Group Title: American architect and building news.
Title: The American architect and building news
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00081791/00001
 Material Information
Title: The American architect and building news
Series Title: American architect and building news.
Physical Description: 94 v. : ill. ; 34 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: James R. Osgood & Co.
Place of Publication: Boston
Publication Date: March 23, 1895
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also issued online and on microfilm from Xerox University Microfilms (American periodical series: 1850-1900).
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1-94 = no. 1 (Jan. 1, 1876)-no. 1723 (Dec. 30, 1908).
Issuing Body: Imprint varies: published later by Houghton, Osgood & Co.
General Note: Title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00081791
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 08696489
 Related Items
Succeeded by: American architect (New York, N.Y. : 1909)

Full Text






























A WEEKLY JOURNAL OF CONSTRUCTIVE AND DECORATIVE ART.

VOL. XLVII. No. 1004.] SATURDAY, MARCH 23, 1895. PRICE, REGULAR ISSUE, 1 CENT


DECORATIVE STUFFS.
Reproductions of Antique Brocaded Silks,
Damasks, Embroideries, and Tapestries for
Drawing-rooms, Libraries, Dining-rooms,
Halls, etc. * Select Cretonnes and
other Cotton Goods for Bedrooms and Coun-
try Houses. * Interesting Stuffs, both
Plain and Figured, for Wall Hangings. Soft
Eastern Silks of Special Designs. * *
Plain Stuffs in Choice Colors: Velvets,
Plushes, Cloths, and Others. A Large Va-
riety of Inexpensive Stuffs for Curtains and
Furniture Coverings, where an Artistic Effect
is required at a Low Cost.

JOHNSON & FAULKNER,
NORTH UNION SQUARE,
NEW YORK.


POLISHED GRANITE WAINS-
COTING.
Columns, Pilasters, Balusters, Vases, Samples,
Monuments, Tombs and Buildings. Also rough stock
from our Red Beach Ret or Beaver Lake Black
Granites. Samples on application.
MAINE RED GRANITE CO.,
O. S. Tarbox, Supt. Red Beach, Maine.



NOW READ '.

"MINOR FOUNTAINS,"
being No. 3 of a Series of
"ARCHITECTURAL ODDS AND ENDS.'
40 Gelatine Prints.
$5.00 per copy.
FOR SALE AT THIS OFFICE.
211 TREMONT STREET, BOSTON, MASS



MAINLAND ARMSTRONG & CO.,
STAINED GLASS & DECORATIVE WORK
Interior Decorations and work in American Mosaic Glass
from the designs of Mr. Armstrong. English painted glass
from the designs of Messrs. Clayton & Bell.
Sole Agents for
CLAYTON & BELL, GLASS STAINERS, LONDON.
61 Washington Square, South, New York, N. Y.



BATTERSON, SEE & EISELE
(Successors to A. L. FAUCHERE & CO.),
Importers and Workers of
MARBLE, ONYX AND GRANITE,
425, 427, 429, 431 and 433 ELEVENTH AVE., N. Y.



E YLLER & CO., Booksellers.
SPECIALTIES:
Architecture, Industrial, Decorative and Fine Arts
Engineering and Mechanics. French, German
and Italian Works on band.
Catalogues free on application.
84 FIWTH AVENUE, CHICAGO.


WHITTIER MACHINE CO.,

ELEVATORS,

53 STATE STREET BOSTON.
93 LIBERTY STREET, NEW YORK.
526 13th STREET, N. W., WASHINGTON.



WINSLO W BR S.
ELEVA TOR CO.

HIGH CLASS
PASSENGER ELEVATORS.

OFFICE, THE ROOKERY,
Erie Co. Bank B'ld'g, CHICAGO.
Buffalo, N. Y.
Peoples Bank B'ld'g,
Denver, Colo.


OTIS ELEVATORS,

THE STANDARD OF THE WORLD
For all kinds of
PASSENGER AND FREIGHT ELEVATOR SERVICE.
OTIS BROTHERS & CO.,
NEW YORK, BOSTON AND PHILADELPHIA.
The New Electric Elevator is the latest type,
and can be run by the electric-light lines, at a
very moderate cost.

ELECTRIC ELEVATORS.
THE ELECTRON MFG. CO.

Makers of high-grade Electric Elevators,
For passenger and freight service.
Large experience. Many in use.
First cost moderate.
Running Expense much less than Hydraulic.
Also makers of low-speed Perret Elec-
tric Motors and Dynamos.

General office and factory, Springfield, Mass.
NEW YORK OFFICE, 126 Liberty Street.
BOSTON OFFICE, 103 Milk Street.

MARBLE MOSAICS,
ROMAN AND VENETIAN STYLES,
For Floors, Walls, Ceilings, Mantels, Hearths, Dec-
orations, etc. Prices very moderate. References,
Principal Architects and Decorators of New York,
AESCHLIMANN & PELLARIN,
37 CLINTON PLACE,
Between Broadway and University Place, New York

"The AMERICAN ARCHITECT-which is the oldest
architectural journal on this continent has been the
foremost and ablest representative of the profession in
the country and under the new conditions its service to
the cause of good architecture as well as the fine arts
in general will doubtless be of increased value."- Bosfto
Herald, Dec. 3, 3Sq3.


AL WAYS THE SAME.
The F. 0. NORTON CEMENT commands every
Architect's confidence.
OFFICE, 92 BROADWAY, NEW YORK.


STANDARD ELEVATOR CO.,

HIGHEST GRADE

PASSENGER
AND ELEVATORS.
FREIGHT j

OFFICE AND WORKS,

15th Street and Ashland Ave.,

Chicago, Ill.


LE VA TORS.

MOORE & WYMAN,
ELEVATOR AND MACHINE WORKS,
COR. GRANITE AND RICHARDS STS., SOUTH BOSTON.
STEAM AND HYDRAULIC,
For Freight and Passenger use.


FL YNT
BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION CO.
GENERAL OFFICE, PALMER, MASS.
We contract to perform all labor and furnish all mate-
rial of the different classes required to build complete
CHURCHES, HOTELS, MILLS. PUBLIC
BUILDINGS AND RESIDENCES.
Also for the construction of
RAILROADS, DAMS AND BRIDGES.
We solicit correspondence with tho'e wishing to
place the construction of any proposed new work
under OE CONTRACT, which shall include all branches
connected with the work. To such parties we will
furnish satisfactory references from those for whom
we have performed similar work.


THE GRUEBY FAIENCE CO.,
MAKERS OF
GLAZED AND ENAMELLED
ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA
AT HIGH HEATS FOR
INTERIORS AND EXTERIORS.
FAIENCE MANTELS.
164 DEVONSHIRE STREET, BOSTON.


DRA WING OFFICE.
DRAWINGS
Rendered in line or color witl reasonable despatch.
Address EDITORS AMERICAN ARCHITECT.


R OBERT C. FISHER & CO.,
Successors to FISHER & BIRD,

MARBLE AND GRANITE WORKS,
97, 99, 101 and 103 EAST HOUSTON STREET,
Established 1830. NEW YORK






7Te American Architectding ews.


TILE LINED REFRIGERATORS
and Cooling Rooms under the
Wickes System.
Mechanical Refrigeration under
the Westinghouse System.
WICKES REFRIGERATOR COMPANY,
860 Broadway, N. Y.


AR gHITECTURAL INSTR UG-
TION.

BOSTON, MASS.

MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOL-
OGY.
DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECTURE.
Professor: F. W. Chandler.

CAMBRIDGE, MASS.

HARVARD UNIVERSITY.
LAWRENCE SCIENTIFIC SCHOOL.
H. Langford Warren.

BROOKLYN, N.Y.

pRATT INSTITUTE.
W. S. Perry.

ITHACA, N.Y.
CORNELL UNIVERSITY.
DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECTURE.
Professor: Charles Babcock.

NEW YORK, N.Y.

COLUMBIA COLLEGE.
SCHOOL OF MINES.
SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE.
Professor: W. R. Ware.
COOPER INSTITUTE.
E. A. Miller.
E. F. Maurer.
INSTITUTE OF ARTIST-ARTISANS,
140 West 23d Street.
John Ward Stimson.
METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART.
G. D. Bartholomew. S. J. Temple.

PHILADELPHIA, PA.

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA.
SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE.
Professor: Warren P. Laird.

CHAMPAIGN, ILL.

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS.
SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE.
Professor: N. Clifford Ricker.

CHICAGO,ILL.

ART INSTITUTE.
A SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE.
Louis J. Millet.

NEW ORLEANS, LA.

TULANE UNIVERSITY.
Professor: Wm. Woodward.



DEAN BROS.

STEAM PUMP WORKS,
INDIANAPOLIS, IND.
Boiler Feeders, Fire Pumps
Pumping
Machinery
for all
Purposes.

Send for
Catalogue.


STANLEY'S


BALL-

BEARING

STEEL

BUTTS.

Send for Samples and Prices.


The Stanley Works.


Architects, Builders, and others will confer a
favor on the Publishers by mentioning The
American Architect and Building News' when
sending for circulars or corresponding with
parties advertising in these columns.


BUILDING MATERIALS.
Foundation:
Dimension..........................
Block.............. .........
BRubble ............................
Bluestone: F sq. ft.)
Sidewalk ........................
Planed..............................
Sandstone:
Longmeadow....... ................
Kibbe..............................
Brown (Connecticut) ...............
Amherst Ohio ........... ........
Berea ..................
Berlin ....... .........
Belleville...........................
New Brunswick (Dorchester).......
Caen.................................
Carlisle. English..................
Corse Hill (Scotch)................
Marble: (V on. ft.)
Lee, Mass............. ...............
Rutland, white and blue...........
Sutherland Falls...................
Glens Falls, black ....... .....
Italian, blue-veined ..................
Sienna ...................
Tennessee, red................. ....
S Knoxville...............
Pennsylvania, blue ..................
Vermont, white....................
Slate: Roofing (F square)............
'1 green..........................
n" fading .............
purple..........................
red............. ...............
black, Lehigh.................
Chapmans ...........
Unfading black, Brownville, M
l" Monson,
Tiles, Am....P M.................
N. Peach Bottom. warranted unfadin
Fire Clay Roofing Tile on cars at facto
PAINTS. (In Oil ( lb.)
White lead, Am ...................
Szinc, ........... .
Red lead, Am.....................
Venetian.......... .........
Vermillion......................
Indian, Eng...................
Yellow Ochre......................
Chrome.....................
Green (chrome)......................
Green, Paris........................
Black, lamp........................
Blue ultramarine .................
Oil, linseed, (raw).......... .....
boiled.................
Turpentine.........................
Varnish, coach...................
Shellac.... ......................
Putty...............................
Whiting ............................ )
Pariswhite, ng........ .
Litharge, Am ......................
Sienna (burnt) ..................
Umber ......................
HARDWARE.
Nails: (Per Cask.) Spikes, (wroughi
10d. common .....................
Shingle.... .................. ....
Lath..............................
(Finishing nails according to size.)
(For casing nails add 75 c. per keg.)
Butts: 4" 4 x .......... ( doz. pairs.)
Plain................................
Japanned.... ......................
Acorn, Japanned ....................
Ball Tip, Boston Finish.... (f pair.).
Bronze metal........................
Brass (for cupboards. .............
Knobs: (V set.)
Ebony...............................
Apple wood...........................
Mineral, best.......................
Lava..................................
Hemacite ......................
Porcelain.........................
Glass, solid...... ...............
Glass, silvered.......................
Bronze metal ............. ...........
Brass ......... ...... .............
Solder:
Sheet Lead............................
LeadPipe ................. .........
Iron:
I-Beams, up to and including 30 ft.....
do. over 30 ft., I c. adv. for every 5 ft
Channel Beams.......................


BEST


BUTTS


FOR


HEAVY


DOORS.



New Britain, Conn.
79 Chambers St., N. V.


HARDWOOD FLOORS
HIGH GRADE, THIOK and THIN.
ND- EWOOD MOSAIC, PARQUETRY, WOOD-
CARPET. WAX-POLISH AND BRUSHES..
W\ Write for our circular on the Care of
Hardwood Floors. Catalogue Free.
WOOD-MOSAIC CO.,
-. ROCHESTER, N.Y.


New York. Boston.


Chicago. Philadelphia.


(Wholesale Prices.) (Prices to Builders and Contractors.)
0 5 00 ton. 20 0
4 60 a perch. 1000 0 cord Conshc
125@ 150 8090 145
30@ 500 400 175 100 O 125ft. lin.th.10
... 50@ 600 @ 75 100 @ 125 37
80 80 0 150 ncub. ft.
... 80 80@ 00 90 100 I
@ 90 90@ 110 45 @ 55
1000 100@ 130 103 @ 130 105
90 @ 95 90@ 100 45 @ 55 85
75@ 100 85@ 90 45 @ 55 55
.. 75@ 100 80@ 90 45 @ 55 85
80@ 125 25@ 135 Not Sold. 100
0 100 75@ 90 @ 105
S@ 200 125
S @ 105 @ 105 75 @ 100 95
@ 105 @ 105 50 @ 100 95
O 175 @ 250 Not Sold. 200
@ O 300 235 @ 800 200
125@ 175 @ 200 185 0 600 170
0 @ Not Sold. 400
.. @ 510 250
0 0 Not Sold.
.. @ 150 @ 200 400
0 150 @ 200 300
S @ Not Sold. 200
S @ 235 @ 800 225
5000 600 4750 525 450 0 510 290
5006 600 5500 650 550 @ 610 425
5.. 00 600 5500 650 550 @ 610 450
01000 1000 1100 1200 @1400 1150
4250 475 0 5(0 0 560 400
O @ 680 0 750 450,
[e. 6000 850 600@ 850 700 @ 900 650
550@ 800 5500 800 700 0 900 650.
@ Salt-glazed cop-
g. o ing 8-16" 9 @ 35 5 76
ry 800@ 800@ 700 0 750 860
7 @ 71 561 5@ 7 0 7*
5 81 0 8 5 @ 71
1 @ 7 561 51 51 @
6 0 101 7 0 12 1 0@ 2 dryEng.
.. 65 @ 70 65 070 dry 65 @ 68 E ng.
12 @ 20 12 20 12 @ 20 61
6 @ 15 7 @ 12 3 15 dry Am.
12 @ 20 180 25 15 0 25
8 0 18 8@ 20 8 @ 20
25 @ 40 250 30 24 0 35 15
15 @ 25 15 25 10 @ 30 81
12 @ 18 18@ 30 12 @ 35 10
55 @ 62 57 @ 59 57 @ 60
58 @ 65 60 62 60 @ 63
36 0 37 30 42 40 @ 42
0 150@ 600 12b @ 200 125
0 2500 300 225 @ 400 150
2 2 2 4 2 2j 21

5@ 6 651 6 7
.. 14 20 40 20 4@ 16 4
14 0 20 140 20 2 @ 10 2
t.) 0285 0 235 0 350 per keg o
0260 0 165 0 185
0833 @ 210 @ 190
0485 0 280 @ 260 3604
0 0 @ Add.60 to1.90 per f 4
0 0 .40 to .90 Add per
2 90 (all ki
0100 O 85 @ 90 2901
@150 125 Not Sold. 1354
@150 @ 125 200 @ 375 1356
@ 65 @ 33 135 @ 350 484
0190 plain 125 100 0 350
S 10 0 10 @ 12 6
0 18 @
0 0 35 @ 376
0 8 0 8 8 @ 10
S 50 0 75 65 @ 80 Not Bo
SNot Sold. 17 33 15 @ 40 256
@ 30 @ 10 8 @ 10 6
Not Sold. @ 50 Not Sold. 100a
Not Sold. 88 @ 100 Not Sold. 175 6
75 @200 50@ 100 7a @ 800 50m
1.00 0250 50@ 100 75 @ 300 756
0@ 14 @ 16 11
@ 61 51 @ 7
S@ 51 4 @ 6 64
S83-10 0 831 225 Any length @
t. o 180 0 200 @
S883100 8) O 225 80 0 200 @


@ 500
oeken
@ 250
0 25
@ 50

@ 105
@ 125
@ 95
@ 75
@ 95
@ 110
@ 115
@ 135
@ 105
@ 105
@ 250
@ 300
@ 300
@ 450
@ 275
0 500
@ 600
@ 400
@ 400
@ 300

0 360-
@ 500
@ 550
@ 435
0 500
@ 900
@ 900
@ 2800
@ 626
@

9 7

@ 76
@ 7
@ 16
o 18
@ 21
8 20
@ 12
@ 24
S60
@ 63
@ 44
SS 00
@ 300


8 14
@ 13
22

8 230
S260
S475
S6
cask
minds )
S90
S200
S275
S50
125
100
S35
100
08
Id.
560
25
250
200
3650
8125
16


28-10
2.8-10
28-.4


[VOL. XLVII.-71







MARCH 23, 1895.]


The American Architect and Building News.


FOR FORMATIONN ABOUT


I U, S, MAIL CHUTES
A necessity in Offmoe Buildings and Hotels, .
write to the sole makers,
THE CUTLER MFG. CO., ROCHESTER, N. Y.
PATENTED. AUTHORIZED.


NELSON & KREUTER,

CHICACO, ILL.


LAUNDRY MACHINERY,

COMPLETE OUTFITS FOR
STEAM LAUNDRIES, HOTELS
AND PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS.


Send for Catalogue.


Estimates furnished upon application.


BEARDSLEY'S DOOR HOLDER,
Is a simple affair,
holds the door when
you want it--holds
the door where you
want it.

o The Beardsloy Mfg. Co.,
234 Lake Street,
+-RUBBER CHICAGO.


For the largest openings in Churches, Chapels,
Schools; Halls, Residences -Openings of
50 feet without posts or mullions,
springs or weights, handsome,
durable and strong.
FLEXIBLE AND FLEXIFOLD
STEEL CLAD FIRE PROOF DOORS, PARTITIONS
AND WINDOW SHUTTERS
for Fire-Walls of Stores, Warehouses, Banks,
Theatres, etc., and for the subdivision of large
areas.
Send for Illustrated Descriptions and Estimates.

FLEXIBLE DOOR & SHUTTER COMPANY,
Worcester, Mass.


Conservatories, Greenhouses,

VINERIES, ETC.
Shipped to any part of the country, and erected
complete, ready for use.
Plans embrace the latest improvements,
Unequalled facilities for manufacturing. Thirty-five
years' experience. Catalogue sent on application.
Address, stating requirements,

LORD & BURNHAM COMPANY
Architectural Office:
160 Fifth Ave., cor. 21st St.,
NEW YORK CITY.
Factory, Irvington-on-Hudson, N.Y.


Have you seen our line of Heaters for 1895 ?
1o styles. 134 sizes. Every one the best of
its type.
We court the investigation of architects and
will have much pleasure in giving a practical
demonstration of the superiority of our product.
Ours is the Largest and Most Complete Line
produced by any one manufacturer. The use
of our Heaters is acknowledged to be the best
practice.
THE J.. H. McLAIN COMPANY,


CANTON, OHIO.
NEW YORK: CHICAGO: DENVER:
69 Centre St. 58 Dearborn St. 1525 Champa'St.


Mercer Boiler.


SAN FRANCISCO:
5 Crocker Bldg.


The H. B. SMITH CO.,
MANUFACTURERS OF


HEATING APPARATUS
Steam and Water
For Public Buildings and Private Residences.
SPECIALTIES :
MERCER'S Patent Improved Sectional Boilers.
MILLS'S Safety Sectional Boilers.
GOLD'S Improved Sectional Boilers.
REED'S Improved Cast-iron Radiators,
"THE UNION" Hot-Water Radiators.
BRECKENRIDGE'S Patent Automatic Air Valves.
GOLD'S Indirect Pin Radiators.

Office & Warerooms, 137 Center Street, New York,
Foundry. Westfield. Mass. Catalogues sent on application.


THE ARCHITECT
Who specifies the "Florida" Steam Boiler may
rest assured that the Houseownevpwill never have
occasion to "kick." The "Florida"



Always Gives Satisfaction.


NEW YORK :
94 Centre St.


'/7/7e7" FLORI
The FLORIDA.


We supply Anything and Everything that (TRADE-MARK ;
enter into the Construction of Heating
Apparatus . ... . . .

m er an oler Copany CHICAGO:
Xmer~ican a N 61 a' 84 Lake St.


BUILDING


MATERIALS.


Reported for the American Architect and Building News.


LUMBER. --P M.
Boards: (Ordinary dimensions.)
Pine, 1st quality, clear ........
2 qality...............
3dqualty................
Spruce..........................
Hemlock .................**..
Yellow pine..................
Cypress... ......... ...... ....
Clapboards:
Pine.....cad ....................
Spruce..........................
Framing Timber:
Pine............ ...........o.
Spruce......................
Hemlock:.... ..................
Yellow pine..................
Laths:
Pine........... ..............
Spruce.......................
Shingles:
Pine, shaved............. M..
Pine, sawed.............
Spruce, sawed........... ..
Redwood............... 126.
Cedar split............... V M..
Cedar sawed..............
Cypress. Split.....Tx 24. "
Miscellaneous:
Piles .............. ft........
Fence pickets, Common........
Cedar posts, 9 ft. (sq. posts.)....
Chestnut posts ..............
Finishing Woods; M. (First
Ash .......... [ t.ki. e.)l
Cherry ..............*.*.*..**.
Butternut.....................
Hard-pine floors (rift)..........
Mahogany, Bsywood lMexican]
St. Domingo........
Maple........................
Oak, red.........- .....* ....
white.....................
S quartered .................
Sycamore quartered...........
ine, clear.............**.... **
Redwood ......................
Rosewood........... ........
Sprue floorslear, (kiln-dried).
Walnut, blaok...............
Whitewood.....................
Yellow pin...... Me........


New York.
(Wholesale
65000 7500
55 00 @ 60 00
18 00 @ 22 00
02500
eal 3@ 14
200 40
@0
0
0

14000 1800
12 00 @0 16 00
18 00 0 2100
Slab
180 @ 190
5000 600
400@ 500
1500 200
1406 160
@0
0
18000 2000
4)@ 5lO
8000 0
0




018000
0360130
4600@ 6000
@180 00

0 9000



45000 5000
@ 700
@ 70000

6000@ 7000
0 6
12500 015000
4500 5000
*4600


Boston. Chicago. Philadelphia.
Prices.) (Prices to Builders and Contractors.)
5500@ 7000 43000 4900 4760@ 6000
42 00 5000 27000 4000 38000 4850
2000 @ 4000 1000 1900 27 50 8650
1200@ 2300 Not sold. 1500@ 2150
12000 1450 @ 1200 1150 13 75
20 00 3300 14 50 2260 14 00 2900
28000 4000 23000 3200 30000 3800
38000 5500 1600@ 2250 1400@ 2500
23000 3500 Not sold. Not sold.
1200@ 1660 26000 .8730
1500 @ 17 00 Not sold. 16000 2150
1200@ 1600 10000 1600 1400 2000
2300 3500 1800 @ 30 00 22 @ 38000
225@ 250 0 235 27650
2 25 @ 250 Not sold. 2 30 @ 2 86
@ Not sold.
@ 450 230@ 276
1600 00 Not sold.
3250 5 75 6000 750 (30" 35 40
@ Not sold. \24" 8 021
200 350 210 250 (20" 35 014
500@ 600 350@ 400 11000 1400
Piles 6o. V ft. 13 0 20 foot.
1000@ 1800 P.1000@2000 9000 1800
250 50 150 40 40@ 150
260 0 Not sold. 200 30
45000 6000 1400@ 3000 40 00 5000
90 00 12000 3000@ 9000 100000 12000
60000 7000 1600@ 3500 7000 9000
4200@ 6000
160 00 @ 17000 110 00 @ 170 00 150 00 20 00
12000 8 500' 140000 20000 200000 40000
4500@ 5000 12000 1900 30000 8000
40000 5000 1400@ 2700 4000@ 5600
45000 @5500 15000 2700 42500 5500
65000 7500 10000 8700 60000 7500
50000 6500 2400 2600 51500 6600
50000 7600 31000 4700 65000 7500
50000 7000 40000 4500 60000 7500
per M. 60000
30000 3600
8600012000 40000 7500 5000 17600
35000 4500 16000 3200 25000 4500
40000 4200 18000 2250 0 4600






The American Architect and Building News.


[VoL. XLVII.-.N6&'014.


CLINTON WIRE-CLOTH CO.,
Sole Proprietors and Manufacturers of

DO UBLE TWIST WARP

STIFFENE_ D (Iron furred)

CLINTON COBBRR UGAT'D

3PlaJn., JT aepav& ed or 3r-lTaniaecd .

The Most Perfect and Economic System of FIREPROOF Construction.

SEND FOR CIRCULAR.

BOSTON, NEW YORK, CHICAGO, FACTORY,
199 Washington St. 76 Beekian St. 137 Lake St. CLINTON. MASS.




WORTHINGTON STEAM PUMPS
SABC THE STANDARD FOR

HYDRAULIC ELEVATOR HOUSE SERVICE.

Send for New Illustrated-Catalouegn

Henry R.Worthington,
NEW YORK, 86 & 88 Liberty St.
BOSTON, 70 Kilby St.
PHILADELPHIA, 607 Arch St.
CLEVELAND, 24 South Water St.
CHICAGO, 185 to 189 Van Buren St.
-ST. LOUIS, Eighth & St. Charles Sts.


A BOON TO ARCHITECTS AND BUILDERS.
THE MORSE PATENT WALL TIE. NewYorkOffil
Made from 81ain. galvamzed steel wire thickness where ends croems -4 in.
Secures Hollow Walls, Brick Facings. Terra Ootta, Etc. 62 Reade St.
Also made from 32 and M8 wie.

CHZIAP, STRONG, RELIABLE.
Adopted by more than 400 Architects and Builders the past three eaons. I
Write for samples, circulars, et.
J. B. PRESCOTT & SON, Sole Mfrs., Webster, Mass.


BUILDING MATERIALS. New York.
BRICK.-P Mh (Wholesale
Do.i.mon: Cargo afloat.
Pale................. 200@ 250
Jersey............. 450 500
Long Island.........
Up ver............
Haverstraw Bay 2d.. 5250 550
lt ......5 60 575
Hollow......................... Lorildards
Fronts: 0 700
Croton, Brown................ 900 @ 1200
S dark............ ...... 1000 1300
S red................... 1000 1300
Chicago dressed (Anderson)......
Moulded................
Baltimore........................ 37 00 4100
Philadelphia .................... 19 00 2100
Trenton................ 1800 1900
Milwaukee......................
Moulded:
Glens Falls Red Pressed.......... 2900
Buff ...... 2700
Moulded Red & Buff 45 00 7000
Enamelled: Imp.
Enamelled (edge).... ... ... 8500 100 00
Enamelled (edge and end)....... 90 00 11000
CEMENT, LIME, eto.--( cask.)
Rosendale Cement..... ......... 95@ 100
Louisville ...........
Utica, Akron, Buffalo, Milw'kee. Not sold.
Portland, English (Gibbs)........ 2 25 2 0
S (K. B. & S.)... 2 50 @ 300
Black Cross.. 2 25 @ 250
(Burnham).... 2 50 @ 2 50
(White's)..... 265 @ 300
French (Lafarge)...... 3 60 @ 375
German (Alsen)........ 290 @ 325
(Fewer)....... 225 @ 240
(Vorwohler).. 2 0 @ 290
(Lagerdofer).. @
S (Dykerhoff).. 2 60 @ 290
(Hanover)..... 250@ 300
Stettin, (Anchor) 2 35 @ 2 85
American (Saylor's)... 2 15 2 25
Roman........................ 2750 300
Keene's coarse .................. @ 4 50
superfine................ @ 650
Lime:
Lime of Tell. .................... @ 400
Hydraulic Lime................. @ 145
Chicago Lime in bulk .......... St. John
Wisconsin Lime............... ( 80
Rockland and Rookport, (Com.).. O 8s
Rockland and Rockport, finish.. 91
Kelley Island Lime, finish.. .... @
State, corn. cargo rates.......... 80
tate, fnishing.................. 105 110
Plaster of Paris (calcined)....... 140@ 150
(casting)......................... 160
Hair (Cattle) bush ............ 16 @ 18
(Goat)..................... 18 @ .21
Sand, 7 load .................. 1000 125
STONE. (p cubic foot, rough.)
Granite: (Maine)
Limestone:
Bedford........................ 45@ 125
Joliet ............................ 100
Lemont*.......* ..o......*o...
Serpentine.......................


Boston.
Prices.) (Prices


Domestic Com.
850 0 950
Domestic Face
18000 2500
Philadelphia
35000 40 00
Phila. mould
50 000 80 00
Enamelled B'k.
Imported.
Enam. (edge)
95 00 @ 105 00
(edge & end)
11500@120 00
Domestic.
Enam. (edge)
90 00 @ 100 00
(edge & end)
110 00 @ 115 00


115@ 125
Brooks S & Co.
240 6 275
2400 275
240 @ 275
0 500
3000 350
Cleopatra
240@ 275
3000 350
Not Sold.

0 350
0 600
700@ 900


St. John 90
@ 95
0 100
Not sold.
Not sold.
1850 200
0 226
S80
1750 190
0 60
9560 100

10 50 per ton


Chicago.
to Builders and
Building Brick
500 550

Indiana Pressed
14 00 @ 20 00
St. Louis Fire-
clay
25000 3000
S. Louis pressed
2700 @ 3000
14000 2000
65000 35000
45 00 @ 5500
4500@ 56000 on
45 00 6000
12000 2500
60000 10000
300
3650
55000 6500
60 00 @ 90 00
75 000 105 00
Not sold.
90@ 100
900 100
2 60 @ 270
2 60 @ 270
260 @ 275
2 60 @ 2 75
2 50 @ 265
8 75 @ 425
300 320
3 20 @ 340
2 75 @ 300
3 10 @ 3 30
2 75 @ 290
2 85 @ 300
2 60 @ 270
2750 325
600 0 700
9000 10 50
Not sold.
50 60
50'0 60
Not sold.
Not sold.
100 bulk, 75c.
Not sold.
Not sold.
165 @ 175
17 @ 190
12 @ 16
200 25
1000 125
800 150
20 40
0
*


Philadelphia.
Contractors.)
In Yard.
Sq. Hard 9 00 1100
0 800
Salmon 6 00
Sq. 0 900
Light Stretchers
1100 @ 1400
Medium "
0 1200
Red
0 1300
Dark '
0 1300
Pressed
0 1800
Best Paving
11000 1500
Second "
0 1800
Third "




130@ 150
BS&Co2 75 300
2 85 325
2 85 315
2765 800
2 85 315
2 75 @ 285
Hemmoor
2 500 275
2 75 @ 285
Josson
2600 275
3000 325
2 76 @ 2 865
2 70 0 300
3000 350
650 0 700
8000 900
White Lime W bush
250 30
( White Mash
S125@ 150
1000 100

Not sold.
Not sold.
1 50 @ 2 2
1750 250
20 @ 25
30O 35
0 150
550 65
75 @ 85
Richmond
& 75 @ 150
Perch 4 50 a 5 50


Both Manufactured by

THE HUYETT & SMITH MFG. COMPANY,

Heating and Ventilating Engineers,
DETROIT, MICH.
Write for Catalogue, mentioning this paper.


NEW ENGLAND
FELT ROOFING
gsa~b's WO R KS,
115 *S i2 -MIK ST., BOSTON.
Incor-Orate& Originators of Felt Roof
1891 uing in New England.
Capitals/ f80.00. Inventors and only Mann-
-- facturers of the Celebrated
LE C.WLLs.7CT asz "BEEHIVE BRAND."


SO -Paged Illustrated Catalogue
of over 250 Designs of
Superior
WEATHER VANES,
TOWER ORNAMENTS,
CHURCH CROSSES,
FINIALS, Etc., Etc.
Mailed to any address for 2-cent
stamp-half the postage.
T. W. JONES, Manufacturer,
170-172 FRONT ST., New York.

