-Market Milk and Milk Plant
Products ......................... 3
DY. 415-Ice Cream Manufacture .... 3
DY. 417-Fermented Milks .......... 2
DY. 419-Cheesemaking ............. 3
DY. 421-Seminar ................... 1
Electives ....................... 2
17
Course Second Semester Hours
BCY. 402-Dairy Bacteriology ....... 4
DY. 408-Dairy Industry Review...... 1
DY. 412-Milk Production ........... 3
DY. 414-Buttermaking ............. 3
DY. 416-Dairy Technology ......... 3


E lectives ....................... 3
17
After having completed the required
work in a satisfactory manner the student
is granted the degree of Bachelor of
Science in Agriculture. His CAREER
may be in one of the following phases
of dairy activities:
PLANT TECHNICIAN. Work in the
plant pasteurizing milk, making ice
cream mixes, freezing ice cream, etc.
DEPARTMENT MANAGER. In charge
of all operations in a specific depart-
ment.
LABORATORY TECHNICIAN. Make
bacteria counts, run butterfat tests, etc.
SUPPLY SALES. Sell dairy equipment
and supplies.
GOVERNMENT SANITARIAN. Em-
ployed by municipal, county, state, or
federal government as inspector of
dairy plants and dairy farms.
PROCUREMENT MANAGER. I n
charge of several fieldmen for a large
dairy plant.
PRODUCTION MANAGER. Respon-
sible for manufacturing processes in
all departments.
RESEARCH DIRECTOR. In charge
of all research for a large company.
COLLEGE OR UNIVERSITY. Teach-
ing and research work at universities
and experiment stations.
MERCHANDISING MANAGER. Re-
sponsible for advertising, sales and
promotion in large commercial plant.
GENERAL MANAGER. Responsible
for all functions of an individual plant
in a large organization.
If you or your sons or daughters are
interested in training in dairying we will
welcome the chance to give you any in-
formation you may desire. Either write
or, better still, come and visit the Depart-
ment of Dairy Science, University of
Florida, Gainesville.

Tampa Milk Price
Appealed to Supreme Court

A RECENT court order in Tampa set aside
a Milk Commission order of several
months' standing which increased the
price of milk in the Tampa area by i1
per quart.
An immediate appeal to the Supreme
Court filed by the Commission had the
effect of nullifying the Tampa court order
and continuing Milk Commission prices
in that area.


Ohio Drought
CINCINNATI, OHIo-Farmers and dairymen
in southern Ohio last week pleaded for
government aid as a result of a severe
six-weeks drought. Milk producers want
emergency price increases to offset the
higher cost of feed they have been unable
to raise.


FOR OCTOBER, 1951 31








Florida Dairy Industry Ass'n
ALLIED TRADES MEMBERS
Special Advertising Section


ADAMS PACKING ASSN., INC.
Citrus Pulp. Citrus Meal, Citrus Molasses
J. L. Coates, Sales Mgr. By-Products Div.


Auburndale, Fla.


Phone 8-7016


CHAS. DENNERY, INC.
New Orleans, La.
Ice Cream Coating, Fruits and Flavors
IRA STONE MIAMI, FLA.

DIAMOND ALKALI COMPANY
Dairy Cleaner 8& Alkali
Florida Distributors:
Miller Machinery & Supply, Jax.
Industrial Chem. & Supply Co.,
Tampa

EX-CELLO CORPN. PURE-PAK
DIVISION
Paper Bottle Machines Electro-Pure
Pasteurizers J. W. Radke
1680 Peachtree N. W. Atlanta, Ga.

GENERAL MILLS, INC.
Dairy Equipment and Supplies
John W. Manning, Phone 9-4586
1601 Congress Bldg. Miami

GULF PAPER COMPANY, INC.
Ice Cream (Linerless) Cartons, Butter Cartons
J. H. McVoy
50 E. Magnolia St., Pensacola, Fla.

DOUGLAS J. HEADFORD
FLA. REPRESENTATIVE
Green Spot Orangeade Concentrate
616 Jessamine Ave. Phone 4356
Daytona Beach, Fla.

JIM JENNINGS,
MFRS. REPRESENTATIVE
"Popular National Brands"
Milk Powder-Chocolate Syrup-Bar Coating
Orange Concentrate
Route 9, Box 356, Jacksonville, Fla.

JIFFY MANUFACTURING CO.
Insulated Bags and Liners
Southern Representative-William Romaine
Box 5463, 5 Pts. Sta., Columbia, S. C.

