• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Preface
 List of Illustrations
 Table of Contents
 Prince Dimple and cribsie-bye...
 Prince Dimple and his bunnies
 Prince Dimple and his Papa
 Prince Dimple making pies
 Prince Dimple and his frog
 Catching sunbeams
 Prince Dimple and his music...
 Sweetheart
 Prince Dimple and Sweetheart
 Finding kisses
 Prince Dimple and his cracker...
 Playing choo-choo cars
 Prince Dimple and the doctor
 Going on the choo-choo cars
 At the seashore
 Down on the beach
 Prince Dimple and his rock
 Prince Dimple and his toy...
 The inlet
 Prince Dimple and the polly
 Prince Dimple and the merry-go...
 Prince Dimple and his letter
 Prince Dimple and the goat
 Prince Dimple on his travels
 Prince Dimple and the mountain...
 Prince Dimple and the lake
 Prince Dimple in the woods
 Prince Dimple and his first fishing...
 Prince Dimple and the baa-baa...
 Prince Dimple and the acorns
 Prince Dimple and his mooly...
 Prince Dimple and his song
 The mooly cow's mistake
 Prince Dimple and the steamer
 Prince Dimple and the carnival
 Prince Dimple and Humpty Dumpty's...
 Prince Dimple and the dog show
 Prince Dimple and the hop-toad
 Prince Dimple and his happy...
 Prince Dimple and the waterfal...
 Prince Dimple and his lighthou...
 Prince Dimple and Dimple Bay
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: Prince Dimple on his travels
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00081943/00001
 Material Information
Title: Prince Dimple on his travels
Alternate Title: Prince Dimple on his travels told for little ones
Physical Description: 149 p., 9 leaves of plates : ill. ; 22 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Paull, George A., 1859-1895
A.D.F. Randolph & Co ( Publisher )
University Press (Cambridge, Mass.) ( Printer )
John Wilson and Son ( Printer )
Publisher: Anson D.F. Randolph and Co.
Place of Publication: New York
Manufacturer: University Press ; John Wilson and Son
Publication Date: c1892
 Subjects
Subject: Infants -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Infants -- Development -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Amusements -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Play -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Friendship -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Parent and child -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Voyages and travels -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Photographs -- 1892   ( gmgpc )
Bldn -- 1892
Genre: Photographs   ( gmgpc )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
United States -- Massachusetts -- Cambridge
 Notes
Summary: A very small baby starts to learn about his world.
Statement of Responsibility: by Mrs. George A. Paull.
General Note: Illustrated with halftone photographic reproductions.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00081943
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002230522
notis - ALH0882
oclc - 27901175

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Frontispiece
        Page i
    Title Page
        Page ii
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Preface
        Page v
    List of Illustrations
        Page vi
    Table of Contents
        Page vii
        Page viii
        Page ix
        Page x
    Prince Dimple and cribsie-bye time
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Prince Dimple and his bunnies
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Prince Dimple and his Papa
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Prince Dimple making pies
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Prince Dimple and his frog
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Catching sunbeams
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Prince Dimple and his music box
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
    Sweetheart
        Page 38
        Page 38a
        Page 39
    Prince Dimple and Sweetheart
        Page 40
        Page 40a
        Page 41
        Page 42
    Finding kisses
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 44a
        Page 45
    Prince Dimple and his cracker animals
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
    Playing choo-choo cars
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
    Prince Dimple and the doctor
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
    Going on the choo-choo cars
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
    At the seashore
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
    Down on the beach
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
    Prince Dimple and his rock
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 68a
        Page 69
        Page 70
    Prince Dimple and his toy closets
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
    The inlet
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
    Prince Dimple and the polly
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
    Prince Dimple and the merry-go-round
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
    Prince Dimple and his letter
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
    Prince Dimple and the goat
        Page 88
        Page 88a
        Page 89
        Page 90
    Prince Dimple on his travels
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
    Prince Dimple and the mountains
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
    Prince Dimple and the lake
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
    Prince Dimple in the woods
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
    Prince Dimple and his first fishing excursion
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
    Prince Dimple and the baa-baa lambs
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
    Prince Dimple and the acorns
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
    Prince Dimple and his mooly cow
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
    Prince Dimple and his song
        Page 116
        Page 117
    The mooly cow's mistake
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
    Prince Dimple and the steamer
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
    Prince Dimple and the carnival
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
    Prince Dimple and Humpty Dumpty's chair
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
    Prince Dimple and the dog show
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
    Prince Dimple and the hop-toad
        Page 134
        Page 134a
        Page 135
        Page 136
    Prince Dimple and his happy chair
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
    Prince Dimple and the waterfall
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
    Prince Dimple and his lighthouse
        Page 144
        Page 145
    Prince Dimple and Dimple Bay
        Page 146
        Page 146a
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text












Ro. Ai.i Iii-l-al IL




















































CRIBSIE-BYE TIME.


i


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~L~ci










PRINCE


DIMPLE


HIS TRAVELS



BY
MRS. GEORGE A. PAULL
AUTHOR OF
"PRINCE DIMPLE AND HIS EVERY-DAY DOINGS," "PRINCE DIMPLE'S
FURTHER DOINGS," ETC.








NEW YORK
ANSON D. F. RANDOLPH & COMPANY
(INCORPORATED)
182 FIFTH AVENUE



































Copyright, 1892,
By ANSON D. F. RANDOLPH & COMPANY.
(INCORPORATED.)































JOHN WILSON AND SON, CAMBRIDGE.


























TO


Ebe ;~imorr of the e Ioaber Darling


WHO FOR THREE YEARS WAS THE LIGHT OF OUR HOUSEHOLD
AND THE JOY OF OUR HEARTS,


THESE PAGES ARE MOST TENDERLY INSCRIBED


BY HIS MOTHER.










PREFACE.


AFTER these pages were in the publishers'
hands, the precious baby who had borne
his illness so patiently and battled so bravely
for his life was tenderly gathered in the arms
of the Good Shepherd, whom he had already
learned to love. If this further record of the
dear baby doings can throw sunshine into other
little lives, then his life may still go on in
other hearts and homes, extending the bright-
ness that it shed upon those who knew and
loved him best.
















ILLUSTRATIONS.



PAGE

CRIBSIE-BYE TIME . ... . Frontispiece

PRINCE DIMPLE READING STORIES .... . 12

HE LOOKED AT HIS PICTURES AND PATTED HIS PUSSY . 32

SWEETHEART . . . . 38

PRINCE DIMPLE AND SWEETHEART .. . 40

SWEETHEART AND PRINCE DIMPLE AND THE PICTURE BOOK .44

POINTING TO THE WHITE SAILS AND GREAT STEAMERS 62

PRINCE DIMPLE AND HIS SEAT BY THE SEA . ... 68

IN A BOAT . .. . ... 76

PRINCE DIMPLE AND THE GOAT WAGON . ... .88

WATCHING FOR MOTHER . . . .95

AT THE GATE . . ... 107

WAITING FOR MOOLY . .. . .. .113

THE MOOLY COW'S MISTAKE . . .. 120

PRINCE DIMPLE ON THE ROCK. ... . . 134

AT THE WATERFALL . .. . 141

PRINCE DIMPLE FISHING IN DIMPLE BAY . .. .146

ON THE BEACH .. .. .. . .. 149





















CONTENTS.







PRINCE DIMPLE AND CRIBSIE-BYE TIME

PRINCE DIMPLE AND HIS BUNNIES .

PRINCE DIMPLE AND HIS PAPA .

PRINCE DIMPLE MAKING PIES ...

PRINCE DIMPLE AND HIS FROG .

PRINCE DIMPLE CATCHING SUNBEAMS .

PRINCE DIMPLE AND HIS MUSIC-BOX .

SWEETHEART . . .

PRINCE DIMPLE AND SWEETHEART .

FINDING KISSES . .

PRINCE DIMPLE AND HIS CRACKER ANIMALS

PLAYING CHOO-CHOO CARS . .

PRINCE DIMPLE AND THE DOCTOR .

GOING ON THE CHOO-CHOO CARS .

AT THE SEASHORE . ...

DOWN ON THE BEACH . .

PRINCE DIMPLE AND HIS ROCK .