Safety.....Satisfaction
WORTHLEY'S PATENT
"SLOW FEED"
OAT MANGERS
Over 9,000 in use.
Siz, 17 x 17 inches.
25 Pounds, 15 Quarts.
Painted (Standard Finish),
$1.60 each.
White Enamelled Finish,
$5.50 each.
Broad Gauge Iron Stall Works.
53 Elm St., Boston, Mass.




Heliotype Printing Co.,

211 Tremont Street, Boston.


ESTABLISHED 1872.



* PHOTO-LITHOGRAPH,


PHOTO-COLOR-LITHOGRAPH.


* PHOTO-GELATINE.


PHOTO-GRAVURE.


* PHOTO-ENGRAVING,


COPIES OF ARCHITECTURAL.
MECHANICAL AND OTHER
DRAWINGS, MAPS, PLANS, ETC.,
PORTRAITS, VIEWS AND ALL
BOOK ILLUSTRATIONS.



Heliotype Printing Co.


KEEP COOL
BY USING
THE SMITH
VENTILATING
FAN.


KEEP WARM
BY USING
THE SMITH
HOT BLAST
APPARATUS.


90@ 190
90 @ 1 00
260@ 270
260@ 270
260@ 275
2 60 @ 2 75
250@ 295
875@ 425
300@ 320
320@ 340
@
275@ 3OO
310@ 330
275@ 290
285@ 300
260@ 27O
275@ 325
600@ 700
900@ 10 0
2Yot sold.
50@ 60
GO'@ 6O
2V-o so .
Vot sold.
1 CO bulk, 75e.
Vot sold.
.Not sold.
1 65 @ 1 75
175@ 190
12 @ 16
20@ 25
100@ 125
80 @ 1 60 "
20 @ 40
@
@
@







MARCH 28, 1895.]


The American Architect and Building News.


IT COSTS MORE


to make the Genuine Taylor OLD STYLE brand of Roofing Tin than any other.

The work is all done by hand, exactly the same as sixty years ago.

No other plate is made in the same way.

No machinery or rolls to cover imperfections.

No artificial production of spangles to catch the eye.

It is the standard Roofing Tin of America.

It has NO EQUAL and is sold at a fair profit on exact cost.

Is a successful Roofing Tin of sixty years' service, worthy of preference WHEN ITS EQUAL IS NOT MADE ?


ESTABLISHED 1810.

86TH YEAR.


Checking Spring Hinges,

For SWINC DOORS.

APPLIED IN FLOOR UNDER DOOR.
rhei close the door gently, without noise or violence
and stop it at once at the centre. Doors can
not sag. Springs do not break or set.

J. BARDSLEY,
149-151 Baxter St., - NEW YORK.

Illustrated Price-list on application.


N. & G. TAYLOR CO., Manufacturers,


PHILADELPHIA.


L See Alphabetical Index on Cover 3 for Pagination.]

Cla is s iled. A.< dver-t isemae33at s.
[Advertisers can be indexed only under a single head free of charge].


Annunciators.
W. R. Ostrander & Co., New York.............
Architect's Materials.
Frost & Adams, Boston..................(eow)
Architectural and Decorat iv e
Works. Eyller & Co., Chicago Ill.........
Architectural Iron Work.
Globe Iron Works, Chicago, Ill................
Art Metal Work.
Ludlow Saylor Wire Co., St. Louis Mo..(mon)
Asbestos Felt & Boiler Covering.
II. W. Johns Mfg. Co., New York...............
Asbestos Paint.
H. W. Johns Mfg. Co.. New York..............
Asphalt.
Neuchatel Asphalte Co., New York........
N.-v York Mastic Works, New York...........
Aash Chute.
Connor Ash Chute Co., Holyoke, Mass.........
Asphalt Floors and Hgoofs.
W. A. Murtfeldt, Boston, Mass..................
Asphalt Roofing.
Warren Chemical & Mfg. Co., New York.......
Bank and Office Fittings.
A. H. Andrews & Co., Chicago, ll........ (eow)
Basin Cocks.
Stebbins Mg. Co., Brightwood, Mass.....(eow)
Bath Fixtures.
The Wm. Powell Co.. Cincinnati, Ohio........
Bath-Tub.
Miller & Coates New York.....................
J. L. Mott Iron Works, New York..............
Blue Prints. "
Spuld'ng PrinutPaper Co.,Boston Mass.(eow)
Boilers.
Babcock & Wilcox Co., New York..............
Bboks and Journals.
Babcock & Wilcox Co., New York..............
Ticknor & Co., Boston..........................
Brick (Colored).
Jarden Brick Co. Philadelphia Pa...........
Brick (Enamelled and Pressed).
American Enameled Brick & Tile Co., South
River, N. J....................................
Tiffany Pressed Brick Co., Chicago, Ill........
Brick (Ornamental).
Hydraulic-Press Brick Co., St. Louis........
W aldo Bros., Boston............................
Building Felt (Fire and Waterproof).
H. W. Johns Mfg. Co., New York..............
Building Stone.
Potsdam Red Sandstone Co., Potsdam, N. Y...
Butts (Wrought Steel).
The Stanley Works, New Britain. Conn........
Ceilings (Metal).
H. S. Northrop, New York......................
Wheeling Corrugating Co., Wheeling, W. Va..
Cement (Hydraulic).
F. 0. Norton Cement Co.. New York...........
Cement.
Alsen's Cement Works. New York.......(cow)
James Brand. New York.... .............
Brooks. Shoobridge & Co..New York..........
Johnson & Wilson, New York......... ........
Lawrence Cement Co., New York..............
Rosendale Cement Co.. New York..... .......
Chrome Steel Castings.
Chrome Steel Works.Brooklyn, N. Y....(eow)
Civil Engineer.
Oscar Lowinson, New York....................
Conservatories. Lord & Burnham Co.,
Irvington on-Hudson. N. Y ..................
Construction (Steel and Iron).
Shifter Bridge Co.. Pittsburgh, Pa.............
Consulting Engineer.
George Hil, New ork.........................
Contracting. Flynt Building & Construe-
tion Co.. Palmer, MLass.........................
Cordage.
Samson Cordage Works. Boston..........(eow)
Correspondence School. School of Meo
ichlnies and Industrial Sciences, Scrantoli, Pa.


Creosote Stains.
S. Cabot Boston...............................
Coverings (Boiler and-Pipe).
H. W. Johns Mfg. Co., New York..............
Decorative Stuffs.
Johnson & Faulkner, New York................
Decorators.
L. Haberstroh & Son, Boston..................
Door-Knobs.
J. Bardsley, New York........................
Door Hangers.
Lane Bros., Poughkeepsie, N. Y...............
Door Stop.
Beardsley Mfg. Co., Chicago, Ill...............
Electric Pumps.
Goulds Mfg. Co., Seneca Falls, N. Y...........
Elevators, etc.
Elektron Mfg. Co., Springfield, Mass..........
Graves Elevator Co., ochester, N. Y..........
Moore & Wyman, Boston... .............
Morse, Willims & Co., Philadelphia...........
Otis Brothers & Co., New York.................
Standard Elevator Co., Chicago, Ill.........
Whittier Machine Co., Boston.................
Winslow Bros. Elevator Co., Chicago, Ill......
Engines.
The E. P. Allis Co., Milwaukee, Wis....(mnon)
Fan (Ventilating).
Huyett & Smith Mfg. Co., Detroit, Mich......
Fireproof Building.
Henry Maurer, New York.....................
PioneerFireproof Construction Co.iChicago, Ill.
Fireproof Boors (Flexible).
Flexible Door & Slutter Co., Worcester, Mass.
Fireprcoofing.
Anerican Fireproofing Co., Boston, Mass......
Fireproof Floor.
H. B. Seely. Chicago, Ill............... ........
Fireproof Lathing.
Hayes Metallic Lathing, New York............
Fireproof Material.
C. Pardee, Perth Amboy, N. J..................
Fire Pumnps.
Goulds Mf". Co., Seneca Falls, N. Y...........
Floors. (Hardwood.)
% ood-Mosaic Co., Rochester, N. Y.... ........
Floors (Inlaid)
Interior Hardwood Co., Indianapolis, Id....
National Wood Mfg. Co., New York..........
Furniture (Special).
Chicago Interior Decorating Co., Chicago, Ill..
Gates.
Win. R. Pitt, New York.................(anon)
Glass (Stained and Ornamental).
Chambers Glass Co., New Kensington, Pa......
Maitland Armstrong & Co., New York.........
Matthews Decorative Glass Co., New York....
McCully Glass Co., Chicago, Ill..........(nmon)
Granite (Red).
Maine Red Granite Co., Red Beach, Me........
New Brunswiek Red Granite Co., Calais, Me..
Grates, etc.
Wm. H. Jackson & Co., New York..............
Greenhouses.
Hitchings & Co., New York..................
Hardware (Art).
Yale & Towne Mfg. Co., Stamford, Ct.........
Heating and Ventilating.
Percy N. Kenway, Boston .................
Smith & Anthony Stove Co.. Boston............
Heating-Apparatus (Hot Water).
R. J. Dillon Co. Chicago, ll...................
Gurney Heater Mfg. Co., Boston....... .......
Wilks Mfg. Co., Chicago................(mon)
Heating-Apparatus (Steam).
American Boiler Co., Chicago, Il1.............
Gorton & Lidgerwood Co., New York....(cow)
J. H. McLain Co. Canton, Ohio................
II. B. Smith Co., New York...................
United States Heater Co., Detroit. Mich........
Heliotype Process.
Ieliotype Printing Co., Boston...........(cow)


Hot-Blast Apparatus.
IIuyett & Smith fg. Co., Detroit, Mich....
Insulated Wire.
W. R. Brixey, New York................(cow)
The Okonite Co., (Ltd.) New York.......(cow)
Insurance.
Continental Insurance Co., New York...(eow)
Interior Decorations.
Chicago Interior Decorating Co., Chicago, Ill..
Interior Wood-work.
Matthews Bros. Mfg. Co., Milwaukee, Wis....
Iron-Work (Architectural).
Belmont Iron Works, Philadelphia, Pa...(eow)
Jackson Architectural Iron Works, New York.
Passaic Rolling Mill Co.. Paterson, N. J........
Phocuix Iron Co., Philadelphia.................
Laundry Machinery.
Oakley & Keating, New York..................
Nelson & Kreuter, Chicago, Ill.................
Troy Laundry Machinery Co., Troy, N. Y.....
Locks.
Norwalk Lock Co., Norwalk, Conn.........
MUail Chutes.
Cutler Mfg. Co., Rochester, N. Y..............
Marble Miosaics.
Aesehliilani n & Pellari, New York...........
Marble-Workers.
Batterson, See & Eisele, New York.............
Robert C. Fisher & Co., New York..............
Metal Lathing.
Cincinnati Corrugating Co., Piqua, Ohio.......
G. Hayes, New York.................. ........
Metal-W ork (Wrought).
Paul E. Cabaret, New York....................
John Williams, New York.....................
Mineral Wool.
American Mineral Wool Co., New York.......
Mortar Colors.
Samuel H. French & Co., Philadelphia.........
Mosaics (Ceramic).
Chicago Interior Decorating Co., Chicago, Ill..
Oats Cleaner.
Thomas Whitfield, Chicago, Ill..........(mon)
Oat Manger.
F. O. Worthley, Boston.....................
Organ Builders.
Farrand & Votey Organ Co., Detroit, Mich
................................... ..... (mon)
Paint.
F. W. Devoe & Co., New York............(cow)
Joseph Dixon Crucible Co., Jersey City, N. J..
I. W. Johns Mfg. Co., New York..............
Photographs.
J. W T r, Chicago, Ill......................
Pipe (Lead Lin d).
Lead Lined Iron Pipe Co., Wakefield, Mass.
....... ........................... ....... (cow )
Plaster Ornaments.
Samuel H. French & Co., Philadelphia, Pa.....
Plumbers.
T. II. Duggan, Boston........................
Pressure Regulators (Curtis).
D'Este & Seelcy Co., Boston...... ..........
Pumps (Steam).
Dean Bros, dinapolis, Ind................
II. R. Worthington, New York and Boston....
Radiators.
American Radiator Co., Chicago, Ill...........
Refrigerators.
McCray Refrigerator and Cold Storage Co.,
Kendallville, Ind.........................
Wickes Refrigerator Co., New York...........
Rolling-Shutter.
J. G. Wilson. New York......................
Roofers.
John Farquhar's Sons, Boston..................
Thomas J. Hind, Boston......................
James A. Miller & Bro., Chicago, Ill...........
Roofing Materials.
N. & G. Taylor Co. Philadelphia, Pa.....(eow)
N. E. Felt RoofingWorks, Boston..............
Thorn Shingle and Ornament Co., Phila., Pa..


Roofing Tiles.
Baltimore Itoofing Tile Co., Baltimore, iMd....
Sanitary Applinces.
Theo. Treiber & Co., Chicago, 111...............
Sanitary Supplies.
Iaiies, Jones& Cadlblir Co., P'lilaldellhil, PI.
Smith & Aintlioy Co., isiton...............
The HIenry llucr Co., New York..............
Sash-Chailns.
Smithi & Egge Mfg. Co., Britlgeplort, Conn.....
Sash-Cord.
Samson Cordage Works, Boston.......... .(rw)
Sash Pulley.
F. W. Stevens & Co., Newton Centre, Malss....
School of Architecture.
C. Powell Karr, New York............... (cow)
Seanless Drawn Con p e r Jirlage
Boilers.
iandolph & Clowcs, Waterlbury, Cioi.........
Separators (Curtis) for Steam and
Grease. D'Ette & Seel'y Co., Iston........
Sheet-arletal Work.
.1. S. Thorn, Philadelpli ........ ... (cow)
Shinglc-Stainls.
S. Calot, Bostont............
Dexter Bros., BoHton.......................
Shutters.
Clark, Bunnett & Co., New York ..............
Sidewalk Lights.
T. II. Brooks & Co., Cleveland, Ohio....(mon)
Sinks.
Kilbourne & Jacobs Mfg. Co., Coliumlbis, 0....
Skylikhts, etc.
G. Bickwelhlpt. No, y-rlk
] ,, ... .. ,. .. ... -- ..-. 1 '-a. ,. i .4
"V ,..I 1' ..., u sI.n .... '.1.i
Snovw Guard.
Folsom Snow Guard Co., Boston.... ... (mon)
Soap.
Pear' Soap Co., Great Britain ..................
Steam Pipe Covering.
Kenashey& Mattison Co., Alller, Pa ...........
SteamL 'raps (Curtis).
D'Este & Seeley Co., BoHton .............
Terra-Cotta.
Grueby Faience Co.; Boston..............
iidiininpolis Terra-Cotta Co., Briglltwood, Ild.
New York Arcliltectiral Terrn-Cotti Co., N. Y.
Perth Amboy Terra-Cotta Co., Perth Aillboy,
N. J. ..............................
The Northwestern Terra-Cotta Co., Cnicagi, Ill.
Winkle T'rra-Cotta Ci., Cheltelliiii, MiO......
Terra-Cotta Luimler.
Pittsburgh TerraCotta Lumber Co., Pitts-
burgh, Pt.................................
Traps.
F. If. Cudell, Clevehland, 0.............. (cow)
Valves and Packing.
Jenkins Bros., New York......................
Varnish.
Murphy & Co., Newark, N. J...............
Vault lights.
Dauchy & Co., Chicago... .............
Ventilation.
Globe Ventilating Co., Troy, N. Y..............

Wall Tie.
J. B. Prescott & Son, Webster, Mass ...... (ow)
Water-Closet.
Fred Adee & Co., New York..............(cow)
C. II. Mlckenhirn, Detroit, Mich...............
Water Lifters.
Goulds Mg. Co., Seneca Falls, N. Y...........
Weather Vanes.
T. W. Jones, New York....................
Window Line.
Samson Cordage Works, Boston..........(cow)
Wire Lathing, etc.
Clinton Wire Clotl Co., Clinton, Maus........
New Jersey Wire Cloth Co., Trenton, N. J....
Wood Filler.
Bridgeport Wood Finishing Co., New Milford
Conn.................. ...........


F' s r-I I -







The American Architect and Building .News.


[VOL. XLVII.-- No.' 1004.


OKONITE INSULATED ELECTRIC LIGHT WIRES.


TRADE MARK
WILLARD L. CANDEE,
H. DURANT CHEEVER,
GEO. T. MANSON, Gen'l S
W. H. HODGINS, Sec'y.


The Okonite Wire is pronounced by Architects to be a SAFE, DURABLE and EASILY
ADJUSTED WIRE, for the INSIDE WIRING of PUBLIC and PRIVATE BUILDINGS.
AWARDED A COLD MEDAL AT THE PARIS EXPOSITION.
BRANCHES: Boston, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Chicago, Omaha, Cincinnati, Minneapolis, San Francsco,
Louisville, St. Louis, Kansas City, South America, London.
}Managers. THE OKONITE COMPANY, L'T'D,
upt. Send for Catalogue and Prices. 1.8 P ErS. =.Lowr e'W 'ork..


THORN'S
PATENT

METALLIC ROOFING,
Tiles and Spring-lock Shingles.
8 DESIGNS
The best, most handsome,
durable and secure roofing
plates yet offered to the
building trade. Indorsed
by all the leading archi-
tects. Send for catalogue.
Thorn Shingle and
Ornament Co.,
1227 Callowhill St., Phlladelphia

PARTHIOK OR TlN.

PLAIN OR
ORNAMENTAL.
OF FINEST WOODS.

CAN BE LAID OVER OLD
FLOOR OR NEW.
Write for Book of Patterns.
The Interior Hardwood Co.
Mfrs. Indianapolis, Ind.FLOORS




Drawing- Office.



Drawings rendered in line or
color with reasonable despatch.

ADDRESS

Editors of the American Architect.


L HAABLRSTROII AND SON:


INE1iMOR DECORATORSa PMA1FTRS

9 Park5t- Cor. Beacorl
tfutiihc Felief 1o5to,1 Ma5- Tapcmtry-Leatte


ARCHITECTS AND BUILDERS KNOW
that the Heating is one of the most important questions in
regard to a Building.


THE "GORTON" BOILER

Always Satisfies."

It is Economical in fuel, Self-feeding and Automatic.

IT IS THE BEST BOILER MADE FOR HEATING PUBLIC
BUILDINGS AND PRIVATE RESIDENCES..


GORTON & LIDCERWOOD COMPANY,
96 Liberty Street, N. Y.
- CHICAGO. BOSTON.


Topographical Index of Advertisers.

[For pagination, see Alphabetical Index on page 3 of Cover.]


CONNECTICUT.
Bridgeport.
Smith & Egge Mfg. Co...........[Sash-Chain.]
New Britain.
The Stanley Works.....[ lWroght-Steel Buts.]
New Milford.
Bridgeport Wood Finishing Co..[ Wlool-Filler.]
Norwalk.
Norwalk Lock Co.......[ lBilders' hardware.]
Stamford.
Yale & Towne Mfg. Co.................[Locks.
Waterbury.
R ndolph & Clowes...........[Kitchen-Boilers.]
GREAT BRITAIN.
Pears' Soap Co..........................[Soap.)
ILLINOIS.
Chicago.
S.... . L, I .'
. ... .. II .. ... ,

II
I t re.................................. ..
Dlsnchy & Co..................[ Valt-Light.
Uillo r Co., thte T............I .[ err-leaCotera.
Eviler & Co f .[ArConsect'l ind Ccor.ative Fire.
Globe Iron Work.. ...............Stel ip
McCuIlv Glevtor Conpny.......[Sl r-G
Miller, .. A. & Bro.................. [o s.
Nelson & hKreuter....... .[Lxaundrll Mchiniert.,
Northwestern Terra-Cottl Co ..[Terra-Cotta.]
Pioneer Fireproof Construetiou Co......[1cre-
rooj j. .. ........ .... .. ... o.. ...
Selr. II. Bi.............. ...... [Fireproo Floor.
Staluard Elevutor Co..............[Elevators.
Taylor, J. W .. ................. [Photo- rphs..
Tifiny Pressed Brick Co...........R.... i ri.
Treiber, Theo. & Co ...... i.........[Soap Cp.
Whitfield, Tlhonas..............[Oas Ceer.
Wilks ,Mfg. Co.S... ............[ot Water
Winrslow Bro. Elevator Co.........[Elevators.
INDIANA.
BrIghtwood.
Ildinuapolis Terra-Cotts Co.....[L rT,ra-C tt.]
Indianapolis.
D.-n .- [rumps.i
I.,I . iIl ,, ,I I' Floors.
Kendallville.
MeCray Refrigerator and Cold-Storage Co.
..... ...........[........[ oolig-Ap rats.
MAINE.
Calais.
New Brunswick Red Granite Co..........iRc
Grhmite.)].................................
Red Beach.
Maine Red Granite Co........... [Reld ranile.]
MASSACHUSETTS,
Boston.


SGrueby Faience Co...[Enamelled Terra-Cotta.'
Gurney Heater Mfg. Co....... [lot water, etc.
Haberstroh & Son, L............ .[Decorators.'
HIeliotype Printing Co.........[Art Printing.)
Hind, Thomas ,J.............[Asphalt Roofing.
IHoones, F. S........... .......... ..[Vaults.1
enway, Percy N..........[Heating Engineer.
Moore & Wyman............... [Elevators.
Mlurtfeldt, W. A...[Asphalt Floors and Roofs.
New England Felt oofing Works...[Roofing.
Nightingale, S. C. & Childa...l[aagnesia Cover.
sgi.]. .........................................
Samson C l..* W.A. .
Sm ith & .t..,. ,, .. . ',
p lics.] .......... ..............................
Spuldig Print Paper Co........[Ite PIrints.
Waldo Bros ................. [Maons Supplieso.
Whitticr Machine Co ............... [Elevators.
Worthley, F. 0...................[Oat .langer.)
Brightwood.
Stebbins Mfg. Co................[Basin Cocks.)
Clinton.
Clinton Wire Cloth Co.......[Metallic Lathing.]
Holyoke.
Connor Ash Chute Co.......... .Coal-S'(fter.]
Newton Centre.
Stevens, F. W. & Co..............[SaSsh Pulley.]
Palmer.
Flynt Bruilding & Construction Co...[Brilding
Contrractors.]..................................
Springfield.
Elektron Mfg. Co..................[Elerators.]
Wakefield.
Lead Lined Iron Pipe Co............... [Pipes.
Webster.
Prescott, J. B. & Son............... all-Tie.]
Worcester.
Flexible Door & Shutter Co...[Flexible Parti.
tions.]........................................
MARYLAND.
Baltimore.
i .... .. R .; TileCo...............[Tiles.
S.. ...... .. [S lights.
MICHIGAN.
Detroit.
Farrand & Vote, Organ Co...[Church Oroans.
Iluyett & Smitli Mfg. Co............ [Fan.]
Muekenhirn, C. It..............[ Water-Clooet.'
United States Ieatesr Co..............[lIeaters.
MISSOURI.
St. Louis.
tydraulic-Press Brick Co ............. [Bricks.
Ladlow Saylor Wire Co.....[Art Metal- W'ork.
NEW JERSEY.
Jersey City.
Dixon Crucible Co., .os.............[[Graphite.]
Newark.
Murphy Varnish Co..................[ garnish.]
Paterson.
Passaic Rolling Mill Co......[SItrctrral Iron.]
Perth Amboy.
Pardee, C............... [Fireproof ~Material.]
Pertls Ahnlloy Terra-Cotta Co... [2'enr-Cotta.].


NEW JERSEY.
South River.
American Enameled Brick and Tile Co.
............................[Building Bricks.)
Trenton.
N. J. Steel & Iron Co..................[Iron.]
New Jersey Wire Cloth Co..... [etallie Lath.]
BrooklynNEW YORK.
Brooklyn.
Chrome Steel Works............[Chrome Steel.]
Irvington-on-H udson.
Lord & Burnham Co......... [Conservatories.]
New York City.
Adee & Co., Fred.......... .....[ater-Closets.
Aeschlimann & Pellarin......[Marble Mosaics.
Alsen's Cement Works.............. [Cements
American Mineral ool Co... ineral Wool.
Armstrong & Co., Maitland.. .[Stained-Glass.)
Babcock & Wilcox............... [Boilers
Bardsley, J..................... .[Doos Knobs.
Batterson, See & Eiselc ...... marblee Worers.
Bicklehoupt, G.....................[SA lights.
Brand, James.....................[. [Cemen s.
Brixey, W. R............ ....I. inlatd Wire.
Brooks, Shoobridge & Co.............[Cements.
Clark, Bnnett & Co ........[CeIling Shutters.
Continental Insurance Co .......... [Insrance.
Deane, E. Eldon.....................[Colorist.
Devoe& Co., F. W................ Paints.
Fisher & Co., Robert C............... arle.
Gorton & Lidgerwood Co.............. [oilers
Hayes, George............... [Metallic Lathing.
H tll, George.............[Cons. lting Engineer.
IIitchings Co....C............[ Green oues.
IIuber Co. The Henry..[Sanitary Specialties.
Jackson & Co., Wm. H............. e[Grates
Jackson Architectural Iron Works........ron
W ork. ........................ .........
Jenkins Bro ..........................[Valves.
Johns Mfg. Co., H. W ................ [Ashesto
Johnson & Faulkner........ [Decoratre Stuffs.
Johnson & Wilson....... .......... [Cements.
Joes, T. W...........................[Vanes.
Karr C. P ...........[Architectural Instrctor:.
Keasbey, A......... ..[Magnesia Corerings.
Lawrence Cement Co ....... .... [Cements.:
Lowinson & Jonson......... .[Civil Engineers.
Matthews DecorativeGlass Co. [Stained.Glass.
Maurer & Son, IIcenry........... [Fireproofing.
Miller & Coates...................[Bath-Tubs.
Mott Iron Works,. L ........... ..[Batuh-Ts."
National Wood Mfg. Co........ [Inlaid Floors.]
Neuchatel Asphalte Co........... ..Asphalt.'
N. Y. Architectural Terra-Cotta Co.... .[erra-
Cotta.] ........................................
New York Mastic Works............. [Asphalt.
Northrop, II. S.............. [Metal Ceilings.
Norton Cement Co., F. 0............. [Cemenets.
Oakley & Keating........ .[Lanndry Machines.
Okonte Co. (Ltd.) ............ [Insulated Wire.'
Ostrander & Co., W. ....... [Annunciators.
Otis Bros. & Co ..................... [Elevators:
Paradigm Construction Co........ .[Skylights:
Pitt W. R...................... [Foldng-Gates:
Raritan Hollow & Porous Brick Co..[Fireproof-
Ing.] ............. ..................
Rosendale Cement Co.......... ... [Cement.
Smith Co.. 1. B................. [Steam Ieat.
Standard Paint Co.................... [Paints.
Warren Chemical & Mfg. Co. [AMLfg alt Roofing.
Wickes Refrigerator Co ........ terigerators.
Williams, John................[C1rought Metal.
Wilson, Jas. G ............... [Rolling-Shutlers.
Wortliington, Henry R......... ..[Pumps.]


NEW YORK.
Potsdam.
Potsdam Red Sandstone Co........... [l ilding
Stone.] .... .......... .............
Poughkeepsle.
Lane Bros..................... [Door angers.l
Rochester.
Cutler Mfg. Co................. [Mail Chutes.]
Graves Elevator Co....................[Elevators.
Wood-Mosaic Co..........[Hlardwood Floors.]
Seneca Falls.
Goulds Mfg. Co..............[Electric Pumps.]
Troy.
Globe Ventilator Co.............[Ventilato.s.]
Troy Laundry Machinery Co...[ l'asimng a-
c/tnes..... .........................

Canton. OHIO.
J. H. McLain Co................. ratingg.]
Cincinnati.
Powell Co., The William...... [Plumber's Sup
plies..............: .................."...
Cleveland.
Brooks, T. H. & Co.......... [Sidewalk Ligh t.]
Cudell, F. E....................... ......[TLrap.]
Columbus.
Kilbourne & Jacobs Mfg. Co............[Sinks.]
Piqua.
Cincinnati Corrugating Co.....[Metallic Lath.]
PENNSYLVANIA.
Ambler.
Keasbey & Mattison Co...[Magnesia Coverings.]
Philadelphia.
Belmont Iron Works............... Ironwok.
French & Co., Samuel II...... [Mortar Colors.]
Haines, Jones & Cadbury Co... [Plwuber'a St -
plies.] ....................................
Jarden Brick Co..................[Bricks.
Morse, Williams & Co...............[Elevators.]
Phenix Iron Co............... [Structural ronl
Taylor Co., N. & G ...................... [i.]
Thorn, J. S. Co...............S....l eet Melal.\
Thorn Shingle & Ornament Co........ [Metallic
Slingles. .......... ................
Pittsburgh.
Pittsburgh Terra-Cotta Lumber Co......[Fire.
Shifier Bnrdge Co ......... [Structural Irotn rid
Steel.] ......... ....................
Scranton.
Correspondence School of Industrial Sciences.
[Architecture.] ...................
WEST VIRCINIA.
Wheeling.
Wheeling Corrugating Co......[Metal Ceiling.]
WISCONSIN.
Milwaukee.
Matthewa Bros. Mfg. Co.......[Anterior Wood-
wTh r E .................... .
The E. P. Allis Co............... [Eslgireers.].


I -p 'I -Ia


9Y~0-I ----


L ---4r~-R~lla~-r I --- -- L I I




The American Architect and Building Neews.


BOAT-HOUSE
of the

BOSTON ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION,
at
RIVERSIDE, MASS.












Stained, in the Club Colors, with

CABOT'S CREOSOTE SHINGLE STAINS.
Special coloring effects, in any shade that can be made in fast
pigment colors, can always be furnished to suit special cases like the
above, and with very little delay. Great as is the variety of our
regular standard colors there is a greater variety still in these special
shades which have been made from time to time to suit the taste of
architects all over the country. They include such tints as "Mustard
Yellow," "Sap Green," "Lichen Gray," etc. Creosote Stains were
the first exterior stains ever made, and are first in all points of
shingle-stain excellence, and first in the favor of those who have used
them.
Send for Samples and Information.

SAMUEL CABOT, Sole Manufacturer,
Agents at all Central Points. BOSTON, MASS.


MAR9,u: 23, 1895.]






The American Architect and Building News


[VOL. XLVII.-No. 1004
tk


' From St. Eustache, Paris.


From St. Enstache, Paris.


From the Mus6e de Lille, France.


From Temple of Mars Ultor, Rome.


From the ClhAteau de Chambord.


Composite Capital.


RENAISSANCE CAPITALS.





The Amervcan Architect and Building News.


AMA~EICAN 1ADIATORS

Acknowledged Best
Honestly Constructed
Circulation Positive
Artistic, Simple, Durable.
Made in endless variety.
Largest Radiator makers in the World.


AMEKGIAN IAIATO COMPANY
111-113 Lake Street, Chicago.


BRANCHES:
New York. Philadelphia. Minneapolis
Boston. St. Louis. Denver.
London, Eng.


For Steam and
Hot Water.


PERFECTION.


FACTORIES: Detroit and Buffalo.


Manufacturer
"CHAMBERS EAGL



Window
1st Quality. 2d Quality.
-v C


Steel Lath.


"Piqua" Lath is made from the best quality of steel, in sheets 27 x 48
inches, and each sheet covers exactly one square yard of surface. The corru-
gations shown in cut are 34 'inches between centers, thus insuring the
greatest rigidity. Samples and prices on application.
THE CINCINNATI CORRUGATING CO., Box 330, Piqua, Ohio.


26oz. CRYSTAL SHEi T.

This Glass is almost equal to Polished Plate,
And less expensive.

Packed with paper between each light
to prevent scratches.

SEND FOR PRIICE LTSTS.


CHAMBERS GLASS CO.
New Kensington, Pa.
Branch Office:
1442 Monaduock Block,
CHICAGO, ILL.

McCRAY REFRIGERATOR AND
COLD STORAGE CO.,
Cooling Rooms for public Institutions", hotels,
Fine Residences, Groceries, and
Meat 1Markets.
KENDALLVILLE, IND.


