The Story of Columbus

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Title:
The Story of Columbus
Physical Description:
xvi, 303, 2 p. : ill. (some col.), port., maps, plan. ; 20 cm
Language:
English
Creator:
Seelye, Elizabeth Eggleston, 1858-
D. Appleton and Company ( Publisher )
Appleton Press
Publisher:
D. Appleton and Company
Place of Publication:
New York
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Electrotyped and printed at the Appleton Press
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Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Voyages and travels -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Adventure and adventurers -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Ship captains -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Sailing -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Sailors -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Seafaring life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Islands -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Shipwrecks -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Hurricanes -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Mutiny -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Discovery and exploration -- Juvenile literature -- America   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1893   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1893
Genre:
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by Elizabeth Eggleston Seelye ; with ninety-nine illustrations by Allegra Eggleston. edited, with an introduction by Edward Eggleston.
General Note:
Frontispiece printed on colors, t.p. printed in red and black ink.
General Note:
Publisher's advertisements follow text.

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University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002237288
notis - ALH7772
oclc - 23777615
System ID:
UF00082002:00001


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4Allegorical representation of Christopher
Columbus as St. Christopher bearing the
Christ-child across the water. iMade in
the year 15oo. in the lifetime of Columbus.






THE


STORY OF COLUMBUS





BY
ELIZABETH EGGLESTON SEELYE


IVI77 NINEETY-NVINE ILL USTRA TIONS
By ALLEGRA EGGLESTON

EDITED, WITH AN INTRODUCTION, BY
EDWARD EGGLESTON


D. ow


NEW YORK.
D. APPLETON AND COMPANY
1893



































COPYRIGHT, 1892,
BY D. APPLETON AND COMPANY










ELECTROTYPED AND PRINTED
AT THE APPLETON PRESS, U. S. A.


















CONTENTS.




CHAPTER PAGE
I.-MARCO POLO 1
II.-HENRY THE NAVIGATOR. 9
III-YOUNG COLUMBUS 16
IV.-COLUMBUS IN PORTUGAL 28
V.-COLUMBUS IN SPAIN 80
VI.-COLUMBUS BEGS IN VAIN 35
VII.-A FRIENDLY MONK 40
VIII.-GETTING READY FOR THE VOYAGE 46
IX.-THE FIRST VOYAGE OF COLUMBUS 51
X.-LAND AT LAST 59
XI.-EXPLORING IN THE WEST INDIES. 65
XII.-CoLUMBUS VISITS CUBA. 70
XIII.-THE DISCOVERY OF HAYTI .. 76
XIV.-WRECKED 83
XV.-A SKIRMISH. 88
XVI.-THE RETURN VOYAGE 92
XVII.-LAND 97
XVIII.-REJOICINGS AT COURT ... 104
XIX.-THE SECOND VOYAGE .. 110
XX.-ADVENTURES AMONG THE CARIBBEE ISLANDS 116
XXI.-WHAT HAD BECOME OF THE COLONY .. 121
XXII.-THE INFANT SETTLEMENT AND ITS INDIAN NEIGHBORS. 130
XXIII.-LOOKING FOR GOLD 186
XXIV.-TROUBLES OF THE COLONY 144
XXV.-THE VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY 148
XXVI.-ALONG THE COAST OF CUB.A .154







vi CONTENTS.

CHAPTER PAGE
XXVII.-THE RETURN TO HISPANIOLA 159
XXVIII.-WHAT HAPPENED IN THE COLONY IN THE ABSENCE
OF COLUMBUS .164
XXIX.-OJEDA'S ADVENTURE AND THE WAR THAT FOLLOWED 168
XXX.-TROUBLES FOR COLUMBUS, AND A NEW GOLD MINE. 175
XXXI.-IN SPAIN. 180
XXXII.-COLUMBUS SETS SAIL ON HIS THIRD VOYAGE 185
XXXIII.-COLUMBUS DISCOVERS PEARLS 190
.XXXIV.-WHAT HAPPENED IN THE COLONY WHILE COLUMBUS
WAS AWAY 196
XXXV.-A REBELLION AND A WAR 205
XXXVI.-COLUMBUS AND THE REBELS. 211
XXXVII.-THE KING AND QUEEN DISPLEASED 218
XXXVIII.-COLUMBUS IN CHAINS 2211
XXX1X.-COLUMBUS LANDS IN CHAINS 225,
XL.-COLUMBUS UNDER A CLOUD 228
XLI.-CoLUMBUS PREDICTS A HURRICANE 235
XLII.-COLUMBUS AT HONDURAS 289
XLIII.-MAGIC POWER AND GOLD PLATES 245
XLIV.-BACK TO THE LAND OF GOLD 252
XLV.-DEALINGS WITH QUIBIAN. 258
XLVI.-QUIBIAN'S REVENGE 264
XLVII.-STEANDED 269
XLVIII.-CoLUMBUS HAS A PLAN 274
XLIX.-A MUTINY. 278
L.-COLUMBUS MAKES USE OF AN ECLIPSE 281
LI.-A VOYAGE IN A CANOE 283
LII.-A SMALL BATTLE .288
LIII.-THE LAST DAYS OF COLUMBUS 29



















LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.



PAGE
Allegorical representation of Columbus as St. Christopher
Frontispiece
Gate of Pekin 1
General map of Marco Polo's journey 2
Catapult loaded. Catapult discharged . 3
Passport of gold, such as the Polos used in China 4
Arrival of the Polos in Venice 5
Prince Henry the navigator 8
Position of Ceuta .. 9
Rock of Gibraltar .10
A ship, from an old manuscript 12
Map of the portion of the African coast discovered before Prince
Henry's death. 14
Gate of St. Andrea, Genoa. as it exists at present. Facing 15
Gate of St. Andrea. Genoa, as it was in the time of Columbus 15
Genoa and its harbor 16
House in which Columbus lived, as it is at present 17
Supposed appearance of the house in Columbus's time (after Stagl-
ieno) ......... 18
Plan of the ground floor of the house in which Columbus lived
(after Staglieno) ... 19
Cathedral of San Lorenzo, Genoa 20
Harbor of Savona 21
Portrait of Columbus .24
Map of the supposed Western Hemisphere .28
Map of Portugal, Spain, and Genoa 80







viii LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

PAGE
Portrait of King Ferdinand. Portrait of Queen Isabella 31
Salamanca 88
Children mocking Columbus 36
View of the Alhambra across Granada 38
With Juan Perez at the monastery 41
A window in the Alhambra 43
Gateway of Granada 44
A caravel ........... 49
Peak of Tenerife 52
The Canary Islands and the Azores 54
Map showing the islands at which Columbus landed 60
Old print of 1500, showing Columbus landing, and the King of
Spain sending ships across to America 61
A calabash 64
Indian paddling in a dug-out 66
Chair such as Columbus's messengers sat in, found in a cave on
Turk's Island. 74
"She may not have enjoyed the clothing very much 78
The Indian monarch and his counsellors visit Columbus Facing 80
Shipwreck 83
An Indian mask from Hayti 85
An arquebus .. .. 86
A Lombard 87
Columbus finds mermaids less beautiful than they had been rep-
resented to be. 89
A wampum belt 91
Columbus and the sailors draw beans 94
Columbus writes an account of his discovery 96
Shore of the Azores 98
Port of Lisbon 101
Royal palace, Barcelona 104
Seville ...........108
The harbor, looking from Cadiz 110
Cadiz, from the mole. 107
Columbus bids good-bye to his sons .. Facing 111
Marigalante Island 113
An Indian child is found in a hut Facing 114
Map of Columbus's second voyage 115
The Indian trusts Columbus 123







LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.


Indian image of stone, from Santo Domingo
Indian figure in wood, from Santo Domingo
Indian figure of cotton, leather, etc., from Santo Domingo
Indian image of stone, from Santo Domingo
The Giralda Tower, Seville .
Map of the route from Isabella to Cibao
Map of the voyage along the coast of Cuba.
View of the southern shore of Hispaniola .
Old cannon from the fortress of Santo Domingo.


Ojeda praying to his picture of the Virgin .
Indian battle-axe .
Cannon of Columbus's time .
Stone carving from Santo Domingo
Columbus's armor. .
Map of Hispaniola
Catalina tells Diaz of a new gold mine
South America
A Trinidad palm .
Tower and fortress of Santo Domingo.
The gunana
Fortress and shore of Santo Domingo .
Church of San Antonio, near Santo Domingo


Facing 168
.169
170
.172
S 173
.177
. Facing 178
188
189
S196
198
S200
S201


Well at Santo Domingo, where ships get water, said to have
been built by Bartholomew Columbus 206
Don Bartholomew finds his messengers dead Facing 209
Chapel called Columbus's chapel, near Santo Domingo 211
Tower in which it is said Columbus was imprisoned 222
Interior of the fortress in which it is supposed Columbus was
imprisoned 22
Portrait of Vasco da Gama, from a manuscript of his time 229
Ruins of St. Nicholas Church, Santo Domingo 231
Interior of Dominican convent, Santo Domingo Facing 282
Ceiba tree, to which it is said the ships moored in Columbus's
time .... 286
Map of Columbus's last voyage of discovery 240
Indian figure of stone found on the Honduras coast 248
Sea view and Indians of the Mosquito Coast Facing 246
Characteristic Indian building on the coast 250
Don Bartholomew embraces the chief 262







x LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.
PAOE
Hull of a ship of Columbus's time 272
Monument to Columbus at Barcelona .291
House in Valladolid in which Columbus died 297
Cathedral of Santo Domingo, where Columbus's remains were
buried 299
Palace of Santo Domingo built by Diego Columbus 802















INTRODUCTION.


BY EDWARD EGGLESTON.

THE purpose of the writer of this book has been to
relate the life of the greatest of discoverers in a manner
interesting and delightful to the general reader, while
producing a narrative strictly conformed to the facts
as given by the best ancient authorities and developed
by the latest researches of scholars. There is here no
attempt to discuss the pros and cons of debated points
in Columbian history. Such investigators as Navarrete,
Mr. Harrisse, Signor Staglieno, and our own learned
Mr. Justin Winsor, have wrought abundantly and with
large results upon these problems. It is the purpose of
the present work to tell the story as understood
through the labors of these scholars, leaving aside
ponderous discussions which in a book intended for
general reading would tire without enlightening.
Though disclaiming original investigation beyond
the careful use of the leading authorities, Mrs. Seelye
has been at much pains not to give the reader the dis-
credited myths used by the old school of biographers.






INTRODUCTION.


It is a poor service to relate as history an interesting
story that is not true, or to lift an historical figure into a
heroism far from his real character. To give the facts
as we know them, and to show Columbus as he really
was, has been the sincere endeavor of the writer of this
book. The story is wonderful enough without the
embellishment of fiction; the man is interesting enough
when painted in his real colors.
The curious researches of Mr. Henry Harrisse into
the personal life of Columbus, the results of which have
been- given to the world in monographs in several
languages, have assisted the author to give it a personal
coloring which is always a legitimate source of interest,
especially to the young reader. One can hardly speak
too highly of the patient ingenuity by which the
antiquary Signor Staglieno has managed to find and
identify beyond doubt the house in which Columbus
lived as a boy. Such investigations dissipate error, and
make us know the real man and his environment.
It was the fashion of the older modern biographers
of Columbus, of whom Irving was the chief, to see all
the Christian virtues in their subject. The school of
romantic history and biography was as characteristic of
the first half of the present century as the school
of romantic fiction and poetry. Both sought at all
costs to find a hero, and, whenever possible, to set over
against this central figure a heroine. When the dis-






INTRODUCTION.


cover of America was the theme, Columbus became a
knight-errant with an admixture of saintliness, while
Isabella played the counterpart of heroine, to maintain
the symmetry of the narrative. Such a niethod be-
longed to a poetic age and had its uses, but it was fatal
to sound historical conclusions. It reached its extreme
of folly in the movement set on foot to have Columbus
canonized by the Church for a saint.
We have now swung to another extreme in our
literary methods. Producing fiction much of which is
quite too sordid to be justly called realistic, we are
possessed at the same time with a sort of rage to debase
the great figures of history. Not content with robbing
them of the false laurels with which our imaginative
predecessors have crowned them, we give way to a
pessimistic passion for denying them any virtue at all.
Because they have been praised for qualities they have
not, we scorn them for false pretenders. One of the
worst sufferers from this reaction is the great Genoese
sailor whose achievement of four hundred years ago gave
to civilization a world unknown before. There seems to
be an emulation of detraction among the most recent
investigators and learned, biographers. To paint the
discoverer in the darkest colors is accounted nowadays
an evidence of scholarship. But the pessimistic and de-
structive mode of judgment is as far from being scien-
tific as the now discarded romantic treatment, while it is






xiv .INTRODUCTION.

much less agreeable. Historic justice remembers the
wisdom expressed in the motto which was Lord Bacon's
device, and settles itself in a secure moderation.
Let us grant, then, that this great navigator was not
a saint. Like other great men, he had faults even when
judged by the light of his own time; and we have no
right to censure him by the standards of our age. But
he was a great fifteenth-century man. He could hardly
have won his battle had he not had some of the faults
of his age. He has been blamed for not having the
qualities of Copernicus or Las Casas. We must not
expect too much for our shilling. Columbus had in a
degree rarely equaled the power to consecrate himself
to one great achievement. He had courage, fortitude,
and a mastery of navigation as then understood. In a
word, he only had all -that was needed to produce a man
capable of crossing the Sea of Darkness. No other
navigator of his time had conceptions so bold or a
pertinacity of pursuit so unflagging. Men of aptitudes
so special are usually one-sided. History will not lay
it up against General Grant that he was a weak states-
man, nor will posterity insist on remembering that Tur-
ner, the painter, wrote bad poetry. It is enough that Co-
lumbus alone of the men of the fifteenth century had
the imagination to plan and the boldness to carry out a
voyage in search of land to the westward. No one
can make him less than what his own merit has made






INTRODUCTION.


him, the most conspicuous figure in the history .of his
age-the man who rendered the world the greatest
service possible at that moment.
He was not in advance of his age in other respects.
He was superstitious; he was ambitious; he sought
wealth, which was the prize that spurred other Genoese
adventurers to hard tasks. He lacked the enthusiasm
of disinterested research which possessed Copernicus
and the reformatory spirit of Las Casas. But neither
Copernicus nor Las Casas ever dreamed of setting out
to find land by the untried water way to the westward,
nor could either of them have set on foot so bold an
undertaking. Nature does not give everything to one
man. And the very faults charged against Columbus-
his pursuit of wealth and his belief in his own divine mis-
sion-propelled and supported him in his arduous and
perilous enterprise. Let us judge him fairly and by -the
standards of his age, and honor him for what he was
and did, without censuring him that he was not some-
thing else. To rob the doers of great deeds of their
hard-earned glory, is to deprive the race of one of the
mainsprings of notable actions.
In the laborious task of gathering material for au-
thentic pictures, the illustrator has been placed under
obligation by the kindness of several gentlemen. Mr.
Nathan Appleton, of Boston, generously put at her dis-
posal a valuable collection of photographs, and several






INTRODUCTION.


drawings made under his own supervision in the island
of Santo Domingo. Mr. E. C. Perry, of Honduras,
also placed his collection in her hands. Acknowledg-
ments are also due to Mr. Henry Marquand, of New
York, Prof. Otis T. Mason, of the National Museum,
and to others.
It remains only to say that the present book is the
first of a series intended to introduce the young reader
and the general reader to what is most interesting and
delightful in American history. It is the result of the
co-operation of two sisters already known to the public
by work in their several departments. I have taken a
lively interest in this labor of my daughters from the
beginning, giving it whatever benefit I could of any
knowledge of mine and of my experience in book-
making, but my function has been merely editorial.
























GATE OF PEKITN.

THE STORY OF COLUMBUS.


CHAPTER I.
MARCO POLO.
1254-1384.
IN the middle ages people had never dreamed
about such a place as America. To them the known
world consisted of Europe, part of Asia, and a little
strip of Africa. The first man to help people to know
more about the world and to make them wish to know
still more was a Venetian gentleman, named Marco
Polo, who lived two hundred years before Columbus.
Strangely enough, Marco Polo did something toward
the discovery of America, though he journeyed by






2 THE STORY OF COLUMBUS.
land rather than by sea, and traveled to the East in-
stead of to the West. -
When Marco Polo was born (about 1254) his
father and uncle, Nicolo and Maffeo Polo, had just
sailed away from Venice, which was their home, on a
trading voyage to Constantinople. When they got to
that city, instead of trading the goods which they had
brought with them for some of the silks and spices
which came from the far East and returning home as







In a 3 ^


Indian Ocean

GENERAL MAP OF MARCO POLO'S JOURNEY.
other merchants did, they exchanged all their merchan-
dise for jewels, which could be concealed from robbers
more easily than gold, and went on into the Eastern
countries. I suppose they had some curiosity to find
out where the spices, silks, gums, and jewels, which
Europeans were so glad to buy, came from. They
journeyed through Asia to China, or Cathay, as people
called it in those days. The great Chinese Emperor,
Kublai Khan, treated the strangers very kindly, and
sent back a message by them to the Pope.






MARCO POLO.


The travelers were gone nineteen years, and when
they returned they found that Nicolo had a son named
Marco whom they had never seen, although he had by
this time grown to be a man. They stayed in Italy two
years, and then they took Marco with them and set out
for the empire of Kublai
Khan once more, carry-
ing some presents and
letters from the Pope to
the Chinese Emperor.
It took the Polos four
CATAPULT LOADED. years to make the diffi-
cult and dangerous jour-
ney across Asia, to the home of the Grand Khan, who
was very much delighted to see them. Marco became
a great favorite with
the Emperor, who made
him one of his officers.
While Marco Polo was
traveling about China
as an officer of Kublai
Khan his father and
uncle made themselves
useful by building a
catapult, which was a CATAPULT DISCHARGED.
machine at that time in
use in Europe for throwing stones and other missiles.
Gunpowder had not yet been invented.
When the Polos had been away from home about
twenty years they grew homesick. They asked the
Khan for permission to go back to Venice for a visit,
but the Emperor was so fond of them that he at first






THE STORY OF COLUMBUS.


refused. He finally consented to let them go, but he
made them promise to return to China, giving them, at
the same time, many rich presents and some tablets of
gold, which they were to show as passports in the vari-
ous countries that they would have to pass through.
About this time the daughter of Kublai Khan was to
be married to the King
of Persia. The Khan
S iI sent the Polos as far as
Persia in the fleet which
1 l carried this princess to
her new home. The
Chinese fleet touched at
different points in the
East Indies, and so the
travelers had a chance to
see something of the isl-
Sands where spices grew.
When they reached Per-
sia they were entertained
S ~ very magnificently for
nine months. After this
e somewhat long wedding
festival was over the
PASSPORT OF GOLD SUCH AS THE
POLOS USED IN CHINA. Polos continued on their
way to Europe, dressed
in coarse Chinese costume, so that they might not be
in danger of being murdered for their riches.
When they reached Venice, after having been gone
twenty-four years, the travelers found that they had
come to be regarded by their friends as long since dead
and buried, and that their house had been inherited by







LI I
V / 4I ~" '" I "'"" -


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~3Z~~


ARRIVAL OF THE POLOS IN VENICE.


?~~.u~"r~
~ans~i~ ~'i,
~ "






THE STORY OF COLUMBUS.


some of their relatives. This was unpleasant for the
three Polos, especially as the members of their family
refused to believe that they were indeed themselves,
which was not so strange, for the wanderers were very
much tanned, wore coarse Chinese dresses, and spoke
their own tongue like Chinamen.
The strangers, however, gave a dinner to which
they invited all the gentlemen of the Polo family.
When the guests arrived they found the travelers
dressed in robes of crimson satin. No sooner had
water been served for the washing of hands, after the
fashion of those days, than the three strange Polos rose,
left the room, and presently returned in robes of crim-
son damask. They caused the satin gowns to be cut up
and divided among the servants. The guests probably
thought this a very extravagant proceeding. However,
the dinner had progressed but little further before the
travelers again left the room and returned in crimson
velvet robes, while the damask gowns were also dis-
tributed among the servants. After a time the three
Polos left the room once more, and came back dressed
as Venetians, causing the velvet suits to be cut up as
the others had been. Finally, when the cloth was re-
moved from the table and the servants dismissed, the
travelers brought in the coarse Chinese dresses, which
they had worn on their travels. Taking sharp knives,
they cut open the seams of these old garments and took
out rubies, carbuncles, emeralds, and diamonds. Before
leaving China they had exchanged the wealth which
Kublai Khan had given them for these jewels, so that
they might carry their riches with them. The sight of
so much wealth quite freshened the memories of the






MARCO POLO.


other members of the Polo family. They could no
longer doubt that such rich men were their relations.
After this, many people came to visit Marco Polo,
in order to talk with him about his travels. He used
the word millions so much in describing the riches of
Kublai Khan that they dubbed him Messere Marco Mil-
lione, or Mr. Marco Millions, as we should say, while
his house is yet called the court of the millions," for
many people did not believe the strange tales of Mr.
Marco Millions.
Marco Polo was afterward captured in a war be-
tween Venice and Genoa, and while he was in a Genoese
prison he dictated an account of his travels to a fellow-
prisoner, who wrote it down. This book became very
famous. Many people doubted Marco Polo's stories
about gold-roofed palaces and other fairy-like wonders,
though we now know that his marvelous tales were many
of them true. The reading of Marco Polo's travels set
some thoughtful people to thinking about distant coun-
tries and to planning ways of reaching them, so that it
was Marco Polo, instead of his father and uncle, who had
to do with the making of great discoveries. The Polos
were not the only Europeans who had wandered as far
as China, but Marco Polo was the first to leave a care-
ful account of what he saw and heard. After him there
was an Englishman named Sir John Mandeville who
made a similar journey, and also wrote about it. These
two books were read much by studious men, who were
curious to know more concerning the geography of the
world.






THE STORY OF COLUMBUS.


CHAPTER II.
HENRY THE NAVIGATOR.
1894-1473.
A MAN who had much more to do with the discovery
of America than did Marco Polo was Prince Henry of
Portugal, though he too looked for an Eastern and not
a Western world. This
prince was born in 1394,
nearly a hundred years
before Columbus discov-
ered America. He was
the son of John I of
Portugal. This king had
seized the throne at a
time when there was great
dispute as to who had a
a right to it, and most of
the people believed him
PRINCE HENRY THE NAVIGATOR. to be the only man able
and brave enough to save
the country. He proved to be a great king. Queen
Philippa, the mother of Prince Henry, was an English
lady, a daughter of the famous John of Gaunt, and
sister of the English King Henry IV. Prince Henry's
parents were noble and high-minded people, and they
gave their sons the best education to be had in that day.






HENRY THE NAVIGATOR.


Henry was the third son of King John and Queen
Philippa, and as it was not likely that he would ever
become king, he had the more time to spend in such
studies as he loved. When the three young men had
come of age, King John and Queen Philippa wished
them to be made knights. In order to become a knight
a young man had first to do some brave deed with his
sword, even though he were a prince. That his sons
might have a chance to win knighthood, King John
thought of giving tournaments for a whole year and
inviting the knights of all nations to attend them.
Tournaments, however, were but playing at war, and
the king's Minister of Finance told him that, as this
would be a very costly plan, it would be better to spend
the money in attacking the Moorish city of Ceuta, which
was opposite to the rock
of Gibraltar, for it was
thought in those days a
Christian act to attack the
infidel Moors.
The young princes ~- r
were better pleased to ** *
gain knighthood in true
war; so everything was
secretly made ready to
attack Ceuta, and Queen
Philippa had three jew- P N OF
eled swords made to pre-
sent to her sons when they should be knighted. But
before the fleet was ready to sail the queen fell ill and
died, giving the swords to her sons on her deathbed.
Instead of waiting to mourn long over her death, the






THE STORY OF COLUMBUS.


king and princes set out on their expedition, for they
knew that this valiant action would have pleased her
best.
Twice the Portuguese fleet anchored before Ceuta,
and twice it was scattered by storms. The Moors were
much frightened when they first saw the Christian ships,
but when they were a second time driven away by
storms the people of Ceuta were thrown off their
guard, for they thought that the vessels would never
get together again. Prince Henry, after a great deal













ROOK OF GIBRALTAR.

of trouble, however, got the fleet assembled again, and
the Portuguese ships anchored for the third time before
Ceuta. When the Moors saw this they crowded the
wall of the city on the side next the fleet with men,
and lighted candles in all the windows, in order to dis-
courage the Christians by making them think that there
were a great many soldiers in the town. The Portu-
guese were indeed already discouraged by so bad a be-
ginning, but the king and his sons held to their purpose.






HENRY THE NAVIGATOR.