PRINCE DIMPLE AND HIS TOY CLOSETS .

THE INLET . . .


PAGE
II

. 15

. 15

. 24

. 27

. 30

. 34

38

. 40

. 43

46



. 54
54
57
. 60


. 64

67

. 71

74


CHAPTER
I.

II.

III.

IV.

V.

VI.

VII.

VIII.

IX.

X.

XI.

XII.

XIII.

XIV.

XV.

XVI.

XVII.

XVIII.

XIX.









Contents.


CHAPTER PAGE
XX. PRINCE DIMPLE AND THE POLLY . .. .78
XXI. PRINCE DIMPLE AND THE MERRY-GO-ROUND 82
XXII. PRINCE DIMPLE AND HIS LETTER . 85
XXIII. PRINCE DIMPLE AND THE GOAT . 88
XXIV. PRINCE DIMPLE ON HIS TRAVELS . 91
XXV. PRINCE DIMPLE AND THE MOUNTAINS ... 94
XXVI. PRINCE DIMPLE AND THE LAKE . .. .97
XXVII. PRINCE DIMPLE IN THE WOODS . .100
XXVIII. PRINCE DIMPLE AND HIS FIRST FISHING EXCURSION 103
XXIX. PRINCE DIMPLE AND THE BAA-BAA LAMBS O6
XXX. PRINCE DIMPLE AND THE ACORNS .. 109
XXXI. PRINCE DIMPLE AND HIS MOOLY COW 112
XXXII. PRINCE DIMPLE AND HIS SONG . ... .116
XXXIII. THE MOOLY Cow's MISTAKE . ... I8
XXXIV. PRINCE DIMPLE AND THE STEAMER .. 122
XXXV. PRINCE DIMPLE AND THE CARNIVAL ... .125
XXXVI. PRINCE DIMPLE AND HUMPTY DUMPTY'S CHAIR I28
XXXVII. PRINCE DIMPLE AND THE DOG SHOW .. 131
XXXVIII. PRINCE DIMPLE AND THE HOP-TOAD .. 134
XXXIX. PRINCE DIMPLE AND HIS HAPPY CHAIR 137
XL. PRINCE DIMPLE AND THE WATERFALL 140
XLI. PRINCE DIMPLE AND HIS LIGHTHOUSE .. 144
XLII. PRINCE DIMPLE AND DIMPLE BAY .. . 146

































I'


READING STORIES.


I


i~,


~~



1.:

~~










PRINCE DIMPLE

ON HIS TRAVELS.



CHAPTER FIRST.

PRINCE DIMPLE AND CRIBSIE-BYE TIME.

T was cribsie-bye time, and Prince Dimple
was fast asleep.
The nursery was very quiet. All the toys had
been put away in the toy closet, Jack was sitting
up very straight in Prince Dimple's chair, and
the owl lamp on the mantle-piece was looking
through its bright yellow eyes, and making a
faint light, just bright enough for Prince Dimple
to see to go to sleep by.
Of course Prince Dimple had to have a light
to see to go to sleep by, for everybody knows you
cannot see to do anything in the dark.







Prince Dimple


Prince Dimple knew when cribsie-bye time
came just as well as any one did. Toward the
end of the afternoon he would get tired of build-
ing his blocks and standing up the animals in his
Noah's Ark, and he would like to get up into
Mary's or Auntie's lap, and have them read him
pretty stories and show him pictures. After
this it would begin to grow dark, and the lamp-
lighter would come down the street.
Prince Dimple always liked to watch for the
lamp-lighter, and as soon as he saw the first light
shining in the distance, he would give a shout of
delight, and wave his hand to the dear lamp-
lighter, who made such pretty lights for him to
look at.
The lamp-lighter could not see Prince Dimple,
of course, for he was such a long way off; and
even when he came near the house, he never
thought of looking up at the nursery windows,
where the little boy was watching for him.
The lights would shine out one after another,






And Cribsie-Bye Time. 13

until they would look like a chain of diamonds;
and they would twinkle and sparkle as if they
were glad to let Prince Dimple see them again.
The lamp-lighter would jump up on the lamp
post, and then he would light a match and make
the lamp burn, and then drop the match and jump
down again, going on his way to the next lamp.
Prince Dimple had watched him so many times
that he felt quite sure that he could have lighted
the lamp himself.
After the lamp-lighter had gone quite out of
sight with his long ladder, then Prince Dimple
knew that cribsie-bye time had come. He would
wave his hand for good-by to the pretty lights,
and then Mary would draw the curtain and shut
them out.
Prince Dimple would sit in his cribsie while
Mary lighted his own little lamp, and then she
would undress him for the night.
Prince Dimple liked to be undressed, and have
on his long white nightdress, that made him look







14 Prince Dimple

like a little wee baby again, instead of a great big
boy who wore short frocks and little shoes. He
liked to watch Mary hang up all his little skirts
and his dress, and stand his shoes on the chimney-
piece in a row, as if they were soldiers ready to
march. Prince Dimple always patted his little
shoes for good-night; and when this was done,
he was all ready to go to sleep.
And this was the way Prince Dimple went
cribsie-bye every night.






And his Bunnies.


CHAPTER SECOND.

PRINCE DIMPLE AND HIS BUNNIES.

Y OU could never guess what came to see
Prince Dimple in the evenings when his
nursery lamp was lighted.
When he was all undressed, and was waiting
for mother to come and rock him to sleep, Mary
would draw her chair up by the white wall, and
then Prince Dimple would see a great many
things that he never saw in the daytime.
He would see his own shadow and Mary's
against the white wall; and he used to like to
nod his head, so that he might see the shadow
do the same thing.
Best of all Mary would make bunnies on the
wall for him. She would hold her hands out and
move them about, and right away there would
be a little black bunny on the wall, that would






16 Prince Dimple

run about and move its long ears and nod at
Prince Dimple. It was very funny how Mary
could make that bunny come on the wall by
moving her hands, for her hands did not look
like a bunny at all; but any baby would have
known that it was a bunny that jumped about
on the wall. After Prince Dimple had watched
the bunny for some time, he would put out his
little hands and try to make one too.
Of course he could not, because he was too
little to know how to hold his hands; but he
thought that the shadows that he made were
bunnies, and that made him very happy. He
would shout and crow and want to kiss the
bunnies, and he often wished that he might take
one of the pretty bunnies to bed with him.
He would try to take one off the wall, but they
would go away when he put his hands close up to
them, so he had to be content with watching them.
These bedtime bunnies were great pets with
Prince Dimple, and sometimes he used to look






And his Bunnies.


at the white wall in the daytime and wonder
where his little bunnies had gone.
They always came back again at cribsie-bye
time, so perhaps the lamp-lighter brought them.
I am not sure but that the lamp-lighter did bring
them; but it was not the lamp-lighter in the
street, but Mary, who lighted the nursery lamp.
What do you suppose happened one day? A
bunny, a real bunny, came to see Prince Dimple.
It was not a black shadow bunny that came
only on the wall, but it was white; and when
mother put it down on the floor it looked just
like a live bunny.
It was so pretty! It had long ears, and bright
yellow eyes just like the owl lamp. Prince
Dimple was very glad indeed to see his new
pet. He slipped down from Mary's lap and
went over to see his bunny. When he came
close up to it he decided that he liked it very
much, and so he leaned over and gave it a very
sweet kiss, right on the end of its nose. I






18 Prince Dimple

am sure that must have pleased the bunny
very much, although it did not say anything.
Prince Dimple knew that the bunny liked to
be kissed, for everybody was always glad when
he kissed them, especially mother.
After a while Prince Dimple pounded his
bunny with the drumstick to see if he would
make a noise like the drum, and one of his nice
long ears fell off.
"Oh," said Prince Dimple in surprise; and
he picked the ear up and put it in his mouth to
see how bunny tasted.
It did not taste at all, so he threw it away,
and was just about to hit the other ear to see
if it, too, would fall off, when Mary picked poor
bunny up and put him on the shelf.
He stayed there for a long time, until his ear
was mended, and then Prince Dimple had him
to play with; but he did not hit him again
with his drumstick, so his ear did -not come
off any more.






And his Papa. 19


CHAPTER THIRD.

