• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Our Christmas party
 Aunt Anna's present
 The big umbrella
 Caught in a trap
 Meddlesome Hugh
 In the land of fairies
 Mischievious Pollie
 Charlie's strange dream
 The young stork
 The scrap-books
 A spring ride
 Back Matter
 Back Cover






Group Title: Our Christmas party : and other stories.
Title: Our Christmas party
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00081947/00001
 Material Information
Title: Our Christmas party and other stories
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 25 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Wall, H. M ( Lithographer )
Cassell Publishing Co ( Publisher )
Mershon Company Press ( Printer )
Publisher: Cassell Publishing Company
Place of Publication: New York
Manufacturer: Mershon Company Press
Publication Date: c1892
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1892   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1892   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1892
Genre: Children's stories
Children's poetry
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
United States -- New Jersey -- Rahway
 Notes
General Note: Conatins prose and verse.
General Note: Cover chromolithographed by H.M. Wall, Brooklyn, N.Y.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00081947
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002224399
notis - ALG4663
oclc - 212375363

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Frontispiece
        Page 1
    Title Page
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Our Christmas party
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Aunt Anna's present
        Page 6
    The big umbrella
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Caught in a trap
        Page 9
    Meddlesome Hugh
        Page 10
    In the land of fairies
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Mischievious Pollie
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Charlie's strange dream
        Page 17
        Page 18
    The young stork
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    The scrap-books
        Page 23
        Page 24
    A spring ride
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Back Matter
        Back Matter
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text



G~'4
~~AR


;' ^ -." ." .' "


,' *:- 4'.]'"* ":"* ,+
" .o i ..*'


CASSELL
PUBLISHING
COMPANY,
NEW YORK.


i I.



I


CFrinfl WM2 BY 5AUSUIL PIUBIIES.&A Uly


9F1
I


~P


g-la~~-'
,i!- II.
: 1~ -:
u





, .- '--f -_- --- --.-v r ,,.... .. ,.N r., .wa.- .. ... t-..?' ...

.o 4.-. '. i .... ". .,-' ... '" ,-', '-.*-. ''.., ."-; v.:
.- "- ', ,. .T .* .


; '


i .'


,.C-

*1-i' *
,', -

/!. -,






ji-
r










~i



















4 .. t- .TeBlv
J"
.",", ..




.,
*. ,...-



11,;
/"'-*

t .















? *.- ,








.!--_







..
i[, -. .... .,) -. I
""
.. *I-, ,- .' : : ,,-, L






III; I III I .. u . .. i

























































71


a




~U;" 'Zitr:., .!~if


P I-







--


~.

i

-i


~.

~


:: :


''~'`

:
:-

.'iJ

'


I':'






i :" .~ I





~...
i'... ~. '. II 1
I~:? : ; "
''' ist '" '' '



`I ...1
i ,-';A'f: 1



i.~-: .,....;..


* I.:


r.%:



























































?l.d


".: -



















I *




































~Is.










I '



A'
















A,





JQ **.P



















I j !-i qf' 'll '..,

f .., I( _
4. ,._ _j- : ._



AUNT I--E_






iill
I I

"hT A NA' i-








AUN~T ANzVA'S P.RES.ENT.








OUR

CHRISTMAS PARTY


Pr)d Otler Stories


NEW YORK
CASSELL PUBLISHING COMPANY
104 & 106 FOURTH AVENUE





























Id%


COPYRIGHT, 1892, B
CASSELL PUBLISHING COMPANY.


Al rights reserved.


THE MERPSHON COMPANY PRESS,
RAHWAY, N. J.









Ou H CHtIfTMAS
PARTY.
THICKLY fell the
snow, and many
eager little eyes
watched it falling,
wondering whether
it would spoil the
Christmas party
that night. But as
the afternoon pass-
ed on the feathery
flakes ceased to fall,
and the ground was
only just nicely
covered with snow.
Very soon the
guests began to
arrive, walking in
quite a little crowd
up the stone steps
leading to the door,







OUR CHRISTMAS PARTY.


and Maggie and
Gertie and Harry
watched them
coming, and even
baby was held up
to the window, and.
crowed with de-
light when he saw
so many boys and
girls.
And then the
fun began. Tea
first, with plenty
of cakes and bis-
cuits and sweet
things; then games
of every sort, and
a giant Christmas
tree, from which
everyone had at
least one present;
then supper, good-
bye, and to bed.