The princes landed, each of them in command of a
division of the army, fought their way in at three dif-
ferent gates, and took possession of several parts of the
city. But their soldiers fell to plundering too soon,
and the Moors, seeing the Christians off their guard,
made a rush and tried to drive them from the town.
Prince Henry held the narrow street where he was with
but a handful of men, and once, left all alone, he fought
the enemy single-handed. Presently a messenger went
to the king and told him that his son Henry had fallen.
The king only answered:
"Such is the end which soldiers must expect."
When evening came, however, and John I called a
council, Prince Henry was there, and his father's face
lighted up with joy when he saw him. The king of-
fered to knight Henry first of the three princes, because
he had proved himself so brave a soldier, but Henry
begged that his older brothers should be honored before
him.
All night long the soldiers made plunder of the
gold, silver, spices, and fine stuffs to be found in the
Moorish city, while one nobleman selected for his share
more than six hundred columns of marble and alabas-
ter and a dome, purposing to build with these a palace
for himself in Portugal. When morning came, the
streets ran with oil, honey, spices, butter, and preserves
which had been wasted by the plunderers. The three
princes were knighted in the great mosque on this day;
the Moors, with their women and children, meanwhile
climbed the mountains behind the city, bewailing their
loss. While others were plundering, Prince Henry
was learning from Moorish prisoners something about





THE STORY OF COLUMBUS.


the interior of Africa and the coast of Guinea, which
made him think of making some discoveries in these
unknown parts.
After Henry returned home he was invited by kings
of other countries to come and lead their armies, but
instead of becoming a great warrior he liked better to
give up his life to making discoveries. In his day peo-




---:-
-m-











A SHIP FROM AN OLD MANUSCRIPT.
pie imagined, when they thought anything about it at
all, that Africa reached to the south pole, but Prince
Henry began to have a notion that possibly Africa did
not extend so far, and that ships might sail around it,
and thus reach the rich world of the East. His second
brother, Dom Pedro, or Prince Peter, as we should say,






HENRY THE NAVIGATOR. 13

spent twelve years in traveling to what people then
called the seven parts of the world-that is, to Palestine,
Turkey, Italy, Hungary, Denmark, England, and other
places in Europe. When he came home he brought
with him the travels of Marco Polo and a map said to
have been made by this famous traveler. So Henry
read the book of Marco Polo, and it helped to make
him wish to find the way to the East Indies and China.
Prince Henry went to live on a lonely promontory
which ran out into the sea. There was nothing but
sage brush growing on this barren place, because the
waves in time of storm spouted up through holes in the
rocky shore and fell in a salt spray over the land, so
that no other plants could grow there. Here he studied,
and sent out ship after ship, to find out all about the
coast of Africa.
Before Henry's time vessels had sailed only in the
Mediterranean and in the Atlantic Ocean along the
coasts of Europe. Sailors were very timid and feared
to leave the land far out of sight. The compass had
only just come to be used. For a long time after it
was discovered that a needle rubbed on a magnet would
turn toward the polar star, sea captains were afraid to
use this discovery in finding their way by sea, lest their
sailors should suspect them of being magicians, for men
imagined that so strange a thing must have been made
by the help of evil spirits. Prince Henry interested him-
self in all things that could make it safer to sail in the
great Atlantic, of which people knew so little and had
so great a horror that they called it the Sea of Dark-
ness." He improved maps and spent great sums of
money on voyages of discovery. Although he did not





THE STORY OF COLUMBUS.


sail on these voyages himself he came to be called
"Henry the Navigator."
Some of the nobles of Portugal, who troubled them-
selves but little about unknown parts of the world, com-
plained about Prince Henry's useless expeditions to the
coast of Africa, until the Madeira Islands were discov-
ered by his ships, when they thought best to say no
more.
In spite of all the efforts of Henry the Navigator,
discovery went on slowly. He had to offer his cap-
tains great rewards to get them to round a new cape.
The sailors of those days imagined strange monsters in
unknown seas, and thought that at the equator nobody
could live, and that there
the water of the ocean boiled
errp because of the great heat.
Prince Henry had difficulty
lahbei~r in getting his seamen to sail
A "nary around Cape Bojador and
thus to enter the tropics.
They were for the most part
content to go a little farther
C. than the last ship had sailed,
and return with some gold
MAP OF THE PORTION OF THE AFRI- dust and negro slaves with
CAN COAST DISCOVERED BEFORE which to make a profit on
PRINCE HENRY'S DEATH.
their voyages.
Henry lived among seamen. He sent out gentle-
men of his household, his cup bearer and his squires,
as captains on his ships. Adventurous sailors from
other countries came to him to be sent on voyages of
discovery, while he entertained negro chiefs and dined







~'1
bk
ia if

3.
| f: 'r
3_ .- 'I~


-r- ,


Ika


Gate of St. Andrea (Genoa) as it exists at present.


J
ii







HENRY THE NAVIGATOR.


on ostrich eggs brought from Africa. When Prince
Henry died, in 1473, the African coast had been ex-
plored to Cape Verd, but the way to India had not yet
been found, though the Portuguese had begun to be
hopeful of it, because the coast of Africa turned east-
ward from Cape Verd.


GATE OF ST. ANDREA, GENOA,
AS IT 'WAS IN THE TIME OF COLUMBUS.






THE STORY OF COLUMBUS.


CHAPTER III.
YOUNG COLUMBUS.
1446-1474.
A VENETIAN gentleman and a Portuguese prince
had made great discoveries in unknown parts of the
world, but the most wonderful of all discoveries was to
be made by one who was neither prince nor gentleman,
Christoforo Colombo, a Genoese weaver.
Christopher Columbus, as we call him, was born in
the Italian city of Genoa, somewhere about 1446. His


GENOA AND ITS HARBOR.


father was called Domenico Colombo, and his mother's
name was Susanna. His father was a weaver of wool,
while his mother came also of a family of wool and silk
weavers. After Columbus became famous, some writers






YOUNG COLUMBUS.


tried to prove that he came of a noble family, but this
is not true, for the Colombos, as they were called in
Genoa were simple working people.
The father, three uncles, and several
of the cousins of Christopher Co-
lumbus were weavers, while his only
sister married a cheese merchant.
The father of Columbus was always
poor, often he had to go in debt for I :
the wool which he worked up, and '
once he bought a little piece of land -:
and agreed to pay for it in pieces of
cloth, but he did not get it paid for.
He worked at his trade until he was
about seventy-five years old, and
finally died in debt, though he lived
long enough to know that his oldest
son had made a great discovery.
A great deal of trouble has been
taken to find the house which Do-
menico Columbus owned, where Co-
lumbus lived when he was a boy, and
where he was probably born. It is
a very narrow house, low.and dark, ,
and stands in a quarter of Genoa
which was outside of the old city i '
walls. In this quarter lived weavers
of wool and silk, dressers of cloth,
fullers, carders, dyers, and all people
who made their living by working at --A~
the making of cloth. Thus we know HOUSE IN WHICH o-
what kid of niLUMBUS LIVED AS IT
what kind of neighbors the great dis- IS AT PRESENT.






THE STORY OF COLUMBUS.


coverer had when he was a boy. The little house
stood just without the gate of St. Andrea, and Colum-
bus must have seen this fine old gate many times in
a day.
On the lower floor of the narrow little house was
the shop, which was open to the street, and here Domen-
ico Columbus and his apprentices did
their weaving, displaying their goods
on a counter at the open front, and
stopping work to sell to any customer
who should chance to come. The
family lived over the shop, and may
have rented the story above this to
some other poor family. The win-
dows had no glass in them, but there
were wooden shutters for cold weath-
er, with small apertures in them,
which let in light through oiled
linen or paper.
The weavers of Genoa established
little schools for their children, and
probably Columbus was sent to one
of these to learn to read, write, and
cipher, until he got old enough to
learn his father's trade. When this
" sE APPEARANUE time came he went into his father's
OF TtIE HOUSE IN
COLUMBUS'S TIME. shop as an apprentice, and here he
(STAGLIENO.)
learned to comb wool or weave, prob-
ably both. Columbus had three brothers, who were
apprenticed to learn the weaver's trade, like himself.
In later life he shared his good fortunes with two of
them, Bartholomew and Diego, while we know nothing






YOUNG COLUMBUS.


of his other brother, except that h
when he was rather young.
In 1470, when Christo- r
pher Columbus was about
twenty-four years old, he
went on some small trad-
ing voyage, for he signed a ..;...
contract to pay a man sixty
dollars for some wine
which Columbus was
to take on board a
vessel and trade at
some other port in the i.-.....
Mediterranean. But
he does not seem to have been yet
much of a sailor, for he is still called
a weaver in the old papers.
In Genoa a young man was not
of age until he was twenty-five years
old. About the time that Colum-
bus came of age his father moved
with his family to the city of Sa-
vona, and there set up a weaver's
shop. Two years after the removal
to Savona a young comrade of Chris-
topher's, named Nicolo Monleone,
who was also a weaver, died. Be-
fore Nicolo died, he made a will, to
which there were six witnesses, three
of whom were tailors, one a boot-
maker, one a cloth-dresser, and one a
weaver, this weaver being Christo-


e must have died



..... ., .... ....'"'
- .... ..-. ..

. ... .. ...
.- .. ...
8:':_:~"~~. '~


7-;:~ ~
A''


PLAN OF THE GROUND-
FLOOR OF THE HOUSE
IN WHICH COLUMBUS
LIVED. (STAOLIENO.)






THE STORY OF COLUMBUS.


pher Columbus. From this we
was yet a plain working man.


know that Columbus
Soon after this, the


CATHEDRAL OF SAN LORENZO, GENOA.


young weaver and his father signed a paper in which
they agreed to pay for some wool in pieces of cloth.
Old legal papers, the only sources from which we
can learn anything very certain about the early life of






YOUNG COLUMBUS.


Columbus, show that he lived in Savona as a weaver
until 1473, when he must have been about twenty-seven
years old. There can be no doubt, however, that Chris-
topher Columbus was no common weaver's boy, for he
had less than twenty years more in which to learn to be
a great navigator as well as to become a man of consid-
erable education. It is altogether likely that he had very






S-4'


HARBOR OF BAVOWA.


little schooling, and that, like other men who have been
poor boys and become famous, he educated himself by
hard study at odd times.
Genoa, like other Italian cities, had made itself rich
by sending ships out to trade. All the land which be-
longed to this city was a very small province, hemmed
in by mountains, and most Genoese men who wished to





THE STORY OF COLUMBUS.


become rich or famous had to take to the sea. The
province of Genoa had already furnished many admirals
to Portugal, where such great discoveries were being
pushed forward. No doubt Columbus, from the time
that he was.a little boy, had often stood on the wharves
and seen the ships unloading their valuable merchandise,
while he talked with seamen fresh from distant lands.
He must have heard of Prince Henry's great plan for
reaching India by going around Africa, and of the voy-
ages made by the Portuguese. Perhaps he too had
heard while he was still a weaver the story of Marco
Polo's strange travels, for we know that at some time
in his life he read Marco Polo's book, and that it made
him wish very much to reach the rich countries about
which it told.
It is certain that young Columbus had a lively imag-
ination, as- well as a great deal of ambition. No doubt
he often fancied himself making such a strange jour-
ney as did Marco Polo, or sailing still farther than any
Portuguese captain had done, and reaching the much-
desired India. For him, as for many another Genoese
young man, the sea was the only high road to fame and
fortune, and Portugal was the place to go to if one
wished to become a great discoverer, so when he was
about twenty-seven or twenty-eight, Columbus gave up
his trade forever and took to the sea. A few years later
we find him in Portugal.






COLUMBUS IN PORTUGAL.


CHAPTER IV.
COLUMBUS IN PORTUGAL.
1474-1485.
THERE is very little known about the life of Colum-
bus before he became a great man. We know that he went
to live in Portugal, and that while he was there he made
many voyages, for he afterward said that he had sailed
in all the east, west, and north. It did not take a great
deal of voyaging, however, to go into all the known seas
of those days. Columbus had but to sail east in the
Mediterranean, north to Iceland, south along the ex-
plored coast of Africa, and to the islands west of Africa
and of Europe to be a very experienced sailor, for this
was as far as Europeans had ventured in any direction.
At some time in his early life he got a wound, perhaps
in one of the sea fights common in that day. While
Columbus was in Portugal he married a Portuguese
lady, of good family, named Philippa Moniz.
Columbus was a tall, strong man, with a long face,
brilliant blue eyes, an aquiline nose, red hair, and a ruddy
complexion, marked with freckles. He was rather rough
and abstracted in his manner, and somewhat quick-tem-
pered, though he knew how to be amiable at times.
Those who saw Columbus said that he was a fine-looking
man, although he dressed almost as plainly as a monk,
for he was too thoughtful to care much about his clothes.






THE STORY OF COLUMBUS.


He was very much interested in geography, and learned
to make maps and globes, and he sometimes made his
living by selling these. Perhaps while he was making
spheres he thought a great deal about what was in the
great blank spaces. He believed that the part of the
world already known-that is, from the Canary Islands
to a certain city in Asia-made two thirds of the distance
















'obcos.,imme.