PRINCE DIMPLE AND HIS PAPA.

P RINCE DIMPLE had such a nice pony.!
When he was mounted upon this pony he
could take the longest rides that any one ever
heard of a little boy taking. He almost always
went to Boston, for that was such a nice ride.
If only the pony could have trotted until Prince
Dimple was tired he could have kept on riding
all day, but Prince Dimple was a heavy boy, and
before very long the poor pony would be so tired
that he would have to stop and rest before he
could go any farther.
Everybody would not have known that it was
a pony. It was only Prince Dimple and papa
and a very few other people who knew about it.
Most people would have thought that it was only







Prince Dimple


papa's foot. Prince Dimple knew better than that,
though. As soon as papa came into the room
after lunch Prince Dimple would want his ride.
Papa would saddle the horse, by putting a
little cushion on his foot, and then he would put
Prince Dimple on, and take hold of his hands
so that he would not fall off if the pony should
get frisky, as it sometimes did.
It was great fun Prince Dimple would shout
with delight when the pony went very fast, and
papa would say,-
"Trot, trot to Boston,
To get a loaf of bread;
Trot, trot back again,
And poor Trot's dead."

Sometimes when the poor pony would get very
tired indeed, he would let Prince Dimple gently
down upon the floor, and then Prince Dimple
would roll over and over and laugh.
As soon as the pony was rested, Prince Dimple
would climb up for another ride, and start off







And his Papa. 21

for Boston again, which is quite a long journey,
you know, for a little boy to go several times
a day.
Prince Dimple did have such fine games with
papa! He liked to be lifted up in those strong
arms till he could almost touch the ceiling with
his little hands. In papa's pockets were ever
so many nice things, and Prince Dimple knew
just where to look for them.
In papa's breast pocket was a little book with
white pages; and when Prince Dimple would
pull the little book out of papa's pocket, papa
would take his pencil and draw pretty things for
Prince Dimple.
Papa would draw beautiful things, and Prince
Dimple always knew what they were meant for.
It was great fun to watch him draw; and after a
while, when Prince Dimple was tired of watching,
he would take the pencil himself, and draw. He
could draw quite as well as papa, or at least he
thought so,







Prince Di.myle


Papa always knew what he was drawing; and
after he had made a mark, Prince Dimple would
look up into papa's face with a sweet smile, as
much as to say,
Do you know what I have drawn now?"
If Prince Dimple made a long straggly mark
across the page, papa would clap his hands
and say,
"That is Aunt Anna!"
If Prince Dimple made another that went the
other way, and was very crooked, papa would
say,-
Why, that is my picture, is n't it, Prince
Dimple? "
Then papa would take the pencil again, and
draw some more pictures.
Sometimes he would say,-
"Now don't laugh at my picture, Prince
Dimple;" and then the mischievous little Prince
Dimple would clap his hands and shout with
laughter, as if he thought it was a fine joke to
laugh at papa's work.






And his Pafa.


Papa's watch was another fine toy. It was
different from every one else's watch. If Prince
Dimple blew on it, it opened in the most wonder-
ful way, and no other watch did that for Prince
Dimple. The funny part was that no one else
could open it by blowing on it. If papa wanted
to open it, he did not blow on it, nor did mother;
but as soon as Prince Dimple put his little
mouth close to it and blew with all his might,
it flew open.
"I must blow harder than any one else,"
thought Prince Dimple. "Or perhaps no one
else knows how to blow."
What a funny little Prince Dimple, to think
that he could blow harder than any one else!






24 Prince Dimple


CHAPTER FOURTH.

PRINCE DIMPLE MAKING PIES.

V HENEVER Maggie was going to make
pies, she always had to go up to the
nursery and get Prince Dimple to help her. It
is not very easy to make good pies, so of course
Maggie wanted some help. She would put
Prince Dimple's tall high chair up by the kitchen
table, and then she would tie his bib on. If she
did not do this, sometimes Prince Dimple would
get the flour all over his dress, and he did not
like that. Then Maggie would go into the
pantry and bring out all the things that she was
going to use in making the pies, and Prince
Dimple would sit very still and watch her with
his big blue eyes.
By and by, when she was all ready to roll out







Making Pies. 25

the pastry, she would give Prince Dimple a piece
of the dough and his own little rolling pin, and
then Prince Dimple's part of the fun began.
Sometimes he would pound the dough, and some-
times he would roll it, and sometimes it would
fall off the table upon the floor and Maggie
would have to pick it up for him. Sometimes
it would get all sticky, so that Maggie would
have to rub his little hands with flour to get it
off them, but Prince Dimple did not mind little
things like that. One must expect to work hard
when one is making pies. He always made the
pies for his dear mother.
Who are you making that fine pie for, Prince
Dimple ?" Maggie would ask, and Prince Dimple
would look up with a merry little smile and say,
" Ma-ma!"
When Maggie cut up the apples, Prince
Dimple would want a little piece to put into
his pie. He did not have a dish to put his pie
in, so of course it did not look just like Maggie's







26 Prince Dimple

pie. He would pound the apple and the dough
together, until you could not tell which was
apple and which was pie crust, and then he
thought it was done.
Maggie would put it on a little tiny tin dish,
and put it into the oven with her pies; and while
Prince Dimple and Maggie were waiting for the
pies to be baked, Maggie would read a pretty
story to him out of one of his picture books.
You can imagine that Prince Dimple was
always glad when it was the day to make pies;
and if he had made pies whenever he wanted
to, I think that the Dimple family would have
had pie for dinner every day.






And kis Frog. 27


CHAPTER FIFTH.

PRINCE DIMPLE AND HIS FROG.

N OBODY ever knew how Prince Dimple had
learned to make a noise like a frog, for he
had never seen a frog except in his picture book,
and a frog in a picture book does not say any-
thing, of course.
One day he was sitting in Papa's lap, turning
over the leaves of his picture book, when he came
to a picture of a frog; and then he made a funny
little noise in his throat, just like a little wee
baby frog, and looked up at papa and laughed.
Oh," said papa. "I did not know that there
was a frog in the nursery. I wonder where it is!
Let us look for it, Prince Dimple."
Papa looked everywhere for the frog, and
Prince Dimple looked too, just as gravely as if







Prince Dimple


he did not have any idea where the noise came
from.
Papa looked in the toy closet, and in the owl
lamp, but of course he could not find the frog,
because there was not any frog there.
I must have made a mistake, there is not any
frog here," he said at last.
Prince Dimple made the little frog noise again,
and then pretended to look around for the frog as
he had before.
I think that you must be the little frog that
I am looking for," papa said at last; and then
Prince Dimple shouted and patted himself, to tell
papa that he had been making the little frog
noise.
After that, when papa came into the nursery
Prince Dimple would play that he was a little
frog, and they would have fine sport trying to
catch Master Froggie.
One day papa got Prince Dimple a little green
frog that would jump around the floor; and he






And his Frog. 29

enjoyed it very much indeed, for he would creep
after it, and make the little frog noise all the
time, as if he was a little frog too.
Mary would pretend that she was quite afraid
to be in a nursery so full of frogs, and that would
make Prince Dimple laugh.
It was so funny to think that Mary was afraid
of a Prince Dimple frog!






30 Prince Dirmple


CHAPTER SIXTH.