FU TURE, 2IANTELS, ii Pulley.
3 neoeceFxtn .' -ey.
V EbTIMATE-0 PROMPTLY
U~A ------INI 'HED. '

f 66P68RTI3MT. IL\.AUKEEWlI.
HITCHINGS & CO., Established 50 years
HORTICULTURAL ARCHITECTS AND BUILD ERS -/. i/7
and largest Manufacturers of
GREENHOUSE HEATING AND VENTILATING APPARATUS.
A New Principle in Sash Pulleys, being applied
above the Pulley style, and possessing the follow-
ing advantages over any other:
First. Entirely concealed from view.
Second. No openings for insects or air.
Third. Gives b5 T more pocket room than any other
4 pulley, saving the necessity of lead weights.
eFourth. Does away with the necessity of having
OR 111"1W1111 sashes grooved.
.Fifth. Is more easily applied than any other pulley.
-" -Sixth. It is cheaper than any other high grade
pulley, and can be used for ribbon, chain, or cord.
:Seventh. Windows run much easier with this
pul!eiy.
The highest awards received at the World's Fair for Horticultural Architecture, Greenhouse Construe- Eighth. The pulley is out of the way of blind
tion andlieating Apparatus. Conservatories, Greenhouses, Palmhouses, etc., erected complete with our staples.
Patent Iron Frame Construction. Manufactured and for sale by
Send four cents for Illustrated Catalogues. F. W STEVENS & CO.,
233 MERCER STREET, N. Y. CITY. P. O. Box 95. NEWTON CENTRE, MASS.


"Piqua"


s of
E BRAND"



Glass
3d Quality.

e G


I


MARCH 23, 1895.]


~ARK~





The American Architect and Building. News.


[VOL. XLVII. No. 1004.


SAMUEL FARQUIIAR. ESTABLISHED 1836.
JOHN FARQUHAR'S


DAVID W. FARQUHAR.
SONS.


Slate, Copper, Tin and Gravel Roofing.
Nos. 20 and 22 EAST STREET, BOSTON.
Order Box at Master Builders Association, Special attention given to Repairs
164 Devonshire Street.| of all kinds.
Inventors and owners of Farquhar's Patent Slate Fasteners, for securing slates to iron roofs,
acknowledged to be the strongest method in use, and ]ias been applied to many of the best
constructed and largest buildings in this country.
Contracts made for Work wherever desired.


A PHALT ROOFING O PAVING
AHALT MATERIALS.
WARREN'S "ANCHOR BRAND" NATURAL ASPHALT ROOFING. WARREN'S NATURAL ASPHALT READY ROOFING.
Send for circulars, samples and specification forms to
WARREN CHEMICAL & MFG. CO. - 81 & 83 Fulton Street, NEW YORK, U.S.A.
THE JENKINS AUTOMATIC AIR VALVE has proved to be all
we claimed for it, i. e., a Positive and Reliable Air Valve. The ex-
pansible plug is a special compound, and MANUFACTURED EX-
PRESSLY for use in the JENKINS AUTOMATIC AIR VALVE. It
does not deteriorate or lose its flexibility under the action of heat or steam.
With the Jenkins Automatic Air Valve, you should connect with
a drip pipe, thus insuring a positive circulation. We guarantee them
to be as repre sented. Our trade-mark is on every Valve.
JENKINS BROS., New York, Boston, Chicago, Philadelphia
If you SPECIFY
Send
for
Samples.
amps SAMSON SPOT CORD
You can tell at a glance that no other cord is substituted. It is
warranted to be of pure Cotton, smooth finish and perfect braid.
Samson Cordage Works, Boston, Mass.

"BROOKLYN BRIDGE" BRAND
NT ROSENDALE CEMENT
.o 4 HYDRAULIC CEMENT
/. ,N CE WARRANTED SUPERIOR TO ANY MANUFACTURED.
O pun- 0 STRONGEST, DARKEST, BEST,
-O-FFICE -- ALWAYS FRESH.
.280BRD A/ USED ON THE
( RooM61 )
NEWYORK. NEW YORK AND BROOKLYN BRIDGE,
WASHINCTON BRIDGE, Harlem River.


Telephone, 190 Franklin.


WM. C. MORTON, Sec'y.


ASPHALT FLOORS
ROOFS,
SIDEWALKS AND CARRIAGE-WAYS
Of Public Buildings. Hospitals,
Warehouses, Stables, Cellars, etc.
Laid with VAL de TRAVERS ROCK ASPHALT,
DURABLE, FIREPROOF AND IMPERVIOUS.
For estimates and list of works executed, apply to
THE NEUCHATEL ASPHALT CO., Limited,
265 BROADWAY. - NEW YORK.


Brown's Patent Seamless
DRAWN COPPER HOUSE BOILERS.
Cannot collapse.
Will not leak.
Ordinary boiler tested to 200 lbs.
Extra heavy tested to 300 Ibs.
Made of two seamless drawn cop-
per Shells.
Handsomest, best and strongest
In the market.
Send for circular giving Instruc-
tions for prevention of accident.
xAnurAeorvBD sol.sLr aT
XANWACTUERD SOEULY UT
RANDOLPH & CLOWES,
Waterbury, Conn.
Western Depot: 71 West Washington
St., Chicago. Branch Offices : 104
John St., New York ; Room 320 Phila-
99 Milk St.. Boston ; Room 208, Neave
Building, Cincinnati.
Proprietors of the Brown & Bros. Tub-
ing and Boiler Works, and the Brown &
Bros. Brass and Copper Rolling Mills.
Maius o0 SEAMLESS AND BRAD TUBING OF ALL KINDS,


Chicago Interior Decorating Co
'Bank, Office & Club
Equipments.
Mantels,Tiles,CeramicMosaics
FINE SPECIAL FURNITURE.
Highest grade of first class goods.
Drawings and Estimates furnished upon application.
149 & z50 Michigan Ave., Chicago, IlI.
Formerly occupied Henr ibblee Co.
by the enry Dibblee Co.


PARQUET FLOORS.
The National Wood Manufacturing Co.,
129 5th Avenue, New York.
WAINSCOTINGS and CEILINGS.
Inlaid Wood Floors 5-16. and
7-8 inch thick.
Solid work, Tongued and Grooved
ill each piece.
Designs & Estimates on applica-
tion. Established 1867.


Absolutely .


Fire-Proof.


MAGNESIA

Sectional Steam Pipe and Boiler Coverings.

THE GREAT COAL=SAVER.


SELLING AGENTS:SELL AGENT
Boston, S. C. Nightingale & Childs, 131 Pearl St. MANUFACTURED BY Detroit, S. P. C A S E:
New York. Robert A. Keasbey, 54 Warren St. NFCTUED BY Detroit, S. P. Cooling 20 Atwater St., Est.
Philadelphia. Macan & Co., 1420 Callowhill St. Minneapolis, Arthur L. Otto, 219 So. Third St
Baltimore, Wallace & Bro., 432 E. Pratt St. Des Moines, J. C. & R. B. Carter.
Washington, Wm.B. Morgan, Builders, Ex. THE KEASBEY a MATTISON C0,, Denver, S.nW.Badgler & o.,8th S Market Sts.
Omaha, Spencer Otis, 307 S. 16th St.
Chicago, Walch & Wyeth, 208 Lake St. Kansas City. J. H. Stoner & Co.
New Orleans, Delbert Engin'g Co., 23 Union St. Denver, W. Badgley & Co.,18th & Market Sts.
Memphis, Symmes & Co., 162 ront St. Salt Lake City, Utah & Montana Machinery Co.
Milwaukee. F. Sprinkman 133 Syamore St. CINCINNATI: AMBLER, CLEVELAND: Butte City, Montana- R. W. James.
t. Loaus, F. Boler, 108Walnut St. 114 West Second St Franciso, eo a Dessing, 2 Cala. St.
St. Louis, F. er, 108 Walnut St. 114 West Second St. PA. 117 Water St. Montreal, Selater Asbestos Manufacturing Co.


The only Rubber Insulation Awarded Medal at World's Fair, Chicago, U. S.A., 1893.

High Grade Insqlated Wires for Interior Use
Electric Light Wires and Feeders.


WRITE FOR CATALOGUE.


Kerite Elastic Tape.


W. R. BRIXEY. Manufacturer, 203 Broadway, NEW YORK.


KeriteoTape.


I


ir p





The American Arclh ect and Building .News.


POINTS ON VARNISH.
NO. 298.-" WE OFFER
the highest wages going,
for an ideal workman on
-. We can-
not afford lower wages
for any fairly good work-
man." Such is an old
ad. that was brought to
our notice.
A famous hotel
keeper remarked that
people never grumbled
at the price, when they
were perfectly satisfied
with the fare. If you
want a dress-suit or a
saddle-horse or a wed-
ding present or some en-
tertainment for a visit-
ing friend, exactly the
right thing is never ex-
pensive, but a fairly good
thing always costs too
much.
There are many things
whose entire value is in
the fact that they are
exactly right. The only
value of a silk hat is the
style of it. Out of style,
it is worse than valueless
-it is -boorish. There
is no such thing as a
bargain in faded flowers
or last week's newspa-
pers. Even so; the value
of fine varnish for hard
wood is the beauty of
it. Varnish which does
not give and preserve
beauty has no value. It
is expensive, though you
get it for a song. The
ideal varnish, which costs
but a trifle more, is the
only thingyou can afford.
MURPHY VARNIS-H CO.
FRANKLIN MURPHY, President.
Head Office: Newark, N.J.
L'ther Offices; Boston, Cleveland, St. Louis, Chicago.
Factories Newark and ChicapO


Hav

used


e you
Pears'


soap?


Pears'

Do you know

the most luxu-

rious bath in

the world?


sins are cWnipfosed/ oapure in//e -
o/dllnd/klehighest/grddeo/lpmlr n/X: 75-eyrdre -
combined by processes exc/usie/y ozir own ndidre unequa/rledb ny /ric mnefssndd pelnla cyo/
ci/or. One qall/n willcover rom 275 to 300 sarefere. two coals wtlhotl tAhi/ngnd Cdca/ be
saldythinn'odW'ifh gadl /nn seed oil to one qdl/on n/nl /or/ first co. -
SAMlPI CAR) Orff IES. ISfRUCflONS fol Qe AND IifGGf.ESIONS oR PA1flN6 ETc. FRiE SY
New York, Jersey City, H. Jons M i e CO.
Chicago, Philadelphia, Boston.


TAMPED STEEL CEILINGS
H 5 NORTHROP 30-o5E5T NEW ORK:
W. L. WEDCER, Boston Agent, 4 Liberty Square.
JOHN WILLIAMS, 644 to 556 West 27th Street, New York.
WROUGHT IRON AND BRASS WORK TO SPECIAL DESIGNS ONLY.
Tiffany & Co., N. Y.; Cottier & Co., N. Y.; L. Marootte & Co., N. V.: MoKIm, Meadl
REFERENCES: White, N. Y.; Babb, Cook & Willard, N.Y.; Bruce Price, N. Y.; B.M. Hunt, N. Y.; Bailey,
Banks & Biddle, Phila.; rran Hill Smith. Boston.; A. H. Davenport, Boston.
Awarded the Grand Prize at the late Paris Exposition.


MAacH 23, 1895.]


F. W. DEVOE & CO.
(Established 1852.)
Fulton St., cor. William, New York.
No. 176 Randolph St., Chicago.
Pure Ready-mixed Paints.
We desire to call attention of con-
sumers to the fact thaL we guarantee
our ready-mixed paints to be niado
only of pure linseed oil and the most
permanent pigments. They are not
"Chemical," "Rubber," Patent," or
"Fireproof." We use no secret or
patent method in manufacturing them
by which benzine and water are made
to serve the purpose of pure linseed oil.
Sample cards, contalning fifty de-
sirable shades sent on application.
FINE VARNISHES.
Hard Oil-Finish & Wood-Stains.
Illustrated Catalogue of Engineers' and
Architects' Supplies, 250 pages, 700
Illustrations, on request.
White-Lead Colors in Oil and Japan.
JW-TAYLOR'S IHOTOCRAPH SERIES .
qSIMDNBDESTOlCAGGC 1 FAMERICAN ARCITFCTURE,
Removed to Owings Building.
Send two 5 cent stamps for Catalogue.







xii The American Architect and Building News. [VOL. XLVII.--No. 1004.


The American Architect

and BuildinA News
IS PUBLISHED BVBRY SATURDAY BT

The American Architect and Building News Co.,
211 TREMONT ST., BOSTON. MASS.

Advance Subscription Rates.
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Address all business correspondence to the
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Advertising Agents.
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Agent at Large: -
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Advertising rates: For wants" and proposals,"
15 cents per line [8 words to the line], each inser-
tion. 50 cents the least charge. Other rates on ap-
plication.

New Advertisements.
N. & G. TAYLOR CO. (Philadelphia, Pa.), Roofing
Tin. Page v.
NEW BRUNSWICK RED GRANITE CO. (Calais,
Me.), Red Granite. Page xiii.
R. J. DILLON CO. (Chicago, Ill.), Water-heaters.
Page xvi.
THE WINKLE TERRA COTTA CO. (St. Louis, Mo.)
Architectural Terra-cotta. Page xx.
HENRY HUBER CO. (New York, N. Y.), Hot-water
Apparatus. Page xv.
LOWINSON & JONSON (New York, N. Y.), Archi-
tectural Engineers. Page xii.

WANTED.
W ANTEI) by an exclusive manufacturing concern,
an intelligent man of good address and personal
magnetism, capable of introducing himself and his
work, with gentlemanly tact and prudence. Acquaint-
ance among first-class architects and builders desir-
able but not essential. Salary $1,000 and commission
with advancement according to results. State par-
ticulars and qualifications. "Opportunity," care of
N. W. Keane, 21 Park Row, New York. 1001
WANTED.
A YOUNG man or woman to make drawings for
ornamental metal-work. One trained in a school
of design preferred. A permanent position to one
who can satisfactorily fill it. Address "T.," care of
American Architect. 1005
WANTED.
TEEL construction for buildings, bridges, etc.
S Designing of this class of work wanted by an ex-
perienced structural engineer. Address J. B. Hurtig,
Box 396, Cincinnati, 0. 1006
WANTED.
OSITION.-A first-class draugltsman, accustomed
to work on the best class of buildings and thor-
oughly familiar with office details, desires a position
as draughtsman. or to take charge of draughting-
room. Address "F. A. D.," care of American Archi-
tect. 1004
WANTED.
POSITION.- Architectural draughtsman and de-
signer, original, exact and experienced in all
branches, open for engagement. Address "B.," 1840
Camac St., Philadelphia, Pa. t.f.
WANTED.
PARTNER.-A fairly good opening in Southern
California for a young architect who must seek a
southern climate on account of health. Address
"California," care of American Architect. 1004

ARCHITECTS' REMOVALS, Etc.

A E. MUNGER has opened an office at 418 Bear-
inger Building, Saginaw, Mich., and will -be
pleased to receive catalogues and samples. 001
HAPMAN & NICKSON have opened an office at
S38 Kelly Building, Akron, 0., and will be pleased
to receive catalogues and samples. 1004
ILLIAM'_E. PATT has opened an office at 174
Weybosset St., Providence, R. I., and will be
pleased to receive samples and catalogues. 1004

E. ELDON DEANE,
Architectural Colorist and Draughtsmnan.
54 BIBLE HOUSE. NEW YORK CITY.

F. S. HOLMES, M. E.,

VAULG ENGINEERING
1101 Betz Building, Philadelphia,

Plans, Specifications and Superintendence of Vault
and Safe Construction.


The Duplex

Water Lifter
Shown herewith is a great though inex-
pensive luxury in cities where pressure is
low, or the water itself hard. Operated
automatically, without waste, by the city
water pressure. No care, attendance or
fuel. No noise, smell or danger. All
Architects, Builders and Plumbers should
investigate this invention. A special cata-
logue mailed on application to

THE GOULDS MANUFACTURING CO.,
Manufacturers of PUMPS and HYDRAULIC MACHINERY,
Works& Main Offices: Seneca Falls, N. Y.,U. S. A. Warerooms: 16 Murray St., New York City.
Or Nearest Branch Agency-THE GOULD CO., 22 and 24 North Canal St., Chicago. III.
SITH & WINCIIESTER CO., 1 to 87 Wendell St.. Boston, Mass. WOODIN & LITTLE, 812 & 314 3arketSt.,SnFanFranele, Ca.
5 O NELSON MFG. CO., Eighth & St. Charles StreetI, St. Lonla, Mo. L. M. BATES, 821 Vine Street, Philadelphias Pa.



C. 111~ 111


PERCY N. KENWAY,
85 WATER STREET, BOSTON.
Plans and specifications for Heating and
Ventilating Apparatus.



GEQ. HIL CONSULTING ENGINEER,
CEO, HILL, BUILDINGS.
44 Broadway, N. Y. CITY.

LOWINSON & JONSON,

ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERS,
PLANS, SPECIFICATIONS AND
SUPERINTENDENCE FURNISHED.

39 & 41 CORTLANDT ST., NEW YORK.

See last or next issue for the following
advertisements.
Chrome Steel Works.
Connor Ash Chute Co.
Continental Insurance Co.
F. E. Cudell.
Thomas J. Hind.
C. P. Karr.
Lead Lined Iron Pipe Co.
Norwalk Lock Co.
Smith & Egge Mfg. Co.
Spaulding Print Paper Co.
J. S. Thorn Co.

See the first issue of the month for the fol-
lowing advertisements.
Edward P. Allis Co.
Alsen's Portland Cement Works.
T. H. Brooks & Co.
Farrand & Votey Organ Co.
Folsom Snow Guard Co.
Brooks, Shoobridge & Co.
Lane Bros.
McCully Glass Company.
Potsdam Red Sandstone Co.
Wm.R. Pitt.
E. Thiele.
Ludlow Saylor Wire Co.
S. Wilks Mfg. Co.
Thomas Whitfield.


BUILDING PATENTS.

(Printed specifications of any patents here mentioned
together withfull detail illustrations, may be obtained
of the Commissioner of Patents, at Washington, for
ten cents.\

535,343. ELEVATOR. -Norman C. Bassett, Chicago,
Ill.
535,354. COMBINED FURNACE AND BOILER.--Jas.
Cotter, Kansas City, Mo.
535,363. ELECTRIC HEATING APPARATUS.--Mark
W. Dewey, Syracuse, N. Y.
535,366. VALVE.-David W. Field, Philadelphia,
Pa.
535,375. SLIDE-RULE. -Ebenezer Hill, South Nor-
walk, Conn.
535,382. PORTABLE GRATE FOR BRICK-KILN FIRE-
PLACES. William M. Leonard, Oshtemo, Mich.
535,394. TINNING-MACHINE.-Edwin Norton, May-
wood, 111.
535,441. STEAMf-BOILER.-John Buckley, Rochester,
N.Y.


BUILDING PATENTS.

535,468. DUPLEX SELF-CLOSING FAUCET. Harry
S. Teal, Chicago, Ill.
535,497. LOCK-BRICK.- George J. Herth, Evans-
ville, Ind.
535,513. VISE.--Joseph O. Therien, Minneapolis,
Minn.
535,515. SEWAGE DISPOSAL. George E. Waring,
Jr., Newport, R. 1.
535,516. METHOD OF DEODORIZING SEWAGE-FIL-
TERS. -George E. Waring, Jr., Newport, R. I.
535,525. LOCK.-Robert R. Ball, New York, N. Y.
535,585. METALLIC LATHING.-George Hayes, New
York, N. Y.
535,587;' MANUFACTURE OF RUSSIA IRON.-Alfred
Hiles. Chartiers, Pa.
535,612. FIREPROOF FLOOR OR CEILING.-Wm.
H. Brown, Indianapolis, Ind.
535.634. CHIMNEY AND VENTILATOR CAP.-Fred'k
C. Stober and Henry A. Stober, Sacramento. Cal.
535,656. EAVES-TROUGH. Hugh Andrews, Anna,
Ill.
535,663. ATTACHMENT FOR CHIMNEYS, ETC. -
Allen H. Blackburn. Petaluma, Cal.
535,681. SECTIONAL STEAM-GENERATOR. Louis
M. G. Delaunay-Belleville, Paris, France.



BUILDING INTELLIGENCE.
(Reported for The American Architect and Building News.)

[Although a large portion of the building intelligence
is provided by their regular correspondents, the editors
greatly desire to receive voluntary information, espe*
cially from the smaller and outlying.towns.]

ADVANCE RUMORS.
Algiers, La.- School-house to cost $10,000 will be
built.
Anderson. Ind.- The Hill Machine Co. will put up
a 36' x 118' machine-shop.
Andover, Mass. -The building of a brick school-
house is contemplated.
Bangor, Me. An insane asylum is to be built about
two miles out of this city.
Boston. Mass. -Ellen M. Fenno will build a house
to cost about $50,000, on the vacant lot at 450 Beacon
St.
Boydton, Va. -A jail is to be built. Address the
county clerk.
Brattleboro, Vt.-The town has voted $25,000 for
remodelling and extending the Town-hall, to include
an opera-house. A new vault for town records, to
cost not over $4,000, will also be built.
Brookline, Mass.-H. W. Phillips will build 2 frame
dwells., to cost about $18,000, on Winthrop Road,
and will also build 3 frame dwells., to cost about
$30,000, on Addington Road.
Cambridge, Mass. It is reported that a new build-
ing, to cost $25,000, will be built for Harvard Uni-
versity.
Camden, Ark.-The Methodists will build a new
church to cost $9,000.
Catonsville, Md. Charles D. Carson, of Balti-
more, is making plAns for the new $100,000 hotel to
be built by John Hubner and others of that place.
Chapel Hill, N. C.-The Y. M. C. A. will build a
three-st'y building to cost $20,00.
Charleston, W. Va.-The Masons will build four-
st'y building, 75' x 127', to cost $45,000 from plans by
H. L. Rowe, of Lexington, Ky.
Cohoes, N. Y. The Commissioners have accepted
the plans of Franklin S. James, of Albany, for the
new city-hall. It will be three stories with mansard
and tower of brick and stone, 64' x 184f, and cost
$65,000. The site is cor. Mohawk and Ontario Sts.
Columbus, O.-A new hospital will be built at the
State Penitentiary.






MARCH 23, 1895.] The Ameracan Architect and Building Nyews xiii

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WHEELING CORRUGATING COj Office and Warehouse, No. 81 Fulton St., New York.

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TURNED respectfully
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Descriptive Cirrclars on application.
CARVED THE W. POWELL CO.,

SA W E D IN SLA BS Makers of Plumbing Specialties. CINCINNATI, OHIO.
We make a specialty of
FINE INTERIORS, BANK AND OFFICE FITTINGS,
in wood and metal.
S S STENOGRAPHER'S CHAIR, $5.00
STONES New BruOFFICE CHAIRS OF ALL GRADES
30 feet in length. A. H. ANDREWS & CO.
Calais, Me. 215 Wabash Av. CIICAGO

ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING BULDINGINT ENC
(Advance Rumors Continued.)
Architecture; Mechanics, Mechanical Drawing; Electricity; Masonry; Carpentry and Paris, Ill. -Plans and specifications have been pre-
Joinery; Ornamental and Structural Iron Work; Steam Engineering (Stationary, Loco- pared for a brick theatre to be built by L. A. G.
motive or Marine); Railroad Engineering ; Bridge Engineering; Municipal Engineerig; Shoaff on Court St.
Plumbing and Heating; Coal and Metal Minig; Prospecting, and the English Branches. er Peoria, Ill.- Work will begin at once upon two ad-
Sditional distilleries with a capacity of 10,000 bushels
The courses commence with addition in Arithmetic, so that to enroll it is only neces- t each. M. J. Greenhut is in charge.
sary to know how to read and write. Architecture offers splendid opportunities to Piedmont, Ala. -N. A. Alexander will increase his
women ambitious to become self-supporting. Students make rauid progress in learning plant for manufacturing bent rims, spokes, hubs,
to Draw and Letter. The Steam Engineering course is intended to qualify engineers to handles, etc.
secure Licenses. All representations may be relied upon. Send lor Free Circular, stat- school-b s ar
ing the subject you wish to study, to Pittsfield, Mass. -- ore school-buildings are con-
templated.
THE INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS, Scranton, Pa. TisAnsAEMsnEsrTe. Portland, Conn.-Hlorace I. Buck, of Worcester,
Mass., has offered to give the town a sumi of money
BUILDING INTELLIGENCE. BUILDING INTELLIGENCE. for a public library building. The town has ac-
BUILDINGI____________ __ U__ [N______.cepted the gift and voted to build.
(Advance Rumors Continued.) (Advance Rumors Continued.) Portland, Me. -Tho Odd Fellows of this placo will
Concord, N. H.-A school-house is proposed. Lexington, Ky.-There is a project for all the b a ew .
The heirs of James R. Hill will build a large brick women's clubs in Kentucky to organize into a stock Rector, Ark. -M. E. Lesem will build a 40-barrol
business block on Hill's Ave. company and put up a Women's Building. flour-mill.
The project for building an opera-house here has Madison, Ga.-Two public schoolbuildings are con- Richmond, Va.--The Cyclorama of the Battle of
been revived. templated at a cost of $25,000. Gettysburg will be removed to this city and an
Dexter, Me.-A new Normal School Building is being Malden, Mass. -The City Council has appropriated a ing be lfor its ccomodation o h
considered. $100,000 for a new high school, and $35,000 for a new dMa .
Findlay, O.--The Council is agitating the question police-station with stables. Rochester, N. Y. Members of United Presbyterian
of a new city building. The new police-station on Mountain Ave., will Church, Rev. J. P. Sankey, contemplate building a
Fitchbarg, Mass. -Abel Bartlett will build a chair- cost about $35,000. new church to cost $40,000.
factory. A four-st'y brick business block will be built on Salem, Mass.--It is said that C. S. Buffum will
fond du L W A t bili, to Pleasant St., nearly opposite the Y. M. 0. A. build a hotel on the site of his block, recently
Fond du Lac, Wls.--A two-st'y building, to ac- H. D. erxa will build upon the lot next east to burned, on Washington St.
comodate 50 students, will be built by the Episcopal the Masonic Block. Salinevlle. Vrydagh & Wolfe, of PiLtsburgh,
Seminary, Grafton Hall. Sallneville, 0.--Vrydagh & Wolfe, of PIttsburgh,
e, Ar. T n o i i Mansfield, O.-H. C. Lindsay. of Zanesville, will Pa., are making plans for an eight-room brick
Gillett, Ark. -The M. E. Church South will build a make plans for two eight-room brick school-houses. school-house to cost about $20,000.
Goshen, Ind. -$15,0hasbeenappropriated by the Marion, O.-A new Union depot will probably be Sand Mountain, Ala.-E. M. Cullom, of Birminug-
GCien Inouc 000 an addition to the Hig- hool built by the five roads running through the town, at ham, will build saw and grist mills at this place.
building. J. A. Arthur will be architect. a cost of 18,000. Saundersville, Mas. Plas have been made for
Gr y, Cl.-A $ 0 school-house is projected. Meriden, Conn. Trinity M. E. Church has bought a new Congregational Church.
Greley, Col.-A $2,000 ua site on West MainSt. and is having plans made by Southbury, Conn.- A large paper-box factory will
Greenfield, Mass.-The Republican Lodge of Masons Kramer & Simions, of New York City, for a stone be built.
intend to build a brick block for business and church to cost abont $45,000. Probably only the
masonic purposes, on Main St. Sunday-school roms and basement will be finished South Manchester, Conn.--The plans of M. P.
Hartford, Conn. George Keller is making plans at present at an expense of $15,000 to $18,010. Hapgood, of Hartford, have been accepted for the
fnew town building, to cost about $12,000. It will be
for 12 houses for the Pope Mfg. Co. to be built on Milwaukee, Wis. Frank C. Reinhardt will estab- one-st'y, brick, with slate roof and 40' square.
their land west of Columbia St. lish a barrel-factory with a capacity of 150 barrels a Conn.-St. Mary's Church has
Haverhill, Mass.-G. W. Chaplin &Co. are intend- day. bouht a lot orw Souta nn St. Mard will build
bought a lot on South Main St. and will build
ing to put up an addition to their shoefactory. Mobile. Ala. --The Episcopalians will build a new a stone church to cost about $100,000. Address Rev.
Hillsboro, 111.-An addition to the County Court- $60,000 hospital. William J. Slocuim.
house is in contemplation. Monroe, Mich. -The Boehme & Rauch Cordage Co. Spartanburg, S. C.- A foundry and boiler-house,
Holyoke, Mass.-The Lyman Corporation will build will build a two st'y 32' x 100' addition, also a machine-shop, will be built by W. ). Fowler
a five-st'y building on the vacant lot near No. 4 Monson, Mass. A. H. Danforth has made plans for and others, for manufacturing the Christopher
mill. a four-st'y block, 50' x 65', on corner of Main and engine.
Howland Falls, Me. -A $250,000 paper mill will be Park Sts., for J. W. Lambert. Springfield, Mass.-The Springfield Gaslight Co.
built. New Berne, N. C.-Several mills are to be built by have plans for some extensive additions to their
Jamestown, N. Y.-Estimates are being prepared the Industrial Cooperative Mfg. Co., recently in- works.
for a new city building, according to present re- corporate. Staunton, Va. Te plans for the fve-st'y Masonic
ports. New Haven, Conn.-Tha Town-hall building on temple have been received by the building committee
Kansas City, Mo.-Preliminary plans are being pre- Orange St., will be remodelled, and the contract will be let in a few weeks. Maj.
pared for the new $20,000 library building. New Orleans, La. -Thompson Bros. will build a H. M. Bell can give further information.
Kenova, W. Va.- Frank P. Milburn is preparing carr.age-factory. Plans have been prepared. St. Pa il, Minn.- An addition toSt. Luke's Hospital,
plans for a jail and court-house to cost $12,000. Newton, Mass.- A $40,000 stone church will be to cost $25,000, will be built; arch .C. H Joinston;
LaKe City, Fla.-Three-st'y brick block, 50' x 105', built in the spring by the Centre St. Methodist a 5,00 laundry building will also be built.
will be built by the Masonic fraternity. Society. Plans have been accepted. rmat Kretz Is at work o drawinause r a llrge
apartment-house which Edward Feldhauser will
Lancaster, O.-Yost & Packard, of Columbus, have Niagara Falls, N. Y. Plans are being drawn for a build on Summit Ave. near 6th St. It will be of
made plans for the new chapel for the Boys' Indus- brick business block on North Main St., owned by brick and stone, seven stories high, 70' x 300', with
trial School. It will be of stone, with slate roof and Mrs. Mary Brandt. about 70 suites.
cost about $18,000. Odebolt, Ia. -Planshave been made by Burkhead & Howlby & Co. will build a large business block,
Lawrence, Mass. -A $45,000 brick school-house Reese, Sioux City, for a bank and store building for 75' x 90', on the southeast corner of 6th and Roberts
will be built, the First National Bank. Sts. Plans are being made.






xiv The American Architect and Building News. [VoL. XLVII. No. 10Q4


-XIK" -

PH(ENIX IRON CO.
410 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa.
Manufacture all their products, both in

WROUGHT-IRON AaD OPEN-HEARTH STEEL,
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Bound, Square and Flat Bars
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PHOENIX COLUMNS AND UPSET EYE-BARS
Of all sizes, in Iron or Steel.
ROOF TRUSSES, GIRDERS AND JOISTS FOR FIRE
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AGENTS:
New York Office: SEYMOUR P. THOMAS and
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Chicago: A. C. STITES, 931 Rookery Building.


PASSAIC ROLLING MILL 00,,
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BELMONT.IRON WORKS, Limited,
Successors to
MANLY & COOPER MAINF'G CO.
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Architectural
GUARDS-
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Twenty-Second Street and Washington Ave
PHILAIN FIPHIA PA.
NEW YORK OFFICE: 36 Cortlandt Street.

BUILDING INTELLIGENCE.
(Advance Rumors Continued.)
Syracuse, N. Y. Plans are being prepared for a
new hall of science for the Syracuse University.
Terryville, Conn.-A. Terry & Co.'s foundry, dam-
aged to the extent of $18,000 by fire recently, will be
rebuilt.
Vallejo, Cal. A new high-school building will be
built to replace the one burned.
Valley Stream, N. Y. -A frame school-house, to
cost $10,000, will be built on Brooklyn Ave.
Ware. Mass. -John H. Storrs will build a three-st'y
brick block for stores, offices and hall on North St.,
to cost about $10,000.
Waterbury, Conn.--W. E. Griggs is making plans
for the five-st'y brick, stone and terra-cotta block,
with tile and tin roof, to be built on Grand St. for
the New England Engineering Co.
Wate loo, a.--The Waterloo Canning Co. will build
a canning factory. comprising a two-st'y 48' x 180'
storage-room, a three-st'y 40' x 50r process-room,
a one-st'y 40' x 60' cooling at d boiler-room and one-
st'y 15' x 607 coal-house.
Waxahachie, Tex. A bond issue will be made on
the 25th inst. of $100,000 5 per cents for the Ellis
County Court-house. Advertisement for construc-
tion will shortly be made.
Webster Station, lIe. -The Webster Pulp Mill will
be built at a cost of $100,000.
Westerville, O. -Bondi to the amount of $20,000 will
be issued for building a school-house.
Wilmington, N. C. Reformatory buildings will be
built by the State to cost about $25,000.
Willimantic, Conn. The Town Building Commit-
tee has called for competitive designs for the new
$60,000 town building.
Windom, Minn. -New bids will be called for the
Cottonwood County Bank; arch., E. P. Bassford,
St. Paul.
ALTERATIONS AND ADDITIONS.
Stamford. Conn. Alterations both interior and ex-
terior are to be made to the Quintard Block to
extent of about $8,010; own., Quintard Land & Im-
provement Co.; arch., Jardine, Kent & Jardine,
1262 Broadway, New York City; estimates being
made.
APARTMENT-HOUSES.
Brooklyn, N. Y.- Pineapple St.. s s, 200' w Fulton
St., five-st'y brick flats. 25' x 90' 9", gravel roof;
$14,500: own., Jas. Constable, 69 Pineapple St.;
arch., J. G. Glover, 186 Remsen St.
Buffalo, N. Y.--Bryant St., near Ashland Ave.,
four-st'y brick apart.; $20,000; own., Oscar L.
Harris; bid., Geo. Duchscherer; arch., J. It. Kim-
ball.
Glenwood Ave., near Main St., six-st'y brick
apart.; $30,000; own. and arch., Ring Bros; contract
not let.
Georgia St., cor. Chippewa St., four-st'y brick
apart.; $50.000; own., Geo. F. Brownell et at; arch.,
F. H. Loverein; not let.
Hartford, Conn. Beach St.. three-st'y brick apart.
47f x 52', slate roof; own. and arch.. R. W. Newton;
contract not let.
New York. N. Y. One Hundred and Forty-eighth
St, n s. 325' w 7th Ave., 4 five-st'y brick flats, 25' x 89,'
56' high, flat tin roof; $61,000; own., J. B. Smith, 14


4rTn:oh rk.

JACKSON ARCHITECTURAL IRON WORKS,
ESTABLISHED 1840.


IRON
Fronts for Buildings, Cornices, Lintels and Sills, Doors and Shutters, Girders and Beams,
Fire-escape Balconies and Ladders, Columns and Roofs, Sky and Floor Lights, Stable Fittings
and Fixtures, Sidewalk Lights. Artistic work in Wrought and Cast Iron, Brass and Bronze.
Designs and Estimates of Cost Furnished for Work in any Department.
Foundry and Shops, East 28th and East 29th Sts. Office, 315 East 28th St., New York.


SHIFFLER BRIDGE COMPANY,1

B BUILDING DEPARTMENT.


SPECIALTIES: STEEL AND IRON BUILDINGS FOR ROLLING-MILLS, STEEL
WORKS, FOUNDRIES, FACTORIES, FIREPROOF BUILDINGS, ROOF TRUSSES,
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Main Office and Works:
48th Street and A. V. Ry.
PITTSBURGH, PA.


Branch Offices:
1123 Betz Building, Philadelphia, Pa.
65 Dexter Building, Chicago, Ill.
228 Lumber Exchange, Minneapolis, Minn.'


H.A. Streeter's Patent Clip

ARCHITECTS, OWNERS, CONTRACTORS, and all
others Interested In Iron or Steel construction will please
note that I have PATENTED A STEEL OLIP for connect-
ing Angle or Tee bars to I Beams, etc., which reduces the expense one-half,
and does away with the old method of Drilling and Bolting, which is a great sav-
Ing of Time, besides allowing an easy method of adjusting Tee bars to any de-
sired width of Tile. (This method is now adopted by our principal contractors).
Clips furnished ready to apply by sending the Sections and weight of Tee
Bars and X Beams, for which connections are wanted.

SFOR PRICES AND FURTHER INFORMATION
APPLY TO STREETER

Globe Iron Works,
35-41 E. INDIANA STREET,
CHICAGO, ILL.


DAUCHY IRON WORKS


PRISMATIC LIGHT WORK
S;;lr.,: iA ":":. :"': ": :: //1/.//.//// ll.//.......


84 to 92 Illinois Street ROSS PATENT LIGHT


BUILDING INTELLIGENCE.
(Apartment-Houses Continued.)
East 75th St.; arch., Webster & Thompson, 14 East
75th St.
One Hundred and Fifty-first St., n s, 175' w Am-
sterdam Ave., flve-st'y brick flats, 25' x 88', 55' h'gh,
flat tin roof: $16.000; own., Florence A. Morrison,
217 West 125th St.; arch., J. Avent Webster, 324
West 12th St.
Sixty-second St., n s, 100' e llth Ave., 13 five-st'y
brick flats, 25 x 89', 56' high, flat tin roofs; $208,000;
own., John B. Smith, 14 East 75th St.; arch.,
Webster & Thompson, 317 West 125th St.
Eighty-eighth St., a w cor Amsterdam Ave.. 4 five-
st'y brick flats, 207, 21', 27' x 90', 59' high, flat tin
roofs; $104,000; own., Hirsh & Steinhardt, 120 East
61st St. and 648 Madison Ave.; arch., Henry Ander-
son. 11PO Broadway.
Eighty-eighth St., s s. 100' w Amsterdam Ave, 5
tive-rt'y brick flats. 20', 26', 27' x 90'. 59' high, flat
tin roofs; $119,000; own., Hirsh & Steinhard, 120
East 61st St. and 648 Madison Ave.; arch., Henry
Anderson, 1180 Broadway.
Easg Tenth St., No. 260-262, five-st'y brick flats, 28'
x 791, 591 10" high, flat tin roof; $22,000: own., Henry
Weberg, Jr., 118 East 11th St.; arch., Charles Rentz,
153 Fourth Ave.
One Hundred and Forty-ninth St., s e cor. Brook
Ave.. five-st' brick flats, 25' x 71', 59' hish, flat tin
roof; $20,000; own.. Samuel B. Ogden, 1031 Madison
Ave.; arch., A. B. Ogden & Son, 1031 Madison Ave.
Pittrfleld. Mass. Bradford St., three-st'y brick
block for partss; own., Chas. R. Foote.
St. Louis, Mo.-Two two-st'y flats, 13th St., near
Soulard St.; $4,300; own., F. Ircka.
Four two-st'y flats, cor. Laclede and Boyle Aves.;
$15,000; own., C. F. Barnes.
Three two-st'y flats, Cozzens St., near Sarah St.;
$3.500; own., Thomas Tumalty.
CHURCHES.
Amherst, Mass.-Stone church; $40,000; own..
Catholic Society; arch., P. W. Ford, 657 Washington
St., Boston.
Rochester, N. Y. New church building for the con-
gregation of the Church of Reformation, Grove St.;
$80,000; pastor, Rev. W. J. Miller.
EDUCATIONAL.
New Haven, Conn.- College St.. four-st'y brick
and stone public school-building, 80' x 110'; $75.000;
own. City of New Haven; arch., L. W. Robinson,
760 Chapel St.; contract not let.


CHICACO


BUILDING INTELLIGENCE.
(Educational Continued.)
Pleasant Plains, R. I., N. Y. Two-st'y brick and
frame school.; $14,000; own., Town Authorities;
arch., Pierce & Brun, 114 Fifth Ave., New York
City; not let.
: FACTORIES.
Baltimore, Md. One-st'y brick factory, 50' x 165',
e s Monroe St.. bet. Eagle St. and B. & 0. R. R.;
own., Herman Kerngood, 723 West Lexington St.
One-st'y brick factory building, 105' x 131' 3", e s
Payson St., near Eagle St.; own., Eureka Coat Pad
Co., 736 West Pratt St.
Shicago, 111.-Col. Kramer & C. Sonderheide, two-
st'y and basement brick stove factory, 206-210 West
Randolph St.; $5,500.
Lydia Chimes, three-st'y and basement brick
factory. 1807-1809 Clark St; $15.000.
Chicago Sash Door and Blind Mfg. Co., tbree-st'y
and basement brick factory, 48-51 West North Ave.;
$11.000.
The Best Brewing Co.. three-st'y and basement
brick brewery, s w cor. Fletcher and Herndon Sts.;
$125,000.
Holyoke, Mass.- Four-st'y brick mill; own.,
Crocker Mfg. Co.; arch., A. B. Tower & Co.
Philadelphia, Pa.- Clearfield and Twentieth Sts.,
large machine-shop factory; con., R. C. Ballinger &
Co., 218 North 13th St.
Emerald St., w s, n Somerset St., five-st'y brick
factory, 40' x 180'. one-st'y brick office, 20' x 201,
attached; own., Thos. J. Lytle; con., Fred B.
Franks, 2215 Emerald St.
Pittsburgh, Pa.--Sixteenth St., cor. Liberty Ave.
flve-st'y brick factory, 60' x 100', stone trimmings;
about $35,000; own., James-Hardie; arch., John L.
Beatty, 36 Sixth St.
St. Louis, Mo.-One-st'y factory, Laclede Ave.,
near Spring Ave.; $24,000; own., Geo. D. Barnard.
Westfield, Mass. Crary Ave., frame factory build-
ing, 38' x 501; own., James A. Brown; arch., A. W.
Holton.
Winsted, Conn. Two-st'y and basement brick
building, asphalt roof, for manufacturing purposes,
38' x 807; own., New Eng. Knitting Co.; arch., E. E.
Benedict, Waterbury; contract not let.
HOSPITALS
Trenton, N. J. -Five-st'y brick and Stockton cut-
stone S. Agnes's Hospital; arch., E. F. Durang,
Chestnut St., s w cor. 12th St., Philadelphia.


I-F






MABOH 23, 1895.]


The American Architect and Building News.


"COMPLETE" WASH BASIN No. 1.
Patented.
lhib combination, which con-
-___l_ o.f A finely-shap-d oval
l ta.be in na. of vitritied china
Pwth Ii inch waste coup-
I Ig. device for opening and
Selo.e g dhe waste, the buttons
-I- .nd noll for securing bowl to
:- lab. Ibt working parts made
Sifrom a r.ry hard silver metal
wbich b ll always retain its
-,.ilor k1., PLATING OR RE-
i-PLAilN'), the top flange of
b awl ground to fit the slab, is
simply what its name implies.
I'he ipper by turning to a
g,.:n I:..nt, may be taken out
I t sb.,Id be necessary to re-
move any obstruction. The
lift-rod works through a brass
S I tube inserted in the aperture in
the earthenware, and is tightly
packed with litharge and gly-
cerine to prevent lodgement of
foul matter. Thespace around
front of waste coupling is also
similarly packed, and, finally, the overflow being large and so accessible as to be easily kept clean, secures,
we think, SANITARY qualities which are not possessed by any other.
FRED ADEE & CO., 90 Beekman St., N.Y.


RAIN BATH.
HUBER'S_.--

"GEGENSTROM"



HOT-WATER APPARATUS.
chaffstiidt Patent.

FOR INSTANT PRODUCTION OF WARM AND HOT WATER
SBY MEANS OF STEAM.
For Insane Asylums, Reformatories, Prisons, Gymnasiums,
'Bath Establishments.

This apparatus can be furnished to supply from one to twenty
douches. It instantly heats v after or other fluids to any desired
degree of temperature without directly introducing steam into
the fluid, and is, therefore, especially adapted for bath establish-
ments using salt, mineral and other medicinal waters.
It needs no hot-water reservoir or boiler and is directly con-
nected to water and steam pipes.
The great danger of scalding the bather is avoided by its use,
as the highest degree of temperature supplied by the apparatus
designed for bathing purposes -cannot exceed 110 degrees.
. 1Writefor descriptive circular C-5.


THE HENRY HUBER COMPANY,
Sanitary Specialties,
81 Beekman Street NEW YORK.


BUILDING INTELLIGENCE.
(Hospitals Continued.)
Philadelphia, Pa. Race St., above 18th St.. four-
st'y stone and terra-cotta building for the Wills'
Eye Hospital (new ward), Spanish tile roof; arch.,
James H. Windrim, 1107 Walnut St.
HOTELS.
Atlanta, Ga. Marietta and Forsyth Sis., granite
hotel; $400,000; own., Venable Bros.
Bethlehem, Pa.--Garrison St., car. New St., a
hotel will be built for J. Rieffi arch., A. W. Leh,
214 Second St., South Bethlehem.
Nazareth, Pa.-A hotel will be built for H. F.
Jiegler: arch., A. W. Leb, 211 Second St., South
Bethlehem.
HOUSES.
Allegheny, Pa.--North Ace., dwell.; arch., Alston
& Heckert, Pittsburgh.
Allentown, Pa. -Three-st'y stone dwell., 50'x 70'
about $20,000; own., James T. Seagraves; arch.,
Jacoby & Weishampel.
Arlington, N. J. Columbia Ave., two-st'y and base-
ment frame dwell.; about $35,000; own., Charles R.
Behrens, 108 Fulton St, New York, N. Y.
Baltimore, Md.--Eight two-st'y brick dwells., Ro-
land Ave., bet. 2d and 3d Aves.; own., J. P. Ben-
son's Sons, cor. 3d and Roland Aves.
Six two st'y brick dwells., e s, Patterson Park
Ave., n Orleans St.; own., Jos. Schamberger, 2215
East Baltimore St.
Four two-st'y dwells., e s Light St., s Ostend St.;
own., Geo. C. Goldman, 1211 North Broadway.
Ten two-st'y brick dwells., n s Patterson Ave.,
bet. Fulton Ave. and Monroe St.; own., Geo. Sauer-
hoff, 609 North Fremont St.
Five two-st'y brick dwells., e s Collington Ave..
bet. Baltimore St. and Fairmount Ave.; own., Wm.
C. Dorsey, 1802 East Monument St.
Four three-st'y brick dwells., as North Ave., e
Bond St.; own., Jno. S. Hagerty.
Seven three-st'y brick dwells., w s Linden Ave.,
beg. n w cor. Presstman St.; own., Chas. A. Lipp,
1635 North Caroline St.
Eight two-st'y brick dwells., n s, Patterson Ave..
w Fulton Ave.; own., J. Crowther, 128 North Eutaw
St.
Three-st'y brick dwell., w s Roland Ave., near 3d
Ave., own., Dan'l S. Schaeffer.
Three-st'y brick dwell., w s Roland Ave., near 3d
Ave.; own., Alvin W. Coltrider.
Two three-st'y brick dwells., w s Washington St..
beg. n w cor. Malakoff St.; own., Chas. Hubert, 1701
North Bond St.
Two-st'y frame dwell., 24' x 41', w s Harford Ave.,


BUILD11r


iG INTELLIGENCE.


(Houses Continued.)
near Hillen Road; own., A. C. Dietrich, 408 Har-
ford Road.
Five three-st'y brick dwells., w s York Road, s
Huntingdon Ave.; own., Wm. Carr.
Seven two-st'y brick dwells.. e s Chapel St.. bet.
Madison St. and Ashland Ave.; own., Otto Gold-
bach, 326 South Bond St.
Ten two-st'y brick dwells., e s Rose St., bet. Fay-
ette and Orleans Sts.: own., E. M. & J. A. Ellinger.
Three two-st'y brick dwells., n s Riggs Ave., bet.
Arlington and Carrollton Aves.; own., Albert Ma-
honey, 920 North Arlington Ave.
Three two-st'y brick dwells., s s Oliver St., and 4
two-st'y brick wellss, n s Keyser St., bet. Gay and
Chester Sts.; own., Chas. Frederick, 2036 East Madi-
son St.
Bethlehem. Pa.-Stone and brick dwell.; own.,
Ashen Borheck; arch., A. W. Leh, 214 Sec :nd St.,
South Bethlehem.
Boston, Mass. Elm Hill St., Ward 21,two-and-one-
half-st'y frame dwell., hip roof, 34' x 42'; own., T.
J. Hughes; arch., T. E. Sheehan; contract not let.
Maple St., Ward 21, two-and-nme half-st'y frame
dwell., hip roof, 351 x 40'; own., P. J. Bergin; arch.,
T. E. Sheehan; contract not let.
Georgia St., near Elm Hill St., Ward 21, two-and-
one-half-st'y frame dwell., hip roof; own., J. J.
Hughes; arch., T. E. Sheehan, 1 Beacon St.; con-
tract not let.
llinden St., near Day St., Ward 22, 2 three-st'y
frame dwells., fiat roofs, 17' x 60' each; own. and
and bid., M. J. O'Brien.
Mountain Ace., near Lauriat Ave., Ward 24, 2
three-st'y frame dwells., pitch roofs, each 22' x 36';
own. and bid., Nicholas White.
Winthrop St., Nos. 110-120, and Dennis St., Nos.
15-25, 12 brick dwells.; $65,000; own., Bennett Nor-
wich, 227 Dudley St.; bid., G. M. Fernald.
Mascot Ave., near Jones St.. Ward 21, three-st'y
frame dwell., fiat roof, 26' x 37'; own. and bid., H.
J. Eckland.
Peter Parley Road, near Walnut Ave., Ward 23,
frame dwell., 27' x 42'; own., Ernest Isenbeck; bid.,
Whittaker & Gerrish.
Linden Park St., Nos. 67-69, Ward 19, 2 tbree-st'v
brick dwells., flat roofs, 20' x 40' and 321 6" x 39';
$11,000; own., J. T. Kenney; bid., W. Tobin; arch.,
Samuel Rantin.
Laselle St., near Harwood St., Ward 23, frame
dwell., 22' x 40'; own., Philip Hoffman: bid., Fuchs
& Wangler.
Millen St., near Montague St., Ward 24, three-st'y
frame dwell., pitch roof, 25' x 38'; own. and bid., C.
S. Cornwall.


FRICTIONLESS CHECK VALVE,

This Valve we can confidently recommend to the
trade as being a full open-way check valve. It has
an anti-friction roller on the valve bearings which
reduces the wear to the least possible amount. It
can be used either in a horizontal or a vertical posi-
tion, and has no complicated parts.
It is made with either "Metal," "Plumbago,"
" Leather," or Rubber" Seat.
Haines, Jones & Cadbury Co.,
1136 Ridge Ave., Philadelphia.
Manufacturers of Plumbers' and Steam Fitters' Brass Work.


BROUGHTON'S


Patent


Self-


Clos1ing


CAN




NOT


BASIN






COCK.


TIED


OPEN.


Every One E Warranted.


Af.l U BRICHTWOOD,
Stebbins Mfg.CoI.,B MASS.,
SOLE MANUFACTURERS.

BUILDING INTELLIGENCE.
(Houses Continued.)
Homer St., near Byron St.. Ward 1. frame dwell.,
22' x 42'; own., Mrs. M. ioley; bid.. G. McDunis.
Grace. Walton and ltoslin s.. Ward 24, 3 frame
dwells., 27' x 3V'; own. and bld J. T. Haddock.
Mills St., No. 5, Ward 21, frame dwell., 28' x 45';
own, Alden Fr, n Fn 28 State St.; bld., C. H. Blod-
gett.
Nottinghla St., near Mt. Bowdoin St., Ward 24,
2 frame dwells., each 1'f x 39' Cf"4 own., F. W. Ben-
nett; bid., T. A. Vickery & Son.
Cypress Ioanl, near Murlock St., Ward 25, frame
dwell., 29' x 31'; own. and bil., Freil Scoflell.
Cherokee St., near Hillside St.. Ward 22, three-st'y
frame dwell., pitch roof. 24' 6" x 47' 10"/; own. and
bid., R. J. Mcl)onald.
Branch Ave., near Arcadia St.. Ward 24, three-st'y
frame dwell., fat roof. 24' x 47', own., W. C. Abbott;
bid., T. J. Farqular.
Falcon St., near Brooks St., Ward 1, frame dwell.,
22' 6" x 49' 6"; own., R. F. and W. A. Burdett; bid.,
David Proctor.
Centre St.. near New Heath St., Ward 21, three-
st'y frame dwell., pitch roof, 24' x 52'; own., C. H.
Vogel; bid., R. D. Ward.
Bridgeport, Conn.- Garfield Ave., frame dwell.;
own., W. H. Lamson.
Lafayette St., frame dwell.. own., W. H. Fisher.
Sanford Ave., frame dwell.; $3,500; own., J. I).
Toomey, Jr.; arch.. J. A. O'Brien.
Seasidle Park, dwell.; own.., W. C. Bryant of tlie
Bryant Electric Co.; arch., Henry A. Lambert;
contract not let.
Brookline, Mass.-Harvard St., cor. Fuller St., two-
and-one-half-st'y frame dwell., pitch roof. 32' x 54';
$9,000; own. and bld., Clarence L. McKay, Alls-
ton; arch., Chas. E. Park, 5 Park St., Boston.







vi The American Architect and Building News. [VoL. XLVII.--No. 1004.




HOT WATER-







aPLENTYIT

" PLENTY OF IT


S. . At Nominal Cost . .


The is a combination
"Cliampionl" .Water Heater


run by Steam or Hot Water from your House Heating Apparatus in the Winter

andby Gas or Gasoline in the Summer.





SENTD SOR DESC2r.ITIVE cI0CUrC.A.R..







R. J. DILLON COMPANY,


2 and 4 South Canal Street, CHICAGO.


BUILDING INTELLIGENCE.
(Houses Continued.)
Fisher Ave., near Buckminster Road, two-and-one-
half-st'y frame dwell., shingle roof, 60 x 75'; $20,-
000; own., W. H. Wilkinson, 184 Washington St.,
Boston; bid.. Geo. Ballentine, Boston; arch., Ball
& Dabney, Boston.
Circuit Road, 2 two-and-one-half-st'y frame
dwells., pitch roofs, 28' x 52' and 27' x 42'; $14,000;
own. and bid., E. D. Buclair & Son, 59 Squantum
St., Atlantic.
Brooklyn, N. Y.- Bay Twenty-second St.. s s, 120' e
Cropsey Ave., 2 two-st'y and attic frame dwells., 13'
9" x41' 6', shingle roofs; $3,500 each; own., George
Shields, Bath Beach; arch., Anson Squires, Bath
Beach.
Bath Ave., w 8, 150' s Bay 12th St., two-st'y and
attic frame dwell., 25' f6 x 33', shingle roof; $3,500;
own., P. Jackman, on prem ses; arch., D. Acker &
Son, 752 Broadway.
Prospect Ave.. s s, 175' e 8th Ave., 3 two-st'y brick
dwells.. 16' 8"r x 50', tin roofs: $3,000 each; own.,
Win. T. all, 4th Ave. and 53d St.; arch., H. L.
Spicer, 1269 Third Ave.
Prospect PI., n s. 3256 e Kingston Ave.. 4 two-st'y
and basement brick dwells., 19' 9' x 45', tin or gravel
roofs: $5,000 each, own., Chas Meyers. 952 St.
Marks' Ave.; arch. and bid., Chas. Collins, Albany
and Atlantic Ayes.
Park Pl., n s, 200' w Vanderbilt Ave., 7 dwells.,
one two-st'y basement and cellar, 18' x 43', 6 three-
st'y basement and cellar, 17' 10'' x 43t, tin roofs;
$5,000 each; own., Win. A. Reynolds, National
Bank, Fulton St.; arch., Dahlander & Hedman,
Arbuckle Building.
Charleston, W. Va.- Two-st'y brick dwell.; $7,500;
own., G. A. Goshorn; arch., Harrison Albright.
Three-st'y brick dwell.; $8,500; -own., F. W.
Ebbney; arch., D. W. Daley.
Three-st'y brick dwell.; $6,500; own., L. E. Mc-
Whorter; arch., Geo. Henneman.
Darby, Pa.- Upland Ave., w 71st St., 2 two-st'y
brick dwells., 16' x 38'; con., Edward B. Ellis.
Denver, Colo. Colfxs. Ave., brick and stone dwell.;
$12,000; own., H. S. O'Brien; arch., Varian &
Sterner, 34 Taber Block; not let.
Colfax Ave., brick and stone dwell.; $10,000; own..
Central Trust Co.; arch., Varian & Sterner, 34 Taber
Block; not let.
Twenty-third St., No. 458, brick and stone dwell.;
$8,000; own., C. S. Musgrove: bld.,Van Stone Bros.;
arch., Varian & Sterner, 34 Taber Block.
Detroit, Mich.--. Helson. 3 three-st'y brick
dwells., 45-49 Plumb St.; $12,003.
Win. Reich, brick dwell., 1051 Champlain St.;
$4,000.
It. Morris, frame dwell., 413 Field Ave.; $5.000.
Doylestown, Pa.--Ashland St., a dwell, will be
built at a cost of about $1,000 for Henry Flack; con.,
Flack & Booz.
East Lyme, Ct.- Frame dwell., 16 rooms,for Jabez
Howes; arch. and bid., Gilbey & Son, New London.
Englewood. N. J.-Three-st'y frame dwell., 40' x
50'; about $10,000; own., Louis Steinhart, New York
City; arch., Werner & Windolph, 60 Liberty St.,
New York City.


BUILDING INTELLIGENCE.
(Houses Continued.)
Hartford, Conn.--Hamilton St., No. 23, frame
dwell., 26' x 37' 4'; own., N. A. Carlson.
Huntington, W. Va.-Brick dwell.; $12,000; own.
W. H. Holswade; arch., T. U. Walter.
Johnstown, Pa.-Three-st'y brick dwell., slate
roof; own., L. A. Geis; arch., George Kruger, Short
and Railroad Sts.
Kennett Square, Pa. -Adwell.; own., Isaac Lar-
kin, Toughkenamon.
MVttlneague, Mass.- Tatham Hill, frame dwell.;
$8,000; own., C. M. Woodward, Morrow, 0.; arch.,
B. H. Seabury, Springfield; contract not let.
New Haven, Conn.- Lake Pt., two-and-one-half-
st'y brick dwell., pitch roof; $6,000; own., Jos. Bow-
den, Jr.; arch., Brown & Von Beren; contract not
let.
Whitney Ave., large frame residence for Mrs.
Jane K. Matthias; arch., W. H. Allen; contract
being placed.
Humphrey St., No. 135, brick dwell., 29'x 59'; $8,-
000; own Ward Coe.
James St., two-st'y frame dwell., 25' x 48'; $3,500,
own. and bid., Win. F. Tobin.
Cedar St., No. 265, two-st'y frame dwell., 25' x 52';
$4,500; own., Terrence Coyle.
Bradley St., three-st'y brick dwell., flat roof, 43' x
42'; $65,000; own., John E. Healey; bld., T. F.
Ahern & Co.
John St., two-st'y frame dwell., 22' x 47'; $3,500;
own., Richard F. Phelan; bid., G. Grenier.
Foote St., frame dwell., 27' x 48'; $4,000; own.,
Geo. C. Schuessler; bid., Jas. A Thorpe.
Chapel St., two-st'y frame dwell., 26' x48'; $4,000;
own., Ellen Flynn; bid., John Lowe.
Chapel St., two-st'y frame dwell., 26' x 48t; $4,000;
own., Patrick Clancy; bid., John Lowe.
New London, Conn. Montauk Ave., two-st'y frame
and stone dwell., pitch roof; $8,000; own., John E.
Barrows; arch. and bid., Gilbey & Son.
Broad St., cor. Cottage St.. frame dwell., 30' x 50';
own., Frank H. Smith.
Montauk Ave., frame dwell.; own., C. B. Whaley.
New York. N. Y. Home St., s s, 75' e South Boule-
vard, three-st'y brick dwell., 25' x 49', 30' high, flat
tin roof; $4,500; own., John Welterer, 748 Colum-
bus Ave.; arch., Geo. L. Amoroux, 729 Columbus
Ave.
Seventy-second St., n s, 350' e West End Ave., 2
four-st'y brick dwells., 30' x 20', 55' x 60', 63' high,
flat and mansard roofs; $60,000; own., Charles
Buck, 264 Columbus Ave.; arch., Henry F. Cook, 261
Columbus Ave.
One Hundred and Seventieth St., n s, 80' w Boston
Ave.. three-st'y brick dwell., 19' x 50', 33: high, peak
metal, tin and tile roof; $5.000; own., Louisa
Golden, 160 East 103d St.; arch., W. C. Dickerson,
3d Ave. and 149th St.
Cordova PI., e s, 134' w St George's Crescent. 3
three st'y brick and frame dwells.. 16' 8" x 53', 34'
high, flat mansard tin roofs; $19,300; own., Maria G.
Del Gaizo, Bedford Park; arch., E. Bourne, 18 Broad-
way.
One Hundred and Third St., n s, 100' w West End
Ave., 5 four-st'y brick dwells., 20' x 58', 55' high, flat


BUILDING INTELLIGENCE.
(Houses Continued.)
tin roofs; $89,000; own., Giblen & Taylor, 143 West
80th St., 33' West 90th.; arch., G. F. Pelham, 503
Fifth Ave.
One Hundred and Forty-seventh St., n s, 125' w
Boulevard, 6 three-st'y brick dwells., 16' x 52', 43'
high, flat tin roofs; $4.,000; own., John Jefferson,
322 West 145th St.; arch., Henry Fouchaux, 11th
Ave. and 162d St.
One Hundred and Twentieth St., a s, 100, w Man-
hattan Ave., 8 three-st'y brick dwells., 16', 17' x 56',
45' high, flat tin roofs; $72,000; own., AbrahamA.
Teets, 505 Manhattan Ave.; arch., J. Averitt Web-
ster, 217 West 125th St.
One Hundred and Twentieth St., s s, 233' w Man-
hattan Ave., three-st'y brick dwell., 45' high, fat
tin roof; $10,000; own, Abraham A. Teets, 505
Manhattan Ave.; arch., J. Averitt Webster, 217
West 125th St.
Third Ave., e s, 25' s 171st St., three-st'y brick
dwell., 25' x 65', 28' high, flat tin roof; $4,000; own.,
Ann E. Khouri, 154 Eighth Ave.; arch., W. C. Dick-
ersiw, 3d Ave. and 149th St.
One Hundred and Fifty-fifth St., w s, 20' e Melrose
Ave., three-st'y brick and trame dwell., 22' x 56', 35'
high, flat tin roof; $5,000; own., Peter Knobloch,
659 East 155th St.; arch., Gustav Schwars, 554 East
158th St.
One Hundred and Third St., n s, 100' w West End
Ave.. 5 three-st'y brick dwells., 20' x 56', 44' high,
flat tin roofs; $80,000; own., Giblin & Taylor 143
West 80th St. and 33 West 90th St.; arch., G. F.
Pelham, 503 Fifth Ave.
Oak Lane, (on North Penn R. R.) Pa. A dwell..
will be built for T. Henry Asbury by contractor J.
S. Liverzey; arch., J. Bennet Colesburg, 1024 Arch
St., Philadelphia.
Philadelphia, Pa. -Ritner St., n w cor. 12th St., 6:
two-st'y brick dwells., 16' x 45'; own., Wm. C.
Young, 2206 Wallace St.
Kirbride St., s w s, n Salmon St., two-st'y brick
dwell., 16' x 42'; con., Fred Breininger, 4545 Salmon
St.
Monroe St., s s, e 52d St., two-st'y brick dwell.,
14' x 30r; own., Edward Morris, 4722 Fairmount
Ave.
I'rankford Ave., n e cor. Dittman St., two-st'y
brick dwell., 14' x 26'; own., John T. Potts, 5012
Dittman St.
Clearfleld St.. Nos. 419 and 423, 2 two-st'y brick
dwells., 14' x 41'; con., Benjamin Wetzel, 427 East
Clearfield St.
Pittsburgh, Pa.- Everett St., three-st'y frame
dwell.; own., George M. Wilson; arch., A. E. Link-
enheimer.
A frame and stone cottage will be built; arch.,
M. Jacob.
Two-and-a-half-st'y press-brick dwell., 22' x 45';.
own., George Sonds; arch., John L. Beatty, 36 Sixth
St.
A dwell, will be built for Chas. A. Cooper; arch.,
Chas. G. Beckel.
Stratford Ave., two-st'y press-brick dwell.; about
$7.000; own., J. E. Smith; arch., F. H. De Arment.
Two-st'y press-brick dwell, own., Mr. Hockett, of
Pentress & Hockett; arch., Wm. H. Sims.


-s
D
-J






MAOH 28, 1895.J


The American Architect and Building News.


THE J. L. MOTT IRON WORKS,


84 to 90 Beekman Street, New York.

311 and 313 Wabash Ave., Chicago. 332 and 334 Boylston St., Boston.

Wainwright Building, St. Louis. Flood Building, San Franc;sco.

,= ,,------. ---- -----






























Copyright, 1893, by THE J. L. MOTT IRON WORKS in their publications. Plate 1001 G. (Reduced cut.)


Roll-Rim Porcelain Wash-Trays. (Patent Applied For.)

The desideratum in modern plumbing work is to have the various appliances set up open and accessible, and wherever

possible without woodwork. In the Wash Trays shown, the Roll-Rim takes the place of a wool top or capping, thereby marking

a more desirable article from a sanitary standpoint, and adding materially to their fine appearance. Interested parties are

invited to visit our showrooms and examine these and other sanitary appliances. Illustrated price-list mailed on application.


BUILDING INTELLIGENCE. BUILDING INTELLIGENCE.

(Houses Continued.) (Houses Continued.)
Amber St., e e, two-st'y brick dwell., slate roof; Two-st'y dwell., Westminster Pl., near Taylor
own., Frank Burrell; arch., J. A. Jacobs, 96 4th Ave.; $11,000; own, J. S. Fullerton.
Ave. Two-st'ydwell.,Olive St.,near Boyle Ave.; $5,000;
Rochester, N. Y.- Buckingham St., house for R. D. own., S. W. Lee.
Richards; 9.000; arch., Fay Dryer, 939 Granite Two-st'y dwell., Castleman Ave., near Klemmn
ihards; $9000; arch. Fay & Dryer, 939 Granite St.; $,500; own.. Ella F. Godfrey.
Building. Two two-st'y dwells., Lincoln Ave., near Warns
Buckingham St., house for Joseph Engel; $6,000; Ave.; $3,600; own., Thos. Hollingshadar
arch., Fay & Dryer, 939 Granite Building. T o-st'y parson, 8th St near
Dart th St., houses for Dean Alvord; arch., Tw-st'y parsonage 8th Stner Howard St.;
Fay & Dryer, 939 Granite Building. $6.000; own., St. Casimir Church.
South Bethlehem, Pa. -Ten cottages will be built Urbana, O.-Two-and-one-half-st'y brick dwell. 12
y Beidlehman & Dodt arch., A. W. Le, 214 See- rooms, slate roof; $8,000; own., Mrs. Mary J. Lat-
byd St & Do imer; arch., Yost & Packard, Columbus; not let.
Springfield, Mass. Pearl St.. two-and-one-half Wallingford, Conn.--Frame dwell. for Jos. H.
st'y frame dwell.; $7,000; own., E. A. Carter; arch., Hodgetts; arch., ). Bloomfield, Meriden; contract
E renot let.
Ea. .Parlett. Centre ,t., cor. Orchard St., brick block; own., F.
Pearl St., two-and-one-half-st'y frame dwell.;
$6,000; own., Walter G. Morse; arch., Gardner, L. Leighton & Co.
Pyne & Gardner. Washington. Pa. Fourteen-room buff brick dwell.
St. Louis, Mo.-Two-st'y dwell., Horton Pl., near brownstone trimmings; own., J. R Kuntz; arch., J.
Hamilton Ave.; $3,000; own., H. W. Williamson. A. Jacobs, 96 Fourth Ave., Pittsburgh.
Two-st'y parsonage, Benton St., cor. 20th St.; Winthrop, Mass.- Court Road, two-and-one-half-
$5,000; own., German Ev. Lutheran Church. st'y frame dwell., pitch roof, 42' x 34'; own., Harry
Four two-st'y dwells., Delmar Ave., near Sarah Blomfield. Cunard Wharf; arch Robt. Coit, 113
St.; $20,000; own., State Savings Funds Building Devonshire St., Boston.
Co. Worcester, Mass. -Blithewood Ave., one-and-one-
Three two-st'y dwells., Westminster Pl., near half-st'y frame dwell.; own., Mrs. Addie Putnam;
Boyle Ave.; $12,500; own., C. C. Nicholls. by day.
Two-st'y dwell., Kennerly Ave., near Marcus Claremont St., two-st'y frame dwell.; own., Mrs.
Ave.; $3,000; own., J. W. Northstine. Sarah C. Legg; arch., Earle & Fisher; bid., Geo. M.
Two-st'y dwell., Evans Ave., near Grand Ave.; Hubbard.
$3,000; own., L. Koeckeler. Malvern Road. one-and-one-half-st'y frame dwell.;
Two two-st'y dwells., Clemens Ave., near Belt own. and bld., Oliver Carignan.
Ave.; $9,500; own., Thos. Manning.
Two-st'y dwell., ClarendonAve., near Grand Ave.; MERCANTILE BUILDINGS.
$3,000; own., Mrs. M. L. Foster. Denver, Colo. Seventeenth St., cor. Glenarm St.,
Two-st'y dwell., Maple Ave., near Union Ave.; hr ck and stone block for mercantile purposes:
$8.000; own., P. Nolan. $125.000; own, J. W. Jackson; arch., Edbrooke &
Two-st'y dwell.. Blaine Ave., near Grand Ave.; Ma-ean, Peo. Bank Building.
$3,500; own., C. N. Perkins.
Two-st'y dwell., Nat. Bridge Road, near Palm St.; OFFICE-BUILDINGS.
$5.700; own., W. Molitor. Galveston, Tex.- Twenty-fourth and Strand Sis.,
Three two-st'y dwells., Westminster PI., near three-st'y store and office-building; $35,000; own.,
Taylor Ave.; $12,000; own., Mrs. G. H. Shields. Jn i. Sealy Est.; arch., N. J. Clayton & Co.; con-
Two two-st'y dwells, Morgan St., near Taylor tract not let.
Ave.; $9,000; own., J. N. Miller. Strand and Twenty-fourth Sts., three-st'y bank
Two two-st'y dwells., Westminster Pl., near and office building; $35,000; own., J. H. Hutchins:
Warne Ave.; $8,000; own C. R. H. Davis. arch., N. J. Clayton & Co.; contract not let.
Two-st'y dwell., Algernon Ave., near Fair Ave.; Owosso, Mih.--Four-st'y brick store and offie-
$7,000; own., J. F. Obermeler.
$7,00; owner. J, F. bermeler.r A building; $30,000; own., H. S. Hadsall; arch., A. C.
Two-st'y dwell., Chonteau Ave., near Taylor Ave.; Varney & Co., Detroit; not let.
$3,000; own., P. W. Brennan. Varney& Co., Detroit; not let.
Five two-st'y dwells., 10th St., near Clinton St.; Plymouth, Ind.--Two-st'y store and office-building;
$8,900; own., H. Hannibal. $9,000; own., H. Corbin; arch., Joseph E. Mills,
Six two-st'y dwells.. Finney Ave., near Sarah St.; Detroit, Mich.; not let.
$14,000; own., A. B. Branekman. STABLES.
Two-st'y dwell., Compton Ave., near Sidney St.; Baltimore, Md.--Three-st'y brick stable. 96' 61" x
$4,200; own., Stephen Prag. 150 s utaw St., bet. Preston and Hoffman Sts.;
Two-st'y dwell., Maple Ave., near Union Ave.; own., Bernard Eutaw St.on,bet.02 Linden Ave.offman St
$4,700; own., C. Mussmann. ow., Bernard Alannion, 1102 Linden Ave.
Two two-st'y dwells., Page Ave., near Academy Brookline, Mass.- Auburn St., two-and-one-half-
Ave.; $5,000; own., Wm. White. st'y frame stable, pitch roof, 45' x 56'; own., Mrs.
Two two-st'y dwells., Franklin Ave., near Leonard P.W. Burkhardt; bid., Connery & Wentworth,
Ave.; $4,000; own., G. H. Pallen. Boston; arch., Driver & Dwight, Boston.
Two-st'y dwell., Washington Ave., near Whittier Bustleton, Pa.- Bustleton Pike, e s, n Hoff St., one-
St.; $6,000; own., Mrs. J. M. Kerr. st'y frame stable, 12' x 16'; con., Jacob Foster.


BUILDING INTELLIGENCE.
(Stables Continued.)
Rochester, N. Y.--Cortland St., two-st'y brick
stable, with basement, livery and boarding; $7.000;
for George R. Ryan, to be occupied by John H.
Brennan; arch., Fay & Dryer, 939 Granite Building.
Roxborough, Pa. Cresson St., s e cor. Grape St.,
two-st'y brick stable, 14' x 18'; con., 0. W. Pestor,
Lyceum Ave.
Worcester, Mass.- Southbridge St., one-st'y barn;
own., Holmes Milner; bid., Jenkins.
STORES.
Brooklyn, N. Y. Bayard St., s w cor. Humboldt
St., 2 four-st'y brick stores and dwells., 27' 6) x 71
and 48'. tin roofs; total $16,001); own.. L. Kanfold,
East Broadway and Clinton St, New York City;
arch., D. Acker & Son, 762 Broadway.
Sumner Ave., e s' 52' n Bainbridge St., 2 one-st'y
brick stores, 24' x 39' G6, tin roofs; $2,000 each;
own.. Henry G. Wilmerling, on premises; arch., W.
H. Burtians, 1063 Bedford Ave.
Drigls Ave.. n e cor. Sutton St., three-st'y frame
store and dwell., 25r x 63', gravel roof; $5,500; own.,
arch. and bid., O. W. Humphrey, 40 Driggs Ave.
Driggs Ave., n s. 25' e Sutter St, three-st'y frame
store and dwell., 25' x 60', gravel roof; $4,800; own.,
arch. and bid., O. W. Humphrey. 40 Driggs Ave.
Nassau Ave.. s w cor. Van Dam St., three.st'y
frame store and dwell., '0' x 53' 66, tin roof; $4,500;
own A. & C. Kraup, 565 Uraham Ave.
Elizabethport, N. J.-Three-st'v brick store and
flats, 36' x 75'; about $9,.00; own., G. Fisher; arch.,
Werner & Windolph, 60 Liberty St., New York
N. Y.
Fitchburg, Mass.- River St., brick block for stores
and tenements; $12,000; own., Iver Johnson; arch.,
Barker & Norcross, Worcester: not let.
New York, N. Y. Vesey St., No. 67, five-st'y brick
store, 11 x 41', 60' high, flat tin root; $6,750; own.,
Estate Henry Carey. 1227 Boston Ave.; arch., Kafka
& Mott. 137 Broadway.
Bowery. No. 91, three-st'y brick store, 251 x 70' x
64'. 34' high, fiat gravel or tin roof; $8.000; own., t.
& O. Goelet, 9 West 17th St.; arch., George Story,
66 East 12 th St.
Philadelphia, Pa. -Arch St., n s, w 8th St., f.,ur-
st'y brick, iron and stone (dry-goods) store, 64' x 140';
own., Marks Bros.; con., Horace E. McPherson, 417
Drexel Builling.
Market St., No. 1221, six-st'y Indiana limestone
and terra-cotta store; own.. Nathan Snellenburg &
Co., 5th and South Sts.; arch., Win. MeCollin, 1028
Arch St.
St. Louis, Mo. -Three-st'y store and flats, cor.
Meaard and Carroll Sts.; $10,5600; own., F. Kohr.
Two-st'y store and flats; Easton Ave., near Mar-
cus Ave.; $5,500; own., Paul Walz.
Two-st'y store. Easton Ave., near Union Ave.;
$3,500; own., Louis H. Geisler.
TENEMENT-HOUSES.
Monsnn, Mass. Main St., cor. Park Ave., four-st'y
frame block of stores and tenements, 50' x 65'; own.,
John W. Lambert; bid., A. H. Danlorth.
New Haven, Conn.- Oak St., No. 36, brick building
for 12 tenements, 43' x 67; $16,000; own., Henry &
Harris Raphael; bid., J. N. Leonard & Co.






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BUILDING INTELLIGENCE.
(Tenement-Houses Continued.)
Ferry St., cor. Pine St., 2 frame tenements, 23' x
50; $4,000; own., James Egan; bid., Pender &
Lillie.
Nash St., cor. Eagle St., three-st'y frame tene-
inent, flat roof; own., Wm. McGushen; arch.,
Brown & Austin; not let.
John St., 2 frame tenements, each 24' x 75'; $4,000;
own., Wallace E. Clark.
Dixiwell Ave., cor. Brewster St.. frame building
for three tenements and store, 35' x 45'; $4,000;
own., James Connor.
Congress Ave., cor. Redfield St., three-st'y frame
building for tenements and store, flat roof; own.,
Carl Erlewein; arch., Brown & Austin; contract
not let.
Edgewood Ave., near Howe St., two-st'y brick
block, 44' x 60'; own., Asa L. Fabriqit; arch.,
Brown & Austin; being estimated.
New York, N. Y. One Hundred and Fifty-fourth
St., a s, 350' e Morris Ave., four-st'y brick tenement,
25'x 70,' 50' high, flat tin roof; 812,000; own., Catha-
rine Egan, 643 Morris Ave.; arch., Charles H. Heck,
148th St. and Willis Ave.
Westchester Ave., e s. 63' n 156th St., three-st'y
brick tenement. 25' x 89', x 42M high, flat tin roof;
$12,000; own., Theresa Bros., Westchester Ave. and
German Pl.; arch., W. C. Dickerson, 3d Ave.
and 149th St.
One Hundred and Forty-ninth St., s e cor. Brook
Ave.. five-st'y brick tenement, 25' x 62', 59' high, flat
tin roof; $13,000; own., Sam. B. Ogden, 1031 Madi-
son Ave.; arch., A. B. Ogden & Son, 1031 Madison
Ave.
WAREHOUSES.
Baltimore, Md.- Two-st'y storage warehouse. 80' x
130', foot of Washington St.; own., A. Booth & Co.,
737 South Wolfe St.
Philadelphia, Pa.- American St. and Columbia
Ave., a warehouse will be built of brick for Fleck
Bros.; con., Geo. W. Stewart, 2526 North 6th St.;
arch., W. J. McAuley, 26 South 15th St.
MISCELLANEOUS.
Ashland, Ky.-Stone and brick depot; $15,000;
own., C. & O. R. R.; bld., Davisson & King; arch.,
A. O. Elzner, Cincinnati, O.
Bridgeport, Conn. -Two-st'y brick building. 69'x
210', to be erected at Barnum Circus Headquarters;
own., J. H. Bailey; arch., W. P. Banks; contract
not let.
Cambridge, Mass.- Bent St., near 3d St., frame
building for storehouse, 100' x 40'; own.. George F.
Blake Mfg. Co.; arch. and bid., Flynt Building &
Construction Co.
Chester. Pa. State and Jackson Sis printing-house
containing several offices, large hall, etc.; con.,
Winfield S. Worrall; own., Hon. Jno. B. Robinson.


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DTTBOIS & DAIRRIOW
EASTERN SELLING AGENTS,
61-63 Gold Street, New York.


Treasury Department, Office Supervising Architect,
Washington, ). C., March 16, 1895. Sealed proposals
will be received at this office until 2 o'clock P. M. on
the 12th day of April, 1895, and opened immediately
thereafter, for all the labor and materials required
for the erection and completion (except heating appa-
ratus) of the United States Post-office building, Salina,
Kan., in accordance with the drawings and specifica-
tion, copies of which may be had at this office or the
office of the Superintendent at Salina, Kan. Each bid
must be accompanied by certified check for a sum
not less than two per cent df the amount of the pro-
posal. The right is reserved to reject any and all
bids, and to waive any defect or informality in any bid,
should it be deemed in the interest of the Government
to do so. All proposals received after the time stated
for opening will be returned to the bidders. Propo-
sals must be enclosed in envelopes, sealed and marked
"Proposal for the Erection and Completion (except
heating apparatus) of the United States Post-office
building at Salina, Kan.," and addressed to CHAS.
E. KEMPER. Acting Supervising Architect.
1005
SEWERS.
_ [At Peoria. Ill.]
Proposals are wanted until Ap-il 11, for material
and labor for the West Bluff sewer system. Address
ISAAC TAYLOR, Commissioner of Public Works. as
above. 1005
BREAKWATER.
Proposals are wanted until April 12, for a
breakwater. Address J. W. SUMMERHAYES, Asst.
Q. M., David's Island, N. Y. 1005
TAIL.
J [At Dawson, Ga.]
Proposals are wanted until April 30, for a fireproof
jail. Address J. W. ROBERTS, as above. 1005

BUILDING. [At Plattsburgh, N. Y.]
Proposals are wanted until April 4, for construc-
tion of buildings, -alterations, etc., at Plattsburgh
Barracks. Address CAPT. GEO. E. POND, Platts-
burgh, N. Y. 1005
BUILDING.
UILDING. [At Fort Myer. Va.]
Proposals are wanted until April 10, for adminis-
tration building, officers' quarters and guard-house.
Address C. R. BARBER, Depot Quartermaster's
Office, Washington, D. C. 1005

M ACHINE S PS. [At East Pittsburgh, Pa ]
Proposals are wanted until March 30, for new
shops for the Westinghouse Machine Co. Plans. etc.,
at the Westinghouse Building, Pittsburgh. Address
E. E. KELLER, Vice-President, same place.
1004

SATER-WORKS. [At Meadville, Pa.]
Proposals are wanted until March 27, for a system
of water-works. Address WILLIS R. VANCE, City
Clerk, as above. 1004
BUILDING.
Proposals are wanted until April 2, for a life-
savinn stati ~ C~r B b B f


g ion on o rervlr us U auua. evtw ee ; euor and
Loans P ort, Ind. A four-st'y building for the ortsmouth,N.C. AddressS.I. KIMBALL, General
Masonie Society; $60,000; arch., A. W. Rush & Superintendent, U. S. Life-saving Service, Treasury
Sons. Department, Washington, D. 1004


PROPOSALS.
Proposals for Iron Furring and Lathing, Stone Curb-
ing. Coping, etc., an.l Marble work. Office of Building
for Library of Congress. 145 East Capitol St., Washing-
ton D. C., March 16. 1895. Separate sealed proposals
will be received at this office until 2 o'clock p. Mn. on
Monday, the 1st day of April, 1895, and opened imme-
diately thereafter in presence of bidders for furnishing
and delivering at the Building for the Library of Con-
gress in this city, the following materials and work
namely: 1. The iron framing, furring and lathing for
the main stair hall and certain other parts of the
building. 2. Dark granite, Potomac blue-stone and
North River blue-stone for dwarf walls, copings, curbs,
etc., for the park, walks and driveways around the
building. 3. Sienna and Rutland white marble work
for the vestibule in the S. W. Pavilion. Specifica-
tions, general instructions and conditions and blank
forms of proposal may be obtained on application to
this office. BERNARD R. GREEN, Superintendent
and Engineer. 1004
RBIDGE.
S[At Montreal, Can.]
Proposals are wanted until May 15. for steel super-
structure of the proposed bridge across the St. Law-
rence at this place. Address ROBERT WATSON
Secretary Montreal Bridge Co., 17 St. James St., as
above. t.f.

BUILDING.
[U At New Riegel, 0.]
Proposals are wanted until April 15, for a new
school-house in Subdistrict No. 7. Address JOSEPH
WEITZEL, Clerk of the Board of Education, as above
1005
1)EFRIGERATORS.
REFRIG TORS. [At Cincinnati, O.1
Proposals are wanted until March 29, for refriger-
ators for the new market-house. Plans, etc., at office
of Samuel Hannaford & Sons, architects, Hulbert
Block, as above. Address THE BOARD OF ADMIN-
ISTRATION, as above. 1004
W ATER-WOBES.
W T[At Pawling, N. Y.]
Proposals are wanted until March 30, for cast-iron
pipe, vitrified tile, hydrants, valves, dam and reservoir.
Plans at office of Board of Stanwix Engineerin Co.,
Rome. N. Y. Address BOARD OF WATER COM-
MISJSONERS, as above. 1004
UATER-WOR H S.
[AT R At Seneca, Kan.]
Proposals are wanted until April 9, for a system of
water-works. Address JAS. H. GLEASON, Mayor,
as above. 1004
SEWER MATERIALS.
[At Champaign, Ill.]
Proposals are wanted until April 8, for material
for twenty-seven miles of sewers, also for laying same.
Address J. P. DUNLAP, City Engineer, as above.
1004
AM.
D AM [At Woonsocket, R. I.1
Proposals are wanted until March 7, for earth
dam, with masonry, core walls, spillway, gate and
screen chambers, etc., and frame gate-house. Plans,
etc., at office of Water Department. Address BOARD
OF WATER COMMISSIONERS, as above. 1004


xvi.
XVlll










THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT


VOL. XLVII.


AND BUILDING NEWS.


No. IC04,


Entered at the Post-Office at Boston as second-class matter.
MARCH 23, 1895.





SUMMARY:-
The Building Outlook in New York. -The Coroner's Verdict
on the Recent Building Accident in New York -The United
States Engineer Corps as Architects. The Risks attending
the Execution of Public Work under Special Statutes. -
Explosions of the Kitchen Hot-water Boiler.--The Tobin
"Dressed Stone Law in Massachusetts.- The Coming Dedi-
cation of the Washington Arch in New York. -The Bridge
over the Bosphorus. Forty Hall for Sale. . . .117
ELECTRICAL SCIENCE FOR ARCHiTECTS.-IX ... .. ... .. 119
BRAMANTE AND ST. PETER'S ........... .... 120
VENETIAN ART AT THE NEW GALLERY, LONDON.--II ..... 122
TIE ACADEMY OF FRANCE, AT ROME. .......... 124
THE ARCHITECT AND THE ENGINEER .. . . .. . .. 125.
DATA RELATING TO WATER. . . . ... .... 126
SOCIETIES. .. . . . . . . .... 127
ILLUSTRATIONS: -
Gothic Corridor: Union Passenger Station, St. Louis, Mo.-
The Union Passenger Station. St. Louis, Mo.--Plans and
Details of the Waiting-room and Staircase of the Same. -
Design for the State Normal School, Jamaica, N. Y.--Hotel
at Irwin, Pa.
Additional: East Approach: Union Passenger Station, St.
Louis, Mo. -Private Dining-room in the Same.- South
End of Main Waiting-room of the Same. -North End of
Main Waiting-room of the Same. .......... 127
COMMUNICATION: -
The Grill-room. . . . . . . . .. 127
EXHIBITIONS . . . . . . . . . . 127
NOTES AND CLIPPINGS. ....... . . . . .. .128

CCORDING to the New York papers, there is a prospect
of a great revival in building in the metropolis this season.
Applications have been filed for a large number of office
and business buildings, of the most substantial and expensive
kind, on and near Broadway, below Fourteenth Street, and in
the upper part of the city there will be much new work. The
estimated value of the buildings for which plans have been
filed, since January 1, is nearly eighteen million dollars, while
the value for the corresponding period last year was less than
seven millions. Moreover, investors of moderate means are
said to be turning their attention to the purchase and improve-
ment of small lots of real estate, and an excellent demand for
such property is reported.

SHE promise of the New York Assistant District Attorney,
that he would have the coroner's jury in the case of the
fall of the Orchard Street tenement-houses composed
partly of architects, appears to have been kept, Mr.. Ernest
Flagg being the foreman of the jury, while Mr. E. K. Ros4iter
was another member. Several other architects and builders
testified before the jury, the evidence all going to show, not
only that the materials and workmanship of the buildings were
bad, but that the plans were defective, and notwithstanding
their defects, had been approved by the Department of Build-
ings, while no adequate attention had been paid by the inspect-
ors to the work as it went on. As the jury found, the arrange-
ment of the plans was such as to bring a load of ninety tons to
the square foot on certain brick piers in the cellar, in direct
contravention of the law, which limits the allowable load on
brickwork to eight tons per square foot. This defect in the
plans, as the jury thought, ought to have been noticed and
pointed out by the examiners of plans for the Department of
Buildings; and, in failing to do this, the jury found the two
examiners to have been guilty of gross carelessness in the
discharge of their duties." The inspector for the district in
which the buildings were situated was also found to have been
guilty of criminal negligence of the worst kind," inasmuch
as he not only failed to notice either the bad workmanship or
the open violation of the law, but made a false report of the
condition of the buildings. The contractors and owner were
also found criminally guilty," in having violated the law in
instances "so numerous and flagrant that they could only have
been carried out by collusion with the Inspector of the dis-
trict," and in having knowingly, and to save expense, used bad
materials, and allowed bad workmanship. In conclusion, the


jury remarked that, in their opinion, the most efficient check
which could be placed upon practices of the kind which have
led to this disaster would be the licensing of all architects, who
should be required to undergo a thorough examination as to
their qualifications to practise an art upon which the lives of so
many people depend." Unsparing as the jury showed itself
toward the parties whom it found negligent, it exonerated, in
its verdict, Mr. Brady, the head of the Building Department,
who, as it said, "seems to be a man of ability and integrity,"
but it found that he was seriously hampered by the character
and incompetency of many of the men employed in the Depart-
ment."

~JTHE old scheme, of having officers of the United States
SArmy superintend the construction of public buildings,
has been revived, according to the Washington papers;
and the usual frightful examples of the slowness of progress
on such buildings, under the ordinary methods, are brought up
to show how much more quickly they would be finished if the
military arm took hold of them. To complete the alluring
picture, we are told that the Congressional Library, which is
nearing completion, under military direction, and has cer-
tainly been rapidly built, is "a gem of art," as if all we had to
do, to scatter gems of art speedily around the country, was
to transfer the Supervising Architect's office to the Army
Headquarters. It is hardly necessary to say that this agita-
tion is decidedly pernicious. That the Congressional Library is
a fine building, well and quickly built, we acknowledge with
pleasure, but, notwithstanding the remarkable and exceptional
qualifications of General Casey and Colonel Green for archi-
tectural undertakings, it is quite capable of improvement as a
work of art, and the rapidity with which it has been carried
out is due as much to the energy with which the officers cut
off Congressional interference, and demanded appropriations, as
to any hidden capacity of the military mind for making bricks
and stones jump into their places without assistance; while
the Pension Building, the other great example of military
architecture, though quickly built, for the same reasons, is
about as far from being a "gem of art" as any structure within
our knowledge. The fact is that the people who can build
most rapidly, skilfully and beautifully are the people who have
devoted their lives to learning how to do so, namely, the
architects; and the sooner the public stops dodging around
them, and trying to utilize politicians and generals and
carpenters and what not, in place of them, the better off*it
will be.

'RCHITECTS often get themselves into trouble over pub-
lic work, by forgetting that buildings erected by the public
are carried out in pursuance of some special statute or
ordinance, and paid for by some special appropriation; and
that, if they find some modifications in the plans, or some
extra expenditure, to be desirable, another special statute or
ordinance must be proposed and passed, and another appro-
priation ordered, before the change can legally and safely be
made. It is, therefore, useful to read occasionally examples
of the strictness with which legality, or, as we call it, red-tape,
is observed in public building-matters by the officials who have
them in charge. In a recent debate in the French Chamber
of Deputies, some curious instances were referred to. At the
porcelain-factory at SKvres, which is public property, the in-
terior of the building is under the care of the Department of
Fine Arts, while the exterior is in charge of the Department
of Civil Buildings. The consequence is that, whenever the
windows need washing, the two departments have to be notified.
It is hardly necessary to say that such departments never take
any notice of each other's existence, still less cooperate with
.others; and the inside of the windows is washed by one set of
people, and the outside by another, the two operations never
taking place at the same time, so that the windows are
never clean on both sides. In the same way, the statues in
the Paris parks belong to the Department of Fine Arts,
and the pedestals to that of Civil Buildings. Some four years
ago, the nose of a statue in the court-yard of the School of
Fine Arts, probably loosened by frost, fell off. The Director
wrote to his official superiors, requesting that it might be
replaced. Then arose a question, whose business it was to put
back the nose, and notes were exchanged among the different


Copyright, 1895, by the AMERICAN ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS COMPANY, Boston, Mass.









The American Architect and Building News.


[VOL. XLVII. -No. 1004.


Departments, without result. The matter was not allowed to
drop, but no way could, apparently, be found to bring it within
the scope of any one's authority, until this year, when an appro-
priation was made for restoring and repairing the facade of the
School, including the nose of the broken statue in the court-
yard.
HE practice favored by our English brethren, of blowing
themselves up in cold weather with their hot-water appa-
ratus, appears to be more popular than ever this year.
According to Engineering, every newspaper we take up con-
tains its tale of houses wrecked and women killed." On the
seventh day of February, there were four explosions, by which
one person was killed, and five injured; the next day there
were nine explosions, and seven or eight more people injured;
on the ninth, four more boilers blew up, on the tenth two,
and on the eleventh four more. Dfiring February, six people
were killed, and thirty-four injured, by these explosions, while
last year nineteen people were killed, and fifty-four injured, in
the same manner. In nearly all cases, the explosions were
caused by the freezing of the water in the circulation-pipes,,
which, sealing up the outlet for the escape of steam, allowed
the pressure in the boiler, or, as we should call it, the water-
front of the range, to increase beyond its power to resist.
Considering that our climate is far colder than that of England,
and that our houses are much more generally furnished with
hot-water supply, it is rather surprising that the explosion of a
water-front, which is almost unknown with us, should be so
common there, and the reason is undoubtedly to be found in
the fact that piping is laid out there with what seems to us
incredible carelessness, while the treatment accorded to the
apparatus in cold weather is not much better. It is hardly
necessary to say that almost the first care of an architect here
is to arrange his plumbing compactly, in the middle of the
house, or over the kitchen, so tlhat the circulation of the hot
water will be as direct as possible; and not only every archi-
tect, but every householder, knows that hot-water pipes are
more likely to freeze than those carrying cold water, and takes
special care of them. Our plumbers claim that if a pail of
boiling water, and one of cold water, are set out of doors
together on a cold day, the boiling water will freeze first; and,
however this may be, it is always the hot-water pipes which,
in our houses, are boxed-in, or covered with felt, if they have
been so planned as to be exposed to the cold. Moreover, with
us, the open hot-water tank in the attic, forming the reserve
from which the house supplies are drawn, which is still used in
England, has long been obsolete, and the direct circulation
from the water-front is simply toand from the closed copper or
galvanized boiler," which stands close to the range. It is
true that, if the pipes which lead from this boiler to supply the
house fixtures were allowed to freeze, it would be possible to
accumulate steam-pressure enough to cause an accident; but
the boiler contains forty or fifty gallons of water, and, even
if the range fire is allowed to go out, a slow circulation,
sufficient to prevent freezing, will continue for many hours be-
tween the water-front and the boiler, and, if these connections
are open, when a fresh fire is built in the range, the first effect
is to heat the water in the boiler, no pressure of steam being
produced, even though all the other pipes in the house may be
frozen, until all this water has been raised to the boiling-point,
which takes, usually, several hours. During this period, the
lead pipes, which are good conductors, are transferring heat in
all directions over the house, so that, while it is not unusual to
have a hot-water supply or circulation pipe caught by frost,
it is almost always free before any steam pressure need be
feared. Moreover, our water-fronts are almost always of cast-
iron, and an explosion, if it should take place, would not
usually be very serious. Engineering advocates, with reason,
the application of safety-valves to domestic boilers ; buta safety
valve on a water-front is unheard-of in this country, where
more careful arrangement seems to give all the security re-
quired.
S we. see by the newspapers, a bill resembling in all respects
the New York dressed stone law, including the paving-
stone feature, which is so clearly expressed that no legal
opinion will be required to determine whether it is covered,
has been introduced in the Massachusetts Legislature, and at
the committee hearing, was warmly supported by the officers
of the Granite-Cutters' Union, and, apparently, opposed by no
one. It will be remembered that the Tobin law is said to have
rown five thousand pavers out of work, for the benefit of one


hundred and fifty granite-cutters; and we advise the people in
Massachusetts whom the passage of such a bill would deprive
of their living to bestir themselves in the matter.

R. STANFORD WHITE'S beautiful Washington Arch,
in New York, is nearly completed, with the exception of
two groups of statuary, for which a place only is provided.
and is to be handed over to the City on the thirteenth of April
next, with appropriate ceremonies. The National Guard of
the citizens will probably parade on the occasion, and Presi-
dent Cleveland, who is a member of the committee in charge
of the erection of the arch, has been invited to be present.
The day chosen is the one hundred and sixth anniversary of
the inauguration in New York of George Washington as the
first President of the United States and is therefore a highly
appropriate one.
CCORDING to the Schweizerische Bauzeitung, w6rk is to
be commenced this summer on the great bridge over
the Bosphorus, which has been talked of for many years.
The Bosphorus, at the point where the bridge will cross it, is
about half a mile wide, and it is intended to build eight piers,
so that the spans will not be of extraordinary width, but the
clear height of the middle span above the water is intended to
be about two hundred and fifty feet. Of course, no draw will
be needed under these circumstances. The bridge will be of
the girder and cantilever type. The bottom of the channel
offers a good foundation for- the piers, so that no special engi-
neering difficulties are feared. The cost is estimated at sixty
million francs, and will be borne by a French syndicate, which
has already carried out docks and other improvements in and
around Constantinople. What the political aspects of the
undertaking may be, or what the Powers may say to it, re-
mains to be seen; but the Turkish authorities are said to have
already approved the scheme. So far as tourists are con-
cerned, the opening of direct railway communication between
Europe and the little-known interior of Asia Minor will be an
important matter. On many accounts, Asia Minor is a region
of extreme interest to the traveller. It was, according to the
legends, the original home of the Ionian portion of the Greek
race, and was, in ancient times, in constant communication
with Greece, as well as with Persia and the East. Moreover,
although traversed, not only by the great trading caravans
which exchanged goods between Asia and Europe, but by the
armies of Cyrus, of Xerxes and Darius, Xenophon, Alexander,
Pompey and Belisarius, Osman and Tamerlane, the inhabitants
are said to retain in tolerable purity the blood of the antique
population. Unfortunately their Turkish conquerors have
inspired them with fanatical Mohammedanism, while they
keep up their ancient reputation for brigandage; so that few
countries are so dangerous for a European to explore. With
the establishment of direct railway communication, it is reason-
able to expect that travel will increase, and will be made safer,
and the beautiful scenery and salubrious climate of the coun-
try? to say nothing of its archaeological interest, will then
certainly attract many visitors.

SHE sentimental people who are pleased with the story of
Sir Walter Raleigh's laying down his new embroidered
cloak in a mud-puddle, for Queen Elizabeth to step on,
may be interested to hear that the estate on which this inci-
dent took place is for sale. The manor-house is known as
Forty Hall, probably from the fact that the estate once be-
longed to the Fortie family. It fell afterwards into the hands
of Sir Nicholas Raynton, who, in 1629, built the present house,
from designs by Inigo Jones. In 1700, the house, which had
passed by inheritance from the Rayntons to the Wolsten-
holmes, was altered and modernized. Two generations later,
the sole heiress of the Rayntons and Wolstenholmes married a
Breton, whose son divided and sold the estate, and it has since
passed through several hands. At the time of the Raleigh
story, Queen Elizabeth was visiting at the neighboring manor
of Elsynge Hall. In contrast with the vicissitudes which this
property has undergone, it appears that an estate in Gloucester-
shire is also for sale, which has remained in the same family,
in unbroken succession, for more than seven hundred years.
This would make the original possessor a contemporary of
Richard Coeur de Lion, at least. How a family must feel in
giving up such property, we, in this country, can hardly
imagine, but one can hardly conceive of anything but harsh
necessity which could lead to such a step.









MARCH 23, 1895.]


The American Architect and Building News.


ELECTRICAL SCIENCE FOR ARCHITECTS.1- IX.
THE NATIONAL CODE OF RULES FOR ELECTRIC WIRING. -II.
6. LIGHTNING-ARRESTERS : -
a. Must be attached to each side of every overhead
circuit connected with the station.
b. Must be mounted on non-combustible bases in plain
sight on the switch-board, or in an equally accessible place,
away from combustible material.
c. Must be connected with at least two "earths" by
separate wires, not smaller than No. 6 B. & S., which must
not be connected to any pipe within the building, and
must be run as nearly as possible in a straight line from
the arresters to the earth connection.
d. Must be so constructed as not to maintain an arc
after the discharge has passed.
A "lightning-arrester" would perhaps more properly be called
a lightning diverter, since it does not arrest the lightning, but diverts
it from the wiring by offering a comparatively easy path to the
earth. If there were not this easy path, the lightning would pierce
the insulation in some other place, because of the great force urging
a discharge. The lightning-arrester is made so that the connection
with the earth is immediately broken as soon as the lightning or
"static discharge" has passed, for otherwise there would be an
opportunity for the leakage of the dynamo current.
Figure 18 shows the principle of a lightning-arrester. At A is a
very short air-space that is an effectual insulator so far as the
normal electrical pres-
Line. sure on the line is con-
cerned. When a light-
SA ning charge accumu-
A latest on the line there is
a very strong tendency
for it to break through
the insulation to the
Search, and the short air-
-Eartfh space is easily sparked
Fig. 18, Showing Principle of Lightning-arrester. across. T h e air is
heated somewhat by the
discharge, and the normal electrical pressure on the line will then be
sufficient to maintain a constant leakage to the earth, if there be not
some arrangement that breaks the connection. This connection can
be broken in several ways. Often the arrester is made so that after
a discharge the air-space is increased until the electrical pressure
can no longer force a current through it, and sometimes a strong
magnet is directed across the space; it being a curious fact that
a magnet will repel an arc and thus blow it out."
"Each side of the circuit means each wire of the circuit; the
one going out and the one coming in.
An "earth" is a connection with the earth; or, the special ar-
rangements such as buried metal, pipes, etc., that insure the electri-
cal connection. A good earth is made by imbedding a copper or
iron plate about two feet square in broken coke and burying the
whole in moist earth, all connections being soldered.
The wire gauge of Brown & Sharp is the one by which copper
wire is usually measured in this country, and it is commonly called
the B. & S. gauge."
The electric "arc" has been mentioned before in these papers.
It is familiar in the arc-lamp. A current of electricity in being
forced through an air-space, meets a high resistance and the energy
required to force the current through this resistance is transformed
into intense light and heat. The heated air and volatilized substances
make of the space a conductor to some extent, but one with a com-
paratively high resistance.
Lightning-discharge currents do not act the same as the currents
from dynamos. They do not always take the path that would be
taken by a dynamo current, but frequently jump across spaces of air
rather than go around corners and bends in conductors. It is con-
sequently important that the path from the lightning-arrester to the
earth be straight, so that the lightning discharge will not cause
damage on its way to the earth. Although arresters are made to
automatically break the connection with the earth as soon as the
discharge current has passed, a heavy discharge may prove too
much for the arrester, and the arc be long continued. For this
reason, everything about the arrester should be non-combustible.
Since parts of the arrester have good connection with the earth,
special care must be taken to prevent leakage, and consequently the
base on which the parts are mounted should be of a material that
will not absorb moisture.
The two earths are required to make sure, good and sufficient
connection with the earth. It is bad practice to connect to pipes in
a building, because there is no certainty that the discharge current
will go to the earth without damage in some unlooked-for place.
7. TESTING :-
a. All series and alternating circuits must be tested
every two hours while in operation, to discover any leak-
age to earth, abnormal in view of the potential and method
of operation.
b. All multiple-arc low-potential systems (300 volts or
less) must be provided with an indicating or detecting
device, readily attachable, to afford easy means of testing
where the station operates continuously.
IContinued from No. 1001, page 92.


c. Data obtained from all tests must be preserved for
examination by insurance inspectors.
These rules on testing to be applied at such places as
may be designated by the association having jurisdiction.
A "series circuit" is one in which everything in the circuit,--
dynamo, wire, lamps, etc., come one after the other, "in series";
the same current
going through
each. (Fig. 19.)
The electrical-
pressure neces-
sary to force the
current through
such a circuit is
usually high, be-
cause each device
requires a ccr-
Fig. 19. Series Circuit, showing same current passing through tain pressure and
lamps and motor. the total pressure
on the circuit
must be the sum of the pressures required by the different devices.
The high pressure, of course, makes leaks more probable and more
disastrous. (See American Architect, No. 971.)
-"In "alternating circuits" the current alternates in direction.
Such.a circuit has peculiar properties that make it possible, where
branches are taken off, to change the pressure with transformers to
anything desired. With alternating circuits the pressure between
the wires that leave the station is high, and this system is conse-
quently classed with series systems and it is required that it conform
to the more stringent rules in regard to testing.
In the "multiple arc," or, more simply, the multiple system, there is
a constant pressure between the main wires, and the different
devices are connected-in between the wires, each device operating at
the full pressure of the system and taking only such current as its
resistance allows. (Fig. 20.)
The pressure between the mains of a multiple system is usually
below 300 volts and is consequently "low," although there are often


Fig. 20. Multiple Circuit, showing Lamps and Motor working with constant pressure.
multiple circuits on which motors are operated, that have a pressure
of 500 volts. (See American Architect, No. 971.)
"Detecting" or "Indicating Devices" are arranged to operate by
the leakage current. Thus a simple form that will serve as an illus-
tration, is as follows:
Suppose that in Figure 21, A and D are the main wires of a
multiple system, and that I and 1' are two incandescent lamps con-
nected across between the mains, but "in series." They will not
burn brightly, because instead of each lamp getting the full pressure,
each gets only one-half. At B suppose there be a connection with
the earth. If now there be a ground-connection, say at C, the cur-
rent that passes through I does not all go through 1', but can at
least, partly leak
through the earth,
A up to B and thence
D to D. As a result,
less current than be-
fore will go through
Sga th l', and more than
before through 1.
This will, of course,
make 1 brighter and
1' less bright. Thus
when the left-hand
lamp burns brighter,
Earth. there is a leakage to
the ground on the
Fig. 21. A Form of Ground detecting device, right-hand wire, and
when the right-hand
lamp burns brighter, there is a leakage on the left-hand wire. A lamp
may also be put in the wire leading to the ground. This lamp will
then light up more or less according to the amount of the leakage.
8. MOTORS:-
a. Must be wired under the same precautions as with
a current of,the same volume and potential for lighting.
The motor and resistance-box must be protected by a
double-pole cut-out and controlled by a double-pole switch,
except in cases where one-quarter horse-power or less is
used on low-tension circuit, a single-pole switch will be
accepted.
b. Must 'be thoroughly insulated, mounted on filled
dry wood, be raised at least eight inches above the sur-
rounding floor, be provided with pans to prevent oil from
soaking into the floor, and must be kept clean.











The American Architect and Building News.


[VOL. XLVII. -No. 1004.


c. Must be covered with a waterproof cover when not
in use, and, if deemed necessary by the Inspector, be en-
closed in an approved case.
[Section c. From the nature of the question, the decision
as to what is an approved case must be left to the Inspector
to determine in each instance.]
9. RESISTANCE-BOXES: -
a. Must be equipped with metal or other non-com-
bustible frames.
b. Must be placed on the switch-board, or at a distance
of a foot from combustible material, or separated there-
from by a non-inflammable, non-absorptive, insulating
material.
[Section a. The word "frame" in this section relates
to the entire case and surrounding of the rheostat, and not
alone to the upholding supports.]

"Cut-out" here means "fusible cut-out." Generally speaking, a
cut-out is any device that makes a break in the circuit and "cuts out"
any lamp, motor, or other piece of
apparatus. The term is, however,
-- becoming commonly applied only to
S fusible cut-outs. The fusible cut-out
ordinarily consists of a block or box of
porcelain arranged so that a fuse,"
or piece of easily fusible metal, will
form a part of the circuit. When
the current becomes too great, the
fuse melts, because of the heat that
&) the current generates in it, and the
: circuit is thus broken. This fuse is
supposed to be so proportioned that
Fig. 22. Double-pole Cut-out. it will melt before the copper con-
ductors can become unduly heated by
an excessive current. The fusible cut-out is frequently called a
"fuse block."
A double-pole device is one that acts in each of the two poles,
two wires, or two sides of a circuit. It is required that cut-outs and
switches be double-pole so that the cutting-off will be complete
and certain.
Suppose that, as in Figure 23, the fuse is single-pole, that is act-
ing on one wire of the circuit only: a heavy current flowing
through the circuit will, of course, melt the fuse and the flow be
stopped. But suppose the fuse to be just inside the wall of the build-
ing and that the wire A outside the wall comes into connection with'
a metal column or with some other conductor connected with the
earth. Suppose further, that there be a connection with the ground
on account of poor insulation at the motor, or that the wire comes
into contact with a gas-pipe somewhere in B C. [See remarks under
Rule 1.] Then the earth will be a by-path or "shunt around the
fuse and will make a closed circuit even though the single-pole
switch be open. Thus in this case a large part of the wire will not
be protected by the fuse at all. A double-pole cut-out or double-
pole switch will, however, cut off all the circuit beyond it.
The "switch" is a device that operates mechanically, and is simply
an arrangement by means of which one can pull out of circuit metal
that bridges over a gap. An air-space or some other insulation is
left, over which the current cannot pass.
When a circuit is broken, there is an arc at the point of separa-
tion. If the circuit be broken at only one point, this effect will be
greater than if there are several points of separation. With a
double-pole switch having two breaks in each pole, there is thus
much less arcing upon opening, than if the switch were single-pole
with one or two breaks. With a small motor running on a low-
potential circuit, the current is small, and the pressure low, so that
the arc formed when the circuit is broken is inconsiderable. It is
also of little importance here that the switch cuts off completely all


Fig. 23. Showing Single-pole Cut-out and
Single-Dole Switch.


Fig. 24. Double-pole Cut-out and
Dnublhlo.nnl. Sitrh


the wiring beyond it. For these reasons the rules allow single-pole
switches under the conditions mentioned.
The motor must be insulated from the ground for the same reasons
that apply to the generator. A motor is, however, used in all sorts


of places and usually has not a special space set apart for it as a
generator has, so there is need of greater precaution. Mounting the
motor on filled dry wood and raising it eight inches from the sur-
rounding floor keeps it well insulated, away from dirt that might
gather on the floor, and less liable to water-damage in case the floor
become flooded during a fire. Drip-pans are required, so that all
surplus oil may be caught, thus keeping everything about the
machine clean and less combustible.
The waterproof cover serves the same purpose as it does in the
case of the generator. (Rule 1 d.)
Rule 1 c requires that a generator shall not be placed in a
room where there are flying of combustible material. It is obviously
not always practicable to confine motors to rooms altogether free
from this sort of thing, and where there is dust or dirt, or flying of
any kind, the motor is enclosed in a case that will isolate it from bad
conditions. Usually the best case is a small room or closet built
about the motor and lined with sheet metal.
Rules 9 a and 9 b are made for the same reasons that 5 a
and 5 b are. In the case of a motor, however, a wooden resist-
ance-box is still more unfit, for it is used only in starting the motor,
and resistance is not supposed to be left in circuit, but to be all cut
out as the motor reaches full speed. When through carelessness or
accident some of the resistance is left in, the coils are very likely to
overheat as they are frequently of too small carrying capacity
to carry for any length of time the current that would flow through
them. RUSSELL ROBB.
(To be continued.)

BRAMANTE AND ST. PETER'S.
HE little town of Urbino which in the year 1883 celebrated the
four hundredth anniversary of the birth of the great painter
Raphael Sanzio, has lately celebrated the five hundred and
fiftieth anniversary of the birth of the greatest architect of the
Italian Renaissance period who, in 1514, died at the age of seventy
years. The name of this grand artist is attached to that of the
greatest of the Catholic monuments, the incomparable Church of St.
Peter, of which he was one of the chief architects. The anniversary
was also commemorated by an address at the Technical Institute at
Pesaro delivered by Professor Benedetto Passeri, a man learned in
the history of art. At the back of the peristyle of the Institute
there was unveiled in the presence of the political and administra-
tive dignitaries and of delegates from abroad, a bust of the celebrated
architect, upon which was the inscription:

TO DONATO BRAMANTE,
PRINCE OF MODERN ARCHITECTS,
THE TECHNICAL INSTITUTE OF PESARO
PROUD TO BEAR HIS NAME.
MDCCCXCIV.

The occasion was as brilliant as possible, and in all respects
worthy of the man it was designed to honor. Bramante was as-
suredly one of the artists whose works most powerfully contributed
to raise the reputation of the century to which he belonged. Chance
willed it that he should also be the uncle of Raphael so that the glory
of the greatest of Italian painters and that of the grandest architect
are involved one in the other and belong to one and the same family.
Bramante belonged to a poor family, but had at an early hour
manifested a strong leaning toward drawing, though at first he
seemed rather to incline towards painting, and his father who needed
t%,utilize the budding talent put him to study in the studio of a
painter of Urbino, Carnevale, under whose direction he executed
several works of very secondary worth. He went to Milan, where
he studied closely the celebrated Gothic cathedral, of which the
imposing style charmed him and caused to spring up in his breast
the inclination toward architecture. Shortly afterwards, he arrived
at Rome. He still lived by his brush and he is credited with paint-
ing over the Porta santa of St. John Lateran, the escutcheon of Pope
Alexander VI. But his penchant for architecture had already
become firmly rooted and he devoted the greater part of his time to

analyzing and measuring all the remains of antiquity remaining in
Rome and its environs. Next he spent some time in the south of
Italy in studying Greek and Roman remains there. Returning to
Rome, he gave open evidence of his intention of devoting himself
to architecture, and the first one to encourage him to follow the new
career was the Cardinal of Naples, who commissioned him to con-
struct in travertine the cloister of the Convent of Sta. Maria della
Pace. Then little by little he was helped by the same patron to
secure the construction of several monumental fountains, the Palazzo
S. Giorgio, the Church of S. Lorenzo in Damaso and other churches.
He prepared the design for the palace of Cardinal Adriano da
Corneto, at Borgo Nuovo, and he conceived and carried out the
enlargement of the Chapel of Sta. Maria del Popolo. But his reputa-
tion reached its apogee in 1503, when he entered the service of Pope
Julius II, lately elected, whose first commission was the creation of
the Belvedre, which Bramante carried out by using two orders,
Doric and Ionic. He also did a great deal of work in re-arranging
the interior of the Vatican Palace, especially the great galleries
wherein were placed, later, the most valuable specimens of Grecian
sculpture.
Bramante was inventive and impetuous; he worked with feverish









MARCH 23, 1895.]


The American Architect and Building News.


and indefatigable ardor and if events had favored him, he would, in
a few years, have made the right bank of the Tiber a truly monu-
mental city. Unfortunately, money was sometimes lacking in spite of
the munificence of the popes and he was forced to curb the ardor
which consumed him.
Amongst his chief works, we must not forget to include the sanct-
uary of Sta. Maria di Loreto, which was finished later by Sansovino,
nor the graceful little house in the Trastevere which belonged to his
nephew, Raphael. Yet his chief claim to fame rests on the part he
took in the construction of the Basilica of St. Peter, a participation
which has given rise to many controversies as to whether the part
he played was useful or disadvantageous to the beauty of the edifice.
Bramante has been accused of too warmly seconding, through per-
sonal interest, the intention of the pope, who wished to tear down the
basilica and build a new church. He prepared an infinite number
of designs, each more bizarre than the last, but which all bore
trace of the fertility of the imagination whence they proceeded.
The fact is that a good half of the ancient structure was torn down,
and that Bramante set about rebuilding with all the impatient zeal
which characterized him. At the death of the pope, the building had
already risen to the height of the cornice. He was the first to use
vaults with wooden projecting caissons, with the stucco ornaments
that encase them, which catch the eye. To him, also, was due the'
invention of the method, subsequently used by Antonio San Gallo,
of building the vaults on hanging bridges.
Bramante's design was grandiose indeed and colossal, but in addi-
tion to the fact that the money at command was not enough to pro-
vide for his vast conception, death overtook him too soon and pre-
vented his carrying to completion his gigantic undertaking. We
cannot even form an opinion of the value of his plan, because it was
altered by the architects who succeeded him, each of whom, for per-
sonal reason, or because they felt the need of flattering the several
pontiffs who ascended the throne, one after the other, found it
desirable to introduce changes so as finally to totally change its
spirit. In the first place, there followed Raphael and Giulio da San
Gallo, who, after the death of Julius II, changed the design and even
altered parts already newly erected. Then came Balthazar Peruzzi,
who would have liked to pull down the entire building and make a
fresh start, and then in the last place came Michael Angelo Buona-
rotti, who knew how to make all details give way before his iron will,
and conform themselves to his taste and manner of conceiving and
understanding things. But all contemporary writers are agreed that
none of these had succeeded in imagining anything as sumptuous and
magnificent as that which Bramante had conceived, and that St.
Peter's would have been a monument much more worthy of admira-
tion if Bramante's ideas had been respected. Even Vasari dares to
express this belief, in spite of his love for and partiality toward
Michael Angelo, which so often made him unjust towards others.
He died, as we have said, in 1514, at the age of seventy. He lived
ostentatiously, spending with liberal hand the money that he earned.
He was very fond of music, and often improvised on the lyre, nor
did he.scorn to practise the poet's art, and his biographers declare
that some of his sonnets were far from bad. He was a typical
artist of the Renaissance, well read and well informed and epicurean,
like the popes of that marvellous epoch.
This Basilica of St. Peter, of which Bramante was one of the most
active architects, is a monument which has passed through the
strangest vicissitudes, some of which have modified and transformed
its physiognomy. It occupies the site where was in ancient times
the Circus of Nero, where all the martyrs were done to death. The
remains of these ancient Christians have been placed in a catacomb,
of which the entrance is at the foot of Monte Vaticano, and accol-
ing to a tradition, which is questioned by Protestants, the remains of
St. Peter himself were transported thither by St. Marcel. However
this may be, about a hundred years after the death of Jesus Christ,
the fourth pope after St. Peter, St. Anacletus by name, caused to be
erected here a sanctuary. The foundations of the great basilica
were laid as follows: About two centuries later, the Emperor
Constantine, converted to Catholicism, to show himself worthy of the
baptism he had just received, undertook to construct on the ruins of
this sanctuary a sumptuous basilica which should be rectangular in
form and divided into five naves by four rows of columns, each nave
being reached through a separate door in the facade, in this particu-
lar greatly resembling the Church of St. Paul extra Muros as we see
it to-day. After the manner of the time, the structure was preceded
by an open square court surrounded with porticos, of which no trace
remains.
In 1440, the Basilica of Constantine threatened to fall in ruins and
Nicolas V, about the middle of the fifteenth century, conceived the
idea of building a new metropolitan church. Nicolas was that pope
of enterprise and genius who first practically opened the era of the
Renaissance. He loved art for itself, not for the sake of mere show
and fashion like some of his predecessors.
The architects of this new structure were Rossellini and Leon
Battista Alberti; but it had been raised only a few metres above the
ground when Nicolas died and the work was instantly abandoned.
Paul V, a man of Venetian birth, undertook a veritable crusade to
raise the necessary funds, himself giving five thousand crowns and,
on his appeal, the faithful sent contributions to Rome for the purpose
of continuing work on a structure which shortly after was to become
the most noted in the Christian world. But the merit of having
given decisive impulse to this grand undertaking was reserved for


Julius II, a Ligurian by birth, who, by the boldness of his conceptions
and the firmness with which he prosecuted them, may be properly
held one of those men of true genius of whom humanity can boast.
He desired above all things that St. Peter's should be finished dur-
ing his reign and he gave the preference to the design of Lazzari
Bramante, who, by the breadth of his views and the ostentatious
character of his project, could not fail to seduce the imagination of
such a pope. Julius II urged him to do something which should sur-
pass in size and majesty every fine piece of work that the world con-
tained, and Bramante did not need to be told this twice.
The most characteristic feature in Bramante's design is that the
basilica was to have the form of a Greek cross with arms of equal
length. He had been much impressed at Florence by Brunelleschi's
dome, which is still a masterpiece of elegance and audacity, and he
dreamed of repeating it at Rome on a greater scale, to be in keeping
with the programme the pope had prepared for him. To this end
he had built at the four corners of the transept four enormous piers to
serve as supports for the dome. Unfortunately, death surprised him
while in the full current of feverish execution and Julius II survived
him only one year.
His successor, Leo X, entrusted the work to the young Raphael
and Giuliano da San Gallo. Their first care was to consolidate the
substructures of the four great piers which did not seem to them to
le strong enough to bear the enormous dome which Bramante in-
tended to place on them. It was Raphael who, setting his love for
an artistic ideal above the veneration he had for his uncle, changed the
general plan of the building, giving it the form of a Latin cross such as
it has to-day. Unfortunately, death overtook this incomparable artist,
too, in his full bloom, and from 1520 to 1546 the work had to be en-
trusted to divers architects who, as much through vanity as through
ignorance, often made changes in the design of the monument which
thus grew without the spirit of natural development and underwent
alterations the unfortunate effects of which its general style felt.
At length, in 1546, the pontiff Paul III broke through the intrigues
which up to that time had kept Michael Angelo at arm's length and
placed the work in his hands. He made the design for the dome, but
before it could be built he also died. It was not finished until 1573
by Jacopo della Porta who entirely respected Michael Angelo's de-
sign. This was not the case, however, with the facade, which
according to Michael Angelo's design was not so commonplace as the
one we now see, with its enormous columns planted against the wall.
He intended to have the columns stand free, forming a portico like
that of the Pantheon and those of the great monuments of antiquity,
which are not heavy, in spite of their often enormous proportions,
simply because light and air have free play over their exterior con-
texture.
During the pontificate of Paul V, Maderno finished this monumen-
tal structure by completing the facade upon which, in 1612, the
name of the munificent pontiff was engraved in huge letters.
Fontana published a monograph of this building, from which it ap-
pears that up to 1694 the total sum expended upon the building had
been forty-seven million Roman crowns, which represents in our
money the sum of about forty-five million dollars. There must be
few buildings in the world that have cost as much, but it is fair to say
that St. Peter's by its vast size and the richness of its details
accounts for the enormous size of the pecuniary sacrifices that its con-
struction demanded.
The aspect of the building gives no clue to its tremendous size, for
every part is so well proportioned, that what elsewhere would seem
gigantic, here appears to be merely of normal size. The circular
colonnade which surrounds the piazza serves to reduce to reasonable
proportions the enormous mass of the basilica framed between the
two semicircular colonnades. This is the reason why, when one
undertakes to measure any portions of the building, the resulting
figures are far greater than was expected. For instance, the facade
has a total height of 167 feet; the columns engaged in the wall are
8.5 feet in diameter and 91.6 feet high; the cornice is 8.5 feet high,
the attic 33 feet, the balustrade 5.8 feet, while the statues on the
balustrade measure 17 feet. The cross which crowns the structure
is 460 feet above the level of the ground. The length of the build-
ing is 613 feet and its breadth at the crossing is 124.7 feet. To get
an idea of the immense size of the nave, it is enough to measure the
baldachino which encloses the high-altar at the middle of the tran-
sept. At first sight it appears to be only of common size, and yet it
is really more lofty than the Farnese Palace, the summit rising 91.6
feet above the level of the floor, that is to say 22 feet higher than
the pediment of the colonnade of the Louvre at Paris.
The diameter of Michael Angelo's dome is only 3.2 feet less than
that of the Pantheon, which measures 141.7 feet. The wall which
supports the dome is not less than 25 feet thick and the distance
from the floor to the vault of the lantern is 393 feet.
The axis of the building runs almost exactly east and west. The
length from the door to the tribune is 597 feet and the width at
the high-altar the same. Finally, the total height from the level
of the piazza to the top of the cross surmounting the lantern is 452
feet.
Michael Angelo passes for the chief architect of St. Peter's,
1Our correspondent gives his measures not in metres but in pieds, which we
assume to be the old French pied and have so reduced his figures to English
measure, though the results so obtained do not agree precisely with any
published figures. It is impossible to say which are the really correct ones, as no
one has thought to state with explicitness from and to what particular points the
measures are taken.









122 %The American Architect

because it was he who had the luck to give the building its definitive
character. Maderno injured it by adding a facade which maims the
design and conceals from the spectator in front the view of the
magnificent dome as Michael Angelo intended it should be seen.
San Gallo and Raphael worked up the details and carried out some
of the secondary ideas contained in Bramante's plan. Balthasar
Peruzzi fortunately could not carry out his own ideas which would
have turned the temple into a ridiculous monstrosity. The real
architect of this cathedral was Bramante, whose anniversary was
celebrated last year, and it is proper to do the justice to his memory
that is its due. Even the dome which bears the name of Buonarotti
was conceived by Bramante and the merit is really his. The fame
of Michael Angelo is sufficiently great without seeking to make it
greater at the expense of others. H. MEREU.

VENETIAN ART AT THE NEW GALLERY, LONDON.'- II.

'1 a previous paper, we gave a general idea of the con-
? tents of this exhibition; reserving to this one a more
S critical survey of the chief features of it, viz, the pic-
iS tures. The three hundred pictures include works
p ^, attributed to all the great lights of the Venetian school,
and many of the lesser ones, but we must say at once
that, with the exception of the proud possessors, no one for a
moment imagines that all are correctly named.
As usual, the battle of the experts chiefly centres around the
name of Giorgione. Since it is well known tfiat he painted many
more large frescos than small pieces, and that many of these latter
have been lost or destroyed by fire and the vicissitudes of time, the
number of pictures bearing his name to which the judges have given
the "hall mark," has been gradually reduced, and Mr. Berenson-
the latest critic, if we mistake not unhesitatingly affirms that less
than a score of his pictures are in existence. It is obvious, there-
fore, that of the thirteen in the New Gallery, only very few can be
genuine. The same may be said of the Bellinis and some other of
the earlier painters. The fact is, when an artist became the fashion
in Italy or Venice, unscrupulous owners effaced an inferior name,
and substituted that of the favorite of the hour.
Virgin and Child," certainly not a Bellini, lent by Captain Hol-
ford, has inscribed on the canvas in large capitals Opus Bellini
Joannis Veneti non Aliter," which is quite sufficient to raise a
doubt of its authenticity.
English owners in the last century were no better than those abroad
and the result of it all is that we have become hypercritical. The
faults of the re-namer can, however, be remedied by a little pains-
taking study, but what can atone for the offences of the restorer?
How is it possible for those delicate touches, by which the very soul
is put into a face, to survive such treatment as the following, related
by a picture-dealer ? A family group by Van Eyk, having been in-
jured in some parts by fire, was treated as follows: he first lined it
and removed the old varnish; soaked it with poppy oil, then ex-
tracted the cement and wax with which the cracks in the color had
been filled, replacing them by a preparation of fine white wax. He
then painted over the background and some less important parts,
restoring the glazings where they had vanished, and completed his
work by two coats of the finest copal varnish. Certainly a frightful
example of the senseless restoration by which numberless master-
pieces are and have been irreparably ruined !
The visitor naturally compares the style of the Florentine and
other schools shown last year with those before him; remarking
especially how much more intellectuality appears in the faces, nota-
bly of the Madonnas." Instead of the former sanctimonious self-
consciousness, we see, in most cases, a healthy good-looking mother
peasant or lady of everyday life, caressing her child, and hold-
ing him up to the admiration of the beholder. This bears out what
some writer has said, that the Venetian School in its purity was
highly intellectual; and that we might distinguish the three Italian
schools thus: the true Florentine, as soul; the Venetian, as mind;
and the Roman, as developed after Michael Angelo and Raphael, as
body."
The Vivarini, of the Murano School, are too meagrely represented
by two pictures on the same legendary subject the Death of the
Virgin "; both legend and treatment are Byzantine : there is also
a Virgin and Child," who are standing behind a handsomely
carved frame, which is surmounted by a beautiful garland of fruit-;
while from a window in the background is seen a fine landscape.
This device of a landscape, viewed through an open window, is intro-
duced in several pictures.
By Jacopo Bellini there are two pictures, and there are several
attributed to his sons, Gentile and Giovanni. Gentile, it was, who,
at the desire of the Sultan, Mahommed II, was sent to Constanti-
nople by the Council, to paint his portrait- now in the possession
of the Layard family, though not lent to this exhibition. Gentile had
been at the court for above a year in high favor, when one day, the
Sultan, criticising a painting representing the beheading of John
the Baptist, ordered a slave to be decapitated before him to explain
his meaning. This alarming incident gave Gentile no rest till he
was en route for Venice.
Giovanni's well known Circumcision," from the Orleans collec-
tion, lent by Lord Carlisle, is interesting, not so much for the sub-
'Continued from No. 999, page 74.


and Building Nrews.