PORTRAIT OF COLUMBUS.

around the globe, and that, as Marco Polo said that Asia
extended very far eastward, it must come quite a dis-
tance over into the unknown third of the world, and
hence it would be quite easily reached by sailing west
from Europe. In reality, only about one third of the
world was known, while there remained two thirds to
be explored; but learned men in those days made the






COLUMBUS IN PORTUGAL.


same mistake concerning the size of the earth that'
Columbus did. Probably if the truth about the circum-
ference of the world had been known, America would
not have been found by Columbus.
We have seen that Columbus was born in an age of
discovery. It was not so much a curiosity to know
about the unknown parts of the earth that made men
at first bent on discovery as it was the desire for
wealth. Italian cities, like Genoa, where Columbus
was born, and Venice, where Marco Polo lived, had
become rich by sending out ships to trade with the
Mohammedans, who sold spices, silks, and precious
stones, which were brought by caravans from Asia.
Those who had the means liked very much to dress in
silk and jewels, while spices were greatly prized for
seasoning the food of that day, which was rather plain
and coarse. Great prices were paid for all kinds of
goods from the East, and those who could sell them be-
came rich, and enriched the countries where they lived.
For this reason Prince Henry, as well as his brother and
nephew, who were successively kings of Portugal, wished
to find a way to India by sailing around Africa, thus
making their country a market for the precious goods
of the East. Spices and jewels, silks and precious gums,
drew men around the world on long and dangerous
voyages and led them to find out about the globe on
which they lived.
It was probably while Columbus was in Portugal
that he first thought of sailing directly west to reach
Asia, instead of trying to go around Africa. He had
not the least idea of finding a new continent, nor any
desire to make such a discovery. Men in those days






THE STORY OF COLUMBUS.


had no use for a new world; what they longed for was
an old world where precious commodities not to be
found in Europe could be procured.
In the days of Columbus many fables about islands
in the Atlantic Ocean were believed. One of these
stories was that when the Moors had conquered Spain,
seven bishops with a great many people had sailed
away into the Atlantic Ocean to an island where they
had founded seven splendid cities, and the imaginary
island on which they lived was called the Island of the
Seven Cities. Another tale was about an island called
St. Brandon, where a Scotch priest named St. Brandon
had landed in the sixth century. People believed so
firmly in these fantastic islands that the kings of Por-
tugal several times gave them to subjects of theirs, who
never could succeed in finding their possessions. An
imaginary island in which the ancients had believed,
called Antilla, was looked for. There was still another
fabled island called Brazil, and an Englishman named
Thomas Lloyd had sailed to the west of Ireland in
1480 in search of it. After about nine months Lloyd's
ships put into an Irish port, badly beaten by tempests,
and without having found the island of Brazil. People
living on the Maderia Islands thought they saw on clear
days a large island to the west, which they believed to
be St. Brandon. They sent in search of it, having first
taken care to procure a grant of St. Brandon, but their
island was never found. In spite of such disappoint-
ments, St. Brandon, the Seven Cities, Antilla, Brazil,
and other imaginary islands were put down on the maps
of that day. Columbus made a careful note of all these
tales. He too believed in the fabled islands, but he did






COLUMBUS IN PORTUGAL.


not want to make a random voyage in search of them, as
had other sailors. He only thought of them as conveni-
ent and encouraging stopping places in making the long
voyage westward to the shores of Japan and China.
All that was known about Japan in the days of
Columbus was that Marco Polo had reported that there
was an island, which he called Cipango, lying five hun-
dred leagues east of China. Marco Polo said that in
Cipango there was an abundance of precious stones,
while the king of that country lived in a palace the
roof of which was covered with plates of gold, just as
in Europe palaces are covered with plates of lead.
This story is not impossible, since temples roofed with
tiles of gold are not unknown in Asia to-day. Colum-
bus did not doubt the stories of Marco Millions,"
and he imagined himself sailing westward around the
world, and so reaching the Island of Japan and the land
of the Grand Khan. Thus the accounts of Marco Polo
had much to do with both the discoveries of Prince
Henry on the coast of Africa and with the finding of a
new world in the West.
Columbus was not the only man who had the grand
idea of sailing west to reach the East. A great as-
tronomer named Paolo Toscanelli, who lived in Flor-
ence, had sent a letter to the Portuguese King, in which
he said that India could be reached by a shorter way
than that which the Portuguese were looking for around
Africa, and that this voyage should be made by sailing
always westward. Columbus wrote to Paolo Toscanelli
on the subject, and the' great astronomer sent him a
copy of this letter. He also sent Columnbus a map in
which the shores of Asia were made to come opposite to






THE STORY OF COLUMBUS.


the shores of Europe, while the imaginary Antilla and
other islands, as well as the real Japan, dotted the ocean
at convenient distances between the two continents.
We see that though Columbus was not the only person
who had the great idea, the difference between him and
other men was that he believed so strongly in his idea
that after he had once got it he thought of nothing
else, and tried for nothing else but to carry it out.
Since he was to find rich heathen lands, which, ac-
cording to the idea of those days, must be taken posses-












it necessary to have a powerful king back of him.




Besides this, he was far too poor a man to pay the cost
of such an expedition alone. From the days of Prince
f sa, tak ya



MAP OF THE SUPPOSED WESTERN HEMISPHERE.
sion of and converted to Christianity, Columbus thought
it necessary to have a powerful king back of him.
Besides this, he was far too poor a man to pay the cost
of such an expedition alone. From the days of Prince
Henry the Portuguese kings had known a great deal
about navigation and had "great heart," as Columbus
himself said, in undertaking voyages of discovery.





R -r 7 T4 .C, /
COLUMBUS IN *abig. 29

John II, the grand-nephew of Prince Henry, was now
on the throne. The king entertained learned men,
both Jews and Christians in his palace, and received
mariners from all parts of the world. While he reigned
some noble discoveries were made by his sailors.
Columbus had come to live in Portugal, the land of
discovery. He carried his project to John II, propos-
ing to him to find a way to the East Indies which
should be shorter than the way he was seeking around
Africa. The king kept Columbus waiting a long time,
and at length declined his proposal. There were sev-
eral reasons why so wise a king should have made this
mistake. Columbus was a poor stranger, and Portugal
did not need any longer to borrow its seafaring men
from other countries, since there were now many hardy
seamen in Portugal who had been taught in the school
of African explorations. Then, too, Columbus, poor as
he was, demanded great rewards for his discoveries; he
would have nothing less than the vice-royalty of the
lands which he should find, the title of admiral, and a
tenth part of the profits. He meant to make himself
rich as well as famous by his discoveries. King John
did not give such high rewards, and he was also perhaps
a little disappointed in the results of Portuguese explo-
rations, which had cost more than they had brought in.
As the Cape of Good Hope had not yet been found, the
success of the attempt to reach India remained still in
doubt. King John, however, did allow some of his
own subjects to try a voyage westward, but they re-
turned without having found land. This is said to.have
made Columbus very angry, for he felt that he had been
cheated.






THE STORY OF COLUMBUS.


CHAPTER V.
COLUMBUS IN SPAIN.
14.85-1487.
COLUMBUS must have been very much disappointed
when he was finally refused by King John, for Portugal
was really the only country which was interested in dis-
covery. But he was a persistent man, and he did not
for a moment give up his plan. His brother Bartholo-
mew had come to Portugal to try his fortunes with
Christopher. Columbus now sent Bartholomew to pro-
pose the plan to the King of England and the King of
France, while he
7hanc S< himself set out for
Spain. Knowing
A that Spain was jeal-
V n y/ ous of the discov-
o series of the Portu-
guese, he hoped that
.brft the king and queen
of this country
MAP OP PORTUGAL, SPAIN, AND GENOA. would be pleased
with the idea of outdoing her neighbor in the race for
India. When Columbus left Portugal to seek his for-
tunes in Spain, somewhere about the year 1485, he left
his wife and several little children behind him.
At the time when Columbus went to Spain it was






COLUMBUS IN SPAIN.


governed by Ferdinand and Isabella. Before the time
of this king and queen the country had been divided up
into a great many king-
doms, and there were all
sorts of disorders, while
the Moors, who had once
conquered all Spain, were
a at war almost continually
with the Christians. But
when Ferdinand, who was
heir to the throne of Ara-
gon, and Isabella, who
became Queen of Castile,
PORTRAIT OF KING FERMDINA. were married, and other
small kingdoms came un-
der their rule, Spain began to be, for the first time,
a powerful country. Ferdinand and Isabella made it
their chief work to conquer the
Moors. At the time when Co-
lumbus came to Spain the Moors
had been driven intu the mount-
ain kingdom of Granada, and
here they were making their
last stand against the Christians.
King Ferdinand was a man
of middle height, with muscles
made hard and strong by exer- .
cises at arms. He had chestnut
hair, a high forehead, which was PORTRAIT OF QUEEN ISABELLA.
also a little bald, crooked teeth,
and a face burned by constant exposure in war. His
voice was sharp, and his speech quick. He dressed






THE STORY OF COLUMBUS.


very plainly, for both Ferdinand and Isabella disliked
ostentation. When Ferdinand once wished to reprove
a courtier for dressing too finely, he laid his hand on
his own doublet and said:
"Excellent stuff this, it has lasted me three pairs of
sleeves."
Ferdinand was an able king, careful and business-
like. But Queen Isabella was much more loved than
he. Her complexion was fair, her hair auburn, and
her eyes blue and kindly. She was thought to be very
beautiful. She was, when her religious bigotry was
not aroused, a tender-hearted woman, and yet a queen
of much ability and force. She governed her own
kingdom, while Ferdinand governed his. During the
wars with the Moors she sometimes busied herself with
sending provisions to the army under command of the
king, and sometimes rode into camp to encourage the sol-
diers. Several suits of steel armor which Isabella wore
have been kept to this day. She rode great distances
on horseback, and sometimes, after spending the day
in business, she would sit up all night dictating dis-
patches.
This great king and queen were so busy with their
war against the Moors that it was very hard for Colum-
bus to get them to listen to his plans or to think about
them long at a time. The Spanish court was a camp
which moved from place to place as the war went on,
and Columbus had to follow it about. When he proposed
his project to King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella they
called a council of the wisest men about the court to
hear what the stranger had to say, and to decide whether
it was possible to reach the islands of eastern Asia by





COLUMBUS IN SPAIN.


sailing to the west. The court was then at the city of
Salamanca, and it was-during the winter of 1486-'87.
The council of wise men which listened to the reasons
of Columbus for wishing to undertake so strange a voy-
age did not think it could be done. Ferdinand and
Isabella did not, however, entirely refuse to consider
the plans of Columbus, for he still followed the court
when it moved to the city of Cordova. The account
book of the royal treasurer of those days has been found,











SALAMAffCA.

in which it is set down that on May 5, 1487, three
thousand marevedis were paid to Cristobal Colomo, for
this is what Columbus was then called in Spain. The
three thousand marevedis would be about seventy-five
dollars, but we must not forget that money would buy
a great deal more in those days than now. In this old
account book Columbus is set down as a stranger em-
ployed in certain things for the service of their High-
nesses." So we see that the poor foreigner who came
to propose an unheard of project was treated with kind-
ness.






34 THE STORY OF COLUMBUS.

SIt is not known how Columbus had earned his living
in Spain before this, though it is told by some that he
made maps, and by others that he sold printed books.
Printed books were a new thing in those days, for print-
ing had not been very long invented, and Queen Isabella
was very much interested in promoting this new art.





COLUMBUS BEGS IN VAIN.


CHAPTER VI.
COLUMBUS BEGS IN VAIN.
1487-1491.

FOB some years Columbus followed the Spanish
court, trying to get the attention of the busy king and
queen, who could not think long of anything but their
war with the Moors. Sometimes he was noticed by
great men at court. Quintanilla, the treasurer of the
crown, pitied the poor foreigner, and gave him a home
in his own house for a while. Diego de Deza, the
bishop who taught the king's son, was kind to Columbus,
and Juan Cabrero, who was first chamberlain to Ferdi-
nand, befriended him. Sometimes the king and queen
ordered money to be paid to him, or commanded the
towns that he had to pass through in going to court to
feed and lodge him. Still, there were times when
Columbus was very poor and wore a shabby mantle.
Many people laughed at his notions, and the very
children are said to have pointed to their foreheads
when he passed, to indicate that they thought him a
crazy fellow.
While Coluinbus was following the bustling court
from place to place, his wife and all of his children, ex-
cept one little boy named Diego, died in Portugal. Co-
lumbus afterward had this little Diego with him in
Spain. He had also another little son, whom he called
4






THE STORY OF COLUMBUS.


Ferdinand. The mother of this child was named Beatriz
Enriquez, and lived in the city of Cordova.
Columbus was present when the king laid siege to
the Moorish city of Malaga, which was a rich and beauti-
ful town, adorned with lovely gardens. The people of
Malaga held out very obstinately, and in order that they
might know that the Christian army had come to stay,


r


CHILDREN SMOKING -OLUMBUS.
CHILDREN MOCKING COLUMBUS.


Queen Isabella rode into the camp and took up her
abode there. It is not very likely that any one thought
much about the plans of Columbus during this busy
time, but he was there waiting as usual. The people of


r ek






COLUMBUS BEGS IN VAIN.


Malaga were finally starved out, the city surrendered,
crosses and bells were put in the mosques, and the poor
inhabitants were enslaved as a punishment for their
stubborn courage.
Every year some great city was besieged and taken.
The next year, which was 1489, it was the Moorish city
of Beza. There were floods and a great scarcity of food
this year, and it was so hard to get money that Queen
Isabella is said to have pawned the crown jewels and
even the crown itself in order to carry on the war.
The lack of money, the continuance of the war, and the
great preparations for the wedding of the Princess Isa-
bella, the daughter of Ferdinand and Isabella, made it
useless for Columbus to try to gain the attention of the
sovereigns. Disheartened, he turned away from the
Spanish court, intending to go to France or England to
look for help. There was, however, in Spain, a noble-
man called the Duke of Medina-Celi, who was himself
almost a king, for he owned vessels and seaports, as well
as great lands. This duke befriended Columbus in his
time of discouragement. He took the poor foreigner
into his own house to live, and kept him for two years
among the many retainers that a great lord was accus-
tomed to keep about him in those days. The duke was
interested in the project of Columbus, and thought to
let the stranger have three or four vessels at his own
cost, since that was all he needed to try his novel voyage.
The ships were made ready, but the duke dared not go
into this undertaking without first letting the monarchs
know about it. He wrote to the queen to ask her per-
mission, but she declined to allow the duke to send out
the ships on his own account.






THE STORY OF COLUMBUS.


Columbus returned to court. Perhaps he hoped
that if the queen cared enough for his project to refuse
to let a subject undertake it she would carry it out her-
self. She did appoint the treasurer, Quintanilla, to ex-
amine the proposal of Columbus. But the king and
queen were making great preparations to lay siege to
the city of Granada, and Columbus was once more for-
gotten. He followed the Spanish court to the encamp-















VIEW OF THE ALHAMBRA ACROSS GRANADA.

ment before Granada. Queen Isabella, dressed in
armor, rode about the field on a beautiful horse, re-
viewing her troops. Once the fine tent in which she
slept caught fire, and the queen and her children were
barely saved from burning. Because of this accident,
and for the reason that winter was coming on, the
queen resolved to build solid houses of stone and mortar
for the encampment, so that there should be a city out-
side of a city. In less than three months, the new city






COLUMBUS BEGS IN VAIN. 39

had sprung up, which was called Santa Fe, or Holy Faith.
Amid all this tumult of work there was no hope for the
poor Genoese. Columbus was out of money and dis-
couraged. His brother Bartholomew had been to
England, where Henry VII was king, and had got some
encouragement there. He had then gone to France,
where he was kindly received by Anne de Beaujeu, who
governed for her young son, Charles VIII. So Colum-
bus resolved to journey either to France or England,
perhaps to both of these countries, and see what he
could do.