CATCHING SUNBEAMS.

pRINCE DIMPLE was sitting in the big
chair in mother's room one day, looking at
his picture book and holding his pussy, when
something flew down upon his book. It was
not a bird, he knew; and yet it seemed to fly
around like a bird, first upon the book and then
upon the ceiling and walls.
It was very bright, so bright that it almost
dazzled Prince Dimple's eyes to look at it; and
he was just a little bit afraid of it, for it flew
around so fast that he could hardly see where it
went to, and sometimes it flashed right into his
face.
Mother did not see it for some time, but at last
she looked at Prince Dimple to see what was






Catching Sunbeams.


keeping him so quiet, and then she saw what he
was watching.
He pointed to it with his little finger, and then
mother said,-
"That is a sunbeam, Prince Dimple; shall I
make it dance for you ?"
Prince Dimple nodded his curly head, for he
liked to see the sunbeam dance. A tall brass
candlestick was standing near the window on a
shelf, and the sunlight was shining on the glass
pendants. This was what made the bright bit
of sunshine on the ceiling and on Prince Dim-
ple's book. When the pendant swung back and
forth the sunbeam would flash backward and
forward as quickly as if it had wings, and when
mother shook the candlestick to make the sun-
beam dance, a whole family of sunbeams darted
about the room.
This made Prince Dimple shout with delight,
and he held out his little hand for a sunbeam.
What do you think? Mother really put a







Prilice Dimfile


sunbeam on the book beside him again, where he
could put his little hand upon it. Prince Dimple
thought that now he would surely have one of


HE LOOKED AT HIS PICTURES AND PATTED HIS PUSSY.


the beautiful things for his very own, and he
closed his chubby fingers over the bit of light.
Oh, how disappointed he was when he opened
his hand and found it empty! Mother smiled
when she saw his sober face, and she held a






Caicing Sunbeams. 33

pendant so that the sunbeam would fall beside
him again.
It was very strange, but the sunbeam would
not be picked up at all. It stayed right there
on the book, no matter how hard Prince Dimple
tried to pick it up.
By and by the sun went under a cloud, and
then the sunbeam went away and did not come
back any more that day. Prince Dimple did not
care. He looked at his pictures and patted his
pussy. What was the use of a sunbeam that
one could not take in one's hand?






34 Prince Dimple


CHAPTER SEVENTH.

PRINCE DIMPLE AND HIS MUSIC BOX.

P RINCE DIMPLE loved music almost the
best of everything, and he heard a great
deal of it. To begin with, there was his music
box, with a little handle that he could turn round
and round and make a pretty tune come out as
long as he wanted to hear it. Then mother
would play for him on the piano, and he always
liked that; and then there was his nice organ-
grinder, who came very often and stood under
the nursery windows and played for Prince
Dimple. There were other organ-grinders, who
came sometimes, but this was his very own
organ man. Prince Dimple looked down the
street for him every morning; and as soon as he
saw him coming, he would clap his hands and






And his Music Box.


shout with delight. The organ man was always
glad to see Prince Dimple too, and he would look
up at the nursery windows and smile and wave
his hand to the little boy. He always came just
at breakfast time, and so Prince Dimple could
watch him eating his breakfast, which was very
interesting. He would use the top of his organ
for a table, and a very nice one it made. When
he had finished eating his breakfast, he always
wiped his mouth on the sleeve of his coat, for he
did not have a bib, as Prince Dimple had; and
then he would begin to play. His organ played
very pretty tunes, and Prince Dimple was always
sorry when at last he had finished them all and
went on his way down the street.
There was another music box that Prince
Dimple had besides his little round one, and I am
very, very sure that no other baby has one just
exactly like it. No one possibly could, for you
see this music box was Prince Dimple's own
mother. Was it not funny that she could be a







36 Prince Dimple

music box? Mother had a dress with buttons
down the front, and it was by pressing on these
buttons that Prince Dimple could set his music
box going. He would touch the top button, and
mother would begin to sing one tune, and when
Prince Dimple got tired of that tune he would
press another button, and then mother would
change to another tune right away. Before she
had sung very much of that one, Prince Dimple
would press another button, and so the tune
would change again; and that was the way it
went on, until all the buttons had been pushed;
and then it was time to start over again.
Of course it made a very funny tune, for it
was all in little bits.
This is the way it sounded:-



Hey did die did die The cat and the fid die, I


love lit tie pus sy her coat is so warm And








And his Music Box.


cur -ly locks, cur- ly locks wilt thou be mine ? Thou shalt not wash


dish es nor Three lit te mice crept out to see
dish Pe nor Three lit tlte mice crept out to see


tt)z


what they could Dick o ry, dick o ry dock The


a ~ I a I


mouse ran up the Jack and Jill went up the hill to

a a : 1.=Ld2..,?Jl


get a pail of wa ter Geor-gie or gie pud-ding and pie.
get a pail of wa ter Geor-gie Por gie pud-ding and pie.






38 Prince Dimple.


CHAPTER EIGHTH.

SWEETHEART.

SWEETHEART came to see Prince Dimple
one day. Prince Dimple was very glad
to see him, because Sweetheart was his very
dearest friend and playmate. Sweetheart was
just about as old as Prince Dimple, and his
birthday came in the very same month. It was
a very good thing that they did not come on
the same day, Prince Dimple told Jack, or there
would have been only one birthday between
them; and Prince Dimple did not know what
they would have done then.
Perhaps they would have divided it, and had
half a birthday each, which would have been a
very funny way to do; or perhaps it would have
been all Sweetheart's birthday, and then Prince








































































SWEETHEART.






Sweelteart.


Dimple would not have had any at all. It was
a very good thing that the birthdays did not
come together, Prince Dimple told Jack.
Sweetheart had sunny curls, eyes that were
just as big and blue as Prince Dimple's own,
and the dearest little face, that could look very
sober and thoughtful sometimes, and then again
would be so bright with smiles that you could
fancy that the sun had come out from behind
the clouds -and the sunbeams were dancing
everywhere. Prince Dimple loved Sweetheart
very dearly, and he was always very glad when
his little friend came to see him, for they had
such happy times playing together in Prince
Dimple's nursery.







Prince Dimple


CHAPTER NINTH.

PRINCE DIMPLE AND SWEETHEART.

S WEETHEART and Prince Dimple had a
great many nice games that they played
together when they visited each other.
Sometimes they built tall houses of blocks, and
then they would roll their balls and try to knock
them over.
It is not very easy to roll a ball in a straight
line, and sometimes the ball would roll away in
just the other direction, and not touch the blocks
at all. Sometimes, though, it would go just as
Sweetheart and Prince Dimple meant to have it
go, and down would come the tall house of blocks
with a crash.
Sweetheart was very fond of horses, as most























































I
N*-


PRINCE DIMPLE AND SWEETHEART.






And Sweetheart.


other little boys are; and they would take all
Prince Dimple's horses out of the toy closet and
have a fine cavalry regiment.
Prince Dimple would beat the drum, while
Sweetheart would make the horses march.
He would tie them all in a row; and then when
he marched up and down the room himself, all
the regiment would march after him.
The horses all marched well, except Jerry.
Sweetheart always put him at the very end of
the regiment, because he marched so badly. He
would stand very still until the marching began,
and then over he would tumble the first thing;
and that of course quite spoiled the appearance of
the regiment, for who ever saw a horse march-
ing with his legs in the air? "I think I will
put sticks in his legs, and then perhaps he can
stand up better," said Sweetheart one day, as he
pinched Jerry's legs and found out how soft they
were. If he had stiff legs, he could march just







42 Prince Dimple

as well as Dapple does." "Sweetheart!" called
his mamma, and Sweetheart had to say good-bye
to Prince Dimple and go home to his own nur-
sery. So Jerry did not have his legs stiffened
that day after all.






Finding Kisses. 42


CHAPTER TENTH.

FINDING KISSES.

P RINCE DIMPLE had been having a very
fine time one day. There was a gate at
the head of the stairs, and he always ran to meet
any one whom he heard coming up stairs.
If it was "Nana," as Prince Dimple called his
Aunt Anna, he would run and find a kiss for
her. No one knew who hid the sweet kisses that
Prince Dimple found in the funniest places.
Sometimes he would have to look for a long
time before he could find one. He would look
in his crib, in the corner of his nursery, and on
his little table; but there would be no kisses in
any of these places. Then, perhaps, he would
look in Aunt Anna's work-basket, and there
would be the kiss he had been hunting for.







44 Prince Dimple

He would pretend to pick it up with his little
fingers and put it in his mouth, and then his
sweet voice would call "Na-na!" and he would
patter after her as fast as his little feet could go
to give her the kiss he had found for her.
If mother was coming up stairs, you may be
sure that Prince Dimple had a very sweet kiss
for her, too. Prince Dimple took care of mother.
He would put his arms tight around her neck
and hold her so close that he was sure no one
could take better care of her than her baby.
"Who takes care of me?" mother would ask,
and Prince Dimple would give her a dear hug
and kiss, and say, in his very sweetest voice,
" Ba-by!"
If papa came up stairs then Prince Dimple
would shout with delight, for he knew he was
going to have fine sport.
He would hold fast to the gate, and when papa
opened it and was just about to come through,
then Prince Dimple would bang the gate shut










































N
V-'tew,


SWEETHEART AND PRINCE DIMPLE AND THE PICTURE BOOK.