I










AUJIT ANNA'NS PRESENT.
EAR Toddles,-" Your present is
waiting for you. Ask your
mother to send Nettie to fetch
it. It has four legs, but it can-
not walk, though you can ride
on it.
This was Aunt Anna's let-
ter, and this was what Toddles was think-
ing about as he stood at the window. It
had four legs, but it could not walk.
What could it be ?
Though it was snowing fast, Nettie
had gone to fetch the present, for Aunt
Anna only lived across the road. All at
once Toddles clapped his hands, and cried
"Hurrah!" Out in the snow, wrapped
up in Aunt Anna's big shawl, he could
see Nettie, carrying in her arms the
present. It had four legs, and it could not
walk, just as Aunt Anna had said. What
was it ? Why, of course, it was a horse.



















THE BIQ UMBRELLA.


" AM glad we brought the big umbrella,"
said Bertie, as he and Margaret were
going home from school. Now we shall
not get wet, however much it snows."
Just then something fell on the top
of it with such a bump that Margaret
jumped and Bertie dropped the umbrella.
"It was a snowball," said Bertie, "and
they threw it;" and he pointed to some
children not very far away.
Let us send one back," said Margaret.







THE BIG UMBRELLA.


So they set to work, and had a fine
game. But the snow made them so wet
that when they reached home mother
said-" Why did you not take the big
umbrella, children ? "
Bertie looked at Margaret, and Mar-
garet looked at Bertie, and then they both
ran out of doors again. They soon found
the big umbrella, lying in the snow where
Bertie had left it; but as they carried it
home Margaret said to Bertie, "I am
sorry we brought the big umbrella."


.,.,. ,t
-:. .-
.-'---.. .
S.6. ..


'' .












CAUGHT I A TFAP.


APPLES
High
So upon a
Stretching
hands.


ripe and red,
above Tim's head!
tub he stands,
upward eager


But the lid gives way !
Back falls watching May!
And, within the tub fixed
tight,
Tiny Tim is lost to sight!













MEDDLESOME HUQH.


Hugh turns a tap
He chances to see;
Down comes the water,
And drenched is he!


.WHO meddles with fire
Oft feels the flame;
And meddling with water
Proves much the same.










THE LAND OF


T. 'HE funniest boy brought a box
of crackers for Nina's Christ-
mas party.
y .What a party it was! Boys
and girls of all ages! Jack and
Milly rode on the great rock-
ing-horse, whilst Susie made tea with the
doll's tea cups.
But the great, fun
of the evening
was the box of
crackers. How
the dear children i
laughed when the '.
big crackers were M',
pulled and they
put funny caps
and bonnets on I
their heads and
marched about,
playing on tin -


PAIIE.







IN' THE LAND OF FAIRIES.


trumpets and shouting. Then they all
marched into the supper room, and after
supper the party was over.
And then Nina went to bed and had
a dream. She dreamed that she was
..... .........-....'...,.

I ,^ .' ,:-. o -. _. ,fl \, l.







dressed like a fairy with a shining star
in her hair; and that a bee with gauzy
wings brought a lantern to her and said-
"If you go into the forest with this
lantern you will see a pretty sight. My
cousin the stag-beetle is there, and two little
men who know all about the lantern."
So Nina went into the forest, where








IN TIHE LAND OF FAIRIES.


all the trees seemed to be made of silver,
and before long she saw a gay train of
fairies coming
',/, along. The king
I/ and queen were
/- w7 walking under
-' i a silken cover,
I' Z and lords and
ladies went
before, and be-
hind, while a
/' fairy band play-
I ed most beauti-
ful music.
E everything
in the forest
'' grew brighter
i, and brighter, so
that Nina could
scarcely bear the light. She opened her
eyes wider, and found the sun shining
into them, for it was morning, and she
had only been dreaming of fairy land.






















































































WHAT NINA SAW IN THE FOREST.


:s-













MIjCHIEVOU POLLIE.


SPOLLIE TAYLOR was
always in mis-
S\ chief, and on the day
of the school treat,
S A \ through getting into
mischief she lost her
tea. Teacher had said
-- T-- \ that nobody was to
:- go out of the big
.-i"- field; and so when
Pollie saw a little boy sitting underneath
a white umbrella she went through the
gate to speak to him. A paint-brush was
lying near him, and Pollie picked it up
and began to paint her dollie.
Go away," said the boy; you must
not touch papa's things."








MISCHIEVOUS POLLIE.


Pollie took no notice, and she was so
busy that she did not hear the bell ring.
When at last she went back to the big
room, she found that almost everyone had


finished tea. At the end of the room she
saw one of the bigger girls with a cup of
tea in her hand, but just as Pollie was
going to her, teacher came up and said
that it was time to go home, and home
poor Pollie had to go without her tea.


