THE STORY OF COLUMBUS.


CHAPTER VII.
A FRIENDLY MONK.
1491.
IT was quite likely that Columbus would have to
wait many years before he could prevail on the rulers
of England or France to undertake his discovery. It
was therefore necessary that he should provide for his
children as well as a poor man could. Ferdinand Co-
lumbus was very young yet, and might be left with his
mother, but Columbus must find a home for Diego. He
made up his mind to take him to the town of Huelva,
where the child had an uncle and aunt, who could take
care of him.
Columbus and his little boy traveled on foot. He
had almost reached the town of Huelva when he stopped
one day at the monastery of La Rabida, and begged the
porter to give him a little bread and water for the child.
The prior of the convent, named Juan Perez, happened
to see Columbus, and noticed that the poor stranger
spoke Spanish with the accent of a foreigner.
"Who are you, and where do you come from ?" asked
the prior.
"I have come," answered Columbus, "from the
court, where I have been to propose certain maritime
discoveries, engaging myself to make land at terra firma,
and demanding that they confide an expedition to me






A FRIENDLY MONK.


for this purpose. But the men of the court have turned
my projects into derision, saying they were nothing
but air bubbles. Despairing of success, I have left the
court, and am going to Huelva, to the house of a man
named Muliar, husband of a sister of my wife."
The good monk wanted to hear what the plan of
Columbus was. So he invited him into the monastery,


WITH JUAN PEREZ AT THE MONASTERY.


and made him tell his story. Then he sent for a certain
doctor of medicine, named Garcia Hernandez, who lived
near by, in the town of Palos. This doctor knew some-






THE STORY OF COLUMBUS.


thing of the science of astronomy, and astronomy had
much to do with geography in those days, for it was
still rather a strange thing to believe that the world was
round, and it took something of an astronomer to have
faith in such an opinion.
The shabby stranger, the monk, and the doctor had
a long talk together, which ended in the monk's believ-
ing in the possibility of the bold project of Colum-
bus. This same Juan Perez had once been confessor
to Queen Isabella. So he wrote a letter to the queen,
begging her not to let Columbus leave Spain from dis-
couragement. ]A pilot, named Sebastian Rodriguez,
carried the letter to court, while Columbus and the
little Diego stayed in the friendly convent. After
fourteen days, Rodriguez came back with an answer
from the queen, asking Juan Perez to come to court
and talk with her. So the good Perez saddled his mule
and set off secretly in the night to the court, which was
still in the city of Santa F6, before Granada.
We do not know why Juan Perez made his journey
so privately, nor what he said to the queen when he saw
her once more, but we know that his friendship was
worth more to Columbus than the friendship of all the
great courtiers who had been kind to him at different
times. The queen sent Perez back for Columbus, and
at the same time she sent the navigator about seventy-
two dollars, which would be the same in value as two
hundred and sixteen dollars in our day. With part of
this money Columbus made haste to buy some decent
clothes and a mule, while he kept the rest to pay his
traveling expenses. He and Juan Perez journeyed
back to Santa Fe together with light hearts.







A FRIENDLY MONK.


After they reached court, Queen Isabella appointed
a conference of learned men to decide once more about
the scheme of Columbus. There was a great discussion
among these men. As for sailing partly around the


A WINDOW IN THE ALHAMBRA.


world, some did not think it could be done and others
were in favor of trying it. The Church fathers were
quoted to prove that there could be no human beings
living on the opposite side of the earth. According to






THE STORY OF COLUMBUS.


their notions, the people of Europe lived on the top of
the ball and it was impossible for men to exist on the
other side of the world, since they would have to walk




o.n ._thet.p._t e ?t er rom-u.,a
-L i
...
















GATEWAY OF GRANADA.

upside down. How was it possible for trees to grow
with their roots above them, and how could it rain and
snow upward? So strong was the notion that they lived
on the top of the earth that, years after, Columbus was
on the top of the earth that, years after, Columbus was






A FRIENDLY MONK. 45

said to have discovered "a considerable portion of the
lower world."
In the midst of this assembly sat Cardinal Mendoza,
who was called the Third King of Spain, because he was
so powerful. Just behind him sat Geraldini, the bishop
who taught the royal children. Geraldini remarked to
the great cardinal that the Church fathers were no
doubt excellent theologians, but only mediocre geogra-
phers, since the Portuguese had reached a point in the
other hemisphere where they could no longer see the
polar star, and had discovered another star at the south
pole, and yet they had found all the countries situated
under the torrid zone perfectly peopled.
The great cardinal favored the project of Columbus,
and so did most of the assembly. About this time the
city of Granada surrendered, and the war with the
Moors was at an end. The flag of Spain floated from
the highest tower of the beautiful palace called the Al-
hambra. Columbus saw Boabdil, the last of the Moor-
ish kings, come forth and kiss the hands of Ferdinand
and Isabella, and of the young prince Juan, who was
heir to the throne. Ferdinand and Isabella had made
themselves the greatest sovereigns in Christendom, but
they never once imagined that the discoveries of this
poor Genoese weaver, who had so long followed their
court and waited disconsolately in their ante-rooms,
would add more to the glory of their reign than their
great Moorish conquest.






THE STORY OF COLUMBUS.


CHAPTER VIII.
GETTING READY FOR THE VOYAGE.
1492..
IT was in the very beginning of the year 1492, after
he had waited seven years in Spain, that Queen Isabella
agreed to send Columbus to seek a new way to India.
But there was still another disappointment in store for
the ambitious adventurer. He asked great rewards-the
titles of admiral and viceroy and a share in the profits
arising from all the discoveries he should make. This
was too much, and Columbus would take nothing less,
so he turned his back once more on the Spanish court,
resolved to go immediately to France. After he had
gone, Luis de Santangel, an officer of King Ferdinand's
Kingdom of Arragon, is said to have remonstrated with
Queen Isabella for letting such an opportunity slip.
The queen relented, and a courier was sent to bring
back the disappointed Columbus as he rode slowly
away on his mule So the poor man with the grand
projects returned to court once more, and this time no
objections were made to his demands.
There was some trouble about raising money enough
to send Columbus on his voyage. The queen wished
him to wait until the Moors were expelled from Spain,
when the treasury would be filled with the money taken
from the conquered people. But Columbus would






GETTING READY FOR THE VOYAGE.


wait no longer. There is a story that Queen Isabella
offered to raise the money that was needed by pawning
her jewels, but this is not probable, since the queen's
jewels had been already pawned, it is thought, to carry
on the war. At this moment, when the plans of
Columbus were likely to fail for want of a little money,
Luis de Santangel offered to lend the money to the
queen.
It would seem that King Ferdinand did not believe
in the project of Columbus, for he did not share in the
undertaking, and for some time after the discovery of
America only the Castilians, who were Isabella's own
subjects, were allowed to send ships there.
At last the papers were signed. Columbus was to
have the title of admiral and the office of viceroy over
the lands that he should discover. He was to have a
tenth part of the gold, precious stones, pearls, silver,
spices, and other articles found in these lands, and if
he bore an eighth part of the expenses he was to have
an eighth part of the profits of all the voyages made,
while he and his family were to have the title of Don,
which was a great honor in those days. something like
the title of Lord in English.
After all the long delays and the many doubts as to
whether it was best to undertake this famous first voy-
age of Columbus, it cost Queen Isabella only about
sixty thousand dollars. Columbus furnished one of
the three small ships which were to sail, and so did his
share toward the expenses. We do not know who it
was that lent to Columbus the money to do this, for he
was certainly too poor to do it himself.
The little town of Palos, which was near the monas-






THE STORY OF COLUMBUS.


tery of La Rabida, had done something for which it
was. punished by being obliged to furnish two ships
every year to the crown. So the order was now given
that Palos should turn over its two ships to Columbus.
The royal order was read in the church of St. George
in Palos to the officers of the town and many of the
people. They promised to furnish the ships without
any trouble, but when it was found that they were to
sail into unknown seas there was great horror. The
owners of the vessels thought that they would certainly
lose their ships, while common sailors refused to go on
any such voyage. When courtiers and learned men
were so uncertain about the undertaking, it is not
strange that it was altogether terrible to ignorant peo-
ple. Some of the men at court are said to have thought
that when Columbus had once sailed west, he would
find the roundness of the earth like a mountain, which
he could not sail up again to come home. The sailors
of Palos probably knew nothing about the earth being
round, but they had many strange beliefs about the Sea
of Darkness, as the Atlantic was called, and they thought
that they would never see Spain again if they ventured
off in this waste of waters.
When Queen Isabella heard of this new difficulty,
she sent a royal officer to see that ships were pressed
into the service, and offered to let criminals out of the
prisons if they would sail on the dreaded voyage. But
still there was a great deal of trouble to get ships and
men. A family of bold seamen, called Pinzon, took an
interest in the expedition, however, and went to a great
deal of trouble to find men to go as sailors.
At last ships were -found. Two of them were of






GETTING READY FOR THE VOYAGE.


the kind of vessel called caravels, and were not any
larger than the small craft which one sees to-day sailing
in rivers or coasting. Only
the largest of them was decked
over, the others were merely
open sailing boats, with cabins
built on the bow and stern,
one being a very small craft
with lateen sails. There was
a great deal of trouble before
the ships could be got ready. A OAAVL.
The men who calked them did
it badly and then ran away; some of the sailors de-
serted and concealed themselves; the owners of the
vessels were also willing to put obstacles in the way of
the voyage.
But everything was ready by the beginning of
August, 1492. Columbus was to sail in the largest
ship, which was called the Santa Maria, that is Holy
Mary, or as it was sometimes called The Marigalante,
which means The Gallant Mary. This ship belonged
to a man named Juan de la Cosa, who went along in
command of her. The second ship, which was the best
sailer, was called the Pinta. Her captain was Martin
Alonzo Pinzon, one of the family who had helped Co-
lumbus to fit out for the .voyage, while another Pinzon
was pilot. This ship belonged to two men of Palos,
named Gomes Rascon and Cristobal Quintero. These
two owners also sailed in their ship, as though they
could not bear to part company with their property on
so dangerous an expedition, and, in fact, they meant to
take the first opportunity to fetch the vessel back to





THE STORY OF COLUMBUS.


Spain. The smallest ship, called the Nina, was com-
manded by another of the bold Pinzon family. The
sailors were a very mixed lot. Some of them were re-
leased prisoners, who would rather risk the horrors of
unknown seas than take their punishment at home; and
we find that there was even one Englishman and one
Irishman in the motley company.
Before Columbus sailed he placed his two little boys,
Diego and Ferdinand, at school in the city of Cordova.
Diego was appointed a page to Prince Juan, the son of
the king and queen. This was an honor which was
usually granted only to the children of noble houses.
The little Diego, who was probably about ten years old
at this time, had to be sent to school for two years be-
fore he was fit to go to court and serve as page to a
prince.
Every one who was to sail on the expedition took
the sacrament before going. There were about ninety
people in all. Letters were sent from the King and
Queen of Spain, addressed to the Grand Khan, or Em-
peror of China, whom Columbus expected, without
doubt, to find. An interpreter was provided who was
supposed to speak Latin, Greek, Hebrew, Arabic, Cop-
tic, and Armenian, for no one thought of anything but
of the possibility of reaching Eastern lands. There was
a- sad parting at Palos, for the friends of those who
sailed had little hope of ever seeing them again. The
three little ships got under way at half an hour before
sunrise on the morning of the 3d of August, 1492.






. THE FIRST VOYAGE OF 00LUMBUS.


CHAPTER IX.
THE FIRST VOYAGE OF COLUMBUS.
1492.
No doubt it was a moment of relief to Columbus
when he found himself fairly at sea, where his men
could not desert nor ship owners make any more delays;
but the ship owners were with him, and his joy was
short-lived. Rascon and Quintero, the proprietors of
the Pinta, contrived, it is said, to have her rudder
broken and unhung. The Pinta made signals of dis-
tress and the fleet was detained in a high sea. Martin
Alonzo Pinzon, who was captain of the Pinta, tied the
rudder with ropes, but it gave -way again next day.
There was nothing to do but. to stop at the Canary
Islands. Columbus tried to get another ship here, but
as he could not do this he had the Pinta repaired, and
at the same time had the lateen sails of the Nina changed
so that she could keep up with the other ships.
Columbus spent about three weeks at the Canary
Islands. While there he heard that some Portuguese
ships were seen hovering off Ferro Island. Afraid
that the Portuguese had heard of his expedition and
that they might try to intercept him, Columbus got
away as quickly as possible. For two days he lay be-
calmed, however, between the islands of Gomara and
Tenerife. The sailors watched the volcano of Tenerife





THE STORY OF COLUMBUS.


smoking day and night. They had never seen anything
of the sort before, and the sight is said to have awak-
ened many fears, but Columbus explained it to them
and told them about Mount Etna.
On the 8th of September, at three o'clock in the
morning, the wind sprang up and the three little ships
were at length off for the New World. When they
saw the last of the Canaries the sailors sighed and
sobbed, for they thought they were doomed men; but


-'- r- i_











PEAK OF TENERIFE.