Finding Kisses. 45

as hard as he could, with a merry shout. Of
course that would upset papa and tumble him
half way down stairs again; but both papa and
Prince Dimple thought that was great fun.
After a while, when papa was tired, he would
say :
Please let me come up, Prince Dimple, I am
so tired;" and then dear little Prince Dimple
would open the gate, and when papa came
through he would run into his arms and give
him more kisses than he could count, because
he had had so many tumbles.
One day Sweetheart and Prince Dimple were
looking at a picture-book together. There was
an old woman in the picture with a basket on her
arm, and Prince Dimple found a kiss in the
basket for Sweetheart. He put it into his mouth,
and then he gave Sweetheart a very, very sweet
kiss, because he loved him so dearly.






Prince Dimple


CHAPTER ELEVENTH.

PRINCE DIMPLE AND HIS CRACKER ANIMALS.

PRINCE DIMPLE had been having a very
hard time one day with a naughty little
tooth, that would neither come out and show
itself properly, as a nice little tooth should do,
nor would it keep still where it was. He had
not wanted to play with Jack nor Jerry nor
Squeaky Sam, and he did not even want to
hear all his pretty songs.
No one could find anything that would make
Prince Dimple happy that day until mother
came upstairs with a little box in her hands.
"See what I have brought you, Prince Dim-
ple!" she said. "Is n't this a nice present?"
Prince Dimple did not say anything. He
was not quite sure yet whether it was nice or






And his Cracker Animals.


not. He thought he would wait and see what
it was first. Mother untied the pink ribbon,
and let him lift the cover off; and then his face
dimpled into a smile in spite of the bad little
tooth, for the box was full of such pretty things.
Prince Dimple did love animals so very, very
much, and the box was full of such pretty little
animals. He forgot that his tooth hurt him
then, and he wanted to sit down in his little
chair and put the animals one by one on his
little table. There were so many of them, and
Prince Dimple knew almost every one. There
was a little camel with a hump on its back,
there was a big elephant with a long trunk, and
there was a little goat with horns. Why, he
could find all the animals that were in his
Noah's Ark in this box! It was very nice,
indeed; and he was very happy as he took each
one out and looked at it before he laid it down.
They would not stand up as the Noah's Ark
animals did, though Prince Dimple could not






Prince Dinmle


see why they did not, for they each had four
legs. Sometimes when some of the animals'
legs had come off, they could not stand up
unless mother fastened a pin in for a leg; but
these animals all had four legs, so they might
have been expected to stand up. Perhaps it was
because they were all in a row, instead of one
on each corner like his Noah's Ark animals.
However, it did not make much difference, for
Prince Dimple could make them march in a row
lying down on their sides. By and by Aunt
Anna came into the room.
"Why, where did Prince Dimple get the pretty
crackers ?" she asked. Are they sweet?"
And what do you think Aunt Anna did?
Such a very dreadful thing; but of course she
would not have done it for anything if she had
had on her glasses, and had seen that they were
animals and not crackers. She took up the
elephant, and bit his trunk right off! Of course
Prince Dimple cried; and he cried so hard that






And his Cracker Animals. 49

Aunt Anna was quite frightened. Any one
would have supposed that she had taken a little
taste of Prince Dimple instead of the elephant,
from the noise he made.
At last she found out what the matter was.
She had eaten a piece of the elephant, and
that was what made Prince Dimple feel so
badly; for what little boy would like to have
his Aunt Anna eat up his pretty animals,
and call them crackers? Crackers were round
or square, he knew that; and so would Aunt
Anna if she had only had her glasses on.
Aunt Anna was very sorry when she found out
what she had done, as Prince Dimple knew
she would be, and she took the elephant away
and mended him as well as she could; and she
was very careful after that always to put her
glasses on when she looked at Prince Dimple's
animals, so that she would not make any more
mistakes.
Prince Dimple always shook his head and
4







50 Prince Dimnle

scolded, if any one called his little animals
crackers; and though he played with them for
a long, long time, he neyer knew that they were
crackers after all, if they were in the shape of
animals.






Playing Choo-Choo Cars. 51





CHAPTER TWELFTH.

PLAYING CHOO-CHOO CARS.

PRINCE DIMPLE liked to play choo-choo
cars very much indeed. He had some
little tin choo-choo cars, and sometimes he
would play with those; but what he liked best
was to have Mary put his little rocking-chair
and his little red chair and his little stool all
in a row, and then he would play that they
were choo-choo cars.
He used to go to Boston in the choo-choo
cars, and sometimes he played that he went to
Philadelphia to see his grandmamma.
Of course he did not go all alone in the
choo-choo cars; he always took Jack with him,
for Jack liked this game just as much as
Prince Dimple did himself. Of course he had







Prince Dimple


never said anything about it, but he always sat
up so straight and looked so happy that it was
plain to be seen that he enjoyed it, too.
Once in a while he would get dizzy and slip
out of the chair, and then there might have
been a dreadful accident and he might have
been run over by the choo-choo cars if Mary
had not been at hand to pick him up.
It always made Prince Dimple laugh very
heartily when he saw Jack tumbling out of the
chair; and sometimes he used to give him a
sly little push, so that he would fall out.
Jack did not know that Prince Dimple did
this, for of course he could not see what was
going on behind him; and no doubt he used to
wonder why he got so many tumbles.
Sometimes Prince Dimple took Jerry and
sometimes he took Dapple in the choo-choo cars
with him. Dapple was always ready for a ride.
He held his head up very high and looked quite
proud, because he was in the first car of all.






Playing Choo-Choo Cars.


Mary would ring the bell, and then the choo-
choo cars would start, and Prince Dimple and
Jerry and Dapple would all go to Boston
together.
Squeaky Sam did not often go to Boston, for
he was so round and so fat that he could not
sit up straight; and no one would care to go
in the choo-choo cars lying down on his side,
unless he went in a sleeping-car, which Prince
Dimple did not know anything about.
You can see what a fine time Prince Dimple
and Jack and Dapple are having as the cars
go along on their way to Boston.
Don't you wish you were going too?







54 Prince Dimple


CHAPTER THIRTEENTH.

PRINCE DIMPLE AND THE DOCTOR.

P RINCE DIMPLE had been sick for a very
long time. He did not know it. He only
knew that he did not care to play horse or
choo-choo cars any more, and that he liked best
of all to have mother rock him and sing to
him all day and tell him pretty stories; but
every one else knew that Prince Dimple was
sick.
He had such very nice times that I do not
think that he would have cared if he had
known that he was sick. His own dear doctor
came to see him every day, and another kind
doctor came, and by and by a doctor came all
the way in the choo-choo cars to see if he






And the Doctor.


could not help to make little Prince Dimple
well.
Prince Dimple had a great many nice drives,
too, and he liked that very much. He used to
go with mother up on the mountains where he
could see all the houses looking like the little
houses in his toy village down below him, and
he could see ever so many mooly cows and
baa-baas. Everybody tried so hard to make
little Prince Dimple happy that he had just as
nice times as when he could run around and
play with his toys, so of course he did n't mind
being sick a bit.
It must be mother that was sick, he told
Jack, for sometimes she looked so sorry that
even his little frog noise would hardly make
her happy again, although he would make it
on purpose to make her smile.
By and by the doctor said that Prince Dimple
must go away on the choo-choo cars, and see
if that would not make him well.






56 Prince Dimple

Prince Dimple was very glad when he heard
that, for he had never been on the real choo-
choo cars, although he had often watched them
go by, and he liked to watch the gates go up
and down as they did when the cars went
past.
So mother put Jack and Jerry and ever so
many other things into a trunk, and then
mother and papa and Aunt Anna and Prince
Dimple and Mary all set out upon their travels.
Of course Jack and Jerry went too, but that
did not seem to count," because they were all
packed up in a trunk and did not know where
they were going.






Going on Ite Choo-Choo Cars. 57


CHAPTER FOURTEENTH.

GOING ON THE CHOO-CHOO CARS.

PRINCE DIMPLE was very glad when he
was down at the station in mother's arms,
waiting for the choo-choo cars to come and
take him. The engine that Prince Dimple had
watched for so often came flying down the track,
with its big, shiny eye in front, drawing the cars
after it; and it made such a noise when it saw
Prince Dimple that he was almost frightened.
In just another moment, however, he was in
the cars, and then of course he was not frightened
any more. It was very nice in the cars. There
were so many nice little seats, and every little
seat had a window, which was just what Prince
Dimple liked, because he liked to look out of the
window.







Prince Dimple


The whistle blew and the bell began to ring,
just as Prince Dimple had heard it a great many
times before, and then the very strangest thing of
all happened.
He told Jack all about it, afterwards; and Jack
was so sorry that he had been packed away in
the trunk so that he could not have seen it too.
Always before when Prince Dimple had come
down to the station to see the cars, when the
engine had rung its bell the train had begun
to move off; and of course that was what
Prince Dimple had expected would happen this
time.
But it did n't. It was very strange, but just
exactly the other thing happened this time.
Instead of the train moving, everything else
began to move. The station went sliding off as
if it had skates on and was out on the ice. The
houses followed, sliding along as smoothly as if
they were skating too, and then the trees and the
fields and the fences all followed them.






Going on the Choo-Choo Cars.


It was no wonder that Prince Dimple was
astonished, and that his blue eyes opened just as
wide as they could. Mother did not seem to be
surprised; but then she was looking at Prince
Dimple instead of out of the window, which
might have accounted for her not noticing it.
Oh! exclaimed Prince Dimple, at last, point-
ing out of the window; but mother thought he
was looking at some mooly cows which were just
going past the window so fast that Prince Dimple
hardly had time to look at them before they were
gone, and so she did not understand that Prince
Dimple was trying to ask her why everything
was running away in this remarkable fashion.
It made Prince Dimple sleepy, at last, to watch
this long procession of trees and houses and
mooly cows and fields and horses that kept on
going past the window, and after he had had a
drink of milk he put his head down on Mary's
shoulder and went to sleep, and did not wake up
for a long, long time.






60 Prince Dimple


CHAPTER FIFTEENTH.

AT THE SEASHORE.

\[HEN Prince Dimple woke up at last, he
found that they had come to the end of
all the trees and the fields and the mooly cows.
There was not anything more left to go past
the windows except a long, long strip of white
sand, and more water than Prince Dimple had
ever thought about before.
Why, it was a great deal more than enough to
fill his little bath-tub full to the very top, and
whatever the water had been put in must be very
full indeed, for it kept splashing over the edges
and running up on the sand, just as his bath-tub
ran over once, when it was too full. Prince
Dimple wondered a little where all the water
and all the sand came from; but he was too







At the Seashore.


tired to think much about it, and so he put his
head down again on mother's shoulder and kept
his eyes shut while they all rode away in a
carriage.
When the carriage stopped and Prince Dimple
opened his eyes, he expected that he would see
his own house; but that was miles and miles
away, of course, and this was a house that he
had never seen before. Poor little homesick
Prince Dimple began to cry, for he was so tired
and he wanted his own nursery and his own
cribsie-bye; but in a very little more time than
it takes to tell about it he was up stairs in a
room with ever so many windows looking out
towards the water, and mother was unpacking
the trunk. Out came Jack and out came Jerry,
and then out came something else, that Prince
Dimple had not known was in the trunk. His
own little table was in the bottom of the trunk,
with its legs all doubled up under it. Mother
unfolded its legs and put it down before Prince







Prince Diomzle


Dimple; and then he began to smile again, for it
looked so much like his own nursery to have his
own little table, and Jack and Jerry.


"IY


HE LIKED TO POINT OUT TO MARY THE WHITE SAIL-BOATS
AND GREAT STEAMERS.

In a very little while tired little Prince Dimple
was fast asleep and in his new cribsie-bye, while
the waves down on the beach sang a soft little
song to him all night long.







At tce Seashore.


The seashore was quite the nicest place in the
world. That was what Prince Dimple told Jack,
the next morning, when he was having a ride
along the broad board walk that was so long that
it did not seem to have any end.
It was so beautiful to watch the waves come
splashing and dashing in, making soap-suds
where they came up on the beach, and then run-
ning back again just to come up once more.
Prince Dimple thought he would never get
tired of watching them; and that was only the
beginning of all the wonderful things that he
saw here at the seashore.
He liked to point out to Mary the white sail-
boats and great steamers that went past, and he
wondered very much where they could all be
going, for Prince Dimple could not see anything
but water everywhere.







Prince Dimple


CHAPTER SIXTEENTH.

DOWN ON THE BEACH.

N a very few days the roses began to come
back into Prince Dimple's little cheeks, and
he felt like playing again. Sometimes, instead
of riding in his carriage, he would like to go
down and sit in the beautiful sand, and let it run
through his little fingers, and toss it around.
He had a little pail and shovel, as all the other
babies did; and it was great fun to fill his little
pail full to the top, and then tip it over and fill
it up again.
Prince Dimple had a little white sun-bonnet;
and he liked it better than any of his other
caps, because the wind could not blow it off. As
soon as his blue eyes opened in the morning he
wanted his little sun-bonnet and his sacque, and






Down on the Beach.


then he was ready to go down on the beach.
Sometimes he had his drink of milk down on
the sand, and Prince Dimple thought that was
a very nice place to eat one's breakfast.
There were beautiful little shells hidden away
in the sand, and sometimes Prince Dimple could
find enough to almost fill his little pail. Prince
Dimple was very sure that the seashore must be
babyland, for there were so many babies every-
where. There would be a procession of little
carriages going along the board walk, and dotted
all over the beach were more babies, while out
on the long piers that stretched out into the
water were more little carriages with babies in
them. Up at one end of the beach was a tall
lighthouse, with a light in the top. Prince Dim-
ple knew it was a lighthouse as soon as he saw
it, for he had a picture of a lighthouse in one of
his books.
It is very nice to have picture books, as Prince
Dimple told Jack, for then when you go on your
5







66 Prince Dimple

travels you know what everything is. Prince
Dimple liked to ride all the way up to the light-
house, and throw kisses to it for good-night. He
used to wonder a great deal about it; but no
one but Jack ever knew all his thoughts. He
wondered what made it so tall and so high; and
he wondered whether it ever laid down to rest
when it was tired, or whether it stood up so
straight and slim all night as well as all day.
He was sorry for it, because it stood a little way
back from the beach, and so it could never come
down to play in the beautiful sand, although it
was so tall it could look out over the water, and
perhaps see to the other side of it.
Prince Dimple saw its bright light flash out
one night, just as he was going to sleep; and he
wished that he could have seen the long ladder
that the lamp-lighter must have had when he
lighted the lighthouse. I think a lamp-lighter
would have had a long climb to light the lamp
at the top of the lighthouse; don't you?






And his Rock.


CHAPTER SEVENTEENTH.

PRINCE DIMPLE AND HIS ROCK.

T HERE was a big rock down on the part of
the beach where Prince Dimple liked to
play. It was all covered with sea-weed, and it
was a very nice place to get up on and rest,
when Prince Dimple was tired of digging in
the sand.
Sometimes Prince Dimple sat on it while he
watched the bathers jumping and splashing about
in the water. It was great fun to see them in
the blue and red suits, with the water dashing
all about them, and sometimes rushing right over
their heads and knocking them down.
Prince Dimple did not think that he would
like it himself, for there was more water than
6






Prince Dimple


he liked when he took a bath, but it was great
fun to watch other people.
Every day his big rock went into the water
and took a bath too; though it did not put on
any bathing suit, of course, because it had so
much sea-weed on.
Perhaps it was not usual for rocks to put on
bathing suits, any way, when they took baths.
Prince Dimple was not sure about this, for he
did not know of any other rock but this one
that went into the water every day.
Jack was quite surprised when he heard that
the rock took a bath every day; but the very
next time Prince Dimple went out in his car-
riage, he showed Jack that the rock was in the
water. The little waves were splashing up
around it, and it had gone quite a good way
out from the beach. It was not jumping about
as the bathers were, but then no one would
expect a rock to jump about.















































PRINCE DIMPLE AND HIS SEAT BY THE SEA.