ROBERT A. JOHNSTON CO.
Dairy Chocolate & Cocoa Products
J. L. Hammons Ph. Dearborn 2811
507 Nelson Ferry Rd., Decatur, Ga.


KIECKHEFER CONTAINER CO.,
CAMDEN, N. J.
Pure-Pak Paper Milk Cartons
R. J. Evans Phone 8-5296
3343 Post St., Jacksonville, Fla.

KLENZADE PRODUCTS, INC.
Chemicals for Dairy and Food Plant
Sanitation H. B. Ahlefeldt
Union Term'l Whse., Jacksonville, Fla.


32 FLORIDA DAIRY


Wilson & Toomer Names
Pasture Consultant

APPOINTMENT OF Harvey A. Page as pas-
ture consultant of the Wilson Toomer
Fertilizer Company, with main plant and
offices in Jacksonville, has been an-
nounced by Wallace B. Hicks, president
of the company.
Page, who major-
ed in animal hus-
bandry at the Uni-

from which he was
graduated in 1949
with a B. S. degree
in agriculture, is a
native of Fort My-
ers, Florida. A mem-
ber of Delta Tau PAGE
Delta fraternity,
Page has a military record of four years
of service as staff sergeant with the U. S.
Army Air Force. He will operate out
of Tampa, Hicks said.
"The production of beef and dairy
cattle in Florida is becoming greater
every year," said Hicks. "Since 1940,
beef and dairy herds in Florida have
doubled in size. More and more pedi-
greed purebred livestock is being im-
ported to produce more vigorous strains
of beef cattle.
"Improved pasture grasses have had
much to do with this increase in cattle
raising. Behind all this has been an
increasing knowledge of proper fertiliza-
tion for the production of better pasture
grasses. We believe the time has arrived
when we can materially help the Florida
dairyman and cattleman and that is why
we have named a pasture consultant."


Jim Jennings Appointed
Mfr's Representative

THE MANY friends of Jim Jennings,
former Jacksonville dairyman and Secre-
tary of the former State Dairymen's
Association, will be interested in the
announcement by three Dairy Supplies
Manufacturers of their appointment of
Jim as Florida Representative, effective
October Ist.
The manufacturers, new in the Florida
field but well known to the Dairy In-
dustry, are the Consolidated Badger Co-
op., Shawno, Wisconsin, manufacturers
of milk powder; the Kalva Co., Wauke-
gan, Illinois, manufacturers of chocolate
syrup and bar coating; and the Eze-
Orange Co., Chicago, orange concen-
trate.

SEATTLE, WASH.-Dairy leaders here are
fearful that the whole Puget Sound-Wash-
ington area faces the most acute shortage
of milk which has ever confronted the
Pacific Northwest.


Florida Dairy Industry Ass'n
ALLIED TRADES MEMBERS
Special Advertising Section


S. H. MAHONEY EXTRACT CO.
Van-Sal Vanillas
SALLY H. MAHONEY, Pres.
221 E. Cullerton Rd., Chicago 16, Ill.

MEYER-BLANKE CO.-Dairy Supplies
"Everything But the Cow"
Jim Campbell Ph. 6-1366
2701 Dauphin St., Mobile, Ala.


PAUL-LEWIS LABORATORIES, INC.
Lactivase For Preventation of oxidized flavors
in bottled milk Redland Brands
26 N.E. 27th St., Miami, Fla.


PURE CARBONIC CO.
Carbonic Gas & "Dry Ice"
T. A. McMakin Ph. 7-8431
Strickland & McDuff Sts., Jax., Fla.


RALSTON PURINA COMPANY
Mills at Tampa and Miami
"A Dairy Program that increases capacity
and milking lile of your Herd"


RIVERSIDE MANUFACTURING CO.
Industrial Uniforms
James M. Stewart Phone 3-3287
306 Lakeview Ave., Apt. 406, Orlando

SCHAEFER INC.
Ice Cream Cabinets, Frozen Food Cabinets
W. G. Wright Phone 4201

333 Harbor Drive, Venice, Fla.


STANDARD CAP & SEAL CORP.
Tamper Proof Seals & Machinery
Larry Hodge

1121 duPont Bldg., Miami, Fla.

STEIN HALL & CO., INC.
Ex-Cello Glue, Powered Egg Yolk,
Stabilizers, Coconut L. A. Gaston
3912 San Juan, Tampa, Ph. 62-0171

STANDARD CAP & SEAL CORP.
Milk Bottle Closures
Bob Smith, 264 Peachtree St., Atlanta
Larry Hodge, duPont Bldg., Miami

TESCO CHEMICALS, INC.,
ATLANTA 5, GA.
Anhydrous Ammonia, Liquid Chlorine
Amica-Burnett Co., Jacksonville
C. S. Johnson, Tampa -
W. L. Filbert, Miami

THATCHER GLASS MFG. CO.
Glass Milk Containers
W. T. LOVE, Florida Representative
2726 Willow Dr., Charlotte, N. C.


NEWS




















Dr. Sam Higginbottom originated the
Red Sindhi-Jersey bull in Alahabad,
India, in 1941.

Red Sindhi-Jersey Bull
Of Interest to Dairymen
THE HANDSOME animal pictured above may
prove to be one of possible new combina-
tions of Dairy animals which will greatly
boost dairying in southern climates and
rough pasture lands.
This bull, called a Sindhi-Jersey, is a
crossbreed between a Sindhi (milk-type
Brahman) bull imported from India by
the U. S. Department of Agriculture and
a pure-bred Jersey. He has been loaned
to Dr. Sam Higginbottom for his Dairy
at the Christian Service Center, Babson
Park, Florida, by the U. S. Dept. of Ag-
riculture.
Dr. Higginbottom, who served for 41
years as an agricultural missionary in
India, originated the Sindhi Herd in Al-
lahabad, India, from which two bulls and
two heifers were secured by U.S.D.A.
Dr. Higginbottom thinks that the Sin-
dhi dairy characteristic plus the Brahman
resistance to heat and disease and their
ability to thrive under rougher grazing
conditions, when cross-bred to the Ameri-
can dairy cow, will produce a new and
more hardy type animal also capable of
average milk production.
Dairymen interested in this animal are
invited to contact Dr. Sam Higginbottom,
address: Christian Service Center, Babson
Park, Florida.

Duval Has Twin Heifers
Under Breeding Program
THE W. J. Simmons Dairy of Duval
County is boasting the first twin heifer
calves born under that County's Artifi-
cial Breeding Program. County Agent
Albert Lawton reports that several twins
have been born in the artificial breeding
program but these are the first heifer
twins.

HENRY FORD once said, "an educated man
is not one whose memory is trained to
carry a few dates of history, he is the man
man who can accomplish things."


FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY


50%" to 100%

MORE GRASS GROWS
On the muck soil in the Everglades.

Come and see


C. A. BAILEY REAL ESTATE
Specializing in Muck Pasture Land
P. 0. Box 216 Phone 2770 Belle Glade, Fla.


FOR OCTOBER, 1951 33







Veterinary Committee:


Vibriosis in Cattle
The Veterinary Committee of the Association desires to be of service to Florida Dairymen through dis-
cussion in this column of any Dairy Herd problems submitted which are of general interest. Submit your
questions to the Editor, FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS. Dr. Karl Owens of Gainesville, Chairman of the Committee
will assign the questions to some member of the Committee to answer.


Q Gentlemen of the Veterinary Com-
mittee: "I am operating a dairy
and I milk about 130 cows at the
peak of the winter season. Last spring
my herd began to have breeding troubles.
Forty of my milking cows did not breed
or lost their calves about four to six
months of gestation. All of these cows
have been vaccinated against Brucellosis
either as calves or as adults. Up to the
present time, my financial losses are esti-
mated to be around $3,ooo.oo. My veter-
inarian suspects the presence of vibriosis.
I would appreciate any information you
can furnish as to the nature or cause of
this condition, its treatment, control and
prevention.


A By Dr. D A. Sanders, Head of the
Veterinary Department of Florida
Agricultural Experiment Station
and President of the Florida Veterinary
Medical Association:
"Inquiries similar to this are being re-
ceived by practicing veterinarians in wide-
ly separated areas in the state. The Veter-
inary Department,
in cooperation with
practicing veterinar-
ians in the state, has
made field investi-
gations in herds
which were suspec-
ted of having vibrio
abortion. The clin-
ical symptoms obser-
ved were similar to DR. D.A. SANDERS
those associated with
Vibrio fetus infection. A positive diagno-
sis of vibriosis has been obtained on se-
lected herds which were suspected of be-
ing infected. The diagnosis was based
upon the agglutination tests on blood sera
which showed the presence of vibrio anti-
bodies. It can now be stated that the pre-
sence of vibrio abortion and its associated
sterility has been definitely established
and confirmed in herds in this state. This
positive diagnosis tends to confirm what
Dr. Fish referred to in a recent issue of
Florida Dairy News, ie. "It is likely that
this infection is quite widespread and the
establishment of additional Brucellosis
free herds will uncover more vibrionic
abortion".
The presence of vibriosis in a herd may
be suspected because of the occurrence
of abortions within the first six months
of gestation and from the poor concep-
tion rate in the herd. Periodic pregnancy


examinations in infected herds will
supply presumptive evidence of the pre-
sence of this disease. Positive evidence
of the disease may be established by la-
boratory examinations of aborted fetuses
and examination of blood from aborted
or sterile cows and by culture examination
of the genital tract of cows slaughtered
because of sterility.
The spead of vibriosis infection in a
recently infected herd is usually rapid.
Field observations have shown that losses
during this period of rapid spread are
equal in severity to the losses resulting
from Brucellosis. Vibrio abortions are
most likely to occur during the first six
months of pregnancy, while those due to
Brucellosis infection usually occur later in
the gestation period.

Suggestions for Prevention
And Control
It remains to be determined by veterin-
ary research how best to control vibriosis
in an infected herd. After the period of
rapid spread, it may be desirable to elim-
inate such reactors as may remain positive
to the tube agglutination tests longer
than six months. The definite role that
the bull may play in spreading vibrio in-
fection also remains to be found through
veterinary research. Owing to the pos-
sibility of spreading infection by the herd
bull, it seems desirable to blood test all
bulls in those herds where the disease oc-
curs or is suspected. In known infected
herds, artificial insemination using semen
from non-infected bulls is advised. Most
of the recent research work conducted on
vibriosis has been done at the Connecticut
Agricultural Experiment Station under
the direction of Dr. W. N. Plastridge.
While no veterinary research work is be-
ing conducted on the disease in Florida,
we are anxious to cooperate, in our limi-
ted capacity, with veterinary practitioners
in handling suspected or infected herds.
Until such time that adequate diagnos-
tic and research facilities are provided at
the University we will have to depend
upon submitting materials to better
equipped and staffed institutions for aid
in establishing facts of new diseases and
ailments that confront our livestock in-
dustries.

How TO tell the sexes apart now that both
are wearing slacks. The one listening is
the man.


New Truck Bodies
Sales Tax Exempt
RECENT INQUIRIES have come to the
Dairy Industry Association regarding the
application of the Florida Sales Tax to
new truck bodies.
It has been previously stated in F.D.-
I.A. Bulletins that the State Comptrol-
ler's Office had advised that new truck
bodies are not taxable if they are used
with a new chassis in making up a com-
plete new truck unit.
The above interpretation has recently
been re-affirmed by the State Comptrol-
ler's Jacksonville Office. Any dairies
which may have paid the sales tax on
new truck bodies when used as stated
above, are requested to advise the F.D.-
I.A. Office.

Plastic Coated Square
Carton at Gold Medal
GOLD MIEDAL Dairy, Ocala, is now using the
new milk packaging process in a square
throw-away plastic coated milk carton.
The new milk package is regarded as a
revolutionary development for improved
sanitation and efficiency in packaging
fresh milk and other fluid food products.

Skinners Announce Birth
Of Son on August 11
F.D.I.A. PRODUCER-DIRECTOR H. C. Skin-
ner, Skinners' Dairy, Jacksonville, and
Mrs. Skinner are the proud parents of a
son, Henry C. Skinner, Jr., born Au-
gust nth.

Veterinary Ass'n Convention
Meets Oct. 28-30 in Tampa
THE FLORIDA Veterinary Medical As-
sociation has announced its 1951 An-
nual Convention to be held at the Flori-
dan Hotel, Tampa, October 28, 29 and
30.
Dr. D. A. Sanders, head of the Veterin-
ary Science Department, University of
Florida, is President of the Association
and in charge of the program.
The Florida Dairy Industry Associa-
tion exchanges official Annual Meeting
Delegates with the Veterinary Associa-
tion, which encourages friendship, un-
derstanding and cooperation between
these two groups.


Farm Bureau Has Birthday

ON NOVEMBER 16th the Florida Farm Bu-
reau will be ten years old. The F.F.B.
has gone a long way since its organization
in Florida nine years ago.

"LOVERS OF today and yesterday differ be-
cause in the old days they gassed on the
step."


34 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS






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Follow the Security Dairy Program from calf to calf


FOR OCTOBER, 1951 35






























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