CHARLIE'P STITANQE DREAJI.


NE day, after playing
all the afternoon, as
'. he hewas too fond of doing,
.-.. .. -Charlie sat in a chair
with his lesson-book in
.'. \. Ihis hands, and being
S,:' very tired he fell asleep.
And then he had a strange dream.
"This way to Play-Land," said a
merry voice.
Charlie looked round, and close by
his side stood a little girl, holding out
one hand towards him as though to lead








CHARLIE'S STRANGE DREAM.


him, and pointing behind her with the
other. So Charlie took her hand with a
smile, and away they went together.
In a minute or two they came in
sight of a lawn, on which were gathered
a pretty group. A fairy with a crown on
her head and a wand in her hand, and
attended by other fairies with wands, was
speaking to two boys and a girl in front
of her; and pointing to three boys behind
her, she said-
These who ever loved to play,
Working never all the day,
They must now play, dance, and sing,
Till they're tired of everything;
Till they long, and long in vain,
To get back to work again."

With a start, Charlie woke, and-well,
he went on with his lessons at once.









THE YOUNq TORK.
.? :"fIT is a stork's egg,"

goose. "You must
sit upon and hatch
it, and then I shall
have a young stork."
So tle goose sat
on the egg, and
-, \-- .- -/ when it was hatched
Sthe goose was sur-
prised, for the stork
grew so big and had such very long legs.
And Jim had a young stork, but he did
not know what to do with it.
"I know what to do with it," said Miss
Etta. "The rats and rabbits are always
fighting, and the stork will help me with
the rabbits."
So the next time the rats came out to
fight the rabbits, Miss Etta called out-
Stork, stork, come here, I pray,
And help to drive the rats away."









THE YOUNG STORK.


And the stork came, half flying and half
running, and a lot of other storks came.















too, and they drove away the rats, and.


came again to fight the rabbits.
.*.. --Ii-






too, and they drove aay the r-ts, and-





frightened them so much that they never
came again to fight the rabbits.
























































ii V


THESE ARE THE CHILDREN THAT CATCH THE BALL-


I 2'`
;1'~.. ~~-~I---- -~~
--
























~bi~f~*j'


1
;
~.I .
,I I
_,~- -~--
;-----~ ii.. ~ I .
~---
s~-=~,,l~,, --- ------- :lil
--~;- -L~- I~i~jl I!'''''I''
;t
i~--
'i' ~ -~75 tT1~ ii
~ike~~
~~;
-~--
-----
-----;-~c;-~-- t~
~-~;~-~-~~~~~~~~-;~
r r
i;--
,;,,
~--------=--
~iBi~iii~'I ~-~-r--
=-~


Iii I'

II


THIS IS THE LASS THAT THROWS IT TO ALL.


r 1.

:SUY~- -C


-g~ ;
;;"


--a.

8


r

--- --~:~
;;
i~-i.




i
















THE SCFrAP-BOOK}.


ii.." 'oR a very long time past the
; children had been saving up
: coloured pictures, Christmas
and birthday cards, valentines,
..-" scraps from crackers, and all
such things, and having now
S a good store, mother said they
/' might make some scrap-books.
There were pictures of dogs
and cats, and horses and cows, and boys
and girls, and fruit and flowers, to say
nothing of views and printed texts.
When the blank scrap-books, and the
scissors, and the paste were ready, "Which
picture shall come first ?" asked mother.








THE SCRAP BOOKS.


"This one of a girl in a grand hat
and feather," said Katie.
"Very well," said Harry; "only if it
does, I should like to paint over it 'Little


Miss Vanity.'" And so he did when it
had been pasted in one of the books.
The work kept the children amused
for weeks, and when the books were
finished, what do you think became of
them ? They were sent to one of the child-
ren's hospitals, with the senders' love.


_a Itq~liC~S~~
*


C~cLI

,u~Rz














A pPRIjq RIDE.

.'. HEN the larks and thrushes
sing,
When the trees are green,
Vhen the later flowers of Spring
First are seen,
On a joyous sunny day,
Out the children go,
Taking for his first Spring ride
Brother Joe.
Through the winter dark and cold
Joe was ill in bed;
But, "The Spring will make him well,"
Doctor said.
And it seems that he was right.
Each day growing longer,








A SPRING RIDE.


Full of sunny rays and
Finds him stronger,


warmth,


Till at last he has a ride
Down the primrose lane;
Soon, we hope, he'll run
and play
Once again !




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs