• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Series title: The roundabout...
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Preface
 Table of Contents
 List of Illustrations
 Half Title
 The Jewetts' new home
 One of the glories of Tokio
 A visit to a lacquer-maker
 How the Japanese make Chinese...
 At a fan-maker's
 Among the porcelain-makers
 A concert at the college of...
 A visit to some sacred places
 A Japanese dry-goods store
 Harvesting the rice
 A ramble in the streets
 Preparing for new-year's festi...
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Wonderful city of Tokio
Title: Young Americans in Tokio
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00081876/00001
 Material Information
Title: Young Americans in Tokio
Series Title: Roundabout books
Uniform Title: Wonderful city of Tokio
Alternate Title: Young Americans in Tokyo
Physical Description: xiii, 301 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Greey, Edward, 1835-1888
Charles E. Brown & Co ( Publisher )
S.J. Parkhill & Co ( Printer )
Publisher: Charles E. Brown & Co.
Place of Publication: Boston
Manufacturer: S.J. Parkhill & Co.
Publication Date: c1892
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Parent and child -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Friendship -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Temples -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Farm life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Costume -- Juvenile fiction -- Japan   ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Juvenile fiction -- Tokyo (Japan)   ( lcsh )
Juvenile fiction -- Japan   ( lcsh )
Family stories -- 1892   ( local )
Travelogue storybooks -- 1892   ( local )
Bldn -- 1892
Genre: Family stories.   ( local )
Travelogue storybooks   ( local )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Edward Greey.
General Note: Originally published under title: The wonderful city of Tokio. Boston : Lee and Shepard, 1883.
General Note: Title page printed in green and blue.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00081876
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002223611
notis - ALG3862
oclc - 37651095

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Series title: The roundabout books
        Page i
        Page ii
    Frontispiece
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Title Page
        Page v
        Page vi
    Preface
        Page vii
        Page viii
    Table of Contents
        Page ix
        Page x
    List of Illustrations
        Page xi
        Page xii
        Page xiii
        Page xiv
    Half Title
        Page xv
        Page xvi
    The Jewetts' new home
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    One of the glories of Tokio
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
    A visit to a lacquer-maker
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
    How the Japanese make Chinese ink
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
    At a fan-maker's
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
    Among the porcelain-makers
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
    A concert at the college of music
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
        Page 206
        Page 207
        Page 208
        Page 209
        Page 210
        Page 211
        Page 212
    A visit to some sacred places
        Page 213
        Page 214
        Page 215
        Page 216
        Page 217
        Page 218
        Page 219
        Page 220
        Page 221
        Page 222
        Page 223
        Page 224
        Page 225
        Page 226
        Page 227
        Page 228
        Page 229
        Page 230
        Page 231
        Page 232
        Page 233
        Page 234
        Page 235
        Page 236
        Page 237
        Page 238
        Page 239
        Page 240
        Page 241
        Page 242
        Page 243
        Page 244
        Page 245
        Page 246
        Page 247
        Page 248
        Page 249
        Page 250
    A Japanese dry-goods store
        Page 251
        Page 252
        Page 253
        Page 254
        Page 255
        Page 256
        Page 257
        Page 258
        Page 259
        Page 260
    Harvesting the rice
        Page 261
        Page 262
        Page 263
        Page 264
        Page 265
        Page 266
        Page 267
        Page 268
        Page 269
        Page 270
        Page 271
        Page 272
        Page 273
    A ramble in the streets
        Page 274
        Page 275
        Page 276
        Page 277
        Page 278
        Page 279
        Page 280
        Page 281
        Page 282
        Page 283
        Page 284
        Page 285
        Page 286
        Page 287
        Page 288
        Page 289
        Page 290
    Preparing for new-year's festivities
        Page 291
        Page 292
        Page 293
        Page 294
        Page 295
        Page 296
        Page 297
        Page 298
        Page 299
        Page 300
        Page 301
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text
































WIN.1






















































The Baldwin Lbrar)

/Di ^ cEmsy


~ __~_________111_1__~n__~~~i-~I_____







HIRK cVN )ABoVT OKS



I'D DRIffNG OID THEWORLD.
2 A VOYAGE IN THE SUNBEAM.
OUR BOYS IN INDIA.
OUF( BOYS IN CHINA. C\
*5 YouNG AMERICANS IN JAPAN,
YOUNG AMERICANS IN TOKI0.
7 YOUiG AMERICANS IN YEZO.
THE FALL OF SEBASTOPOL.
FIGHTING THE SARACENS.
STHEYOUNG COLONISTS.

./ .< ..
CD^ ^^
















. II' I II


CONCERT BY JAPANESE LADIES.








HEi VNABoVT oo(S


NOUN ----- --
:-= .

----= =.



BY
E' .DWARD GREEY"
AUTHOR OF
YO UNG AMERICANS -N JAPAN
YOUNG AMERICANS IN YEZO "
BLUEJACKETS ETC.
S LLUSTRATED-


BOSTON,
CHARLES E.BROWN & Co.
l .. ..












































Copyright, 1892,

BY CHARLES E. BROWN & Co.





































S. J. PARKHILL & CO., PRINTERS
BOSTON














PREFACE.



The kind manner in which the Young Americans in Japan was
received by the press and public, has induced me to write a sequel to the
story, and to give my friends some further insight into the thoughts,
manners, and customs of the people of the Land of the Rising Sun.
A year ago I revisited the Wonderful City of Tokio, witnessed the
scenes I have described in this book, renewed my acquaintance with
some old friends, and made many new ones. Everywhere I found
earnest students, anxious to be more thoroughly understood by my coun-
trymen, and to adopt the better portion of our civilization.
The Japanese have a quaint superstition that on New Year's Eve
the Takara-bune (treasure-ship), manned by the Seven Gods of Luck,
and laden with all good things, enters every harbor. That this fortu-
nate craft may come to each of you, is the earnest wish of


EDWARD GREEY.


















CONTENTS.


PAGE


THE JEWETTS' NEW HOME
ONE OF THE GLORIES OF TOKIO
A VISIT TO A LACQUER-MAKER
HOW THE JAPANESE MAKE CHINESE INK.
AT A FAN-MAKER'S .
AMONG THE PORCELAIN-MAKERS
A CONCERT AT THE COLLEGE OF MUSIC
A VISIT TO SOME SACRED PLACES
A JAPANESE DRY-GOODS STORE
HARVESTING THE RICE .
A RAMBLE IN THE STREETS
PREPARING FOR NEW YEAR'S FESTIVITIES


S20

S 54
83
S 104

S 157
192
213
251
261

274
291


CHAPTER
I.
II.
III.
IV.
V.
VI.


VIII.
IX.
X.
XI.
XII.
















ILLUSTRATIONS.


PAGE
Concert by Japanese Ladies, Frontispiece.
Tokio Restaurant xiv
The Front Gate of the Jewetts'
Residence I
The Morning Meal 4
O Cho (Miss Butterfly) 5
Choso, the in-riki-sha Man 6
Postman 7
A View of Fuji-yama through a
Window painted by Hokusai 8
Railways of Japan 10
Tatsu (Dragon), Huo-wo (Heavenly
Bird) and Imperial mon (crests) I
Fire in Tokio as seen from the
Bund, Yokohama 14
Mr. Asada Saving his Household
Gods 16
Fleeing from the Fire 17
A Scene on the Sidewalk, Tokio,
during a Fire 17
Profiting by the Fire .
Old Sokichi in his Storm-proof
Dress 21
Toy-maker 22
Clock-maker 23
Japanese Girl Painting her Lip
with Carmine 25
Oto's Blind Cousin, Miss Taki 26
Amateur Performers 27
A Frenchman's Idea of Japanese
Costume 31
Kuya-shonin, a Famous Priest 34
Blind Shampooer at Work 37
Flute-seller 18


Pipe-mender ...
Public Story-teller. .
Kusunoke Masashige
Bewitched by Foxes
Collector of Waste Paper
Side Entrance to the Yashiki with
Guard-house
Oto Nambo when a Boy (1871)
Boy Flying his Kite
Carpenters at Work
Riu-to (Sea-god)
Agricultural Tool-seller
Agricultural Implements
Tokio News-boy .
Tai-ko-bo .
Daimio Presenting a Samurai with
a Suit of Armor .
Street in Asakusa, Suburb of To-
kio .
Tento (Heavenly Lamp)
Travelling Toy-seller
Ascending Dragon
Paper Butterfly-seller
Whistle-seller
Gosuke, Johnnie's Jin-riki-sha Man
Mura saki shikibu, a Japanese
Poetess .
A Tokio Bank .
Strolling Musicians
Uzumd Dancing the Tokoyami
Clog Cobbler. .
Jiu-ro (God of Learning)
Singing Girl Visiting her Friends .
Stone-cutters .


PAGE
39
42
45
47
49

51-
53
55
56
58
59
61
63
65

67

69
70
71
73
74
75
77

78
80
84
87
88
90
92
94






ILLUSTRATIONS.


Ceremony of Washing the Infant
Buddha .
Sawyer at Work
Farmers Planting Rice, Suburbs of
Tokio .
Singing Girl and her Servant
Nobori .
Battledore-seller
Round-Fan seller .
Flower Peddler
Kotoro-kotoro. Game of Catching
the Child
Image of Fuku-roku-jin, Longevity
God, and his Attendant, the Stork
Charming Ants
Korean Tortoise-tamer
Coopers .
Sword Juggler
Dealer in Gold-fish
Ancient Japanese Vase
Seller of Folding Fans
Miniature Garden, belonging to
Kimura .
Hot Spring, Tono-sawa, Hakone
The Clam's Breath, Popular Jap-
anese Idea of the Cause of a
Mirage .
Wayside Tea-house
Sake'-shop .
Cake-seller
Wine Merchant's Boy
Wrestling at Eko-in, Tokio
Insect Dealer
Shinto Festival .
Tortoise-Seller's Sign
Car Used at Festivals
Bishamon, God of Swordsmen and
Scholars .
Maker of Gluten Figures
Fish Vendor .
Japanese Fishes .
Flask Made by Gi-yo-gi
Raku cha-wan (Tea-bowl of Raku
Ware).
Cha-ire (Tea-jar) Seto Ware .


PAGE

97
99

101
102
105
107
108
io8


III

113
115
119
120
122
124
126
127

129
131



133
135
137
139
143
149
150
153
156
158

159
16o
163
165
168

169
170


Fire-proof Warehouse .
Entrance to Temple Grounds, Shi-
ba, Tokio
Street Toy-seller .
Daruma .
Gaku Dance .
Modern Satsuma Incense Burner.
An Actor and his Candle-Bearer
Women Planting out Rice
Festival of the God of Water
Plasterers at Work after an Earth-
quake .
Yebis, Brother of the Sun, God of
Markets
Seller of Sea-weed Isinglass .
Florist or Gardener
Ice-water Seller
Vendor of Hats
Junks Becalmed in the Gulf of Os-
aka
Fortune-teller
Fine Carvings in Ivory .
Tomb of a Great Lord .
View of Fuji-yama, from the Sea
Figure of Silence .
Ancient Burial Place of an Em-
peror .
Temple of Dai-Butsu at Nara, con-
taining Gigantic Figure of Bud-
dha
Writing of the Present Emperor .
Mikado's Old Palace, Kioto .
Figures of Korean Dogs, placed at
the Foot of the Imperial Throne
at Kioto
Candy-maker .
Wayside Book-store
Country Inn .
Hairdresser at Work
Street Dancers
Japanese Flying Bridge
Hotei, Patron of Children
Suspension Bridge
Incense Burner, Seto Ware
Old Awata Brazier .







ILLUSTRATIONS.


PAGE
Yatsu-shiro Vase .240
Agricultural Implements 241
Tower of Nagoya Castle 243
Shinto Shrine 245
Sacred Shrines of Ise 246
Boys Fishing. 247
Coasting Junks 248
Fuji-yama, as Seen from a Railway
Car 249
Gold Fish of Nagoya Castle 250
Dry-goods Store 254
Fruit Peddler. 256
Lucky Cake Man 257
Open Air Drug Store 259
Fish Seller 262
Wet Gods 263
Peddler of Sweet Wine 264
Street Juggler 265
Ka'por 266
Harvesting Rice .267
Cutting Rice 268


Rice Cleaner .
Side View of Dai Butsu
Grave of Yoritomo, at Kamakura .
Bean Seller
Bird Catcher .
Squash Seller
Maker of Broiled Bean Curd
Vendor of a Hot Infusion of Lo-
quat Leaves
Paper Store
Japanese Wolf
Farmers Winnowing Rice
Grinding Rice
Waiter Bringing Buckwheat Ver-
micelli to a Restaurant
Man-zai
Boys at Play .
Tori-no-nachi
Pamphlet-Seller
Mr. Nambo at Prayer
Owari (the End) .













YOUNG AMERICANS IN TOKIO.
























































TOKIO RESTAURANT.



















THE FRONT GATE OF THE JEWETTS' RESIDENCE.


YOUNG AMERICANS IN TOKIO.



CHAPTER I.

THE JEWETTS' NEW HOME.
Every thing has its hour of honor. In January we bow respectfully to the
hibacki (fire-bowl, used by the Japanese as a stove); in August we ignore its
existence."
THE old mom-ban (gate-keeper) in charge of the main
entrance to the Kaga Yashiki, in Tokio, was leaning over
the gate, conversing with a jin-riki-sha man who had sum-
moned him as though upon important business.
Great Yebis what do you want?" demanded the mom-
ban. Are you aware that it is only six o'clock? Is your
honorable mother sick, or are you crazy? Nobody pays visits
at this hour in the morning."
The man bowed and replied-"Honorable mom-ban, I
know very well that you are speaking the truth, but when a





THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.


Japanese has to do with foreigners he must rise very early.
A few days before the New Year's holiday, I received a letter
from the honorable Professor Jewett who lives in your yashi-
ki. He informed me that one of his sons requires a strong
jin-riki-sza man, and ordered me to call on him as soon as
the festival was over. This is the eleventh day of the first
month, and I am here."
Thus speaking he looked up at the heavy tiled roof of the
ancient gateway, and said in a sort of aside:
"Ah! there was a time when this yashiki contained some-
thing better than a lot of foreigners."
The mom-ban twitched his mouth and said-"-You are
a nice sort of fellow to talk thus about your prospective
employers. I can tell you one thing, the Americans are good
people. They are exceedingly polite, give many presents,
and do not cause me any trouble. Professor Jewett is a very
learned man, and his wife is a most charitable lady. As to
his boys, Johnnie and Fitz, they are amiable enough to be
Japanese, and their sister is a perfect angel."
The jin-riki-ska man chuckled, and nodding, said, -
"Now, honorable Mr. Momn-ban, after that, perhaps, you will
let me in."
The keeper unfastened a bolt, swung open the heavy gate
and admitted the man, who, glancing at some horses, feeding
under a shed, demanded,-"To whom do those beautiful
creatures belong?"
"To the chief foreign doctor and his assistants," answered
the mom-ban. I suppose you know that the government
hospital is in this yashiki ? The great doctor sends
his animals here while he makes his first tour of inspec-
tion."
The visitor smiled and said, -" These foreign doctors





THE JEWETTS' NEW HOME.


are teaching our people wonderful things. Is it true they
can cut a man's head off and replace it without injuring
him?"
The mom-ban scratched his ear, looked puzzled, and re-
plied, "Well, I do not believe they can quite do that. I
think when a man's head is once off, not even a foreign doctor
can put it on again. Now go into the yaskiki, take the road
to the left, and stop at the first house that is the residence
of Professor Jewett."
The coolie passed through the little side doorway of the
great gate, and found himself in the yashiki (park-like enclos-
ure in which formerly stood the residences of the lord of Kaga
and his retainers). The ground was frozen hard and the air
was cool and bracing. Upon reaching the professor's house,
a large, one-storied dwelling surrounded with a neat bamboo
fence, he went to the rear entrance, and peeped into the ser-
vants' quarters, where he saw five Japanese men and two
women squatting on the floor, partaking of their asa-meski
(first meal) which consisted of rice, tea and fish.
He stood for several moments watching them, being too
polite to interrupt the party, who were busily engaged in
emptying their bowls with their hashi (chopsticks).
"For my part," said the kashi-ra (steward), taking his
chopsticks and picking some salted salmon from a dish, "I
think our young masters are just like nobles. I would do
anything to serve them."
Hai! hai! (yes, yes) said the others. "You are right."
A thousand pardons," murmured the jin-riki-sha man,
coughing in order to attract attention. "Is this the honorable
house of His Excellency the Professor Jewett?"
On seeing him the servants put down their bowls and
chopsticks, and bowed until their heads touched the matted




















































-T~ MORNING MEAL.






+ THE JEWETTS' NEW HOME. 5

floor, then the steward said,-" You are coi rect. This is the
place. Honoln ble Mr. Choso, I hope I ham: the pleasure of
seeing you in lie possession of good health."
The new arrival bowed and answered,-"Your solicitude
for my welfare a-i
fords me the great- "
est happiness. I A
hope your health is !
of the very best."
"Will you con-
descend to come I
in, and partake of
our miserable
fare ?" said the
chief servant. If
we had known you
were coming, we
would have pre-
pared something
more worthy of
you."
After many fine
speeches on both
sides, the jin-riki-
,-a man slipped off M
his sandals, :,
joining the gro p, O-CHO (MISS BUTTERFLY).
was assisted to the food.
While they were enjoying themselves, a maid servant
entered and said to the steward, 'Master V itz wishes to
know whether the jin-riki-ska man has come yet?"
"Yes, O-Cho San, (Miss Butterfly) he is here," replied





THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.


the steward, pointing to the tran, who was thrusting lumps of
cold boiled rice down his tlr at with his chopsticks. "When
he has refreshed himself he will pay his respects to the honor-
able O-bosan (master-boys)."
The girl waited until the coolie had several times emptied
his bowl, after which she led the way into the portion of the
house occupied by her employers, and bidding the man sta?
in the library, retired.
Although there were chairs in the apartment, the coolie
squatted on his heels and remained thus until Johnnie and Fitz
Jewett entered the room, when he bowed
his head to the ground and waited for them
to speak.
Hullo!" cried Fitz in English, "here
is one of the old timers! He will not be
so polite after he has been in my service
7 a month."
CHOSO, THE JIN-RIKI Hush! said Johnnie, then, speaking
SHA MAN.
to the man in Japanese, he demanded,-
" Are you the person to whom my father wrote ?"
The fellow bowed again and, smiling, said, -
I am Choso. Your honorable father wrote me that you
wished a strong, active, vigorous, honest person to draw your
jin-riki-sza. I can heartily recommend myself."
I should think so," said Fitz. I imagine that you do not
require any references. Well, how much wages do you ask?
I want to be taken about the city quickly."
The man stated that his pay was ten paper yen (about five
dollars a month), for which sum he would agree to be at the
boys' service from six in the morning until eight at night. Fitz
engaged Choso, and told him to go into the stable and clean
his jin-riki-sha, which had not been used for several days.






THE JEWETTS' NEW HOME.


As the coolie departed, Sallie came out of her room,
saying, -
Boys, the yu-bin hai-tatsu jin (postman) is coming up
the avenue. I hope he has a letter for me from Yokohama."
In another moment they saw the object of her remark
trotting up the pathway. He was dressed in a sort of uniform-
jacket, a bamboo hat covered
with black oiled paper, f
white trowsers, and straw
sandals, and carried a '
leather bag slung over his
shoulders.
Sallie waited until the c
man had entered the veran-
da, then, opening the front
door, inquired in Japanese,
"Anything for me, Post-
man?
The carrier squatted on
the door-mat, unlocked his
bag, produced several let-
ters, and handing them to
the girl, replied, "One is
registered; please sign the
receipt wrapped about it." POSTMAN.
She did as he requested, and in a few moments he was up and
away again, running like a deer to the next house in the
yashiki.
As Sallie sorted the letters, Fitz opened a sliding window,
and glancing out, said,-
"Look, there is Fuji-yama. It is the first time I have
seen it for several days."














_4,


A VIEW OF FUJI-YAMA THROUGH A WINDOW, PAINTED BY HOKUSAI.





THE JEWETTS' NEW HOME.


"I never behold the mountain thus, without thinking of
Hokusai's picture," gravely observed Johnnie.
"Yes, I remember," answered Sallie. The one where the
servant with the duster in his girdle, is represented as raising
the paper window and revealing the sacred mountain to the
gaze of his astonished master, who is so amazed that he upsets
his tobacco-box, and drops his pipe. Some Japanese say that
the kakimono (hanging picture) was invented by the person
depicted in Hokusai's painting."
"Oh, you little goose, Sallie Jewett!" shouted Fitz.
" The kakemono was invented by the Chinese, long before the
Japanese ever thought of it. Come, tell us from whom your
letter is."
It is from Miss Sherman," answered the girl, rapidly
scanning the note. She wishes us to go down to Yokohama
to witness the amateur theatricals. What do you say, boys?
Shall we ask father and mother?"
Yes, yes," said Fitz. "It will be good fun, particularly
as Miss Sherman is to take a part in the performance."
The professor and his wife readily gave their consent, and
that afternoon Fitz, Sallie, and Johnnie went down to 'the
Shin-bashi railway station and started for the settlement.
On board the cars they met the chief inspector of the line,
a very gentlemanly Japanese, who chatted with them about the
railways of his country, saying, -
This road has been a great success, and the one from
Kobe to Kioto is paying well. We have other railways pro-
jected. Here is a map that will show you what we intend to
do. The heavy strokes denote the lines already in existence,
the light ones those in progress of construction, and the dotted
tracks the ones we propose to build as soon as we can afford
to make the outlay."





THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.


"Your government is very poor, is it not?" coolly inquired
Fitz.
"Yes," replied the official. "The foreigners drained our
country of nearly all its gold, and made treaties that have pre-
vented us from taxing our imports. These reasons, and the
expenses of a prolonged civil war, have forced us to use paper
currency, the value of which has become greatly depre-
ciated."


RAILWAYS OF JAPAN.


"Don't you be down-hearted," said Fitz. We had the
same experience in the States. Your silver dollar has never
been worth above one hundred and eighty cents paper.
During the war our currency was very much more depreci-
ated than yours 'has ever been."
"Yes," sadly replied the gentleman; I know that, but






THE JEWETTS' NEW HOME.


you had all the resources of the finest country in the world
to back your promise to pay." Producing a one yen kinsalsu
(paper dollar) he continued: I do not see how we shall ever
redeem this in sterling."
Johnnie glanced at the bank note, then inquired, Why
do you have these emblems on your greenbacks? "


TATSU (DRAGON), HUO-WO (HEAVENLY BIRD), AND IMPERIAL MON (CRESTS).

For the same reason that you use the American eagle on
your money," answered the gentleman. "The round mon is
the official crest of the mikado, and represents the imperial
chrysanthemum; the one below it is the kiri-mon, his majesty's





THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.


private crest. The tatsu (dragon) and the huo-wo (heavenly
bird) are always used as imperial insignia."
My goodness! ejaculated Fitz. "What a queer-looking
bird the huo-wo is?"
It is not half so comical as the eagle on our new dollar,"
quietly remarked Sallie. I think the huo-wo is quite too
utterly beautiful, and, though it may be an imaginary creature,
it is very decorative."
The Japanese gentleman smiled good-humoredly, and re-
plied, -
"Yes, both of our national birds are too, too inexpressibly
precious;" adding, as the train stopped, "Here we are at
Yokohama."
In another moment they were on the platform of the depot.
The second-class Japanese passengers made a terrible clatter
with their clogs as they disembarked from the cars and moved
over the pavement, so the young Americans, who dreaded
having their toes trodden on by the wooden-shod feet, hurried
ahead and gave up their tickets at the turnstile before the
crowd came. Two minutes afterwards they were in jin-riki-
sha on the way to their friend's house upon the Bluff.
Miss Sherman gave the Jewetts a cordial welcome, and
made them feel thoroughly at home.
"What part do you take in the performance?" inquired
Fitz. "Cannot I help you?"
The young lady laughed and replied, -"I am much
obliged, but I hope I shall not require any assistance. All I
want is your kind encouragement."
Soon afterwards her father arrived from his office, and
when he had shaken hands with the visitors, told them that
every ticket for the entertainment had been sold.
About seven o'clock they summoned their jin-riki-sha






THE JEWETTS' NEW HOME.


and were trundled down to the theatre, a dismal-looking
stone building that had once been a tea-warehouse.
Precisely at eight the curtain rose upon Byron's comedy of
"Young Men and Old Acres," and Johnnie, Fitz and Sallie, for
the first time in their lives witnessed a theatrical performance.
The acting was most excellent, the ladies being particu-
larly well up in their parts, and as much at home on the stage
as professionals.
Johnnie looked on with a grave, interested face, Sallie
sympathized with all the actors in turn, and Fitz uttered his
opinions in very loud asides that greatly amused both audi-
ence and performers.
Miss Sherman took the part of the servant maid, and had
to deliver a speech ending with,-
Oh dear! I'm afraid I have failed in my efforts to please
you!"
Fitz, who had watched her with open-mouthed admiration,
rose, smiled at her encouragingly, nodded, and said, -"Don't
you worry, Miss Sherman. Keep right on and speak your
piece; you have done as well as any of them."
This caused every one in the house to laugh, and the
young lady to bow her thanks. Before their merriment had
subsided they heard shouts outside, and the Japanese crying,-
"Kaji! Kaji! Kaji! (Fire! Fire! Fire!").
The audience rose en masse, and the actors quitted the
stage in their costumes; everybody imagining that the neigh-
boring buildings were in flames. On reaching the street they
saw a brilliant light in the direction of Tokio and learned
that the conflagration was in that city.
Let us go down on the Bund," said Mr. Sherman, wrap-
ping a cloak round his daughter. If the fire is of any impor-
tance, we shall get a good view of it from there."






THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.


They found their jin-riki-ska among a mass of those
vehicles and were soon on their way to the stone sea-wall that
protects the front of the settlement of Yokohama. Looking
up the Bay of Yeddo, they beheld a line of fire which ap-
peared to. extend along the entire water front of the city of
Tokio.
"Oh! poor papa and mamma!" ejaculated Sallie. "I am
afraid they will be burnt. We must go to their rescue."
"Yes," said Fitz, whose face betrayed his anxiety. "Come,













FIRE IN TOKIO, AS SEEN FROM THE BUND, YOKOHAMA.

Johnnie, what are you looking at? We have not a moment to
lose."
John, who always took a practical view of things, calmly
regarded the lurid line, and said, -
"I do not think our parents are in any danger, still, o,
such a night as this, I reckon they would like to have us with
them. The next train does not start for nearly an hour, so it
is no use hurrying ourselves."
Do let us go at once," urged Sallie. I cannot bear to
remain here."
"The fire is crossing the river," said an English merchant






THE JEWETTS' NEW HOME.


who wore a pith helmet, and who had been attentively watch-
ing the blaze through an opera glass. It began near the
Eitai-bashi and is now burning the shipping lying near the
bridge. In a few moments it will reach a district where it
will not stop for want of old houses to feed on."
The spectators, among whom were many Chinese, regarded
the scene with the greatest interest, most of them having
friends or business connections in the capital.
"Oh, boys, do let us go home," said Sallie, in an agonized
tone. Supposing the wind changes, and the fire goes to-
wards our yashiki. You will excuse us for not staying at your
house all night, won't you, Miss Sherman?"
Certainly," replied the young lady. I think you are
quite right to return to your parents."
The crowd was so dense that the jin-riki-sha men with
difficulty forced a way for their vehicles; however, by dint of
shouting and pushing, they contrived to effect a passage and
to reach the railway depot in time for their fares to catch a
special train, which was densely packed with people anxious
to visit the fire.
This way, this way, boys," cried their friend the superin-
tendent of the line, coming to their rescue. "I have an empty
carriage which will be attached to the outgoing train. Come
across the track with me and I will give you a compartment
all to yourselves. I am going to Tokio with you."
In a few minutes they were off, travelling as fast as steam
could carry them, and within half an hour they arrived at the
Shin-bashi station.
Upon emerging on the street they beheld a young Japanese
dressed in foreign costume, minus his shoes, his feet being
shod with one sandal and one wooden clog, and his shoulders
burdened with packages secured with cord. In his right hand





THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOK[O.


he carried a Japanese paper parasol and his boots, and in his
left an American umbrella, a Japanese sword, and a pith
helmet, while on his head, was perched a tall silk hat. Upon
seeing the boys, he shouted in English,-- "I just managed to
save my household gods! I have been burnt out twice to
night. A pretty big fire, was it not? Half the city is gone."
S" Pooh! said Fitz. It is
nothing to what we have in the
States. Come, Sallie, here's a
'riki-sha for you, get in."
The young Japanese, who
had been educated at Harvard,
and had known the boys at
home, bowed as politely as
his load would allow him, and
entered the depot.
"Who is that gentleman?"
inquired Sallie, as Johnnie ad-
justed the rug round her feet.
MR. ASADA, SAVING HIS HOUSEHOLD "That is Mr. Asada," re-
GOODS.
plied her brother. "When he
was at college, the boys used to make fun of him about his silk
hat, and say that he wore it in bed."
"He has saved it anyhow," said his sister. "Come, brother,
I feel terribly anxious. Do let us hurry home."
As they passed through the streets, they met people fleeing
from the conflagration, some of them having their entire
household goods packed on a kuruma (hand-cart), with the
baby perched on top of the pile, and others, like Mr. Asada,
laden with their worldly effects. Officials wearing Derby hats
and Japanese clothes were rushing along at a rapid pace, their
bearers shouting, Hai! hai! hai! (look out).






THE JEWETTS' NEW HOME.


1 1 li ,III
I ri, i I i 7ir llpl'




-c- = -----:- -.-
5


FLEEING FROM THE FIRE.

The Jewetts, after traversing several streets, were stopped
by a crowd of vehicles, and compelled to halt for a few
moments. On the sidewalk on their right, was a Japanese



















A SCENE ON THE SIDEWALK, TOKIO, DURING A FIRE.

family, who had fled from the burnt district, and camped for
the night under the shelter of a wooden fence.
The unfortunate people had saved a folding screen, a






THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.


couple of wadded quilts, a paper umbrella, and a few house-
hold utensils, and were squatting on the spread out bed-furni-
ture, nursing two children, who were laughing and chatting as
though they were in a house.
Here comes honorable husband," said one of the Women
to the other. Thank the gods, he has -found honorable
mother! "
As she spoke, a coolie appeared, staggering under the
S--- weight of an old woman, whose head
was tied up with a handkerchief. He
Deposited her gently upon the quilt,
and Sallie and the boys saw him and
the women carefully tend the dame,
who evidently had been more fright-
ened than hurt.
"What are those fellows carrying
in their little tubs?" asked Sallie,
pointing to a number of men running
hither and thither as though convey-
ing something of great importance.
"Those are wet-mud men," said
PROFITING BY THE FIRE. Johnnie. "When a conflagration
breaks out, the Japanese always close their fire-proof houses
and fill the crevices with clay obtained from the canals. Those
coolies are reaping a harvest."
The whole city was in confusion, the fire having swept
back towards the north, and caused a scare in a new quarter.
It was past midnight before the young folks arrived at the Kaga
Tashiki. As the old mom-ban admitted them, he said,-
Honorable master boys, it is good you have returned.
When a fire starts in this city there is no knowing where it
will run to."






THE JEWETTS' NEW HOME.


Mr. and Mrs. Jewett welcomed their children, and they all
retired to bed. Within half an hour silence reigned in the
house, while in the distant part of the city, the flames leaped
from dwelling to dwelling, and before morning, had rendered
over five thousand people homeless.
When the boys rose, they saw that the ground was covered
with snow, and that the laborers employed in the yashiki
were wearing mino (waterproof cloaks made of straw) and
storm hats.
There is old Sokichi," said Johnnie; pointing to a coolie,
who carried a tem-bin-bo (bearing-pole) over his shoulder,
and who, on seeing them, smiled a recognition.
Hullo, Sokichi," cried Fitz. Is the fire out yet?"
The man nodded, and replied good humoredly, The
cold-rain god and the fire god had a wrestling bout last night
but the former conquered." Laughing merrily,-"Oh! he is
worth all the fire-companies in Tokio."
Is the snow very deep? asked Johnnie.
"Yes, there has been quite a fall," answered the man.
Then pointing to an artificial mountain in the centre of the
yashiki, he added, Now you can get out your sori (sleds)
and amuse yourselves by sliding down the yama. Make the
most of the beautiful snow, master-boys, for it will not last
very long. Before the end of the week everybody will be
going to see the Umne yashiki (plum garden) of Kamedo."






THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.


CHAPTER II.

ONE OF THE GLORIES OF TOKIO.

When I look upon the red and white clusters of the plum blossoms,
I think of the brave Tokiwa, wife of Yoshetomo, fleeing before the soldiers of the
Taira.

T HIS was sung in Japanese, by Dr. Oto Nambo, one morn-
ing in February, as he stood with his friends, the Jewetts,
admiring a plum-tree that was blossoming in their garden.
"What do you mean, Oto ?" asked Sallie. I cannot see
the connection between the flight of Tokiwa and the red and
white plum blossoms."
The young doctor smiled and said,-- I thought every
one knew that. When Tokiwa fled from Utsumi, the snow
was deep upon the ground. She had one child, Yositsune, in
the bosom of her robe, and she held the hand of another,
while the third followed, bearing his father's sword. As she
walked, she left crimsoned imprints of her wounded feet in
the snow. The poem I have just sung, refers to that incident,
and indirectly to the name of the war. -'The struggle of the
Red and White.'"
How is it that you have both colored blossoms on one
tree?" demanded Fitz. "I have never seen them in the
States."
Oto chuckled quietly and said, I am glad you allow
that we have something you do not. The red plum blossom
is a very beautiful object, and is grafted on the stock of the
white flowered tree, so as to produce a contrast. Would you
like to go out to the Ume-yashiki, and see the blossoms in all
their glory ?"






ONE OF THE GLORIES OF TOKIO.


I think we
could walk there,"
said the profes-
sor; "the snow has
all gone, and I love
to see the sights of
this wonderful
city."
They set out
together, the boys
going first with
Oto, and Sallie fol-
lowing with her
parents.
Just outside the
yashiki, they saw
an omo-cha-ya (toy
maker) and his son
working in a store,
which, notwith-
standing the cool-
ness of the weather,
was open to the
street.
"Why do you
not invent some-
thing new?" asked
Fitz of the man,who
was putting the fin-
ishing touches to a,
rattle representing
the god Daruma.


OLD SOKICHI, IN HIS STORM-PROOF DRESS.






THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.


The operator smiled good-temperedly, and said, Invent
something, 0 bo-san? Oh, that would be useless! I have a
beautiful neko (cat) with a red collar round its neck, lovely
doves with peas in their insides, fish, irises, and these hand-
some Daruma."


TOY MAKER.


Yes, yes," added the man's son, who was busily engaged
varnishing the figures; "that is so. Nobody in Tokio makes
better toys than my honorable father."
As he spoke he inserted the handle of the figure in the
straw-filled tub, and taking up another of the toys, fitted a
stick in its base and continued his occupation.






ONE OF THE GLORIES OF TOKIO.


"Let us go on," said Sallie. "I am afraid we shall be
poisoned by the lacquer."
A little further down the street they stopped before the
workshop of a toke-shi (clock-maker), who was engaged in
repairing a native time-piece. This was a very simple affair,
consisting of a few cogged wheels and a leaden weight
enclosed in an oblong box. He squatted behind a piece of

















CLOCKMAKER.
iron, that served him as an anvil, and was examining a wheel
through a magnifying glass.
"Good morning," said Fitz. "You seem to be puzzled,
Mr. Clockmaker."
"Yes, I am," replied the mechanic. "I have bought
some ready-made works in Yokohama, and I do believe they
were cut out by machinery. Will you kindly translate the
inscription on this?"
The boy took the wheel, and after looking at it, said, -
It is stamped 'American Clock Company, New York.'"






THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.


"Well! well!" murmured the man, receiving back the
piece and bowing. "After this I am going to give up my
business, and intend to peddle foreign time-pieces. It would
take me a week to make such a wheel as this. I suppose your
machines would manufacture one in a day."
"In a day!" cried the boy. "Why, our machines would
turn out a thousand such things in an hour."
The artisan looked incredulous, picked up his pipe,
lighted it, and said, -
"I like to hear wonderful stories! Of course I am only an
ignorant man, still you need not make fun of me."
"That is true," said the clockmaker's daughter, who was
kneeling before a metal mirror at the far end of the store.
" It is very easy to tell my honorable father such things, but we
cannot comprehend them."
She took a brush, dipped it in a pot containing beni (car-
mine), and applied it to her lower lips.
Why do you paint yourself there? inquired Sallie.
Because all our ladies do so," merrily replied the girl.
We put the beni on our lower lip and you put it on your
cheeks. If I did not do this, nobody would think anything of
me."
She was very bright and intelligent, so they chatted with
her for a while, then quitted the spot and walked on until they
reached a bridge, where they saw a tall coolie pulling a little
jin-riki-sha, containing a young lady.
That is one of my cousins, O-Taki," said Oto. She is
blind. Wait a moment, I will speak to her."
The coolie stopped, and Oto introduced his friends to the
girl, who said,-
I have been to Kamedo to see the plum-blossoms. The
flowers are very fine this year. I am sure you will greatly
enjoy the sight."














































































JAPANESE GIRL PAINTING HER LIPS.






THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.


She bade them saionara (farewell), and opening her pa-
per parasol, told her man to go on.
Poor cousin," said Oto. Hers is indeed an affliction.
She was born blind, yet talks as though she could see. That
is the way with many persons who are deprived of their sight


OTO'S BLIND COUSIN, MISS TAKI.


She touches and smells the flowers, and enjoys that almost as
much as seeing them."
After they had passed the bridge, they heard the noise of
music, and noticed a little crowd gathered before a house in
which a girl was practising dancing, and two women were
playing an accompaniment.
"Let us stop a moment, mamma," begged Sallie.


















































- AMAT--UR P-RFORM--RS.

AMIATE UR PERFORMERS.





THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.


The elder of the musicians had two instruments called
tsudzumi, one of which she held over her right shoulder, and
the other under her left arm. The younger played the
samisen (guitar) with a piece of ivory, shaped like a fan. The
dancer performed some graceful evolutions that quite pleased
the spectators, then suddenly, the trio began to sing.
Oh, dear! exclaimed Mrs. Jewett. Let us move on.
I knew they were going to do it! Their dancing is pretty
enough, but why do they not learn our music?"
I am sure we are endeavoring to do so," smilingly replied
Oto. Have we not a musical college in the Kaga yashiki,
and good Professor Luther W. Mason to teach our rising
generation what you call music. We are doing our level best
to civilize ourselves after the American fashion."
"Just listen to them," said the Professor, who was regard-
ing the performance with profound attention. There is a
world of meaning in their songs. Fitz, you have a quick ear,
what does the sound convey to you?"
The boy laughed and bluntly responded, -
"Well, sir, they are saying that the mist vanishes swiftly
before the glory of the rising sun, but, if I did not know the
language, I should imagine they had eaten some unripe fruit
and were describing their symptoms."
"Fitz," sternly replied his father; "do not indulge in
levity. The music of the Japanese is a study well worthy of
your attention."
The boy looked very penitent, and as he quitted the place,
said,-
I did not intend to be disrespectful, sir. I only said what
I thought."
He is quite right," remarked Mrs. Jewett. Their songs
sound more like the wail of an agonized spirit than anything I
ever heard."






ONE OF THE GLORIES OF TOKIO.


A little further on they beheld a Tsu kuiri-banauri (arti-
ficial flower-seller) who was perched on a cane-seated stool
near a stand containing his wares. He was a very waggish
fellow, and had something to say to every one who went by.
Will you purchase these beautiful hair-pins? he said to
a young lady, extending a bunch of artificial plum-blossoms
from which depended a silken tassel. "This is the month
of the flower, Miss, and you ought to have it for your beautiful
hair."
How much do you ask for it? she said.
Only ten sen," he replied. When you wear this um e,
nobody can tell but what it is real. I believe if you were
to put it in the ground, after you have finished with it, this
spray would grow."
The girl bought the pin, then the dealer turned to Sallie
and remarked, -
I have decorations for the hair, especially made for foreign
ladies."
He arose, offered Mrs. Jewett a seat, and on her declining
his attention, said, -
"I have an assortment of nice kushi for the hair," pointing
to some semi-circular articles on his stall. My combs are
made of the best Tsuge (box-wood). The teeth will not
break out like those of foreign ones."
They left him shouting to the passers by: "Oh, these are
the beautiful artificial flowers! They are the best in Tokio."
After a brisk walk they arrived near the temple, and enter-
ing a tea-house proceeded to a private room and ordered
refreshments.
Upon the wall was an oil painting, quite an unusual decora-
tion in such a place. It was intended to represent a group of
Japanese ladies and children, but the costumes and figures






THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.


were not quite correct. When the landlady entered, the Pro-
fessor inquired where she had obtained the picture.
"Ah!" she said, "that is a very valuable thing. A
foreign gentleman once came out here to stay. His remit-
tances did not arrive in time, so he gave me that picture i:
lieu of a month's rent."
"What does it mean?" asked Oto. "Our countrywomen
never dressed in that fashion."
"Certainly not," was the smiling response. "Those are
honorable foreign ladies going to a matsluri (festival)."
"It is signed Emile Bayard, and was painted by quite a
celebrated French artist," said the Professor. "I wonder
where he got his models?"
"I should think out of his own head," said Fitz. "No one
ever saw Japanese children rigged up in that style."
They entered the grounds of the temple of Temmangu
and passing the outer gate, saw a pond around which were
many wistaria trees, trained upon trellises and covered with
straw to protect the young branches.
After walking over a bridge they came to a gate that faced
the temple.
In the garden, before the main edifice, stood a beautiful
tree which was one mass of red and white blossoms.
That," said Oto, "was grown from a seed of the celebrated
Flying Plum-tree."
"Flying?" queried Johnnie. "Surely you must be joking."
"Oh, no!" gravely replied the young doctor. "There
have been several books written about the tree. Sugawara-no-
Michizane, who is worshipped in this temple under the title of
Tem-man Dai-ji-zai Ten-jin, was one of our national heroes."
"Did he kill himself?" inquired Fitz.
"No," laughingly answered Oto. "He was a great scholar
































































A FRENCHIMAN'S IDEA 01F JAPANFSF' COSTUM1E.





TIE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.


and is worshipped by persons who wish to write a beautiful
hand. For some reason or other he was banished to the island
of Kiushiu. One day, in spring, he was lamenting that he
would never again see the blossoms of a lovely ume tree that
grew near his residence in Kioto. While he was sighing, a
plum pit struck his cheek and dropped at his feet."
Pooh," said Fitz. Some boy must have shot it through
a bean-blower."
I wish you would not pull the roof off our beautiful
legend in that way," merrily retorted Oto. "Our people be-
lieve that the plum seed flew from Kioto to Kiushiu. Yonder
tree sprang from a pit of the original tobi-ume planted by
Michizane."
"How interesting!" exclaimed Sallie. "So that white
marble elephant, over there, is one of the old gods?"
"No," replied their friend, "it is intended to represent the
cow on which Michizane used to ride when he was in exile."
"I wonder he did not prefer a horse," said Fitz. "Japan-
ese cows were of a queer shape in his time."
After inspecting the sacred animal, they visited a well, cov-
ered with a stone-tortoise, the name of which, kame, gives the
title to the palace, Kamedo.
"We can go from these grounds into the Ume yashiki,"
said Oto. "It is about four cho (streets) from here. I suppose
we can walk that distance."
"Why is the place called Ga-rio-bai (crouching-dragon
plum trees)?" inquired the Professor.
Because the trunks creep along the ground," said Oto.
"There are over five hundred trees in the garden."
In a few moments they arrived at an enclosed place which
was perfectly white with the beautiful blossoms, and was
studied with upright slabs of stone, inscribed with poems in
praise of the flowers.





ONE OF THE GLORIES OF TOKIO.


"Oh! oh!" exclaimed the Jewetts in chorus; "this is a
sight worth seeing."
The yashiki was filled with well-dressed people, who
evidently enjoyed the scene, and chatted with each other like
happy children.
All of the trees were very old, and their gnarled stems
were supported on short bamboo stakes, to prevent the flowers
from coming in contact with the earth.
Why are those papers tied to the branches?" asked
Sallie.
Those are poems," said Oto. When my countrymen
feel very much delighted with anything, they write a verse and
attach it to the object of their admiration."
"Do you ever fasten them to your young ladies?" asked
Fitz.
"Oh, no!" said Oto. "We only affix them to trees."
It is not solely a Japanese idea," remarked the Professor.
" Shakespeare mentions such a custom in 'As you like it.' We
Americans are too prosaic to do such things."
"Yes, sir," said Fitz. "The only inscriptions we put upon
our trees are 'Keep off the grass.' "
When the party had thoroughly enjoyed the glorious sight
they made their exit through the main gate, where one of the
attendants was peddling boxes of the dried plums called ume-
boshi.
Upon quitting the place Fitz began to partake of his pur-
chase, when he made a very wry face, and, turning to his sister,
said:
Do not eat any of these, Sallie, they are salted."
Yes," observed Oto, "that is done to preserve them. The
fruit is really very good and is considered excellent for sick
people."





THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.


Fitz gave his box to a beggar, and, nodding at his friend,
said, in a grumbling tone:
I think I should be sick if I ate many of them. I like
my plums sugar-cured."
Near the gateway was a bronze statue of a priest, carrying
in one hand a bamboo staff, and in
Sthe other a pilgrim's hammer.
LL "Why has that figure a branch in
its mouth? asked Fitz.
/ Oh, don't you know?" quickly
replied his sister. "Old Deacon
Brown always chews a straw when
S he is thinking what he will say at
S the next prayer-meeting. It assists
his mental digestion. I believe the
good bozu carried a branch of bam-
boo for the same reason."
Oto's eyes twinkled, and he re-
marked:
KUYA-SHONIN, A FAMOUS You are right, Sallie. The
PRIEST. statue represents one of our famous
priests named Kuya-shonin. When he made his pilgrim-
ages, he affixed a metal bell to his girdle, and, after he had
repeated a certain number of prayers, he struck the kane with
his hammer. He travelled all over the country, and made
many converts."
"Yes, but why does he hold that twig in his mouth?" per-
sisted Fitz.
Oto has told you that Sallie guessed the reason," said
Johnnie.
"I wish they would put the particulars on the pedestals,"
grumbled Fitz. "These sort of things worry a poor little fel-
low, who wants to know as badly as I do."





ONE OF THE GLORIES OF TOKIO.


They walked leisurely homeward, and passed through a
very busy quarter occupied by artisans, who worked in the
front rooms of their dwellings.
Wait a moment," said Johnnie, stopping before the store
of a tatami-ya (floor-mat maker). Why do they keep that
rooster in a cage ?"
The artisan turned, and, smilingly regarding the speaker,
said:
The bird is a very great pet. It has a most beautiful
song."
Song?" interposed Fitz. "Does it sing?"
"Oh, yes," said the man. "You know the rooster is a
favorite bird of the gods. When Amaterasu came out of the
cave, the ondori sang a song of welcome, so we esteem the
amiable bird."
Yes," said his mother, an aged dame, who wore a towel
about her head, and, like the man, had a pad fixed to her right
elbow, "we pay great respect to that bird. Would you like to
buy some nice mats for your house?"
"Let us go inside," said the Professor. "I want to see how
the tatami are made."
The man and woman bowed as the visitors entered, and the
dame, who was very smart, explained the process, then said:
"We make our mats of the very best rice straw; they are
six feet long, three feet wide and two inches thick, and the
edges are bound with strong blue cotton cloth."
"Why do you wear those pads on your elbows?" asked
Johnnie.
We have to beat the mats smooth as we work it," she re-
plied, "and, if we did not protect our elbows, we should soon
wear them out."
"Then, why not buy a mallet? suggested Sallie.






THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.


The woman took a piece of paper string from a holder ly-
ing upon her left, placed it upon her tongue, dexterously
threaded a packing-needle, and complacently replied:
"Buy a mallet, honorable young lady? Why should we
waste our money on such luxuries, when we can use our
elbows? Besides these shields prevent the sharp pieces of
the straw from running into our flesh."
She then thrust the needle into the mat, and began to stitch
with great rapidity, while her son fetched the visitors some tea
and brought Oto a light for his pipe.
An old lady was in the back room, enjoying the luxury of
being shampooed by a blind boy, who knelt behind her and
alternately thumped and kneaded her back.
"That is honorable grandmother," said the mat-maker.
" She is over ninety years old, and is a most pious person. She
counts her beads all day long, and has attained a perfect com-
posure of mind."
The aged woman chuckled at this remark, and said to the
shampooer:
"Don't hit me too hard, my bones are not as strong as they
used to be;" adding, in an undertone: I think those honor-
able foreigners ought to make me a present. They do not
often have the happiness of seeing any one as old as I am."
The Professor gave the dame's grandson ten sen for her,
whereupon she chuckled like an overjoyed child, and, bowing,,
said:
"Iro, iro, arigato! (thanks, many thanks). Now I will
buy myself some very good tobacco."
Soon after they had left the mat-maker's, they heard a toot-
ing noise, and presently beheld a man standing by a portable
stall on which were arranged an assortment of flutes and
whistles.






ONE OF THE GLORIES OF TOKIO.


That is a yoko-buye uri (flute seller)" said Oto.
"Jemmy! cried Fitz. "Just look at him; why he is play-
ing a flute with his nose."


BLIND SHAMPOOER AT WORK.


The party halted and watched the performance, which was
truly a comical one; the man being employed as Fitz had said.







THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.


He was a shrewd-looking old fellow and the way he quavered
and shook out his notes was most astonishing.
On noticing the foreigners he indulged in some very gro-


FLUTE-SELLER.


tesque gestures, and, while continuing to produce a tune from
the instrument, put out his tongue derisively, pursed up his
mouth, and made such extraordinary grimaces that a small
boy, who was watching him, doubled up with laughter.






ONE OF THE GLORIES OF TOKIO.


Fitz bought one of the flutes, and, in spite of Sallie's
earnest protest, endeavored to perform on it; however, he
soon discovered that he did not possess the ability of the yoko-
buye and gave up the attempt.
As they neared home they saw a na-oshi (pipe mender)
engaged in the occupation of straightening bamboo sticks for
pipe-stems.





2 ,









.-.



PIPE-MENDER.

~He carries his shop with him, does he not?" remarked
Johnnie. He must mend a great many pipes before he can
earn a day's rice."
The man glanced up, regarded them sourly, and said in a
low tone, to a friend that stood near him:
"Foreigners! I never take any notice of them- they
have no pipes to be mended. It makes me sad to see people
smoking rolled up tobcaco leaves as they do. It is an exceed-
ingly barbarous and wasteful habit. I suppose they have not
any pipes in their benighted country."






THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.


The boys laughed at his insinuation, then walking quickly,
soon rejoined the Professor and his wife.
When they reached home they found that the steward,
cook, and several of the servants had gone to a wedding.
"I am so sorry," said Mrs. Jewett. "What shall we do
for supper? Sallie and I can manage to find something to eat,
but I am at a loss what to give you."
"We will go to a Japanese restaurant," said her husband.
"Oto, do you know of a good one hereabouts?"
Yes, sir, there is a famous rio-ria in Uyeno."
They walked through the grounds, and, in a few moments,
were seated on the floor of a restaurant, called the Golden
cherry blossom."
Around them were groups of Japanese, singing, joking and
eating, the combined noises being almost deafening.
After ordering their supper they watched the other guests,
and Fitz said:
Why does not each party have a private room? One
gets bewildered listening to half a dozen songs at the same
time. How rank the candles smell. You have gas in the
streets, so why do you not introduce it in your restaurants?"
Because our people dislike the odor," quietly answered
Oto. You enjoy the smell of gas; we prefer that of our ro-
soku."
Hullo! there is a picture of our long-headed friend," said
Fitz, nodding towards a kakemono (hanging picture) on the
wall.
SThat is a good name for the god of longevity," said Oto.
".Look at the dwarf plum tree in front of him. It bears alter-
nate bunches of red and white blossoms. Is it not wonderful? "
Fitz regarded it with a critical air and quietly answered:
I don't think much of it. In the States we have rose






ONE OF THE GLORIES OF TOKIO.


trees that bear eighteen varieties of flowers on one stem. You
cannot teach us anything in horticulture."
As he spoke some geisha (singing girls) began to play and
sing, two of them keeping time by knocking wooden blocks
together.
Do you call that noise music?" said Johnnie, who was
very hungry and somewhat cross. "I think it is a dreadful
racket."
When I was in America," quietly remarked Oto, "I went
with you to a minstrel show. One of the performers played
upon the bones and gave me a very bad headache, but I did
not make unkind remarks about him."
"Well said, Oto!" cried the Professor. My boys forget
that you have a right to prefer your own music."
Here comes the waitress," said the young Japanese.
"Johnnie will not notice the din of the hio-shigi (clappers)
when he begins to use his teeth upon these delicious broiled
unagi (eels)."
I did not mean to offend you, Oto," returned the lad, tak-
ing up his chopsticks. My father is quite right."
He always is," said the young doctor, following his
friend's example. "Your father is a man of a hundred
thousand."
They heartily enjoyed the meal, and at its conclusion the
Professor said:
"We have still an evening before us; what shall we do,
Oto?"
There is a very good kosha-ku-shi (public story-teller)
not far from here. Would you like to pay him a visit?"
They all agreed, and, quitting the restaurant, pro-
ceeded to a house near by, and entering, found the man
waiting for an audience. He was seated on a platform, behind






THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.


a low table upon which rested a manuscript book and a piece
of wood, used by him to emphasize certain portions of his
narrative. He was dressed in a cotton kimono (long coat)
covered with a fine geometrical pattern, and he held a fan in
his right hand.
Upon seeing the visitors he bowed profoundly, and, when


PUBLIC STORY-TELLER.


they were seated upon the matted floor, he poured out a cup ot
tea from a pot resting on a little hibachi (portable furnace).
After drinking, to clear his voice, he rapped on the table, in
order to command silence, and said:
The Land of the Rising Sun has produced a hundred
thousand heroes who have left behind them a cloud of fragrant
memories. Of all these, none was greater than Kusunoke





ONE OF THE GLORIES OF TOKIO.


Mashashige, that brilliant example of unselfish devotion to
duty, calm courage and pure patriotism, whose loyalty was as
stainless as the sacred mirror of Ise'.
"The gods presided over his birth, he received his educa-
tion in the Chinese classics from a venerable priest, and he
devoted all his spare time to the art of war.
"At the age of twelve years he had exhibited his valor in
battle, and at fifteen he went to the temple and solemnly
vowed to overthrow the Kamakoura usurper. All men of any
intelligence know the history of this noble patriot, and every-
body is delighted to hear the story repeated. (Assuming a
very solemn manner.) When Mashashige marched for Ka-
wachi, his son Masatsura, aged eleven, followed him in order
to die with his parent. Upon arriving at the town of Sakurai,
Mashashige called the boy to him and said:
My son, listen to the last instructions of your father. A
few days ago the Mikado assembled his generals in council.
Every one was satisfied with the victory in Kioto, I alone
urging that the rebels should be followed and wiped out of ex-
istence. My advice was rejected and when I returned to my
tent, I exclaimed, 'I am doomed!' but I felt happy in the
prospect of dying for the Mikado.
Our enemies are ten times as strong as ourselves, still I
am not afraid to meet them, for that is my duty. My son, you
are too young to die yet, so I command you to return home
and wait until you are old enough, when you will be able to
help the Mikado. (Rapping on the table.)
"Then the great hero took a short sword that had been pre-
sented to him by the emperor, and, handing it to his child,
said:
<" Masatsura, keep this for my sake, and promise me that
you will t~"n ,se it except in the service of the Mikado.'





THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.


'Let me die with you!' pleaded the boy. How can I
live when you no longer exist? '
"Mashashige tenderly regarded him, then said:
"My dear son, your duty is to obey me. Mine, to obey
my lord!
"The boy, whose heart was torn with conflicting emotions,
bowed respectfully to his parent, and, bidding him a sad fare-
well, returned home.
Mashashige, at the head of seven hundred devoted clans-
men, marched to Mi-nato-gawa, where he pitched his tents
and awaited the enemy. The end soon came.
Surrounded by an overwhelming force, he fought until he
only had seventy-two followers alive, when he ordered them
to retire to a neighboring farm-house where they could calmly
and honorably end their existence.
"Taking off his armor he discovered that he had eleven
wounds. These he regarded proudly, and exhibited to his
brother, to whom he said:
"'What more do you wish?'
"The other replied:
'I would desire to live seven lives, that I might have sev-
en opportunities like this, of doing my duty to the Mikado.'
Good!' cried Mashashige, turning to his wounded clans-
men. 'Since we are defeated, let us show our enemies that
we prefer an honorable death to dishonorable flight.'
(In a solemn tone.) Then all the heroes committed hara-
kiri! "
The story-teller rapped his hiyoshi-gi upon the table, and
bowing low, remarked in a pleasant voice:
Now is the time for your liberal appreciation."
"I suppose he means that he is going to take up a collec-
tion for the poor heathen," whispered Fitz to his father.

















































































KUSUNOKE MASHASHIGE.





THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.


The Professor smiled and rewarded the man, who, once
more rapping the table, bowed repeatedly, and said:
"Honorable sirs, perhaps you would like to hear a story of
the god-fox?"
"We would," frankly answered Fitz, speaking for the
party. "Tell us something funny. We don't particularly ad-
mire tales of hara-kiri."
The koshaku-shi assumed a comical air, rapped on the
table, and said:
In the little village of Oji, lived a man who did not be-
lieve in the benevolent Inari (the god of rice) and went about
ridiculing him to his neighbors, saying:
'The worship of such a god is foolishness, and as to his
attendants, the foxes, you are not going to make me believe
they can assume human shapes, it is all nonsense. Such
stories may serve to scare old women, but they do not frighten
me.'
"One day, when he was working at his trade of making
gold ornaments for the hilts of swords, a beautiful lady came
to his shop and said:
My husband desires to see some of your exquisite me-
nuki.'
"The man, flattered by her words, packed his treasures in
a box and followed his visitor to a little hill near the Oto-
nashi-gawa, where he saw a magnificent palace surrounded by
rice fields. The lady took the package from him and said:
"'Wait till I go indoors and show these to my husband."
She then threw the box into the building, when, behold,
in an instant, the mansion tumbled to pieces and resolved itself
into a ruined well.
"The man gazed about him in a bewildered manner, and,
falling upon his knees, cried:






ONE OF THE GLORIES OF TOKIO.


" Give me back my gold ornaments!'
"Upon glancing up again, he found that his visitor had


BEWITCHED BY FOXES.


changed into a fox, which laughed derisively at him and said:
Yeh, you ignorant fellow! Another time you will know
better than to scoff at Inari.'






THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.


'"Oh, my gold ornaments!' he howled. 'What have you
done with my gold ornaments?'
"The god-fox mocked at his terror, and echoed:
"'Gold ornaments! Gold ornaments!' You are the fellow
who did not believe in Inari. He has deprived you of your
treasures."
The koshaku-shi then bowed, smiled, and said to his lis-
teners:
"Is that not a funny story?"
"Oto," whispered Fitz, "please laugh, for I cannot.
Where does the joke come in?"
"Don't you see?" returned Oto. "The god-fox avenged
the insult cast upon Inari, whose servant he was. I think the
story is very quaint."
They gave the man some more money, and quitting the
place, emerged upon the street.
"Did that story really amuse you, Oto?" inquired Johnnie.
"Yes," was the response. I think it was more ridiculous
than anything I have read in your comic papers."
Fitz nudged his brother and said, in a low tone:
"Johnnie, I am afraid we are not educated up to Japanese
wit. Perhaps, if we think over it for a week or so, we may
see where the laugh comes in."
As they were chatting, two ragged outcasts approached
and began to turn over the rubbish in the road, for scraps of
waste paper. They wore dilapidated, conical hats, the lower
parts of their faces were concealed by blue towels, and they
moved warily, like rats.
"Those are kami-kudsu-hiroi," whispered Oto. "They
are not very particular how they fill their baskets. Have you
any persons like them in the States?"
"Lots," said Johnnie. "~We call them rag-pickers. The






ONE OF THE GLORIES OF TOKIO.


way one of our fellows will investigate the contents of an ash-
barrel, would astonish your kami-kudsu-hiroi."
"Are they honest? inquired the young doctor.


COLLECTOR OF WASTE PAPER.


"Well, they seldom attempt to handle anything they can-
not carry," replied Fitz.
At that moment he felt a tug at his coat pocket, and on ex-
amining it found that his handkerchief had been stolen.
One of the kami-kudsu-kiroi, who carried a pair of long
sticks which he used like tongs, had dexterously twisted them
round the handkerchief and conveyed it into his basket. Before





THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.


a policeman could be found, the rascals had vanished, so Fitz
gave up all hopes of recovering his property.
They entered the yashiki by a side gate which was kept in
the same manner as it had been when the place was owned by
the Lord of Kaga. On the right of the mom-ban's quarters
was an upright frame containing three extraordinary-looking
instruments that stood out black against the moonlit sky.
The porch of the building was shaded by a curtain hung
from a pole, and inside the door lounged three men, who were
watching the approach of a tall Japanese.
"That is a Satsuma man," whispered Oto. "Look at the
crest on his haori (short jacket). I wonder what he is doing
in the Kaga-yashiki? "
I suppose he is on a visit to the mom-ban," said the Pro-
fessor.
No, he must be stirring up mischief," cautiously replied
Oto. No doubt he is a spy sent to ascertain how the people
like the new order of things."
For what did they use those pitchforks?" demanded Fitz,
pointing to the weapons.
For this," said Oto. "In the old time, if a stranger en-
deavored to pass the guard-house without giving his name and
stating his business, the soldiers would seize those mitsu-dogu
and either entangle them in his clothes or trip him up with
them. You will observe that the prongs are covered with lit-
tle hooks."
"I wonder the mom-ban did not keep them inside the
house," remarked Johnnie.
The milsu-dogu were put there more to scare people
than anything else," said Oto. "Indeed, for some years, they
have only been retained as ornaments."
"What is that hour-glass shaped structure on the left? "in-
quired the Professor.











































SIDE ENTRANCE TO THE YASHTKI WTTH GTIARD-HOUSE.


jL~I~F~II~
~i~,~ii






THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.


"That, sir, was the guard-house toro (lantern)," replied
Oto. "In former times a lamp was kept burning in it all
night. Now it is used as a rabbit-hutch by the mom-ban."
"Here we are at home," cried Fitz. "Mother and Sallie
have gone to bed. Will you come in, Oto?"
"Yes, for a few moments," answered their friend. "I for-
got to tell you that I had brought you a curiosity, -a
daguerreotype of my family, taken when I was quite a boy."
They entered the house and proceeded to the library, when
Oto, producing a small morocco case from his pocket, exhib-
ited a picture of four persons, remarking:
This was made in 1871 -just before we gave up wearing
our swords. In those days my father carried two in his obi
(girdle) and I wore one. My mother is standing behind him
and my eldest sister is on my right."
"Where is she now?" asked Johnnie.
"Alas! she is no more," returned the young Japanese.
She died when I was staying with you in America."
What a queer-looking little fellow you were, Oto! said
Fitz. "You did not think much of foreigners then, did you?"
"I did not know you as well as I do now," was the gentle
reply. Still I never disliked you, my father having from the
first taught me to respect all nations. I have brought this for
your mother. I once heard her say she would like to have
seen me in the olden times."
I thank you, for my wife," said the Professor, taking the
case; she will value your gift very highly."
"Boys," said Oto, as he quitted the house, "I cannot be
away from the hospital more than one day in each month.
What shall we do the next time I visit you?"
"We will take a stroll about the city and see the sights,"
said Johnnie. "We want to go to the places where they man-






ONE OF THE GLORIES OF TOKIO.


ufacture lacquer-ware and silk goods,
of making Indian ink."


and to witness the process


2qI!,


OTO NAMBO WHEN A BOY (1871).

"All right, I know where to take you," said Oto. "I must
be off. My mother will not go to sleep until she knows I am
safe in bed. Saionzara."
In another moment he was out of sight.






THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.


CHAPTER III.

A VISIT TO A LACQUER-MAKER.

When the blustering March wind scatters the fully opened blossoms of the plum,
The man laughs who has not pawned his shi-tcki (cold weather under-coat.)"

T" HEW!" cried Fitz, as he entered the breakfast-room.
I "Is it not blowing this morning?"
This is Futen's (the wind god's) month," said Sallie. It
is good weather for children. See, the mom-ban's boy is out
in the yashiki flying his tako (kite).
SI wonder why they always make those things square,"
remarked Johnnie.
You do not use your eyesight," said Fitz. Some of the
toys are like birds, and others resemble fishes. I think Japanese
kites are a good deal better than ours; you can put hummers
on them and make them buzz like bees. Look at 0 Kame,
the boy's sister, she is telling him to pay out more string."
While they were watching the lad, some one in a closed jin-
riki-ska entered the compound. As the vehicle stopped
before the door of the house, the curtains were removed and
the Jewetts saw Oto, who was muffled up in a comical fashion.
Hullo!" cried Johnnie, going into the veranda to meet
him. "We did not expect you to-day."
Oto shook his friend's hand; then, as he accompanied him
indoors, said:
"My ward is almost free of patients, and I shall not be
wanted at the hospital until to-morrow morning, so I thought
I would come over and have a good time with you. Is it too
cold for Sallie to go out with us?"






A VISIT TO A LACQUER-MAKER.


"No, indeed," answered the young lady, "I want to see
the lacquer-workers before the weather becomes warm."
I know a very nice man who lives in the Asakusa quar'


BOY FLYING HIS KITE.


ter," said Oto. He has been one of my patients, and will,
I am sure, show us the various processes of applying the
lacquer."






THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.


After obtaining their parents' permission, the young folks
wrapped themselves up and set out with Oto.


CARPENTERS AT WORK.


As they passed through the grounds, they halted to see
some dai-ku (carpenters) at work upon a new fence. One of
the men was trimming a post with a primitive-looking adze,





A VISIT TO A LACQUER-MAKER.


and the other was planing a board, placed upon a sloping log,
the lower end of which he steadied with his right foot.
"Why do you draw your plane towards you?" demanded
Johnnie. Our carpenters always push theirs from them."
The workman picked up some shavings, cast them on a
pile of rubbish burning near by, and replied:
Ours is the correct way. Your carpenters cannot teach
us anything."
We can put a plank, like that, in a machine, and plane it
in an instant," said the boy, who was desirous of astonishing
the man.
Oh! yes, certainly," sarcastically returned the carpenter.
"You Chinese can do wonderful things. I suppose you can
grow a tree, saw it into boards and build a house with it while
one is winking."
"Not quite," was the laughing rejoinder. "But it would
make you wink to see our circular saws at work. We are not
Chinese, but Americans. You ought to visit our country and
take some lessons."
The man put his tongue in his cheek, laid his plane on the
wood, and resumed his work without condescending to bestow
any more notice upon them.
It was quite a walk from the Kaga yashiki to Asakusa,
however, the day was fine and the party enjoyed the exercise.
As they passed through the street leading to the foot of
Uyeno Hill, they stopped before a bronze-maker's, where the
workmen were busily employed upon a quaint figure support-
ing a lantern.
What a comical-looking creature that is," remarked Fitz.
He looks like a colored person."
This is Riu-to, the god of the bottom of the sea," said the
foreman of the shop. "II would not advise you to be disre-






THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.


spectful to him, or you may get shipwrecked some time. It is
fortunate for you that his eyes have not been opened."
"What?" demanded the undaunted boy.
"You must be very ignorant if you do not know that,"
snapped the man. "When we make the gods they are blind.
Our customers take them to the bozu (priest) who blesses
them and then they can see
everything."
Sure?" said Fitz.
"Certainly," was the confi-
dent reply, as soon as this
god has had its eyes opened, it
will see and hear what you do,
and be revenged if you insult
him."
The boy began to chuckle,
noticing which, his sister said
in English:
Come away, Fitz."
"One moment," remarked
the irrepressible; then, turning
1 to the idol-maker, he inquired:
RIU-TO (SEA-GOD).
"RAre you sure that the gods
can see everything when the bozu have fixed them?"
"Just as sure as I live," was the confident rejoinder.
"Why do you not take your blind people and have their
eyes opened?" he asked. If the bozu can make the idols
see, surely they can do the same thing for your unfortunate
mekura."
This made the workmen laugh, they evidently enjoying
their foreman's annoyance, while the latter turned his back
upon Fitz and said:

















































































AGRICULTURAL TOOL SELLER.





THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.


What is the good of talking to people who are so ignorant?
I do not believe they have any gods in their country."
At the foot of Uyeno Hill they saw a kara-kasa uri (um-
brella seller) kneeling on his mat and offering his wares to a
young lady, the tie of whose obi (girdle) stood out like the
wings of a butterfly. "You can warrant this, can you?" she
inquired, opening a kara-kasa and examining its color. Well,
I think I will take it."
Here is the ring to keep it together, Miss," he said, hold-
ing out the article referred to. If you do not use this, your
umbrella will soon get out of shape."
They left him counting over the paper money and brass
coins he had received from her in payment.
When they neared Asakusa, they saw a hasho-dogu-uri
(agricultural tool-seller) kneeling upon a mat placed on the
sidewalk. Before him was a book in which he entered his
sales, and on his right a tray containing an ink-stone and
brushes for writing. Scattered about upon the mats were the
heavy hoes, rakes, grass-scythes and clumsy ploughs (literally
mud stirrers) used by the farmers.
One of the latter class was paying the man for a hoe and
grumbling at the price, saying:
We have to work half our time for you fellows. When I
was a boy, tools like this only cost a third of what you charge,
and they lasted twice as long."
In those days my father only paid you half as much for
his rice," replied the ready-witted implement seller. "Thank
you, sir, I wish you a safe journey home."
Oto," inquired Sallie, please tell me why some of your
people grow their hair in the American fashion, and others
shave the top of their head and wear a little queue."
I will," he answered in a low tone. "All those persons






A VISIT TO A LACQUER-MAKER.


who wear their hair as I do, are not following the American
fashion. It is more a sign that they belong to the new party,
and believe in the government religion, Shinto. Those who
shave their heads and wear a queue, belong to the Buddhist
party, and think a great deal of their old lords; however, the
fashion of wearing all the hair will soon become general
among our people," add-
ing slily, "because it
saves the barber's fee."
Just then a skin-bun-
ski-haidnasu (newspaper
carrier) passed them, h
shouting something that
was unintelligible to the
Jewetts. He bore a box
of papers over his right
shoulder, and had a num-
ber of copies in his left
hand.
"Please, sir," said a W -
AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS.
girl to him, "have you
the last 1-ro-ha Skim-bun? "
Oh, no! Oh, no!" he said. "I never sell such rubbish."
Away he went, repeating his cry.
"What is written upon that woman's parasol?" asked
Sallie.
"That is 7-in (everlasting)," said Oto. "Our manufac-
turers often mark their goods thus. I do not imagine it will
last much longer than an ordinary hligasa."
After exploring a number of streets, they arrived in one
occupied by makers of bowls, trays and cabinet wares; when
the young doctor remarked: Here we are at the lacquer-
man's."





THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.


As he spoke a middle-aged Japanese advanced to the front
of one of the stores, and bowing, murmured:
I trust your honorable excellency is in the possession of
good health. Since I left your honorable care, I have been
perfectly free from sickness. I have thanked the gods every
day, and made an offering to Bindzuru (the helper of the
sick) ."
"I like that," whispered Fitz. "You, Oto, have cured the
fellow, and he pays your fee to the old wooden god, Bindzuru.
I think he ought to have given you the money."
Hush," breathed Sallie. "The man will hear you."
Oto introduced the lacquer-maker as Nishi Gori Yoheye.
The man bowed repeatedly, sucked in his breath, and said,
as he led the way into his store:
I understand from the honorable doctor that you wish to
see the process of lacquering goods. I must tell you one
thing, the urushi (lacquer) is very poisonous, and cannot be
worked by any one but a Japanese."
"We are not desirous of going into the business," said
Johnnie. "Our countrymen would like to know how you
use the lacquer, and we wish to be able to inform them."
"Yes, yes, I understand," was the smiling response. There
are many ways of preparing the liquid. I use principally black
and red lacquer -please come with me."
He drew aside a sliding-door, and conducted them into a
little apartment, filled with covered tubs containing an acrid-
smelling substance, that looked like molasses.
This is urushi (lacquer)," he said. It is the sap of a tree
that is found all through Central Japan, and is obtained by
making incisions in the stems and branches. When we desire
to make the lacquer black, we add to it a small quantity of
water that has stood for several days in a vessel containing






A VISIT TO A LACQUER-MAKER.


iron-filings and crushed gall-nuts. After this has been well
stirred into the lacquer, the latter becomes a glossy black
color. When we wish to make red lacquer, we mix the


TOKIO NEWSBOY.

urusii with vermilion and stir it well, then strain it and the
article is ready for use. Now come with me."
He took them into a shed-like building, upon the floor of
which were a number of workmen lacquering wooden bowls
and trays for the American market.






THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.


They first of all covered the joints and knots with linen
gauze, after which they took their brushes and laid on the lac-
quer, just as our workmen do shellac. The articles were next
placed in boxes lined with wet paper; the urushi not drying
evenly in the light or in a warm atmosphere.
As soon as the pieces were hard enough, which, their
guide told them, often took several days, they were rubbed
down with water and powdered charcoal, then relacquered,-
the process being many times repeated. Before the final
polish is given, the article is decorated with gold paint or in-
laid with mother of pearl, then once more relacquered; the
last coating being polished with powdered deer's horn.
The common ware, such as this," said the manufacturer,
"only has a few coats of uruzshi, while the finer sorts often
have from fifty to a hundred. Please come into the next de-
partment, and I will show you a beautiful cabinet that I am
making for one of our nobles."
They followed him and found the polishers putting the
finishing touches to an exquisite work of art. The front panel
represented a daimio (great Lord of old Japan) presenting
one of his clan with a suit of armor. The figures, which were
made of hard lacquer and were in bas-relief, were beautifully
carved and colored, and the entire panel was a charming
specimen of modern Japanese work.
How do you solidify the lacquer? asked Sallie.
We mix it with the white of an egg, and apply it when it
is like a thick paste. As soon as it hardens, we carve it as we
do ivory. It takes a high polish and is not at all brittle."
"Why did the daimio give that samurai the suit of
armor?" asked Fitz, examining the panel.
It is a very old story," said the man. During the wars
of the Gen and Hai (red and white chrysanthemum), the






A VISIT TO A LACQUER-MAKER. 65

lord of Chiosu sent one of his councillors upon a dangerous
expedition, in which he fell into an ambush, had his armor cut
to pieces and narrowly escaped with life. Upon his return,
the lord sent for him, and, in the presence of the assembled
clansmen, gave him a magnificent suit of his armor, saying:
'Wear this forever in token of my appreciation of your valor.'"
How did he know the apparatus would fit the recipient?"
asked Fitz.
Don't spoil the romance of the story," said Sallie.
Among the decorations of
the cabinet was a figure of an
aged man, sitting on the bank
of a river, fishing.
"Who is that old gentle-
man?" inquired Fitz.
"The illustrious Tai-ko-bo,
a Chinese sage," replied the
proprietor.
"Is he dead?" said Fitz.
"Yes, he has been dead a
long time. He always fished -
with a straight hook (smiling.)
Very extraordinary, was it not? TAI-KO-BO.
You would never guess what he caught."
"Guess he caught a bad cold," was the quick response.
"No?-Well, the Chinese do things differently from other
folks. They blow starch out of their mouths upon our shirt-
bosoms, and iron them with a copper dipper filled with live
charcoal."
The man looked puzzled, so Fitz said: "I was referring
to the Chinese washermen in the States."






THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.


"Please tell us about the sage Tai-ko-bo?" urged Sallie.
" You must not notice my brother's remarks."
"I do not," said the lacquer-maker, in a gentle tone. "He
is very young and does not venerate the sages. This is what
I know about Tai-ko-bo. Although he was a very learned
man he was exceedingly poor. He lived in the town of I on
the Isui (river I). For a long time he was in the habit of
going to fish in the stream, but, instead of using a barbed hook,
he tied a piece of straight copper wire to the end of his line,
and did not carry any bait. (Smiling.) You see I have rep-
resented that on the cabinet. People often said to him:
"'Honorable Tai-ko-bo, what do you expect to catch?'
"To which he would reply:
"'A big fish!'
I should think he was not quite right in his mind," inter-
terposed Fitz.
The man regarded him pityingly, then calmly continued:
"One day Tai-ko-bo's wife came to him and said:
"'Honorable husband, why do you not work and make
some money, instead of trying to do what is impossible? You
have been fishing here for several years, and have not even
caught an ai (minnow).'
"' Women never know what is passing in a man's mind,'he
replied. 'Wait, I will catch a big fish.'
She pulled up his line, and on examining the hook became
very angry, saying:
"'You have been making fun of me all the time, I will not
live with such an idiot. Please divorce me.'
One morning after Tai-ko-bo had done as she requested,
the emperor came by, and seeing the sage, asked what he was
about. Tai-ko-bo replied in his usual fashion, whereupon
the emperor questioned him, when he said:

























































DAIMIO PRESENTING A SAMURAI WITH A SUIT OF ARMOR.






THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.


I am showing the people the wisdom of waiting. I have
been five years watching for your Majesty to come this way
and to ask me this question. Nothing good is done in a
hurry.'
The emperor talked for a long time with Tai-ko-bo, then
took him to his palace and gave him charge of his troops, re-
marking:
The general who can wait will always achieve a victory!'
When Tai-ko-bo was once riding in state, surrounded by
his soldiers, he saw an old beggar woman, who, kneeling,
requested permission to speak to him. He told her to go to
his mansion and await his return.
After several hours he arrived home, then ordered her to
be brought into his presence, and thus addressed her:
Woman, what do you want of me ?'
"'Honorable Tai-ko-bo,' she replied, 'I am your divorced
wife. I beg you will have pity upon me and take me back!
You are now rich, and I repent ever having given you cause to
put me away.'
He looked at her contemptuously, filled a cup with water
and bade her take it, saying:
"'Empty that on the ground!'
"The amazed woman obeyed, and asked:
Now, great sir, will you receive me back?"
"I will," he sternly answered, "when you can put the
water you have spilt back into that cup!"
How exceedingly interesting," said Sallie. Thank you
very much, sir."
They quitted the shop containing the cabinet, and visited
many sheds in which they saw workmen engaged in making
ordinary lacquer-ware, such as boxes and bowls.
Where does all that cheap stuff go to?" asked Johnnie.






A VISIT TO A LACQUER-MAKER.


"To America and Europe," replied the proprietor. The
Yokohama merchants will buy anything. Our people are
more particular and will only purchase goods made of sea-
soned wood."
The party thanked Mr. Nishi for his kindness, then bade
him farewell and proceeded along a street leading to the
temple of Kuwannon.

















STREET IN ASAKUSA, SUBURBS OF TOKIO.