And his Rock.


Perhaps the water has come up to the rock
instead of the rock going down into the water,"
said Jack; but Prince Dimple laughed.
That was very stupid in Jack. Did not Prince
Dimple see people going into the water every
day, so why should not his rock have done the
same thing?
One day he was sitting on his little cushion
in a little cubby-hole in the rock when the wind
began to blow. It made Prince Dimple's yellow
curls dance as if they were sunbeams, and he
had to hold on to his shovel with all his might
to keep it from being blown away.
In another moment the mischievous wind
caught Mary's hat, and blew it away up the
beach. Prince Dimple thought that was very
funny, and he laughed and laughed while he
watched Mary chasing her hat. It would not
stop and wait for her, but it kept rolling along
just as fast as she could run.






70 Prince Dimple

At last a boy stopped it, and then Mary came
running back again to Prince Dimple. He used
to wish that Mary's hat would blow off again;
but after that when the wind blew she always
held it on, and so of course the wind could not
play such a mischievous trick again.







Ancd his Toy Closets.


CHAPTER EIGHTEENTH.

PRINCE DIMPLE AND HIS TOY CLOSETS.

SNE of the very nice things about the sea-
shore was that there were so many nice
toy closets here and there along the board walk.
The very first time Prince Dimple went down
on the board walk, he found one of these nice
toy closets. There were a great many more toys
in it than in his toy closet at home, although
he had a great many toys. There were shelves
and shelves of toys in this closet, and little
tables full of them besides. I could not begin
to tell what all the toys were, for it would take
so long; but Prince Dimple thought that they
were quite the most beautiful toy closets he had
ever seen.
Of course the toys were there for him to take







Prince Dimple


one, he thought; and so he stretched out his
hand for a pretty windmill that went round and
round, as Prince Dimple liked to see things go.
The man who took care of the toy closet was
very willing to hand it to Prince Dimple; and
he was so pleased with it, and so busy watch-
ing it go round and round as he held it toward
the wind, that he did not see Aunt Anna give
the man some money.
By the next day Prince Dimple had begun
to get tired of the windmill, and he saw a little
box with a man turning a crank and letting sand
run down, that he thought he would like better.
Papa was with him this time, so the nice man
in the toy closet gave it to Prince Dimple just
as willingly as he had given him the windmill.
The next day Prince Dimple saw a little ele-
phant that nodded its head and looked as if it
was saying "How do you do, Prince Dimple?"
It was a pretty little elephant, prettier than
any Prince Dimple had; and he thought he







And his Toy Closets. 73

would like it very much indeed. Mary gave
the man some money, and so he gave the ele-
phant to Prince Dimple, as he had given him
all the other nice things.
"You are the best customer I have, Prince
Dimple," the man said one day; but Prince
Dimple only looked at him and smiled. He
did not know what the man was talking about.
Not even Jack knew that these nice toy closets
were stores, and that the man might not have
been so very kind to Prince Dimple if some one
had not always been ready to give him some
pennies when Prince Dimple wanted anything.
Prince Dimple liked the sand better than
anything else, though, after all; and so he very
soon was ready to pass these beautiful toy closets
without wanting anything more, which was a
fortunate thing for everybody's pocket, except
the man who kept the toy store.







74 Prince Dim}57e.


CHAPTER NINETEENTH.

THE INLET.

T HERE was one little trip that Prince Dim-
ple liked to take .very much. He liked to
go up to the inlet with mother, and watch the
beautiful ships with their white sails, that rocked
gently as the water touched their sides. Some-
times the sails were all folded up, as if they had
gone bye-bye; and sometimes they were spread
out, and looked like the white wings of the
sea-birds.
Sometimes a ship was just going to sail away,
and then it was great fun for Prince Dimple to
watch the sailors pull the anchor up, and hoist
the sails. The same wind that tossed Prince
Dimple's curls would fill the big sails, and then
the ships would sail away, sometimes fast and







7he Ird.


sometimes slow; but they would always go out
of sight at last. There were so many pretty
things to see at the inlet, that it was no wonder
that Prince Dimple always was delighted when
mother said, Come, Prince Dimple, we will take
a ride up to the inlet."
There was the nice ride in the open cars, to
begin with. Jack never went, because he was too
much trouble to carry, especially when mother
had Prince Dimple to carry. Prince Dimple
never could tell Jack just what kind of cars he
went in, because he was never sure himself. He
knew they were not horse cars, for there were
not any horses to draw them; and they were not
choo-choo cars, because there was not any engine
to whistle, and as Prince Dimple did not know
about any other kind of cars, of course he could
not tell Jack about them. If Jack had gone him-
self, perhaps he could have told Prince Dimple
that they were electric cars; but you see he never
went.






76 Prince Dimple.

Besides the big ships, there were ever so many
little boats tied up by the wharf, or anchored just
a little way out in the water.







",-: ..... "









IN A BOAT.

"Don't you want a boat ride, little boy?"
asked one of the sailors one day; and Prince
Dimple clapped his hands.
Of course he wanted a ride in one of those
lovely boats. He took Mary with him, for he






The Inlet. 77

knew she would like a ride, too; and then the
sailor pushed them out a little way from shore.
Prince Dimple held the oar, and as it swayed
around in the water he thought that he was really
rowing the boat. He did not know that the boat
was tied up to the shore, and that when the old
sailor was ready he could pull it in again. Not a
bit of it. He was quite sure that he was taking
Mary out for a row, and that his little hands were
holding the oar and guiding the boat.
This was quite the best fun that Prince Dimple
had ever had; and he shouted with delight when
the water dashed up against the sides of the boat,
and splashed even into his face.
He had a fine time that morning, and when he
went home he told Jack all about it.







78 Prince Dimple


CHAPTER TWENTIETH.

PRINCE DIMPLE AND THE POLLY.

PRINCE DIMPLE was riding along the
board walk one day in his carriage, when
he heard a very harsh voice say,-
"How d'ye do? How d'ye do?"
Prince Dimple thought that some one was
speaking to him, and he looked around to see
who it was.
They were in front of a place where it was
always dinner time. Prince Dimple had been
past there a great many times, and he could
always see the tables ready for dinner; and
almost always there was some one eating. He
did not know that it was a restaurant, and he
often wondered what made people so hungry in
that house.






And Polly.


Sometimes a man in a white apron would be
standing near the door; but this time there was
no one there who could have spoken to Prince
Dimple.
"Did you hear Polly talking to you, Prince
Dimple?" asked Mary, as she stopped the car-
riage when Prince Dimple began to look for the
voice.
Prince Dimple shook his head. He did not
see Polly, or any one else. "Look!" and Mary
showed him a round table, swinging from a
hook over the door. There was a tall pole on
it, with little perches on it here and there; and a
big red and green bird was climbing up and down
these perches.
SPolly must have been very much afraid that
she would fall, for she held on with her beak as
well as her claws as she climbed.
Sometimes her head would hang down, and
sometimes she would be right side up; but she
did not seem to -care which way she was.







8o Prince DimYle

Polly saw Prince Dimple looking at her, and
she stopped climbing long enough to say,--
"How d'ye do? How d'ye do?"
Prince Dimple had never heard a bird talk
before, and he hardly knew what to make of it.
He had a cracker in his hand, and Polly must
have seen it, for the next thing she said was, -
"Polly wants a cracker! Polly wants a
cracker!"
"Shall we give Polly your cracker, and see
her eat it?" asked Mary; and as Prince Dim-
ple was very willing, she tossed it up to the
bird.
Polly was very glad to get the cracker. She
held it in one claw, and stood upon the other
while she ate it.
After that Prince Dimple felt very well ac-
quainted with Polly, and every time he went to
ride in that direction he would take a cracker to
her. Sometimes he took her peanuts; and it
was even more fun to see her eat these, because







Andl Polly. 81

she had to crack the shells and take the nuts
out before she could eat them.
Prince Dimple liked Polly very much, and
he made up his mind that he would take her
home with him when he should go back to his
own house.






Prznzce Dimjhle


CHAPTER TWENTY-FIRST.

PRINCE DIMPLE AND THE MERRY-GO-ROUND.