Columbus talked to them about the great countries to
which they were sailing, and inflamed their minds by
the promise of riches for them all. He saw that he was
in danger of failing because his men were faint-hearted,
so he did everything that he could to encourage them.
He kept two reckonings of the distance the ships had
sailed-one for the sailors, which he made every day
some leagues shorter than the actual distance, and a se-
cret reckoning for himself, which gave the true dis-






THE FIRST VOYAGE. OF OOLUMBUS.


tance made. He did this because he knew that the
men would be disheartened if they knew how far they
were from home.
Three days after the ships left the Canary Islands a
piece of a mast was picked up. It had lain long in the
water, and seemed to have belonged to some large ship.
Perhaps some vessel had tried these seas before and
been lost. The men did not like the looks of this.
Three days later Columbus noticed that the needle of
the compass did not point directly toward the north
star. He had never heard of the variation of the
needle, now so well known to all mariners, and he was
at a loss to understand it as many learned men have
been since. In a few days the pilots noticed it and
were anxious, for if the compass should fail them in this
unknown ocean what would they do ? But Columbus
had invented a theory to explain it, and made use of it
to reassure the pilots.
The fleet presently entered the region of the trade
winds which blow steadily from east to west, following
the course of the sun. The ships were blown gently
westward, while the air was so sweet and mild that Co-
lumbus said it would have been like April in Andalusia
or southern Spain if one might but have heard the song
of the nightingale. A heron and a water-wagtail flew
over the vessels and rejoiced the hearts of the men, for
they thought that these birds would not fly far away
from land.
The ships at length began to sail past great patches
of green and yellow weeds floating.on the water. Sure-
ly these weeds must have come from some island or
reef. On one of the patches Columbus found a live





THE STORY OF COLUMBUS.


crab. He kept it very carefully, for it was encouraging
to see life in this great waste of waters. When night
came on the ships plowed through schools of tunny fish,
and the sailors amused themselves by throwing the har-
poon at them. The crew of the Nina succeeded in kill-
ing one of these fish with a harpoon.
The smallest things were noticed on this first advent-
urous voyage. At three hundred and sixty leagues






4"bob
Yl7fanric Ocean
l~ores U con



wi y-fJricca



THE CANARY ISLANDS AND THE AZORES.

from the Canaries another water-wagtail was seen. The
weather continued to be mild. There was a gentle
breeze, while Columbus said that the sea was as calm as
the river Guadalquiver at Seville. The Pinta, being the
best sailer, pushed ahead. Presently she waited for the
admiral's ship, and Pinzon, who was her captain, called
out that he had seen a great many birds flying toward






THE. FIRST VOYAGE O- COLUMBUS.


the sunset and also that he had seen land covered with
clouds to the north; but Columbus would not turn out
of his course to look for land, though his men wanted
him to. He believed in land to the west, and he did not
wish to waste his time in sailing hither and thither.
The wind began to freshen and the sailors had to short-
en sail for the first time in a dozen days.
The next day there were drizzling showers, which
Columbus thought were a sign that land was near.
Two pelicans lit on the ships, and he told his men that
these birds did not often fly twenty leagues from shore.
Perhaps the ships were passing between islands, but
still Columbus would not change his course. He sound-
ed, however, with a line two hundred fathoms long, but
there was no bottom, and this certainly did not look as
though land were near.
The men had for a long time been discontented in
spite of drizzling showers, weeds, live crabs, and water-
wagtails. They were long out of sight of land, no
other ships had ever sailed in these seas, so that there
was no hope of rescue if they got into trouble.
They did not like it that the wind blew always from
the stern of the ship, for if the wind blew always one
way how were they to reach home when they turned
about? Then, too, they were afraid that the ships
might be caught in one of those great fields of tangled
weeds as they had heard of ships being caught in frozen
seas.
It is not strange that the sailors were frightened.
Many of them had been forced into this most audacious
sea adventure that the world had ever known. Each
day that they were disappointed in looking for land






THE STORY OF COLUMBUS.


they thought how much farther they were from home.
They had already sailed quite far enough to have made
theirs one of the most wonderful of voyages.
One day there was a light wind blowing from the
southwest, which was lucky for Columbus, for it proved
that the wind did not always come from the east.
Three little birds, which the men thought must have
come from groves or orchards, lit singing on the masts
in the morning and flew away again at night. Big
birds, it was thought, might fly very far out to sea, but
it was impossible that these tiny creatures would vent-
ure very far. Still, no land was seen and the breezes
from the southwest were so light that they scarcely ruf-
fled the water. The men began to complain that they
could never reach home with such feeble winds. Co-
lumbus tried to encourage them; but when he had be-
gun to be afraid that he could not restrain them much
longer, there came up a great wind from the northwest,
and the sea was quite rough enough to satisfy any one
that the wind did not always blow from one quarter.
This same day a dove flew over the ships, and to-
ward evening the men saw a pelican, a little river bird,
and a white bird. There were also several live crabs
on the floating weeds, and they discovered fishes swim-
ming about the ships. Columbus made the most of
every sign that land was near, but, under such circum-
stances, men grew tired of signs. The sailors began to
say to one another that the admiral was a foreigner,
who, for the mere fancy of making himself a great
name and being called Don, made a game of exposing
them to the greatest dangers and leading them to cer-
tain death. If Columbus would not consent to return,






THE FIRST VOYAGE OF COLUMBUS. 57

they might throw him in the sea, and say that he had
fallen in while gazing at the stars, as was his habit.
Meantime the wind was favorable again on the 25th
of September and the air was soft and mild. The ves-
sels sailed near each other, while Columbus talked with
Pinzon, the captain of the Pinta, about the map which
Columbus had brought with him and which Pinzon had
borrowed a day or two before. Pinzon thought that
they might now be near Japan. Columbus agreed with
him, but thought that the currents of the ocean might
have carried the ships out of their course. He wished
to look at the map again. Pinzon tied a rope to it and
threw it on board the admiral's ship. While Columbus
and his pilot were studying the map, Pinzon, who was
standing on the high stern of the Pinta, shouted:
"Land land! Senor, I claim my reward "
The reason that Pinzon said this was that the king
and queen had offered a velvet coat and a pension to
the one who should first see land; but he who gave a
false alarm could not claim the reward again. The cap-
tain of the Pinta pointed to the southwest. Yes, every
one saw land there. Columbus threw himself on his
knees and thanked God. It was growing dark, so he
ordered that the ships should head toward the land in
the night; but in the morning there was no land to
be seen. Pinzon had been deceived again by sunset
clouds.
The ships sailed on with a soft wind and a calm sea.
In spite of their disappointment the sailors amused
themselves by swimming about the ships. The men
began to see dolphins, while flying fish fell on the decks
of the ships. Four water-wagtails lit on the admiral's





THE STORY OF COLUMBUS.


ship. So many birds of a kind, said Columbus, would
not have" ventured far from land. The Nina was the
next to discover land, but it was again a false alarm.
There began to be great flocks of birds flying over the
ships. The sailors, however, were disheartened and
would hear no more of signs. They had been a month
out of sight of land, always on the lookout, and yet the
sun rose day after day out of the boundless water and
set again in the ocean. At sunset Columbus noticed
that the birds all flew toward the southwest as though
they were going to their roosting place, which must be
on land. Remembering that the Portuguese had often
found land by following the flight of the birds at sun-
set, Columbus changed his course to the southwest.
The 11th of October came. The air was sweet with
land odors, fresh weeds floated by the ships, while the
men saw a kind of green fish which lives about. rocks.
But, better than all, they picked up a thorny branch
with red berries growing on it which was freshly
broken from the tree. Then, too, they found a reed, a
small board, and a stick which had been carved by
hand. Even the discontented men could not doubt
that land was near. In the evening, after all hands
had sung the Salve Regina as usual, Columbus made
his men a little speech, in which he told them how good
God had been to bring them so far safely, telling them
that as they had that day seen such sure signs of land
they had better keep a lookout during the night.






LAND AT LAST.


CHAPTER X.
LAND AT LAST.
492.
No eyes were closed on board the three little ships
that night. The Pinta pushed ahead as usual. All
were eagerly on the lookout. About ten o'clock, Co-
lumbus, who was standing on the high poop of his ship,
saw a faint, trembling light. It appeared and disap-
peared, as though it might be a torch in a fisherman's
boat which was being tossed up and down on the water,
or perhaps a small candle being carried from one house
to another on land. At two o'clock in the morning a
gun was fired by the Pinta. A sailor on board this
ship had seen land. The sails were now furled and the
men spent the hours till daylight in rejoicings. Colum-
bus must have been the happiest of them all. The poor
weaver had made himself one of the greatest of men by
the success of this voyage.
It was the 12th of October, 1492. After having
been thirty-three days out of sight of land, Columbus
and his men saw at daylight a low island covered with
beautiful tropical trees, blooming and bearing fruit at
a time of the year when the leaves were falling in
Spain. It is not known to-day which island in the
West Indies is the one at which Columbus first landed.
It is a question between Watling's Island, Grand Turk






THE STORY OF COLUMBUS.


Island, Cat Island, Mayaquana, Samana, and Acklin's
Island.
It was soon evident that the island was peopled, for
men were seen running out of the woods to look at the
ships. The Spaniards were, no doubt, too much de-
lighted to see green land once more to be disappointed

-S2nSaoilabor











Cuba


MAP SHOWING THE ISLANDS AT WHICH COLUMBUS LANDED.

when they found that these men were naked, and that
nothing was to be seen of the magnificent cities of
Japan.
The ships' boats were manned, and the Spaniards
made haste to the shore, carrying the flags of the expedi-
tion, which had a green cross on one side and the initials
of Ferdinand and Isabella, surmounted by crowns, on
the other side. Columbus had dressed himself richly in
scarlet for this great occasion. When the boats touched
shore, admiral and men leaped out, threw themselves on







LAND AT LAST.


the earth, and kissed it. Columbus, when he had
arisen, solemnly took possession of the island in the
name of the king and queen and called it San Salvador,
or Holy Saviour. He was then greeted by his men as


~I(I ,fJ


LX


OLD PRINT OF 1500, SHOWING COLUMBUS LANDING AND THE KING OF SPAIN
SENDING SHIPS ACROSS TO AMERICA.

viceroy of this new world, and they humbly begged
his pardon for any offenses they had given him during
the voyage.
The naked Indians assisted at the ceremony by star-


~ IES





THE STORY OF COLUMBUS.


ing very hard, having not the smallest idea that their
country was being taken possession of. It is said that
when the natives first saw the ships in the early morn-
ing, they thought them some kind of strange animal.
Now, however, they imagined that these men had come
down from the sky by means of the wings which they
saw on their ships. After they had got a little used
to the strangers they came near them, touching their
beards, and wondering at the whiteness of their hands
and faces. Columbus was pleased with the gentle, sini-
pie ways of these islanders. He gave them red caps,
necklaces of glass beads, and other such things as the
Portuguese used in trading with the negroes of Guinea.
The Indians were delighted with their gifts, and made
haste to put the strings of beads around their necks to
enjoy the effect.
After resting on shore all day, Columbus and his
men returned to their ships. Meantime the news was
spreading among the natives, and each one was anxious
to get some treasure of the men from the skies before
they flew away again in their winged boats. They pad-
dled up to the fleet in canoes or swam out, bringing
live.parrots and great balls-of cotton yarn to exchange
for anything the white men would give them. They
were ready to give the few gold ornaments they had for
a piece of broken dish, a scrap of glass, an end of a
strap, or a bit of a barrel hoop; but Columbus would
not let his men trade with the Indians for anything less
valuable than beads or bells. When night came the In-
dians disappeared, only to swarm about the ships again
when day returned. Their canoes were made of the
trunks of trees hollowed out. They turned over very






LAND AT LAST.


easily, but this did not trouble the natives, for they had
no clothes to wet, and they swam about in the warm
water until they could right their boats once more, bal-
ing the water out with calabashes. After a day or two
the Indians began to feel themselves at home on the
ships, and those who had nothing to trade would seize
some trifle which had taken their fancy and, jumping
overboard, swim ashore with it.
Columbus explored the coast of the island for some
distance in the ships' boats. As the white men coasted
the island, natives came out from the woods to see
them, and ran along shore after them, offering them
food and trying to get them to come to land. As they
did not do this, the Indians swarmed about them in
canoes or swam to them, making signs to them to know
whether they had come down from the sky. Colum-
bus was pleased with their simplicity, and gave them
pins and other trinkets, with which they were highly
delighted. After exploring part of the shore of the
island, he resolved to push on for China or Japan.
Marco Polo had said that there were over seven
thousand islands extending .along the coast of Asia,
where spices and scented woods grew. Columbus
thought that he must be among these islands, and it
only remained to find Japan, or the country of the
Grand Khan-that is, China. Columbus asked the In-
dians where they got their gold ornaments, and, as they
pointed toward the southwest and seemed to say some-
thing about a great monarch who used dishes of gold,
he decided to go in search of this desirable king. Co-
lumbus carried away seven of the natives of San Salva-
dor to teach them Spanish and make use of them as in-






.64 THE STORY OF COLUMBUS.

terpreters. He noticed that these men were not nearly
so dark as the negroes of Africa, while their hair was
not curly, but flowing. Some of them were covered
with red, white, and black paint, others were only colored
about the eyes and nose.