The houses were thatched and presented a very mean ap-
pearance, the inhabitants being poor people who could not
afford to keep their habitations in repair.
The stores in this quarter do not make much of a display,"
remarked Sallie. "A few cases of komnpeito (candies), boxes
of cakes and packages of dried persimmons, form quite a stock
in trade for these dealers."
The street was not very crowded, and no one on it appeared
to be in a hurry. A man was leading a horse laden with
buckets of fertilizer. A blind shampooer was striking his






THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.


stick on the ground and whistling for customers. A little boy
was bowing to another child, who was out for an airing with
his sister. A wandering geisha was tinkling her samisen, and
the store-keepers were looking on in a listless manner, as
though they did not care whether they sold anything or not.
There are miles of such streets in the city of Tokio, and,
as every other house is a shop, it is a
marvel how the proprietors contrive
to get a living.
The young people turned the
corner and found themselves in a
busy thoroughfare, the sidewalks of
which were lined with peddlers vo-
ciferously crying their wares.
"What has that fellow got upon
his pole?" asked Fitz.
That is an omocha-uri (travel-
ing toy-seller)," said Oto. "Those
gaudy objects stuck in the straw on
the top of his staff, are for little chil-
dren. Some are pin-wheels, some
flags, and others drums. All our
TENTO (HEAVENLY LAMP).
youngsters like to play with those
things. See, he is blowing his trumpet to attract customers."
Presently, a small boy with his head partly shaven, ad-
vanced in great haste, shouting:
"Give me a drum. I have three sen to spend. I want
a drum."
The omocha-uri ceased his music, lowered his pole, and
presenting the collection to the child, said:
Honorable master-boy, choose which you like. They
are all the same price, exactly three sen each."
















































































TRAVELLING TOY-SELLER.






THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.


The child selected a pin-wheel, paid his money and ran off
with his prize, shouting:
"Hai! lai! hai! (Look out!)"
A little further on they saw a hideous figure of bronze,
placed on the left of the approach to a temple. It represented
a demon supporting a lantern on his hand and shoulder.
That is a tento (heavenly lamp), carried by an oni (imp),"
remarked Oto. "The inhabitants of this quarter erected it
there as a mark of gratitude for being spared during the last
cholera visitation. It is a very ancient piece of work."
"Why does he not have a twig in his mouth?" demanded
Fitz.
"Oh, brother," replied Sallie, how can the oni hold any-
thing in its mouth when it is depicted as screaming. For my
part, I think it is too exquisitely grotesque."
It is too, too utterly homely to suit my taste," mused Fitz.
I think it would make a first-rate scarecrow."
On one of the doors of the temple-gate, was a bronze figure
of an ascending dragon, which greatly interested Johnnie.
"What a strange monster it is!" he remarked to Oto. Do
you believe such a thing ever existed?"
That is a very difficult question to answer," replied their
amused friend. It is something like the sea-serpent, nobody
can swear it is a myth, and everybody doubts those who say
they have seen it. Still, I believe such creatures once lived
on the earth."
Hullo! exclaimed Fitz. Here comes a ronin. Look
at his hat."
"He is a cho-cho uri (paper butterfly seller). See how
that boy on the girl's back is dancing up and down and scream-
ing for one of the articles. They are very cleverly made, and
will last a long while."






A VISIT TO A LACQUER-MAKER.


But what are they for?" demanded Fitz, as they advanced
to the man.
"They are toys, and are sometimes used as hairpins. Our
maid-servants consid-
er it lucky to wear a
butterfly in the month
of March."
They continued
their walk until they
reached a corner on
which a man was seat-
ed upon a mat, ped-
dling some curious
looking musical in-
struments.
That is afifuye-uri
(whistle seller)," said
their friend. See,
there is a blind sham-
.pooer going to make a
purchase."
The person referred
to, placed his clogged
feet wide apart,
dropped the butt of
his staff on to the ASCENDING DRAGON.
ground and said:
Hullo, Mr. Fuye-uri, how are your wares selling to-day ?"
I have a beautiful one that will just suit you," replied the
peddler. It is only four sen."
I do not want any of your four sen trumpery," returned
the amma, thrusting his hand into his wallet. Give me the
best double-whistle you have in your stock."






THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.


The fuye uri handed him what he required, then the
shampooer tried the article and paid for it. Taking his staff


PAPER-BUTTERFLY SELLER.


in his right hand, he felt his way down the street, threading in
and out the crowd as though he could see; every now and
then, blowing a succession of melancholy notes upon his
whistle.













































































WHISTLE-SELLER.






THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.


Sallie," said Oto, as they neared the Kaga-yashiki, I
must say good morning, I have to go to the Ginko (bank).
Cannot we accompany you?" she asked.
Certainly," he replied, but you must be tired. I think
it is nearly luncheon time, so vote we postpone our visit until
two o'clock."
When they reached home they found Gosuke, Johnnie's
jin-riki-ska man, sweeping the lawn. Seeing them he bowed
low and said:
Very soon the young grass will be up, and I will cut it so
that you can play your ball game (lawn-tennis). No one in
the yashiki has such a beautiful grass-plot as this. Do you
know the reason?"
"No," answered Sallie, who delighted to listen to his
stories. What is the cause?"
Gosuke grinned and said:
I go every morning and make an offering at the shrine of
the god Fox that is why the grass grows so nicely."
They all smiled, and Sallie remarked:
I do not think the god Fox has very much to do with it.
I should say that you deserve all the credit for keeping the
place in such good order."
The man bowed, smiled until he showed all his upper
teeth, and, regarding her through his half-closed eyes, answered:
Of course I do my best, honorable O jo-san (Miss), but,
if I did not look after the god Fox, the grass would be as full
of dandelions as your neighbor's."
"What a curious superstition," said Johnnie, as they en-
tered the house. I really think Gosuke believes what he
says. You must own, Oto, that your poor people are very
credulous."
The young doctor laughed and shrugged his shoulders
significantly.






A VISIT TO A LACQUER-MAKER.


"Why do you do that?" demanded Fitz, throwing himself
upon a lounge.
"I cannot help smiling," said Oto. When I was in the
States I saw lots of signs of the persons whom you call clair-
//

~ 7>~


GOSUKE, JOHNNIE'S JIN-RIKI-SHA MAN.


voyants. I think there are a good many credulous people in
every country."
After they had refreshed themselves, Sallie went to her
room and brought out a picture, which she exhibited to Oto,
saying:






THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.


"Will you please tell me what this means? My brothers
and I have been arguing about it."
"I know," interrupted Fitz. "That young girl has just
parted with her admirer, who has gone off in one of those
fune (junks), and she is waving good-by to him. I told
Sallie so, and she will not believe me."


MURA-SAKI-SHIKIBU, A JAPANESE POETESS.


SYou are wrong, this time," said Oto. The lady was a
celebrated poetess, named Mura-saki-shikibu. She lived a
long while ago, and wrote the story of the Genji."
Why does she leave her lamp burning when it is day-
light?" said Fitz, in an unconvinced tone. "She is not writ-
ing, anyhow."
"She shut herself up in a pavilion and completed the
poem in a few days," answered Oto. Being much absorbed
in her occupation, she was not conscious that her lamp was


~- --- --

C4





A VISIT TO A LACQUER-MAKER.


burning long after the sun had risen over the horizon. The
picture represents her as saluting the glorious goddess."
"Why did she wear her hair hanging down her back in
such an untidy way?" asked the inquisitive boy.
All poets like to have their locks flowing, when they are
composing verses," replied Oto.
Fitz whistled and remarked:
I told Sallie that the lady was short of hair-pins. I sup-
pose nobody could write poems if they had their hair banged
all over, as I used to, when I went to school."
"Fitz, do not be so absurd," said Sallie.
Boys, are you ready to go to the Ginko?"
They replied in the affirmative, and ordering their jin-
riki-sha, started from the yashiki.
When they arrived at their destination, they saw a police-
man, in foreign uniform, parading in front of the building.
He was a wiry, little fellow, and he carried under his arm a
long club of'hard wood.
My gracious!" whispered Fitz. "Don't his clothes fit
horribly? His jacket is shirred under the arms, and, oh! do
look at his trousers."
The officer, whose mouth had a stern, downward curve, on
perceiving Oto, saluted and said:
My head is all right now, Doctor."
Have you found the medicine I gave you beneficial? in-
quired the young man, as he dismounted from his vehicle.
I presented it to my honorable mother," gravely answered
the policeman. She had rheumatism in her ankles, so, of
course, I did not think of myself. I am pleased to tell you
that it has completely cured her."
The Jewett boys waited until they got inside the bank
building, then yielded to their merriment.





THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.


"I shall die! I shall die! said Fitz. "What did the fel-
low have the matter with him?"
Oto bit his lips, then said:
Last week, when the policeman was engaged in sup-


A TOKIO BANK.


pressing a riot, near the Nippon bashi (Great Bridge of Japan),
one of the fishermen struck him on the skull with a bamboo
and rendered him insensible. He was brought to the hospital
and remained two days in my ward. On leaving, I gave him
a supply of powders that certainly would not cure the rheu-
matism. Though those jznsa know very little about medi-





A VISIT TO A LACQUER-MAKER.


cine, they are by no means uneducated in other matters, and
are very smart officers."
Yes," said Johnnie, with a nod, the way they will club
a poor coolie and take him into custody is a caution to law-
breakers, the thieves are afraid of them."
That is more than they are of our policemen," said Sallie.
" I do not see much to laugh at in what the man said. He
was evidently willing to sacrifice himself for his mother."
They went into a spacious counting-room filled with clerks,
busily engaged in making entries in large books of thin Jap-
anese paper.
Oto handed a check to the paying-teller, and received a
pile of kinsalsu (currency), then, as he counted it, said to his
companions:
"Do you want to go over the building? I know one of
the chief officials."
His friends said that they would like to see where the
money was kept, so Oto led the way upstairs, and introduced
them to his acquaintance; who, after saluting them respect-
fully, said:
This edifice was erected specially for banking purposes,
is fire and burglar-proof, and will stand any ordinary earth-
quake. It is three stories high, and the lower floor is of solid
stone laid in cement."
Can we see the place where you keep the money?" in-
quired Johnnie.
The official showed them into several apartments filled
with clerks who were working very hard, or pretending to do
so, then led the way into the vaults on the first floor. Holding
a light above his head, he revealed stacks of kinsatsu piled
in the recesses.
"Where do you keep your gold and silver?" asked Fitz.






THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.


"We have none," was the calm reply. The Yokohama
merchants use specie, while we have not seen any for some
time."
"What?" said Johnnie, producing a bank bill. "Do you
really mean to say that you could not give me silver or gold
for this if I very much wanted it."
We could not," said the official. There is not a bank
in Tokio that could do it. A few years ago your banks were
just as unable to redeem their notes."
"When will you resume specie payments?" demanded the
boy,
The gentleman sighed, shook his head and said:
"Nobody knows. So long as the people will take this
paper money, everything will go right; but if they were to
refuse it, all the banks would break, and the nation would be
irretrievably bankrupted."
The official explained the system of keeping the books,
then invited the visitors to partake of refreshments. On part-
ing with them he said:
I would like to spend a few years in your honorable
country. I read your newspapers, and know all about Wall
Street. We are now establishing a Stock Exchange and
Clearing House, after the American model."
They bade him adieu, and, as they entered their jin-riki-
ska, Oto said:
The next time I have a holiday the cherry trees will be
in bloom. You know the old saying: 'If you want a beau-
tiful perfume go to the ume (plum blossom). But when
you behold the glorious sakura (cherry) you forget that it is
scentless.'"




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