I MUST not forget to tell you about the very
strangest of all the strange things that
Prince Dimple saw when he was on his travels.
One day he was going along the board walk,
when he came to a large, routed house; and he
heard some music, which he thought was very
pretty. It was very easy to look into this house,
for it was almost all doors; and when Mary
stopped his carriage so that he might see, he
could look in and see all that was going on.
It was a Noah's ark. Prince Dimple knew
that just as soon as he looked in; but the strange
part of it was that the animals were all march-
ing around in a circle. His Noah's ark anirrials
had never done that; but then it was probably
because they were too little.






And the Merry-go-round.


The animals in this Noah's ark were very big;
a great deal larger than Prince Dimple himself.
There was a beautiful giraffe, holding its head so
high that it looked as if it might touch the top
of the house if it grew a little taller. There were
prancing horses, the very prettiest that Prince
Dimple had ever seen, prettier than Dapple or
Jerry even. There was a great big lion, with a
shaggy mane and yellow eyes. Prince Dimple
did not like his looks very much, for his mouth
was open a little way, and showed some very
fierce teeth. There was a goat with horns, and
a camel with a hump. It was a very nice
Noah's ark, indeed.
But there was something else that was strange
about this Noah's ark, besides their being able
to march about. Each animal had a saddle on,
and children were riding on them. This was the
nicest part of all; and when Prince Dimple saw
what fun it was, he made up his mind that he
must have a ride, too.






Prince Dimple


Whenever the animals began to move, the
beautiful music played; and Prince Dimple
wished that he had such a Noah's ark at home.
He would ride and listen to beautiful music all
day long, if he only had.
Do you want to ride on the merry-go-round,
darling?" asked mother. Of course Prince Dim-
ple did; and the very next thing that happened
was that Prince Dimple was sitting on one of the
prancing horses, with Mary standing beside him
to keep the horse from running away, all ready
for a ride.
When the music began and the horse started
off, he was a little tiny bit frightened, and looked
back at mother as if he wanted to get off, but
very soon he was enjoying it as much as any-
body; and after that I need not tell you that he
very often went to the merry-go-round and had
a ride.







And his Letter. 85





CHAPTER TWENTY-SECOND.

PRINCE DIMPLE AND HIS LETTER.

E VERY now and then there would be a rainy
day, and Prince Dimple did not like that
at all. It was bad enough at home when he
could not go out in his carriage, but then he
had so many playthings at home that it would
take him nearly all day to play with each one
for a little while.
One day he thought he would write a letter
to papa, as mother was doing. She seemed to
enjoy it very much, so it must be fun.
Mother knew what he wanted to do, so she
gave him a big piece of white paper and a
pencil.
He made a great many marks on it, and
every now and then he would hold the paper






86 Pri'ce Dimple

up and look at it, as if he was reading what
he had written.
When the letter was all done he wanted mother
to put it in an envelope just as she did her own
and send it to papa. Prince Dimple helped put
the stamp on when the envelope was directed,
and by and by, when it stopped raining, he went
with Mary to drop it into the letter-box.
No one but Jack knew what Prince Dimple
had written, for no one else was clever enough
to read Prince Dimple's writing; but it was a
very interesting letter.
Prince Dimple had told his dear papa how
much he loved him, and how he hoped the choo-
choo cars would bring him down to the seashore
very soon indeed. He told papa all about his
Polly and the merry-go-round; and he asked
him to get just such a Noah's Ark for him
when he came home.
Perhaps it was just as well that papa could
not read Prince Dimple's letter; for of course he






And his Letter. 87

would have tried to get his dear little boy what
he wanted, and I am sure I don't know where
Prince Dimple would have kept a merry-go-
round at home.
If he had kept it in the nursery, then I am
very sure that mother would have had to find
some other place to keep Prince Dimple, for
there would not have been room for them both
there.






88 Prince Dimple


CHAPTER TWENTY-THIRD.

PRINCE DIMPLE AND THE GOAT.

O NE morning Prince Dimple was down on
the beach playing in the sand, when he
saw a black goat coining, drawing. a little wagon
after it. Prince Dimple thought that it would
be fine fun to have a ride in this little wagon,
almost as much fun as riding upon the animals
in the merry-go-round; and he coaxed mother
to give him a ride.
"I don't think you would like the goat, dar-
ling," mother said, but Prince Dimple was very
sure that he would.
When the goat come to the place where mother
and Prince Dimple and Mary were sitting, mother
asked the little boy who was driving if he would
let Prince Dimple have a ride.

























Ia -r -.. --


--._* --

't
-. ,. ...--'ef
--- '-" i,
t...


Fb ~iV


*a *>


PRINCE DIMPLE AND THE GOAT WAGON.






.dnd the Goal.


He was very willing; so when he got out,
Mary lifted Prince Dimple into the seat and
gave him the reins.
Mary held him so that he could not tumble out,
for even if the sand is soft one does not like to
tumble out of a wagon when one is having a ride.
Prince Dimple was delighted at first, and
shouted when the goat began to go, for he
thought it was great fun. All at once some-
thing happened which quite spoiled the pleas-
ure of the ride for Prince Dimple. The goat
stood still for a moment, and then he sneezed
with all his might. I suppose the poor goat
had taken cold, and so he had to sneeze, and of
course he did not know that it would frighten
Prince Dimple.
Oh, oh," cried Prince Dimple in a fright, for
he did not know what had happened. He did
not know but that the goat was going to fly to
pieces or have some other dreadful thing happen
to him after such a noise as that.







90 Prince Dimple

"Don't be frightened, Prince Dimple," said
Mary. "The goat was only sneezing. He will
take you a nice ride now."
But Prince Dimple .did not want to ride with
the goat any more, and he cried to get out of
the wagon.
So Mary took him out, and Prince Dimple
went back to his play in the nice sand while
the boy went off with the goat.
He was a big boy, so of course he was not
afraid of anything that the goat did; but Prince
Dimple made up his mind that he did not want
any more rides in a goat wagon.
He was very willing to have the goat go away
down the beach out of sight, and he did not
want to have him come back any more.
The goat in the merry-go-round was a great
deal nicer, because it did not sneeze just when
one was having a nice ride.







On his Travels. 91





CHAPTER TWENTY-FOURTH.

PRINCE DIMPLE ON HIS TRAVELS.

pRINCE DIMPLE was going on his travels
again. He had been to say good-by to
Polly, and the merry-go-round, and his dear light-
house; and he had said good-by to all his new
friends in the house; and Jack and Jerry and his
little table had all been put into mother's trunk
again, so Prince Dimple was ready to start.
This was a very long journey for such a little
boy, for he went in the choo-choo cars for a long
time, and then in a great big boat,--so big that
Prince Dimple would have thought that it was
a house if he had not heard mother call it a
boat.
Prince Dimple told Jack where he slept that
night. I am sure you could never guess, so I







Prince Dimple


will have to tell you. He told Jack that he
slept on a shelf in a little pantry, and mother
slept on the shelf over his head.
It was no wonder that Jack laughed when he
heard that. To be sure Jack had slept on the
shelf in the toy closet sometimes; but Prince
Dimple had never been used to that. He had
always gone to sleep in his cribsie-bye.
It was a very nice place to sleep, if it was a
shelf; and the boat rocked a little all night, so
that Prince Dimple slept like a top, and dreamed
of all sorts of beautiful things.
How do you like sleeping in a berth in a
state-room?" mother asked Prince Dimple the
next morning; but he did not quite understand
what she meant, so he only kissed her for answer.
A kiss was a very good answer to any ques-
tion, Prince Dimple knew, for mother had often
kissed him when he had tried to ask her
questions. Perhaps Jack might have explained
matters to Prince Dimple if he had known about






On his Travels.


them; but you see he was all packed up in the
trunk, so he did not know anything at all about
what was going on while Prince Dimple was
taking this long journey.
After they left the boat, then came the choo-
choo cars again; and Prince Dimple was just
beginning to get very tired again, when they
came to the water. It was very strange that
water was at the end of every journey.
This water was not like the water at the sea-
shore. It was not so full, to begin with; for
instead of the water running up on the sand, as
it did at the seashore, the trees and grass rose
high around it on every side. Where had all
the rest of the water gone to? Prince Dimple
wondered.




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