A CALABASH.






EXPLORING IN THE WEST INDIES.


CHAPTER XI.
EXPLORING IN THE WEST INDIES.
1492.
COLUMBUS could see many islands from his ship, and
it was hard to decide which one to visit first. His In-
dian guides seemed to say by signs that at a neighbor-
ing island the natives wore bracelets and anklets of gold,
so Columbus sailed for this. He landed and took pos-
session with the same ceremonies that he had used on
San Salvador, calling the island Santa Maria. Santa
Maria proved to be very much like the first one; the
natives were quite as much astonished, they were quite
as naked, and gold was quite as scarce. So Columbus
decided to proceed to another and much larger island.
As the ships were about to sail, one of his Indian guides,
who was on board the Nina, seeing that the white men
were going so far away from his home on San Salvador,
jumped into the water and swam to a canoe full of
natives which was near. The sailors gave chase, but the
Indians were too quick for them. They paddled ashore
and ran into the woods, while the men took their re-
venge by capturing their canoe and tieing it behind the
Nina. Columbus regretted this incident, since he did
not want the Indians to be afraid of the white men. A
canoe was approaching the ships from another part of
the island with one native in it. This fellow was com-






THE STORY OF COLUMBUS.


ing to trade a ball of cotton yarn for some hawk's shells.
He stopped when he got near the ships, and seemed
afraid to come nearer. Two or three sailors jumped
overboard and captured him. Qolumbus stood on the
poop of his ship. He ordered the Indian to be brought
to him. The poor fellow came trembling and holding
out his ball of yarn as an offering. But Columbus put
a red cap on his head, strings of green beads about his
arms, and hung little bells on his ears. He then had
the fellow put in his canoe with his ball of cotton yarn
and set free. He also made the sailors of the Nina let
the canoe go that they had captured, so that the Indians
to whom it belonged might find it again.
The ships now made for the larger island, and pres-
ently they ran across an Indian alone in a canoe, pad-
dling across the wide gulf between the islands. He had
a little cassava bread, which was the chief food of these








INDIAN PADDLING IN A DUG-OUT.
people, and a gourd of water for supplies. He had also
a little red earth with which to paint himself on his ar-
rival, and some dry leaves, which the white men thought
were medicine. It is quite likely that they were leaves
of tobacco. He wore a string of the white men's beads
around his neck, and was no doubt paddling to other







EXPLORING IN THE WEST INDIES.


islands to astonish the natives with his finery, and to
tell the story of how he had got it. As he seemed tired
with paddling so far, the Spaniards took him on board,
canoe and all. They fed him on bread, honey, and
wine. The sea was so calm that the fleet did not reach
the large island until night. The ships lay to until
morning, but they put out the Indian boatman with his
canoe, his treasures, and some presents, which Columbus
had given him. He paddled ashore, and soon spread
the news of the kindness of these strangers. The natives
began coming out to the ships in the night, bringing
fruit, roots, and spring water. Columbus gave them
trinkets, and when any of them came on board, he gave
him sugar and honey to eat, sweets being a great novelty
to the Indians.
Columbus named the island Fernandina, for the king.
The people of this island sometimes wore a cotton mantle
over the shoulders, or a sort of apron tied around the
waist. Their houses were circular bowers, made of
branches, reeds, and palm leaves. Under these tent-like
roofs were nets made of cotton cord, stretched from one
post to another, for beds. The Indians called these beds
hamacs, and so it is from these simple people that we
get our hammock, even to the name.
The admiral sailed along the shore of Fernandina.
While the men landed to fill their water barrels, Co-
lumbus went ashore and walked about. The great
tropical forests filled him with admiration. The coun-
try," said he, "was as fresh as the month of May in
Andalusia; the trees, the fruits, the herbs, the flowers,
the very stones, for the most part, as different from
those of Spain as night is from day." The Indians
6






THE STORY OF COLUMBUS.


made haste to fill the casks for their visitors from cool
springs or little brooks.
Columbus sailed away from Fernandina in search of
an island which the Indians described by signs as hav-
ing a gold mine, and also a king who dressed in fine
stuffs and wore golden ornaments. He discovered an
island which he called Isabella. "There came off a
fragrance," said Columbus, "so good and soft of the
flowers and trees of the land that it was the sweetest
thing in the world." He landed on this island without
finding any sign of either gold mine or king, but he
was delighted with the country. I know not where
first to go," he said, nor are my eyes ever weary of
gazing on the beautiful verdure. The singing of the
birds is such that it seems as if one would never desire
to depart hence. There are flocks of parrots which
darken the sun, and other birds, large and small, of so
many kinds and so different from ours that it is won-
derful; and, besides, there are trees of a thousand spe-
cies, each having its particular fruit and all of a marvel-
ous flavor, so that I am in the greatest trouble in the
world because I do not know them, for I am very cer-
tain that they are each of great value." Columbus did
not doubt that many of these strange growths which he
saw would be much prized in Spain for medicines and
spices. He thought that he was in the East Indies,
where valuable herbs and well-known spices grow. He
did not fancy for a moment that he was in a new world
where the plants were strange to Europeans, who had
yet to learn their use and value.
When the admiral asked the Indians of this island
where gold was to be found, they pointed south and






EXPLORING IN THE WEST INDIES. 69.

said something about a large island called Cuba. He un-
derstood by their signs that there were gold, pearls, and
spices there, and that large ships came there to trade.
These, he made no doubt, were the ships of the Grand
Khan, and the island must be Cipango or Japan. Co-
lumbus thought to sail there and load up with gold and
precious stones. He purposed then to sail to China,
where he would deliver his letters to the Grand Khan,
and return in triumph into Spain.





THE STORY OF COLUMBUS.


CHAPTER XII.
COLUMBUS VISITS CUBA.
1492.
WHEN Columbus neared the northern coast of Cuba
he found that it was very large, with high mountains,
beautiful valleys, and fine rivers. He landed in the
mouth of one of these rivers and named the island
Juana, after the little Spanish prince Juan, in whose
suite his son Diego was to be a page. Two cabins
stood near the place at which the Spaniards landed.
The people who lived in them fled into the forest when
they saw the strange visitors approaching. On examin-
ing the cabins the seamen found nothing in them but
some nets made of palm-tree fibers and harpoons made
of bone. Columbus forbade his men touching any of
these things.
Cuba was the most beautiful of all the islands that
had yet been discovered. The lofty trees were covered
with a fine foliage, laden with beautiful blossoms or
fruit, and peopled with birds of brilliant hue. Colum-
bus did not doubt that the sweet odors filling the air
came from spice trees. He believed that there were
gold mines in the interior and that the oysters which he
saw in the water bore pearls.
The admiral coasted along the shore of Cuba, uncer-
tain whether it was the island of Japan or the mainland






COLUMBUS VISITS CUBA.


of China. He visited a village, but the terrified people
fled to the mountains. The houses at this place were bet-
ter built than any Indian cabins he had seen before, and he
found in them rude wood carvings and masks. Colum-
bus, ever hopeful, now felt sure that he would soon dis-
cover signs of a more advanced civilization, and be-
lieved that he was nearing an important kingdom.
These people, he fancied, might prove to be tribes of
poor fishermen living on the coast and selling their fish
at cities in the interior. He presently found what he
took to be skulls of cows, which proved to his satisfac-
tion that there were cattle in Cuba, but they were in
reality the skulls of what is known as the sea cow.
The Spaniards reached at length a large cape which
was covered with palms. Three of the San Salvador
Indians told Pinzon that behind this cape was a river
which led to a country called Cuba-nacan, where there
was much gold. In their language Cuba-nacan meant
middle Cuba, nacan meaning middle; but Pinzon was
certain that Cuba-nacan was Kublai Khan, the Emperor
of China. If this were true this beautiful country
would prove to be not Japan, but the mainland of
China. The Spaniards set out to look for the river
beyond the cape; but there was no river there, and
contrary winds set in so that the ships had to turn
back.
It was now the 1st of November. Columbus sent
some men ashore to see the natives; but the Indians
ran away as soon as the white men landed. When
the Spaniards returned to their boats, the natives came
back and stared at them from the shore. Columbus,
who had learned his Marco Polo pretty well by heart,





THE STORY OF COLUMBUS.


remembered that the Grand Khan was in the habit
of sending ships to capture the natives of the islands
for slaves. No doubt this was one of the islands
visited by the slave ships of the Khan, and hence the
reason for the alarm of the natives at the sight of ves-
sels. With this idea in his head, Columbus sent one of
his Indians ashore in a boat, charging him to tell the
natives that the Spaniards were peaceable and that they
had nothing to do with the Grand Khan. As the Indi-
an interpreter knew nothing of the Grand Khan and
little of the Spanish tongue, he probably said that the
white men were good people and very generous in giv-
ing away some very desirable articles, such as beads and
bells. At any rate, he made a speech to the natives
from the ship's boats, and then jumped out and swam
ashore. Before night, sixteen canoes came out to the
ships. The Indians brought cotton yarn and other
such things to trade; but Columbus forbade trading for
anything except gold, thinking he could in this way
make the Indians bring- out their hidden treasures.
They really had nothing of value, however, except a sil-
ver nose ornament which one of them wore. These
people said that their king lived inland, and that they
had sent messengers to him to let him know of the
presence of the white men.
Columbus thought that this must be some petty mon-
arch, so he concluded to send messengers himself to find
out how rich he was, and what he knew about the Grand
Khan. He sent one Spaniard, one converted Jew, and
two Indians on this errand. The Jew was sent because
he could speak Hebrew, and some other Eastern tongues.
As Columbus believed that he was on the coast of Asia,






COLUMBUS VISITS CUBA.


he thought it likely that the Jew would be able to talk
with the king of this country. The messengers were
to ask the distance to certain seaports in Asia, and were
to show cinnamon, nutmegs, cloves, peppers, rhubarb,
and so forth, to the king, and find out if these things
grew here.
Columbus had his ships careened and calked while
he was waiting for his messengers to return. He showed
the Indians who hung around him gold and pearls.
They used the word bohio, and sometimes babeque, when
they saw gold. Some old fellows told Columbus that
there was a country where the people wore such things
in their ears and around their necks. They also told
about people who had one eye, and others who had
dogs' heads. Perhaps they believed these tales them-
selves, but it is also possible that they only wished to
give the white men some stories large enough to suit
them, or that they were speaking figuratively, after the
manner of Indians, and were misunderstood.
Meantime, the town of the inland king, where the
messengers had gone, proved to be an Indian village of
some fifty houses. The white men were received with
every honor, and seated on some curious reclining chairs
in the shape of hammocks, carved to look like animals
with short legs and a flattened tail. The tail was curved
upward to serve as a back, and the eyes and ears were
incrusted with gold.
The visitors were fed on fruits and vegetables, and
their hands and feet were kissed by the men and women
of the place. But the people of the village spoke neither
Hebrew, Arabic, Coptic, nor Armenian, and so one of
the Indian interpreters had to make a speech, ih which






THE STORY OF COLUMBUS.


he told them among other things that the white men
had come from heaven.
As there was nothing to be learned here concerning
the whereabouts of the Emperor of China, the Spaniard,












CHAIR SUCH AS COLUMBUS'S MESSENGERS SAT IN.
FOUND IN A CAVE ON TURK'S ISLAND.

the Jew, and the two Indians set out on their return
journey. On their way back they met Indians carrying
firebrands with them, so that they might light fires with
which to cook a certain root. This root was nothing
less than the potato, and this was the first time that a
white man saw it. The potato was destined to be worth
more to Europe than all the spices for which Columbus
was looking, but of course the Spaniards did not sus-
pect this. These messengers also saw Indians rolling
up dry leaves within a dry leaf, and then lighting one
end of the roll and sucking the smoke into their mouths.
The Indians called these rolls of dried leaves tobaccos.
The innocent white man could not imagine why the
Indians smoked these leaves, unless it were to perfume
themselves. The same messengers were the first Euro-






.COLUMBUS VISITS CUBA. 75

peans who saw fields of Indian corn; they also saw fields
planted with potatoes, others with the yucca, the root
of which was made into cassava bread, besides fields of
cotton, which the Indians spun and made into hammocks
or wove into a sort of apron, which the women some-
times wore.
Though the white men had discovered so much that
was new and wonderful, Columbus could not find that
he was any nearer the Eastern cities for which he was
looking. So, taking some of the natives of Cuba with
him, he set out in search of the land of Bohio or Ba-
beque, which the Indians seemed to speak of as the land
of gold.







THE STORY OF COLUMBUS.


CHAPTER XIII.
THE DISCOVERY OF HAYTI.
1492.
TROUBLED by contrary winds, Columbus did not
make any new discoveries for some days. He beat
about in sight of the island of Isabella, but feared to
touch here lest he should lose his Indian guides, who
did not like being kidnapped by the white men. The
poor fellows kept a wistful eye toward San Salvador,
which was their home. Meantime Pinzon thought he
would try a little voyage on his own account. The
Spaniards were all greedy for gold. One of the Indians
on board Pinzon's ship had made him believe that he
could guide him to a land of great riches. Columbus
had signaled to the Pinta to join him, but she worked
gradually away, and by another morning she was out
of sight. This made Columbus angry, for it was the
duty of Pinzon to obey him, as the admiral of the fleet.
Columbus now returned to Cuba, and did some more
sailing along its coasts. He found in one of the Indian
cabins a cake of wax, which he took as a present to the
king and queefi, for where there is wax," he said,
"there must be a thousand other good things." He
finally reached the eastern' end of Cuba, which he
thought to be the eastern end of Asia, though he called
it India, for the different parts of Asia were very much






THE DISCOVERY OF HAYTI.


mixed in people's minds in those days. Columbus did
not know which way to turn. As he was sailing about
in uncertainty, he saw land to the southeast. The Indi-
ans said "Bohio when they saw this land, and, as Co-
lumbus thought that bohio meant a land where there was
much gold, he steered for it. The word bohi6 is still
used in Santo Domingo for a cabin, and no doubt the
simple guides meant that there were many cabins here.
Columbus saw that he was coming to a beautiful shore,
with high mountains, rich plains, and everywhere grand
tropical forests. At night, the Spaniards could see
many fires, while in the day-time numerous columns of
smoke rose from the land, and there seemed to be many
cultivated fields. They coasted along the northern
shore of the island, for this was the island of Hayti, or
Santo Domingo, as we call it to-day. There were noble
mountains, covered with forests of the most valuable
trees, and between them lay beautiful savannas, where
there were fields of grain growing, decorated here and
there with palms. There were so many fish in the sea
that they sometimes jumped into the Spaniards' boats,
and the voyagers heard what they thought to be the
song of the nightingale in the woods, though there are
no nightingales in America.
The island of Hayti seemed to Columbus the most
beautiful of all; he therefore named it for Spain, His-
paniola. When the white men landed, they found that
the people had all fled. As Columbus could see culti-
vated fields, he thought that the people of Hispaniola
were perhaps more civilized than the other Indians that
he had found. Columbus set up a cross to show that
he took possession of the country. Three sailors, who






THE STORY OF COLUMBUS.


wandered about in the woods while this ceremony was
being performed, happened on a crowd of Indians, who
ran away very fast, not being troubled with any clothes
to hinder them. The sailors ran after them and caught
one young woman, whom they took back to the ships.
As she wore no clothing
whatever, it was necessary
to give up the theory that
the natives of Hayti might
be more civilized than those
of other islands; but, on
S the other hand, the young
woman, not to be wholly
without decoration, wore a
gold ornament in her nose,
which gave the Spaniards
encouragement. Columbus
caused the woman to be
S clad, presented her with
some trifles, and then set
her free. In that warm
climate this young savage
Smay not have enjoyed the
clothing very much, but she
"SHE A OT AE ENJOED was no doubt delighted with
THE CLOTHING VERY MUC.odoubtdelightedwith
her beads and bells.
The next day the admiral sent some men and a
Cuban Indian on shore to see if they could not get a
chance to talk with the people of the village from which
the woman had come. The messengers, after walking
a considerable distance, found a large Indian village in
a beautiful valley on the shores of a river. Here were






THE DISCOVERY OF HAYTI.


banana and palm trees, with birds gayly singing among
the branches, though it was now December. There
were a thousand houses in this town, but people there
were none; all had taken flight. The Cuban Indian
was sent in pursuit of them. They were not so much
afraid of a naked man of their own color, so they let
him come near, and listened while he persuaded them
to return and see the visitors from the skies. The
Indians after a while ventured slowly back, stopping
every now and then to put their hands on their heads,
which was either an act of politeness with them or some
charm to keep them from harm at the hands of these
strange beings. A second company of Indians arrived
soon after, carrying the woman whom the Spaniards
had clothed upon their shoulders, to show how pleased
they were with the treatment she had received. The
savages gave the white men food and whatever else
they required. They wished them to stay in their vil-
lage all night, but the messengers returned to the ships.
They told Columbus that they had seen a very rich and
beautiful country, and that the people were finer looking
and lighter colored than the Indians they had seen in
the other islands.
Columbus prosecuted his voyage still farther along
the northern coast of Hayti. One night, when he was
in the channel between the islands of Tortuga and His-
paniola, he came upon an Indian paddling alone in a
canoe. He wondered that a man should venture so far
from land when the wind was blowing hard and the sea
was rough. He did not see how the fellow could keep
his tiny boat from turning over. The Spaniards picked
up this solitary navigator, took his canoe in tow, fed






THE STORY OF COLUMBUS.


him with sweets, decked him with beads and hawkbells,
and then sent him ashore on the island of Hispaniola.
When the Indian told his friends how well he had been
treated, they soon came out to the ships with their usual
merchandise to trade for gewgaws. They wore some
gold ornaments, which gave the Spaniards new hopes.
The signs of gold increased. One chief was found
who cut a plate of gold as large as his hand into pieces
and traded it with the white men. He promised to
bring more gold the following day. The next day
some sailors, who had been ashore, hastened on board
to tell Columbus that this king was coming to see him;
not on foot, however, though he was a young man, but
carried on a sort of hand-barrow or litter, by four men.
When he arrived, Columbus was eating his dinner in
the cabin. He ordered the monarch of the hand-barrow
to be brought to him. The king entered the cabin of
Columbus, commanding his followers with a wave of
the hand to stay outside, which they did, squatting on
the deck, except two old men, who entered with the
king and sat at his feet. Columbus, always ready to
apply European notions to. America, conjectured that
one of these men was the king's tutor and the other his
counselor. This savage monarch would not permit the
admiral to rise from his dinner, so Columbus caused
some of his dishes to be offered to the chief. The latter
tasted each dish very daintily, and then turned it over
to the tutor and counselor, who devoured it quickly
enough. He did the same with the drinks that were
offered him, and Columbus was charmed with his air of
stately dignity. He spoke little, but Columbus was sure
that what he said must be very judicious, though he did




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mods:mods
mods:titleInfo
mods:title The Story of Columbus
mods:name type personal
mods:namePart Seelye, Elizabeth Eggleston
date 1858-
mods:role
mods:roleTerm authority marcrelator Creator
Appleton Press.
prt; elt
D. Appleton and Company.
Contributor
mods:originInfo
mods:place
mods:placeTerm text New York
mods:publisher D. Appleton and Company
mods:dateIssued 1893
mods:language
mods:languageTerm English
mods:identifier ALEPH 002237288
NOTIS ALH7772
OCLC 23777615
mods:note Frontispiece printed on colors, t.p. printed in red and black ink.
Publisher's advertisements follow text.
mods:genre Publishers' advertisements -- 1893.
mods:subject
mods:topic Columbus, Christopher -- Juvenile literature.
Voyages and travels -- Juvenile literature.
Adventure and adventurers -- Juvenile literature.
Ship captains -- Juvenile literature.
Sailing -- Juvenile literature.
Sailors -- Juvenile literature.
Seafaring life -- Juvenile literature.
Islands -- Juvenile literature.
Shipwrecks -- Juvenile literature.
Hurricanes -- Juvenile literature.
Mutiny -- Juvenile literature.
Juvenile literature. -- Discovery and exploration -- America
Bldn -- 1893.
mods:hierarchicalGeographic
mods:country United States
mods:state New York
mods:city New York.
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mods:extent xvi, 303, 2 p. : ill. (some col.), port., maps, plan. ; 20 cm
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UF00082002_00001.mets
METS:structMap STRUCT1 mixed
METS:div DMDID The Story of Columbus ORDER 0 main
D1 1 Front Cover
P1 Page
METS:fptr FILEID
P2 2
D2 Matter
P5
D3 3 Frontispiece
P8 i
P10 ii
D4 4 Title
P11 iii
P12 iv
D5 5 Table Contents
P13 v
P14 vi
D6 6 List Illustrations
P15 vii
P16 viii
P17 ix
P18 x
D7 7 Introduction
P19 xi
P20 xii
P21 xiii
P22 xiv
P23 xv
P24 xvi
D8 Marco Polo, 1254-1324 Chapter
P25
P26
P27
P28
P29
P30
P31
D9 Henry the navigator, 1394-1473 9
P32
P33
P34 10
P35 11
P36 12
P37 13
P38 14
P40 14a
P41 15
D10 Young Columbus, 1446-1474
P42 16
P43 17
P44 18
P45 19
P46 20
P47 21
P48 22
D11 in Portugal, 1474-1485
P49 23
P50 24
P51 25
P52 26
P53 27
P54 28
P55 29
D12 Spain, 1485-1487
P56 30
P57 31
P58 32
P59 33
P60 34
D13 begs vain, 1487-1491
P61 35
P62 36
P63 37
P64 38
P65 39
D14 A friendly monk,
P66 40
P67 41
P68 42
P69 43
P70 44
P71 45
D15 Getting ready for voyage, 1492
P72 46
P73 47
P74 48
P75 49
P76 50
D16 first voyage
P77 51
P78 52
P79 53
P80 54
P81 55
P82 56
P83 57
P84 58
D17 Land at last,
P85 59
P86 60
P87 61
P88 62
P89
P90 64
D18 Exploring West Indies,
P91 65
P92 66
P93 67
P94 68
P95 69
D19 visits Cuba,
P96 70
P97 71
P98 72
P99 73
P100 74
P101 75
D20 discovery Hayti,
P102 76
P103 77
P104 78
P105 79
P106 80
P107 80a
P109 81
D21 Wrecked,
P110
P111 83
P112 84
P113 85
P114 86
P115 87
D22 skirmish, 1493
P116 88
P117 89
P118 90
P119 91
D23 return
P120 92
P121 93
P122 94
P123 95
P124 96
D24 Land,
P125 97
P126 98
P127 99
P128 100
P129 101
P130 102
P131 103
D25 Rejoicings court,
P132 104
P133 105
P134 106
P135 107
P136 108
P137 109
D26 second
P138 110
P140 110a
P141 111
P142 112
P143 113
P144 114
P145 114a
P147 115
D27 Adventures among Caribbee Islands,
P148 116
P149
P150 118
P151 119
P152 120
D28 What had become colony,
P153
P154 122
P155 123
P156 124
P157 125
P158 126
P159 127
P160 128
P161 129
D29 infant settlement and its Indian neighbors,
P162
P163 131
P164 132
P165 133
P166
P167 135
D30 Looking gold, 1494
P168 136
P169 137
P170 138
P171
P172 140
P173 141
P174 142
P175 143
D31 Troubles
P176 144
P177 145
P178 146
P179 147
D32 discovery,
P180 148
P181 149
P182 150
P183 151
P184 152
P185 153
D33 Along coast
P186 154
P187 155
P188
P189 157
P190 158
D34 to Hispaniola,
P191 159
P192 160
P193 161
P194 162
P195 163
D35 happened colony absence
P196 164
P197 165
P198
P199 167
D36 Ojeda's adventure war that followed, 1494-1495
P200 168
P201 168a
P203 169
P204 170
P205 171
P206 172
P207 173
P208 174
D37 Trouble a new gold mine, 1495-1496
P209 175
P210 176
P211 177
P212 178
P213 178a
P215 179
D38 In 1496
P216 180
P217
P218 182
P219 183
P220 184
D39 sets sail on his third 1498
P221 185
P222 186
P223 187
P224
P225 189
D40 discovers pearls,
P226 190
P227 191
P228 192
P229 193
P230 194
P231 195
D41 while was away, 1496-1497
P232 196
P233 197
P234 198
P235 199
P236 200
P237
P238 202
P239 203
P240
D42 rebellion war, 1497-1498
P241 205
P242 206
P243 207
P244 208
P246 208a
P247 209
P248 210
D43 rebels, 1498-1499
P249 211
P250 212
P251 213
P252 214
P253 215
P254 216
P255 217
D44 king queen displeased, 1500
P256 218
P257 219
P258 220
D45 chains,
P259 221
P260 222
P261 223
P262 224
D46 lands
P263 225
P264 226
P265 227
D47 under cloud, 1500-1502
P266 228
P267 229
P268 230
P269
P270 232
P271 232a
P273 233
P274 234
D48 predicts hurricane,
P275 235
P276 236
P277
P278 238
D49 Honduras,
P279 239
P280
P281 241
P282 242
P283 243
P284 244
D50 Magic powder plates,
P285 245
P286 246
P287 246a
P289 247
P290 248
P291 249
P292 250
P293 251
D51 Back land 1502-1503
P294 252
P295 253
P296 254
P297 255
P298 256
P299 257
D52 Dealings with Quibian, 1503
P300 258
P301 259
P302 260
P303 261
P304 262
P305 263
D53 Quibian's revenge,
P306 264
P307 265
P308 266
P309 267
P310 268
D54 Stranded,
P311 269
P312 270
P313 271
P314 272
P315 273
D55 has plan,
P316 274
P317 275
P318 276
P319
D56 mutiny, 1504
P320 278
P321 279
P322 280
D57 makes use an eclipse,
P323 281
P324 282
D58 canoe,
P325 283
P326 284
P327
P328 286
P329 287
D59 small battle,
P330 288
P331 289
P332 290
P333 291
P334 292
D60 last days 1504-1506
P335 293
P336 294
P337 295
P338 296
P339 297
P340 298
P341 299
P342 300
P343 301
P344 302
P345
D61 Advertising
P347 304
P348 305
D62
P350
P351
D63 Spine
P352