[VOL. XLVII. -No. 1004.


ject, though a favorite with early painters, as for the wonderful way
in which its most harmonious and rich coloring has been preserved
and for the naturalness of manner in the Virgin and her female
companion, both of whose dresses and ornaments are perfect. Near
this is one of the numerous copies of this picture, but the colors are
less vivid. The former is signed Joannes Bellinvs," the latter,
"Joanis Bellini P."
Though, strictly speaking, Andrea Mantegna was Venetian neither
by birth nor style, his marriage to the sister of the Bellinis a cir-
cumstance never forgiven by his first teacher, Squarcione and his
subsequent residence in Padua, have led to his being included among
Venetian painters. It is said that he, like Giotto, was in early life
a shepherd-lad, but how he came to be a pupil of Squarcione is not
known. We wonder how many embryo Giottos and Mantegnas are
lying perdus in our villages, waiting for their talents to be developed
in a Technical or Art School I
Mantegna is specially known in England by the nine paintings by
him, now in Hampton Court. They are painted in tempera or dis-
temper, on twilled linen, which has been stretched on frames and
fixed to the walls of the Communication Gallery, a place said to be
haunted by the ghost of Queen Katherine Howard. Mantegna was
sent for by the Duke of Mantua to paint a frieze for a hall in
his newly-built palace of San Sebastiano; the subject was The
Triumph of Julius Caesar," and the frieze remained in its place a
hundred and fifty years, andd with the rich collections of paintings,
was hidden when the town was pillaged in 1629. Afterwards the
then Duke, being much impoverished, sold the frieze and several
paintings for 20,000, to Charles I of England, who was then form-
ing his splendid collection. After his execution, Parliament disposed
of the pictures, but Mantegna's frieze, valued at 1,000, was reserved
to the Protector, to whose care we also owe the preservation
of Raphael's cartoons. They were afterwards given to Charles II,
but it is not known by whom.
Louisa, Lady Ashburton, lends a magnificent Adoration of the
Magi," by Mantegna, which, though it has suffered from age, is a
fine example of his later style and technique. The gifts being pre-
sented by the three kings are all Venetian; one, held by the Afri-

can, being a glass vase of exquisite workmanship. His own cape is
confined loosely under the chin by sequins attached to a delicate gold
chain, while round the neck his muslin shirt is richly embroidered in
Venetian fashion. The scene is very homely, bearing in mind that
none of these pictures suggest a locale other than that of Italy and
Venice. Also by him, and a later work, is the fine Greek head of
"Judith."
The name of Antonello da Messina is assigned to three pictures:
the first in importance being the "Ecce Homo," of which there is a
replica with variations in the Academy at Venice. It is a wonder-
fully-painted head, the eyes being simply perfect, and the whole ex-
pression showing intense, though subdued suffering. The model,
however, was a man of a low type, consequently the face lacks the
dignity and grace that even in extreme sorrow should characterize
the person of the Saviour. This picture, on a panel 11" x 8", and in
excellent preservation in a glass case, is said to have been picked up at
an old stall in Seville many years ago; it was then brought to the
fine collection at Richmond, whose owner, Sir F. Cook, has lent it to
the New Gallery. Another work, "Head of Hans Memling," is lent
by M. Ldon Somzde, and is marvellously life-like: the eyes again are
charming. There is also a "Judith" by him, a small full-length
figure, putting the head of Holofernes into a bag. This picture is
said to have passed for a Raphael in Charles I's collection and was
exchanged by him with the Earl of Pembroke for one by Parmigiano.
It-"is doubtless known to most of your readers, that during a visit
Antonello paid to the Netherlands, he became acquainted with Van
Eyk, and learned the secret of mixing colors with oil instead of fixing
them with a gum made by infusing young figs. On his way home he
imparted the knowledge to some of the Venetian painters.
Of the thirteen pictures reputed to be by Giorgione, what is to be
said ? Undoubtedly, the best that can be affirmed is that they are
Giorgionesque, but The Shepherd with a Flute," lent by the Queen
from Hampton Court, is one that bears all the marks of genuineness.
It is in a shabby old frame and needs cleaning, but probably on that
account there still remains the subtile glow which is the distinguish-
ing characteristic of this painter, joined to the joyoiusness that was so
marked a feature of the Renaissance.
Of three exceedingly fine portraits by Lorenzo Lotto, the gifted
and original contemporary and fellow-countryman of Giorgione, one
is lent by the Queen, from Hampton Court; while Captain Holford
lends the others. Her Majesty's is the beautiful and well-known one
depicting Andrea Odoni, standing surrounded by the various an-
tiques he has collected, a good-looking and easy-going man. He has
a ring on one finger quite near the nail, and the same is noticeable
in other portraits, besides which the rings are small. Odoni was a
rich and enthusiastic admirer of contemporary art in North Italy and
the friend of Titian, Aretino and other artists and writers. This
picture was for a long time supposed to be by Coreggio, but Dr.
Waagen recognized Lotto's style which was verified later by the faint
signature "Laurentius Lotto, 1527," being discovered. The other
portraits are of ladies and are unnamed. The first is a half-length,
nearly full face, she wears a black dress, white sleeves and chemisette,
serviceable leather gauntlet gloves and a large black turban with
gold medallions. The dress of the other lady is a mixture of black
and green, with large short puffed sleeves and an extraordinary









MARCH 23, 1895.]


The American Architect and Building News,


turban trimmed with something resembling little curls of white wool.
She wears a large jewel suspended by a gold chain from her neck,
in her left hand she holds a drawing of "Lucretia," which name
has been given to this picture--while on a table beneath it is a
paper with this inscription, "Nec Villa Impudica Lucretice Exemplo
Vivet." All three portraits, but especially those of the ladies, show
powerful treatment.
Some thirty pictures bear the name of Titian, and from among
those not portraits we select a few for some remarks. In "The
Magdalen," from the collections of Christina of Sweden and
the Duke of Orleans, we see depicted a very beautiful and refined
woman with fair hair, looking up as in prayer; a skull and book
stand on a table before her and to one side is a delicate glass vase
with cover. The Daughter of Herodias looks out of the picture,
her deep-set eyes and her beautiful classic features showing a tragic
intensity. The charger is on a table from which she turns away, and
an attendant stands near her; through an arch is seen a landscape,
recalling in its somewhat gloomy mountains the scenery of Titian's
early home. This picture is a repetition of the beautiful one in the
Doria Palace. The Triumph of Love is a characteristic one of
the great Venetian's, representing Cupid with bow and arrow stand-
ing on a lion's back. The canvas is circular in form and rather
dirty. Lucretia," lent by the Earl of Malmesbury, and which for-
merly belonged to Charles I, shows a nude full-length figure holding
with the left hand a red cloak over her eyes, while she is about to
stab herself with a dagger. M. Somzde lends the Worship of
Venus," a replica of a picture in the Royal Gallery, Madrid, but not
particularly interesting.
The portraits, however, form the chief attraction in the exhibition,
not only as regards the interest attaching to them historically, but
also for the grave and senatorial dignity imparted to portraits by all
Venetian artists, and notably by Titian. Indeed, after looking at
some of these for a short time the visitor feels quite en rapport with
them, as though face to face with flesh and blood. If it be so now,
when the canvasses have been scoured, re-varnished and what not,
with what beauty must they have gleamed on the walls when in their
pristine splendor! It is said that Titian always painted his pictures
for the place they were to fill, and, when possible, finished them on
the spot.
Having to contend with old Giovanni Bellini on the one hand, and
the fashionable Giorgione on the other, Titian found it somewhat diffi-
cult to obtain the height of his ambition the appointment of Court
Painter, then and for above thirty years past held by Bellini in suc-
cession to Vivarini, a post by no means a sinecure, since the entire
walls and ceilings within the Ducal Palace were in process of being
covered by the works of the greatest painters: besides It is a custom
of this city," says Sansovino, "that the Prince when in office should
do three things, procure his own likeness, life-size, to be placed in a
certain lunette under a window in the Hall of Great Council; obtain
a picture of himself kneeling before the Madonna attended by Saints,
for the College; and furnish a shield bearing his arms, to be placed
on board the Bucentaur."
The salary attached to the post was paid in two ways, probably
to prevent the great cost being known to the people of Venice. The
painter was granted a broker's patent connected with the Salt Office,
producing a hundred ducats yearly, with an annual exemption from
taxation equal to twenty more. It was the privilege of the best
masters to paint the portrait of the Doge, the remuneration being
twenty-five ducats. Titian followed up his numerous petitions by
one in which he said he had been invited to the Papal Court, but
would prefer devoting his talents to the Republic "if it pleased their
sublimity."
The first Doge whose portrait he painted was Antonio Grimani,
whose career was so remarkable that a brief sketch may be interest-
ing. Long before his age entitled him to inscribe his name in the
Golden Book" of Venice, he had visited every market in the
Mediterranean, amassing so much wealth that he paid twenty-five
thousand ducats for a Cardinal's hat for one of his sons; a lucky
investment as the sequel shows. Grimani was elected Captain-
general of the expedition against the Turks, in 1499, the famous
Loredano being next in command. The result was a decided Turkish
victory; each of these two Venetians accusing the other of with-
drawing his support at a critical moment. When the news came,
Grimani was cursed by the infuriated Venetians as the ruin of
Christianity; he was brought home in irons and condemned to im-
prisonment. After some time he escaped to Rome where he lived
for some years with his son, the Cardinal, until, being able to reconcile
Venice and the Papal See after the League of Cambrai, he was
entitled to a pardon. When he returned home, eleven years later,
at the age of eighty-seven, he was elected Doge far ahead of all
competitors. This Cardinal Grimani was one of the four distin-
guished persons whose friendship Erasmus enjoyed during his visit
to Rome.
To return to the portrait after this digression; the face is a marvel
of skill even from Titian. Over the intrenched and shrivelled face
of the old Doge he has thrown an indescribable charm, as it were,
glorifying without concealing the wrinkles, while in the keen glance
and the firmly set mouth- there is an air of vigor and subdued
triumph. The life-size figure of the Doge is three-quarters length;
he stands erect looking out from the canvas, wearing an ermine
mantle with gold embroidery up the front and round the neck. The
ducal cap by this time become very rich is adorned with jewels,


while underneath it is the cotton biretta covering the ears. This
biretta was worn, it is said, in order that under no circumstances the
dignity of the Doge should suffer by his head being uncovered.
This picture was an heirloom in the Grimani Palace till 1873,
though sold in 1871 to Count Rosenberg, Netherlands Consul-
General; at his death, in 1890, it became the property of his widow,
who has lent it to the exhibition it is now shown for the first time
in this country.
Rapidly glancing at the other portraits by Titian we notice one,
formerly in the Orleans collection, lent by the Earl Cowper, that of
his daughter "Lavinia," the famous and splendid picture represent-
ing this beautiful woman holding a bowl of fruit and looking back
over her shoulder; all the details are rich. The Portrait of a
Lady," a golden-haired dame in a pink dress holding flowers, comes
from Mr. G. F. Watts, R. A. The celebrated Cornaro Family,"
owned by the Duke of Northumberland, with the great series of
Titian's at Bridgewater House, with many other gems are conspicu-
ously absent; two portraits of members of that family are exhibited.
Captain Holford lends his "Caterina Cornaro," niece of Andrea
Cornaro, a Venetian noble, who was declared a daughter of St.
Mark's, and married in 1472 to the King of Cyprus. At his death,
shortly after, she was proclaimed Queen, but by the advice of her
brother Giorgio, abdicated in 1489, in favor of the Republic. In
this portrait the beautiful Queen is superbly attired, a noticeable
feature being the high pointed head-dress of some rich material, with
the ends falling over the shoulders; in her hand she holds a marten
with a collar on its neck.
"Giorgio Cornaro" is here also, an undoubted Titian, an attrac-
tive looking man caressing a falcon, with his dog at his side. We
know from his history that the habits and manners of the Venetians
of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries were far from puritanical,
but these men and women have at least open countenances, and do
not look as if they would have a man stabbed in the dark. Francis
Medella Rovere, Duke of Urbino, with his Son," the picture next
on our list, is, however, the exception proving the rule, having a most
crafty face, though that of his little boy is very winning. In this
large canvas-44" x 78"- the Duke, a noble-looking man, life-size,
in white doublet and hose with black surcoat and cap, stands full
length, his right arm resting on a helmet placed on a table, beside
which are two scrolls inscribed "S. R. E." and "S. V. R. P."
The picture is lent by the Duke of Westminster.
There are some specimens of that highly decorative artist, Pinis
Bordone, a pupil and imitator of Titian's. The most striking subject
is that of "Alfonso If D'Este, Duke of Ferrara, and his Mistress,"
who was Laura dei Dianti, and perhaps at this time his second wife.
It depicts the life-size, three-quarter length figure of a fair-haired
buxom young woman, wearing a rich dress, very low and exposing
the neck, standing by a table, her left hand on the shoulder of the
Duke, who leans against her breast and holds her right hand. He is
a dark handsome man, but weak and amorous. The picture was
brought from Venice by Napoleon I and given by him to his uncle,
Cardinal Fesch; it now belongs.to the Earl of Malmesbury. A
picture called Gli Innamorati," by Romanino, from the Casa Mori
collection is treated somewhat similarly. The Corporation of Glas-
gow lends a "Madonna and Child with Saints and Donors," but, as a
rule, the donors do not appear to such advantage as they do in por-
traits intended for the walls of their own palaces; they are then more
natural and not overawed.
A more important collection of Tintorettos has seldom, if ever,
been seen in England, the finest two examples being Esther fainting
before Ahasuerus," a painting of the first order, lent by the Queen,
from Hampton Court where it is not seen to such advantage as in
the New Gallery -and a Venetian Noble and Family." The
former the original sketch for which is in Madrid is a large
canvas, 81" x 105", and would be improved by careful cleaning. In
the fine sweep of this magnificent and animated composition, so
characteristic of Tintoretto, there is all the dignity suited to an
Oriental court. On the left is the King, behind whom a man in armor
is seen anxiously descending the steps of the throne, before which the
fainting Esther is being supported by two attendants. Many
handsomely dressed women are crowding around, while-a not
uncommon object in the Venetian picture a cat is seen in a boy's
arms. The "Venetian Noble and his Family" has an air of
grandeur conveyed to it by the almost royal dignity in the pose
of the chief figures, and by its size, 73" x 93". The father is dressed
in black with an ermine-lined coat, while his son is held by the hand
of the mother, who wears a richly-embroidered brown-velvet gown
and white ruff, pearl ear-rings and necklace. The boy is in a
crimson satin dress with white and gold sleeves; and the lady's
train is borne by a page in brown and gold velvet, the whole scheme
of color being sumptuous. A curious conceit of the portraiture of
the time is the background, where, through an open window, God
the Father is seen with outstretched hand blessing the group. The
lady in this picture is exceedingly like Jane Dormer, Duchess of
Feria, a great friend of Mary I, of England, and the image of the
Duchess of Fife. The Earl of Roseberry lends a first-rate portrait
of a weather-beaten "Venetian Admiral"- from the Hamilton
Palace collection. The portrait of "Andrea Barbadigo," life-size
three-quarter length, is grand; on a table near which he stands is a
splendid suit of inlaid armor, while through a window is seen the sea
and sea-monsters; its size is 46" x 37".
Tintoretto proved himself more than a match for Aretino, who










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[VoL. XLVII.-No. 1004.


was without doubt the most malignant man Italy ever produced, and
it was truly said of him that he spake ill of everybody except God,"
excusing himself for that by saying, I do not know Him." Meet-
ing Tintoretto one day, he began to praise the "amiable Titian "-
a nasty trick of his which had brought him many a blow. Tintoretto,
becoming impatient, bethought him of an artifice, viz, to invite
Aretino to his studio in order to take the portrait of so illustrious
a man." Aretino did not refuse and having entered the studio
arranged his ugly face in accordance with the wishes of the artist
who, at this juncture, with great calmness, pointed a long pistol at
the face of the sitter. Don't be so frightened said he with a burst
of laughter, I am only seized with a fancy to take your measure,"
and glancing at him from head to foot he continued quietly, "You
are twice and a half the length of my pistol," then placed himself in
the attitude of sketching him. Aretino, trembling all over, forced
his lips into an awkward smile and replied, You are very clever
and will always gain your point." History tells us that henceforth
this Scourge of Princes," as he was called, had no language sweet
enough for Tintoretto.
By the middle of the sixteenth century a great change had taken
place in the manner of delineating sacred subjects, and although the
transition was gradual, it was none the less marked, so that even
the most casual observer can easily detect the vast difference
between the devotional pictures of Giovanni Bellini, in their fervor
and sweetness recalling Fra Angelico, and the gorgeous canvases
of Paolo Veronese, all aglow with the mundane splendor of every-day
life.
Far and away Veronese's finest picture in this exhibition is
"Christ at the House of Levi," a small replica of one in the
Academy at Venice. This work was in the Carthusians' Monastery,
at Lyons from the sixteenth century till it came into the hands of its
present owner, M. Ldon Somzee, to whom we are indebted for
its appearance here. This unsurpassable picture is in size 60" x 85",
and we see depicted a portico with three arcades, beneath which is a
long table crowded with guests; under the central arch Christ is
seated, and near him are Peter, John and Levi called later Mat-
thew. The feast is a splendid one, judging from the number of
dishes and the retinue of servants coming and going, almost jostling
one another on the fine staircase leading to the court-yard beneath.
The details are minute, from a servant carrying a glass with wine,
- sent from table evidently, as he smells it to the cat running out
from under a table to fly at a dog. Over the table is a sort of
balcony from which a red baldachino hangs over the chief guest.
Apart from the personal interest the picture is very grand archi-
tecturally ; through these arches we look out upon splendid palaces
brilliant in the radiance of the Adriatic light.
Passing on to those bright lights of the Venetian decadence,
Canaletto and Guardi, we notice two or three of their charming little
works. The former is impressively represented by a View of a
Fair on the Piazza," a line of booths and crowds of visitors making
a busy scene, while a fine architectural effect is conveyed by the
Campanile and Cathedral of San Marco seen in the distance. A
View of the Grand Canal," looking towards the ducal Palace, is
taken from the steps of Santa Maria della Salute, while another
" View from the Piazzetta" looks toward that splendid edifice.
The Misses Cohen lend two Guardis, but they have become
blanched through exposure; one is a view of Venice comprising the
ducal Palace, the Tower of St. Mark" and other buildings.
The other is "Santa Maria della Salute." Also by Francesco
Guardi are two pictures of ceremonials, Pope Pius VI receiving the
Doge and Senators of Venice in the great Hall of the Scuola (or
guild) of Giovanni and Paolo showing these dignitaries entering
in procession, the sides of the hall being lined with the members of
the guild. The other picture is an out-of-door pageant, showing great
attention to minute details.
We must leave unnoticed a number of really magnificent paintings.
For instance, there is the sketch for Titian's Last Supper" for Philip
II, which being too high for the wall in Madrid where it was to hang,
had the top containing the fine arches cut off The sketch, of
course, is complete.
A picture called a Lady Professor at Bologna excites great
comment; said by many to be the work of Fernandino Licinio
though not attributed in the catalogue. It is difficult to say whether it
is a somewhat manly woman, or a womanish man, since, though the
hands holding a skull on the table are delicate, and indeed beautiful,
the face and head of hair resemble those of a young man of the time.
Be that as it may, it is a splendid painting; the dress is black and
there is a white chemisette above it. The dress might be for either
sex.

THE ACADEMY OF FRANCE, AT ROME.
HE list of French students of architecture entered at Rome -
and M. Chedanne is one of the latest is a long one, dating
as it does from the year 1720. Since then, with the exception
of the years of disorder, 1794-5-6 and a few other years, the French
Government have sent a student of architecture annually to the
Academy' of France, at Rome; and, in some years, two such stu-
dents have been sent. Among them are such names as Dorbay
(1739), Cldrisseau (1746), David Leroy (1750), De Wailly (1752),
Peyre, Jr. (1762), A. L. T. Vaudoyer (1783), Percier (1786), Guen-
dpin (1805), Huoyt (1807), Caristie (1813), Lesueur (1819), Blouet


(1821), Duban (1823), Labrouste (1824), J. L. Duc (1825), L.
Vaudoyer (1826), V. Baltard (1833), Lefuel (1839), Ballu (1840),
L. J. Andrd (1847), Brune (1863); and a host of other architects,
who did well in their time, whom it is impossible to mention here.
Again, among the living may be cited the names of Alfred Normand
(1846), Charles Garnier (1848), Honord Daumet (1855), Honorable
Corresponding Members of the Royal Institute of British Architects,
and many others in practice at the present time.
The establishment of the Academy of France, at Rome, was the
work of Louis Quatorze and his great Minister, Colbert. The King
commanded that the sound principles and most correct rules of
architecture should be publicly taught two days a week, in order
that a nursery, so to speak, of young architects might be formed;
and to give them more courage and passion for the art, the King
ordered that, from time to time, prizes should be awarded to those
who succeeded best, promising that a certain number of the young
men so premiated should be sent immediately, at the Royal cost, to
Rome, in order that nothing might be wanting on the King's part
to complete their education and render them fit to act in the con-
duct and superintendence of the Royal buildings." This was after
Desgodetz had been despatched by Colbert on a mission to Rome to
measure the finest of the ancient buildings remaining there -the
results of that architect's labors not having been published until
1682. But long before as early as 1666 Louis Quatorz had
sent young painters and sculptors to Rome; and established, at the
Palazzo Capranica, an academy in which twelve artists were to be
lodged and boarded at the Royal cost, each for a term of five years.
Its first Director was the President of the Royal Academy of Paint-
ing and Sculpture in Paris; and he, in March, 1666, left for Italy
with twelve young Frenchmen for the purpose of pursuing their
studies in Rome. This period was also eventful for architecture.
The Italian Bernini, who had just completed the colonnade of St.
Peter's, and who was in Paris at the invitation of the King, had vis-
ibly impressed His Majesty with the magnificence, long fallen into
disrepute, of the master-art; and in 1671, by the exertions of Col-
bert, was founded the Royal Academy of Architecture, which still
exists, partly as the section of the Ecole des Beaux-Arts and partly
as the third section of the Acaddmie des Beaux-Arts, one of the five
academies now composing the Institut de France, which was founded,
by a decree of the Republic, on August 22, 1795.
The Palazzo Capranica had long been used for the purposes of the
Academy, when it was transferred to the Palazzo Mancini; leaving
that palace, in 1803, for the Villa Mddicis (as the French term it)
where it is still housed.
The course of events which led to the formation of the present
cole des Beaux-Arts, some particulars of which were furnished
about ten years ago to the Editor of the Journal by the late Albert
Lenoir, formerly Secretary of the Ecole, is instructive as showing
how the arts emerged from the flood of destruction which deluged
France at the end of the last century and the beginning of this:

The condition of architecture after the Revolution was most unsatis-
factory. Of the Royal Academy, suppressed in 1793, no trace was per-
mitted to remain. The systematic study of architecture was discontin-
ued until David Leroy, a pensionnaire, in 1751, of the French Academy,
at Rome, afterwards celebrated for his researches in Greece, and known
to Englishmen from his controversy with Athenian Stuart, collected
together a few young men and taught them in private.
About that time, Antoine L. T. Vaudoyer draughted a scheme for a
School of Architecture, and in 1800 he joined Leroy. The two, with
the assistance of L. P. Baltard and, among others, Fontaine and Percier,
promoted emulation by offering prizes for designs and drawings, to be
submitted in competition, according to definite instructions issued for
the purpose, within the studio, oit atelier, they conducted. This school,
founded and developed by private enterprise, was afterwards removed
to the Louvre, and ultimately taken under Government protection at
the Collge Mazarin (the present Palais de l'Institut) in which, at that
time, the students' competitions for the annual Grand Prix de Rome
used to take place.
In such a manner the Ecole des Beaux-Arts, the most justly-famous
school of its kind in the world, came into existence. In 1816, it was
removed to the Convent des Petits Augustins.de la Reine Marguerite, in
the street of that name, now called the Rue Bonaparte, where it is still
located. At that time, the Convent buildings contained the Musde des
Monuments Francais, which was a collection of fragments of royal
tombs and effigies, and of monuments of distinguished Frenchmen,
preserved from iconoclastic fury by the reverential care of the scholar
and gentleman. The Museum was abolished in 1816; in its place, the
present Ecole des Beaux-Arts was begun. This was affected by
the adaptation of parts of the old Convent and the construction of new
buildings, first under the charge of Debret, and afterwards of Duban -
both members of the Institut. On the 4th of August, 1819, a Royal
ordinance determined the rules of the School, and divided the section
of architecture into two classes. No change occurred until 1863-64,
when the School was reorganized by Napoleon III, and in a manner
which has since undergone hardly any alteration in principle.

A young Frenchman, in order to gain admission as an "6leve de
l'Ecole des Beaux-Arts," has to pass an examination, after which he
is received into the second class of the school. He has then to work
on the various competitions and other exercises belonging to this
grade, and relating to both the science and art of architecture, to
ornament and figure drawing, and to the modelling of ornament.
These courses of study, moreover, include mathematics, physics, and
chemistry generally, descriptive geometry, perspective, stereotomy










MARCH 23, 1895.]


The American Architect and Building -News.


and construction. Numerous prizes of every kind are awarded to
the elves, both in the first and second classes. It is, however, im-
possible to devote space to a full description of a French student's
career; all that can be done is to describe the final competition in
which he may take part:
The competitions for the Grand Prix de Rome take place at the
Ecole des Beaux-Arts, and they are open only to candidates of French
nationality under thirty years of age, whether students of the school or
not. In the case of architecture, as in those of painting and sculpture,
the competition is an annual one, adjudicated on by nine architects,
who are chosen by ballot from a list presented by the Council of the
School. In like manner, nine painters and nine sculptors compose
the juries of their respective sections. The conditions of admission
to the competition for the Grand Prix in architecture are very simple.
In March of every year a preliminary trial takes place. The candidate
has to make a sketch (esquisse) in twelve hours, and from the authors
of these sketches the jury select twenty-five, who have to undergo a
second ordeal, which consists of another sketch, to be made in twenty-
four hours. From these last, ten candidates are chosen, and they enter
their loges for seventy-two days. A loge is an enclosure within which,
as before mentioned, a candidate works all day, beginning at 8 A. r.,
and during the period of trial he is not permitted to .enter the loges of
the other competitors or introduce anybody into his own. A careful
programme of the work he has to do is given to him by the Academy
of Fine Arts, and this last year (1883) it was a Necropolis." Out of
the ten competitors, three are selected and premiated. The first obtains
a gold medal, which has always been, and, I believe, is still, regarded
as the highest prize open to French students, and he leaves early in the
following year for the Academy of France, at Rome, where lie is
lodged and boarded at the cost of the nation.1 The competitors placed
respectively second and third also receive medals, and gain a just dis-
tinction thereby; they further are exempted, should they try again for
the Grand Prix, from submitting preliminary sketches.
Nor is this the place in which to enter on a description of the
diploma in architecture granted, after examination, to students of
the Ecole des Beaux-Arts, after they have obtained a certain num-
ber of medals, etc., in the various competitions of the school, or in
the Prix de Rome." To continue:
At the Villa Medicis the student has a bedroom and a studio allotted
to him: lie dines and sups at fixed hours at a common table; lie has to
conform to the rules of the Academy, and to submit while there to the
orders of the Director, who is always a French painter, appointed for
five years, one of the conditions of the appointment being that he shall
.have previously resided in Rome. The original term of a student's
sojourn was five years, but in 1864 this was reduced to four years. By
a pleasant fiction he is supposed never to re-enter Paris during those
years, the real fact being that, so long as a student fulfils his obliga-
tions in the matter of drawing, no restraint is put upon his actions.
It is a part of his duty, after the second year, to visit the principal
cities of Italy, and he may extend his tour to Greece. During the first
year of his sojourn he has to make four studies of detail from such of
the finest ancient buildings as he may choose in Rome and Central
Italy; the second year he must make four studies of detail, from the
ancient monuments of Italy, and add some details of Renaissance archi-
tecture; the third year he has to draw two sheets of details from
ancient monuments of Italy (including Sicily) and Greece; and all the
foregoing must be drawn to a scale of one-quarter of an inch to a foot.
During this same year the student has also to make a restoration of a
part of some ancient monument, the details of which he has hitherto
been drawing; and the restoration must show the character of the con-
struction the principal points of which he has to describe in an
explanatory msmoire. The student has, moreover, to make detail
drawings of external and internal ornaments, together with views of
buildings and portions of buildings erected during the Middle Ages
and the Renaissance. Tracings of these are preserved in the archives
of the Academy, but the original drawings remain the property of the
student. In the course of the fourth year he makes the geometrical
drawings of an ancient building, either of Italy or Greece. These draw-
ings are colored and executed from the building itself, representing it
exactly as it appeared at the time. The student has also to make
another set of drawings of the same building restored to its pristine
condition, or as he supposes it to have originally been, adding an
historical notice of it and an account of its construction. He has also
to make detail drawings, a quarter full-size, of the most interesting or
characteristic portions of the building; and all these drawings become
the property of the Government.
The student, on his return from Rome, reports himself to the
Academy, in Paris, and his name is then sent to the Government.
He is afterwards admitted, as an assistant, to the Conseil Gdndral
des Batiments Civils, a council established by Colbert for the pur-
pose of advising him upon matters regarding buildings, which met, at
the great Minister's time, twice a week on Tuesday and Friday--
and still meets on those days. Admission to that board gives the
student of Rome, in due time, a right of presentation to some public
building or national monument, in which he becomes the subordinate
of some architect of eminence, who has risen to high position after a
similar course of training. As an inspecteur, the student passes the
day upon building works, checking the quantity and character of
materials, and the hours of workmen employed. He rises in time to
be assistant-architect, then, perhaps, joint-architect, and he may
ultimately become the architect-in-chief to the very work upon which
he began as an inspecteur. .To quote further from a small English


treatise on this and like subjects connected with public buildings in
France, the student of Rome will be summoned in course of time to
take a place of Councillor on one or other of the several boards per-
taining to various administrative departments. The Acaddmie des
Beaux-Arts will hear of him again; and having at their disposal the
record of his earlier career, the Academicians have no need to make
a humiliating inquiry of outsiders for possible recruits.
Those who desire to obtain fuller particulars of the Academy of
France, at Rome, than can be given in a hasty compilation like this
will do well to read the late Victor Baltard's Villa Me'dicis i Rome "
(fo. Paris, 1847). Information on the whole subject will also be
found in Transactions," 1883-84, in a paper entitled A Brief
Review of the Education and Position of Architects in France since
the year 1671."- Journal of the R. I. B. A.

THE ARCHITECT AND THE ENGINEER.2
MR. PRESIDENT AND GENTLEMEN OF THE AMERICAN INSTI-
TUTE OF ARCHITECTS:-
JUST why a committee should select one who had never been
known to make a speech, to respond to so important a sentiment as
that of The Architect and the Engineer," will probably never be
known ; but the subject is so fitting to an occasion of this kind that
even a tyro may say an interesting word upon it.
We understand an architect to be one who plans buildings and
superintends their erection; while the civil engineer is one who
plans and constructs the works pertaining to the internal develop-
ment of the country. The work of the architect is so broad that it
develops some specialists, but the field of engineering is so diversi-
fied as to bring forth not only specialists in various branches, but
special professions, if they may so be called. Legally, neither the
architect nor the engineer is recognized as a professional man, but
after ten or twenty years of combined.study and practice he is prob-
ably as well justified in speaking of his calling as a profession, as is
the callow youth who has spent three or four winters in the law
school or the medical college. This condition gives rise to a happy
freedom, both pleasant and refreshing. If it becomes expedient for
a carpenter to sign his name as architect," or an auctioneer to
pose as a civil engineer, either can do so without violating any
statute and neither architect nor engineer can do more than to merely
smile at the peculiarities which some people manifest. Before the
law, then, we stand upon an equality-it always being granted that
men of our quality can stand upon nothing whenever occasion de-
mands.
Even here the engineer may be said to have some advantage, bo-
cause there are so many things that such a variety of people may
have done and thereby acquired such various titles. One may have
drawn a map with certain marks upon it to indicate a lill, a stream
and a road, and became a topographical engineer," another may
set up a pump somewhere and become an hydraulic engineer," lie
who has invented a smoke consumer is unquestionably a mechani-
cal engineer," and the prolific geniuses who have produced car-
couplers and travelled upon tie passes, are entitled to rank as "rail-
road engineers "; others have laid pipe-lines even into the domains of
architecture and style themselves sanitary engineers," but the Lord
has been kind to us and raised up in the building trades a sort of
counter irritant known as the sanitary plumber"; then we have a
class of successful wire-pullers who are letting their lights shine upon
us as electrical engineers," while another species are endeavoring
by a different kind of wire-pulling to pose as municipal engineers,"
while so long as there remains "one more river to cross we shall
continue to have with us the bridge engineer."
Being only a plain civil engineer, I cannot be expected to repre-
sent everybody, but I can point with pride to the great achievements
of the American civil engineer, in developing lines of transportation,
constructing great industrial establishments, opening mines, and pro-
viding for the commerce of our country. Wherever we may go with
our railroads or highways, we are followed or accompanied by the
architect, who builds for the progressive American the massive busi-
ness block, the tasteful home, the public building, the school-house
and the church. The American architect and the American engi-
neer are placing the products of their handiwork all over this fair
land. They are proud to be known as its master-builders, and their
works shall endure as lasting monuments of their skill and fidelity in
the centuries when the present age shall have become ancient
history.
In the routine of every-day work, the architect being commissioned
to plan and erect a building, sends for the surveyor or civil engineer
to define for him the boundaries of the premises to be occupied, give
the grades of the adjacent streets, the location of sewers, water-
supply, etc. This is properly the work of a city surveyor, or it may
be done by a civil engineer having the requisite local knowledge.
The surveyor ordinarily styles himself a civil engineer, and when he
is without knowledge of the qualities of materials or of engineering
construction, or even of mathematical science, as is frequently the
case, he becomes a more troublesome maverick, than does the carpen-
ter who poses as ant architect, because he pretends to be thit which


Response by M. D. Burke, President Cincinnati Engineers Club, to the Senti-
1 Irrespective of the Government allowance, certain other sums of money fall ment, The Architect and the Engineer," at the dinner given by the Cincinnati
to the winner of the Grand Prix in architecture, the proceeds of special legacies Chapter of the American Institute of Architects, on its 25th Anniversary at the
I eft for the purpose at various times by discriminating persons. University Club, Feb. 14, 1895.









The American Architect and Building News.


[VOL. XLVII. No. 1004.


he is not, assumes responsibilities for which he is unqualified and
brings odium upon an honorable vocation. Those who employ him
suffer for his incompetency, and never become wise enough to know
an engineer when they see him.
The diagram having been furnished, the architect and the surveyor
or engineer are wont to part company. When it has been made by
a surveyor, this is wise. If it had been made by a civil engineer, and
the building is to be one of much magnitude, it may be unwise. In
viewing anything we see that feature which our study and training
brings most prominently to our minds. If it be a landscape, the
botanist will see its flora, the farmer its soil, the geologist a valley of
erosion, or the age of its rock formation, the architect its buildings,
the engineer its topographical features and means of accessibility.
If it be a building or the drawing of a structure, the architect will
place it in its proper order of architecture, speak of its sky-lines and
its symmetry, while the engineer will regard the correctness of its
proportions, mainly in the light of its stability. The moments of the
engineer are not moments of leisure, his unit strains are not musical,
but he has the true scientific method so long as he takes nothing for
granted, other than that which observation has shown to be truth,
and by mathematical reasoning he can demonstrate that his struct-
ure will carry given loads and resist given stresses. No college
diploma gives him title, and no statute gives him standing, but by his
works ye shall know him.
In the erection of the modern building, his analytical methods, his
knowledge of machine tools and their application in shop practice,
will give you the proper skeleton, correctly articulated, and you can
clothe it with the ruddy flesh of symmetrical beauty, and drape it
with the lines of architectural and artistic finish. It is this composite
structure, or the picture of it, which the people desire to see. If,
you, gentlemen, would put a little more engineering into your archi-
tecture, you could frequently add to the stability and endurance of
your structures without increasing their cost, and if the engineer
would come to you with the bare-bone work of his roof and bridge
trusses, you would clothe them with lines of beauty, such that all the
world would call you blessed.
There is here a broad field for mutual labor and mutual benefit.
To work it profitably, the architect must admit that he is not an
engineer, and must not be content with the aid of a mere computer;
and the engineer must acknowledge that he is not an architect, and
that utility and stability are not the only elements to be regarded in
designing his structures. He must not be content with the work of a
mere draughtsman, who will endeavor to fasten a few tawdry rosettes,
or patches of galvanized iron upon a gaunt framework, and call such
things ornament. It is the joint production of the master-builders,
which the analytical methods of the engineer has made like the dea-
con's one boss shay," of equal strength in all its parts, and which
the artistic taste of the architect has made of symmetrical design,
and clothed in lines of beauty, that will meet the demand in the-
modern building. And this will stand for ages, silently setting forth
that, in America, the architect and the engineer in the age of steel,"


were the peers of all who preceded them in the art of building, and
that they were men, who, like true artists, combined utility and beauty
of design with strength and endurance.

DATA RELATING TO WATER.
URE water consists of 2 parts hydrogen and 1 part oxygen.
Chemical name, h) drogen oxide; chemical symbol, HO. Pure
water is a colorless, odorless, tasteless, transparent liquid, and
is practically incompressible. Water freezes at 320 Fahr. and boils
at 2120 Fahr. At its maximum density 39.10 Fahr. it is the
standard for specific gravities, and 1 cubic centimetre weighs 1
gramme.
f 231 cubic inches.
1 united States gallon 0.13369 cubic foot.
1 United states gallon.. 8.3311 pounds distilled water.
8.34 pounds -in ordinary practice.
62.425 pounds at 39.10 Fahr., maximum density.
| 62.418 pounds at 320 Fahr., freezing point.
1 cubic foot ........-...= 62.355 pounds at 620 Fahr., standard temperature.
I 59.64 pounds at 2120 Pahr., boiling point.
1 57.5 pounds'at ice.
1 cubic foot.....:.......= 7.485 United States gallons.
1 pound................= 27.7 cubic inches.
1 cubic inch ...........= 0.03612 pound.
A column of water 1 inch square and 2.31 feet high weighs 1
pound.
A column of water 1 inch square and 1 foot high weighs 0.433
pound.
A column of water 33.947 feet high equals the pressure of the
atmosphere at the sea-level.
One pound per square inch equals a column of water 2.31 feet in
height.
0.433 pound per square inch equals a column of water 1 foot in
height.
Water is an almost universal solvent; consequently pure water
does not occur in nature. Sea water contains nearly every known
substance in solution.
The latent heat of water is 79 thermal units. When water freezes,
it gives off its latent heat. The latent heat of steam is 536 thermal
units. When steam condenses into water, it gives off its latent
heat. Catalogue of the Holly Manufacturing Company.

Doubling the diameter of a pipe increases its capacity four times.
Friction of liquids in pipes increases as the square of the velocity.
The mean pressure of the atmosphere is usually estimated at 14.7
pounds per square inch, so that with a perfect vacuum it will sus-
tain a column of mercury 29.9 inches, or a column of water 33.9 feet
high.
To find the pressure in pounds per square inch of a column of
water: Multiply the height of the column in feet by .434. Approxi-
mately, we say that every foot elevation is equal to J pound
pressure per square inch; this allows for ordinary friction.
To find the diameter of a pump cylinder to move a given quantity


BAROMETRIC PRESSURES AT DIFFERENT ALTITUDES.--WITH EQUIVALENT HEAD OF WATER AND THE VERTICAL SUCTION LIFT
OF PUMPS.

Altitude. Barometric Pressure. Equiv. Head Practical Suction Altitude.
of Water. Lift of Pumps.
Sea-level....................... 14.70 lbs. per sq. in. 33.95 ft. 25 ft. Sea-level.......................
n mile (1,320 ft.) above sea-level. 14.02 " 32.38 24 j mile (1,320 ft.) above sea-level.
" (2,640 ft.) 13.33 " 30.79 23 i (2,640 ft.) "
(3,960 ft.) 12.66 " 29.24 21 (3,960 ft.) "

1 (5,280 ft.) 12.02 " 27.76 20 1 (5,280 ft.) "
11 (6,600 ft.) 11.42 " 26.38 19 14 (6,600 ft.) "
1 (7,920 ft.) 10.88 " 25.13 18 1I (7,920 ft.) "
2 (10,560 ft.) 9.88 " 22.82 17 2 (10,560ft.) "

WEIGHT AND CAPACITY OF DIFFERENT STANDARD GALLONS OF WATER.
Cubic Inches in a Gallon. Weight of a Gallon in Pounds. Gallons in a Cubic Foot. Weight of a Cubic Foot of
Imperial or English. 277.274 10.00 6.232102 Water, English Standard,
United States.. .... 231. 8.33111 7.480519 62.321 lbs. Avoirdupois.
A miner's inch of water is approximately equal to a supply of 12 United States gallons per minute.

APPROXIMATE QUANTITIES OF WATER DELIVERED PER HOUR BY SINGLE-ACTING PUMPS.
From 2-inch to 6-inch diameter by 4-inch, 6-inch, 8-inch and 12-inch length of stroke respectively, and worked at 30 strokes per minute.


Diameter Working Barrel or Cylinder, Inches. 2 24 22 3 3J 4 4J 5 6 7 8
Gallons delivered by pumps with 4-inch stroke.. 70 90 120 160 220 280 360 450 650 885 1,155
6 .. 105 135 180 240 330 420 540 675 975 1,326 1,721
8 . 140 180 240 320 440 560 720 9,000 1,300 1,770 2,310
i 10 .. 175 225 300 400 550 700 900 1,125 1,625 2,212 2,887
12 .. 210 270 360 480 660 840 1,080 1,350 1,950 2,652 3,442

If pamp be worked at 40 strokes per minute, the quantity delivered will be, of course, one-third more than named above; if at 20
strokes only, one-third less water will be delivered, and so on.
Double-barrel pumps, having two cylinders each of above diameters, or double-acting pumps, will deliver twice the quantities named


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MARCH 28, 1895.]


The American Architect and Building Tews.


of water per minute (100 feet of piston being the standard speed) :
Divide the number of gallons by 4, then extract the square root, and
the product will be the diameter in inches of the pump cylinder.
To find quantity of water elevated in one minute running at 100
feet of piston speed per minute: Square the diameter of the water-
cylinder in inches and multiply by 4. Example: Capacity of a 5-
inch cylinder is desired. The square of the diameter (5 inches) is
25, which multiplied by 4 gives 100, the number of gallons per
minutes (approximately).
To find the capacity of a cylinder in gallons: Multiplying the area
in inches by the length of stroke in inches will give the total number
of cubic inches; divide this amount by 231 (which is the cubical
contents of a United States gallon in inches) and the product is the
capacity in gallons.
The capacity per minute will be determined by multiplying this
product by number of strokes cylinder is working per minute.
To find the horsepower necessary to elevate water to a given
height: Multiply the number of gallons per minute by 8.35 (weight
of one gallon), and this result by total number of feet water is raised
(that is, frbm surface of the water to the highest point to which the
water is raised), and you have the power in foot-pounds. Divide
by 33,000 and you have the horse-power. One horse-power is equal
to about five men. To the theoretical power a liberal allowance for
friction, etc., always wants to be added. Catalogue of the Goulds
Manufacturing Company.







SKETCH-CLUB OF NEW YORK.
HE first of the regular weekly Club Nights which the Club has
I inaugurated, occurred on Wednesday evening, March 13.
There was an exhibition of sketches by Club members,
including some recent composition by Mr. Henry P. Kirby and
water-colors by Mr. Hughson Hawley. The Century Company
loaned the original drawings for the Napoleon posters, including a
caricature by "M. Grassy."
SMusic was furnished by Club members and their guests, free
cigars had been supplied by an enterprising material-man and a
steady demand was made upon the House Committee for other
refreshments. The occasion was voted a social and artistic success
and the popularity of the Club Night in future was felt to be assured.
ALFRED F. EVANS, Recording Secretary.







[Contributors of drawings are requested to send also plans and a
full and adequate description of the buildings, including a statement
of cost.]

GOTHIC CORRIDOR: UNION PASSENGER STATION, ST. LOUIS, MO.
MR. THEODORE C. LINK, ARCHITECT, ST. LOUIS, MO.
[Gelatine Print issued with International and Imperial Editions only.]

THE UNION PASSENGER STATION, ST. LOUIS, MO. MR. THEODORE
C. LINK, ARCHITECT, ST. LOUIS, MO.
A FULL description of this building was published in our issue for
October 13, 1894. The total cost of station, train-sheds, etc., has.
exceeded $7,000,000.

PLAN AND DETAILS OF THE WAITING-ROOM AND STAIRCASE OF
STHE SAME.

DESIGN FOR THE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, JAMAICA, N. Y.
MESSRS. CRAM, WENTWORTH & GOODHUE, ARCHITECTS, BOSTON,
A MASS.
THE design represented by this plate was not successful in gaining
the approbation of the jurors in the competition in which it was
submitted.

HOTEL FOR MR. T. C. PATRICK, IRWIN, PA. MESSRS. BARTBERGER
>h & EAST, ARCHITECTS, PITTSBURGH, PA.



[Additional Illustrations In the International Edition.]

EAST APPROACH: UNION PASSENGER STATION, ST. LOUIS, MO.
MR. THEODORE C. LINK, ARCHITECT, ST. LOUIS, MO.
[Gelatine Print.]


PRIVATE DINING-ROOM IN THE SAME.
[Gelatine Print.1

SOUTH END OF MAIN WAITING-ROOM OF THE SAME.
[Gelatine Print.1

NORTH END OF MAIN WAITING-ROOM OF THE SAME.
.Gelatine Print.1






[The editors cannot pay attention to demands of correspondents who
forget to give their names and addresses as guaranty of good faith ;
nor do they hold themselves responsible for opinions expressed by
their correspondents.]
THE GRILL-ROOM.
NEW ORLEANS, LA., March 13, 1895.
TO THE EDITORS OF THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT:-
Dear Sirs, In several, if not most, of the Club plans published, 1
note the term grill-room." I would be thankful to you for an ex-
planation of its meaning, as I must confess I do not know it.
Yours, etc., F.
[THE grill-room is an adjunct of the modern restaurant in this country,
adopted from the English inn and London chop-house : it is merely an eat-
ing-room, with open fires whereat the cooks broil, or grill, steaks, chops,
etc., so that the consumer may not only pick out the particular viand lie
wishes to eat, but oversee its cooking and have it served without loss of
heat.-EDs. AMERICAN ARCHITECT.]





.......... .....-...... ............

BALTIMORE, MD. -The Walters Art Gallery will be open to the public
on all Wednesdays in March.
BOsTON, MASS.- Winter Exhibition, including Pictures loaned by Quincy
A. Shaw; Paintings by Puvis de Chavannes; Line Enqravings, Mezzo-
tints, and Etchings by Rembrandt: at the Museum of Fine Arts.
Eighth Annual Exhibition of Boston Society of Water-color Painters:
at Williams & Everett's Gallery, 190 Boylston St., March 14 to 28.
Loan Collection of Portraits of Women: at Copley Hall, 194 Claren-
don St., March 12 to 30.
Pictures by Edmund II. Garrett: at Shreve, Crump & Low's, Corner
of Tremont and West Sts., March 15 to April 0.
Exhibition of Japanese Prints: at the St. Botolph Club, March 18
to 30.
Water-colors of the English Homes of the Pilgrims, by Harold B.
Warren, also, Etchings by C. J. Watson and Frank Short: at Walter
Kimball & Co.'s, 9 Park St.
Exhibition of the Dutch Water-color Society: at J. Eastman Chase's,
7 Hamilton Place.
Exhibition of Oil-paintings by J. J. Enneking, D. Jerome Elwell, T.
M. Wendel, J. II. Hatfield, Joseph De Camp and others: at Wm.
Hatch & Co.'s Gallery, 209 Tremont St., March 25 to April 6.
BUFFALO, N. Y. -Second Annual Architectural Exhibition of Buffalo
Chapter, A. L A. and Exhibition of Buffalo Society of Artists: at the
Art Gallery, March 18 to 30.
CHICAGO, ILL. -Pictures by George Inness and Claude Monet; also an
Exhibition of Bookbindings: at the Art Institute, February 26 to
March 24.
Seventh Annual Black and White Exhibition of the Chicago Society of
Artists: 274 Michigan Ave., opened March 12.
NEW YORK, N. Y.-Loan Exhibition: at the Metropolitan Museum of
Art, New North Wing, opened November 5.
Paintings by Edouard Manet, also, Works by William A. Cofin: at
the Durand-Ruel Galleries, 380 Fifth Ave., March 11 to 30.
Theobald Chartran's Portrait of Madame Calvd as "Carmen": at
Knoedler's Gallery, 170 Fifth Ave.
Miniatures by W. J. Baer: at Knoedler's Gallery, March 21 to 30.
Paintings by Leonard Ochtman: at the Avery Galleries, 368 Fifth
Ave., March 18 to April 1.
Seventieth Annual Exhibition of the National Academy of Design:
opens April 1.
Pictures and Sketches by Anton Mauve: at the Macbeth Gallery, 237
Fifth Ave., March 15 to 30.
Seventeenth Annual Exhibition of the Society ofA merican Artists: at
the Fine-Arts Building, 215 West 57th St., March 25 to April 27.
Loan Exhibition of Specimens of Religious Art: at the Tiffany Glass
Co., 333 Fourth Ave., March 25 to April 6.
Second Annual Exhibition of Society of Amateur Photographers of
New York: at 11 West 38th St., closes Marchl 27.
Engraved Portraits of Women Writers: at the Grolier Club, closes
March 23.
PHILADELPHIA,- PA. Fifth Annual Exhibition of Water-colors and
Pastels: at the Art Club, March 18 to April 14.









The American Architect and Building News.


[VOL. XLVII.-No. 1004.


Dutch and Flemish Old Masters, Water-colors of Egypt by Wilfrid
Ball, Etchings and Mlezzotints by Frank Short and Charles J. Watson:
at Robert M. Lindsay's Galleries, 1028 Walnut St., until April 15.
PROVIDENCE, R. I.- Loan Exhibition of Paintings: at the R. I. School
of Design.
Water-colors by S. R. Burleigh: at the Art Club.
ST. Louis, Mo.-- Works of St. Louis Artists of the last fifty years: at
the Art-Union "Palette," 1820 Chouteau Ave., March 12 to 25.






THE YOUTHFUL PERFORMANCE OF CHRISTOPHER WREN.- Sir Chris-
topher Wren, says an article in Current Literature for February. was a
prodigy .in youth, as in maturity. Oughtred, the first mathematician
of his day, declares in the preface to his great book that an Ingenious
boy, Gentleman Commoner at Wadham," had enlarged the sciences of
astronomy, gnomonics, statics and mechanics by most brilliant dis-
coveries, "prceclaris incentis." This was Wren at the age of fifteen; a
year before that he had taken out a patent for an instrument to write
with two pens at the same time; in the same year he was appointed
Demonstrating Assistant on Anatomy at Surgeons' Hall. Wren lived
to justify his early promise; but Dugald Stewart tells us of a boy who,
as he hoped, "would rival the fame of Sir Isaac Newton." This was
the son of Count Pusgstall. I cannot help considering him," wrote
the Scotch professor, "as the most extraordinary prodigy of intellectual
endowment that has ever fallen under my knowledge." This is a great
saying, indeed, from Dugald Stewart, who was not given to enthusiasm
nor to careless expression. Unfortunately, we have no detailed infor-
mation about the youth's acquirements in later years; he died at nine-
teen, of general decay apparently. But Mr. Lemaistre met him in his
travels, and published an account in 1806-the boy being then five
years old: "He sits on a carpet, surrounded by his books, and when
the gravest and most acute remarks fall from the lips of his little
person, a spirit seems to speak rather than a child, and the fine expres-
sion which sparkles on his countenance tends to strengthen the idea."
Among other tests, Mr. Lamaistre asked him to make a map of the
Venetian Empire, which he did with accuracy. Those competent to
judge the fact will readily believe that the child of five years who per-
formed it was an animated miracle. The French armies barred nearly
every road in Europe to an English traveller at that date. Mr. Le-
inaistre asked how he could get home without touching Hanoverian,
French or Dutch Territory'; the child "instantly traced on the globe
the single road remaining open." It is well for this gentleman's credit
that Dugald Stewart's evidence, long afterwards, makes the story
possible.

Tfic CHIMES OF ST. MICHAEL'S, CHARLESTON, S. C.-The chimes
of St. Michael's Church, in Charleston, S. C., have a peculiar history.
The bells are nine in number, and of unusual purity and sweetness of
tone. They were cast in England when St. Michael's was built, about
130 years ago. When the War of the Revolution came the bells were
sent to England for safe-keeping. After the treaty of peace had been
consummated, negotiations were opened in London for the return of tlhe
bells by the first American Minister to Great Britain. He succeeded,
and the bells were sent to Charleston, and upon their arrival were re-
ceived with triumphant ovations and escorted by a large procession to
the church, in the belfry of which they were replaced. During the late
civil war the citizens of Charleston were desirous of protecting the bells
from danger, and as the steeple of St. Michael's was made the target
for the cannon of the besiegers the bells were taken down and sent to
Columbia for safe-keeping. When Sherman's army took Columbia the
sheds in the yard of the State-house, in which the bells had been placed
and which also contained the marble friezes and other sculptures
intended for the decoration of the Capitol, were broken in and tlie
sculptures and bells were smashed into fragments, and the sheds were
then set on fire. At the conclusion of the war the pieces of the bells
were carefully gathered together, boxed and shipped to a commercial
house in Liverpool, together with extracts from the records of St.
Michael's, showing where the bells were cast and the proportions of the
metals forming their component parts. Upon inquiry it was found
that there was still in existence in England the firm of bell-founders,
unchanged in name, and consisting of the descendants of the proprie-
tors at the time the bells were made. The records of this firm con-
tained descriptions of the bells, and the proportions there given were
found to correspond with those furnished from Charleston. The bells
were made anew, therefore, of the same metal, and for the fifth time
they were carried across the Atlantic and arrived safely at Charleston.
Their return was made the occasion of great rejoicing in the city. -
Charleston Newspaper.

AN ORIGINAL PORTRAIT" TALE.--I believe it was our pleasant
friend, Mr. Dixey, the comedian, who once* remarked on the funny
things one sees when one hasn't got a gun. About ten years ago, an
artist friend of mine, who was grogging and nicotining the small hours
away in tile office of a paper I then edited, fell into a discussion with
me upon the power of memory. As an illustration of the extent to
which it could be practically developed, he, with pen and ink, on the
paper which bore my office heading, sketched half a dozen admirable
portraits of celebrities, merely from his recollection of originals from
life which he had seen. Not one was an actual copy. Each was a
composite as it might be, but all were striking likenesses. One of them
was a head of George Washington in uniform. I left the sketches on
my desk when we locked up and went off to eat a daybreak supper of
broiled lobster. When I returned to the office, the small boy who set
things to rights there, including myself not seldom, and who was a pro-


nounced stamp fiend, autograph fiend and very clever sketcher, asked
me if he could borrow these sketches so's to learn something from
'em, boss." I told him he could have them, and he carried them away.
A few weeks later, he asked.me if I had any objection to his selling the
sketch of Washington. He had been offered $2 for it by a bookseller
with whom the paper did business and to whom he was often sent on
errands. I told him to sell it and buy himself some stamps with the
proceeds. Last week, a subscriber to this paper wrote to me that he
wished my opinion of an original pen-sketch from life of George Wash-
ington, made by Peale, which lie had purchased for $40 from the agent
of a New York bookseller. He sent me this prize by express, and
when I looked at it I almost fell out of my armchair. It was the old
mnemonic sketch which I had given to my little office-devil who is,
I am happy to say, quite a big and booming young man now -ten
years ago. It had been given a bath of coffee-grounds, and pasted
down on a cardboard mount, evidently a cover of an old book. I soaked
it off, and on the back was my office imprint and also my name in type.
The dealer who had doctored the sketch had not even taken the trouble
to scrape them off. I sent the documents in the case back to my sub-
scriber, and am curiously awaiting to ascertain whether he has the
moral courage to acknowledge publicly that he has been swindled, and
to force the swindler to disgorge. The Collector.

A LEGEND ABOUT DAMAScus SWORDS. -A manuscript, lately discov-
ered, gives in detail the method employed in making the famous Damas-
cus blades. The manner of tempering is something almost too horrible
to relate. "Let the high dignitary furnish an Ethiope of fair frame," the
description runs, and let him be bound down, shoulders upward, upon
the block of the god, Bal-hal, his arms fastened underneath with
thongs, a strap of goatskin over his back and wound twice around the
block, his feet close together, lashed to a dowel of wood, and his head
and neck projecting over and beyond the block. Then let the master-
workman, having cold-hammered the blade to a smooth and thin edge,
thrust it into the fire of cedar-wood coals, in and out, the while reciting
the prayer to the god Bal-hal, until the steel be of the color of the red
of the rising sun when he comes up over the desert toward the east, and
then, with a quick motion, pass the same from the heel thereof to the
point six times through the most fleshy portion of the slave's back and
thighs, when it shall have become the color of the purple of the king.
Then, if with one swing and one stroke of the right arm of the master-
workman, it severs the head of the slave from his body, and display
not a nick nor crack along the edge, and the blade may be bent round
about the body of a man and break not, it shall be accepted as a perfect
weapon, sacred to the service of the god Bal-hal, and the owner
thereof may thrust it into a scabbard of ass's skin, brazen with brass,
and hung to a girdle of camel's wool dyed in the royal purple." -
Illustrated Carpenter and Builder.

THE GENERAL SCHEME FOR THE EXHIBITION OF 1900 SETTLED. The
commissary-general of the Paris Exhibition of 1900 .has just settled
the general plan of that great international show in accord with the
projects which obtained awards at the recent competition. The prin-
cipal points of the programme are as follows : The suppression of the
Palais de 1'Industrie in the Champs Elysdes and the creation of a
great road connecting the Champs Elysdes with the Place des Invali-
des, with a monumental bridge over the Seine. The Palais de l'In-
dustrie is to be replaced by a new edifice. The principal entrance to
the exhibition will be on the Place de la Concorde. All that concerns
decorative art and that has a distinctly French character will be grouped
along the Cours la Reine and on the Esplanade des Invalides. The
Electricity Palace will be close to the principal entrance. The banks of
the Seine will be made as decorative as possible. The Champ de Mars,
where the Eiffel Tower will be preserved, will be occupied by exhibi-
tions which require great space, such as agricultural machinery. The
Machinery Gallery, of the 1889 exhibition, will be allowed to stand. It
will be decorated with a huge dome, and will be occupied again by
machinery. The fine arts and liberal arts palaces will be suppressed.
The Champ de Mars will be levelled, and will rise in an inclined plane
from the Seine to the Machinery Gallery. The Colonial exhibition will
be at the Trocaddro. N. Y. Evening Post.

DECOMPOSITION OF GLASS BY WATER. From a long series of experi-
ments of his own on these subjects, and from the work of others, the
author draws the following conclusions:
1. The weathering of glass is caused by the decomposing action of
the atmospheric moisture. The carbonic anhydride of the air does not
act directly on the glass, but only on the alkaline products of the aque-
ous decomposition.
2. Dry carbonic anhydride is without action on dry glass.
3. There is no proof that water can be retained by glass, except when
it enters into chemical combination therewith.
4. The weathering of glass and the decomposition of glass by water
are similar processes, and are both preceded by the taking up of
water into the glass molecule.
5. The surface changes caused by weathering are comparatively
slight with good glass.
6. Tle action of water on weathered glass is only temporarily more
rapid than it is on new glass.
7. Glasses (lime glasses) are more hygroscopic and weather more
easily, the more easily they are attacked by water.
8. Even after long action of water, glass is still capable of becoming .
weathered.- Illustrated Carpenter and Builder.

GARIBALDI MONUMENT IN ROME. Tle cornerstone of tile Garibaldi
monument was laid March 18, in the presence of the Ministers, Gari-
baldi's sons, and the municipal authorities. The monument is intended
to commemorate the defence of,Rome, in 1849. It will be completed
and unveiled with great pomp in September, on the twenty-fifth anni-
versary of the reunion of Rome with Italy, Exchanqe.


8. J. PARKHILL & Co., Printers, Boston, U. S. A.




23, 1895.]


The American Architect and Building News. xix


Fire-Proof Composition
FOR BUILDINGS.
Floors, and upon Walls,
Ceilings, Elevator anF
Light Shafts, Boiler Rooms,
Doors, Shutters, etc. It is
Air, Dust, and Vermin
Proof, and a Sound-
Deadener. Ofice, 166 Devonshire Street, BOSTON.
A. J. HOLDER. Pres. C
OHAS. T. BAKER, Treas. R-om 49 Master Builders CO N STRU
W. D. LOMBARD, Gen. angr Ass:e aton Buldmg.
CONTRACTS FOR FURNISHING
AND CONSTRUCTING . 1545 SO. CLARK STREET, CHICAGO.

FIREPROO F IN G MANUFACTURERS AND CONTRACTORS
TAKEN IN ALL PARTS FOR EVERY DESCRIPTION OF
THE UNITED [STATES .

PITTSBURGH TERRA-COTTA LUMBER CO., H0110wTile PPorousTerra-Cotta
42 SIXTH AVENUE, PITTSBURGH, PA. Ti
POROUS TERRA-COTTA
AND FOR FIREPROOFING BUILDINGS.
HOLLOW TILE
Send for Illustrated Cat-
alogue and Price List. CONTRACTS TAKEN IN ALL PARTS OF THE UNITED STATES. Send for Illustrated Catalogue and Price List.

"Architects" L FRI3 'I Attention is called to Fireproof and Vermin-Proof
SPECIFY CEMENT TO ARCHITECTS' MINERAL WOOL,
(MuANuFT IN BFANC) N R As a Lining in Walls and Floors for preventing the
MANUFACTUREDD IN FRANCE) AND OWNERS. ESCAPE OF WARMTH AND THE DEADENING OF SOUND.
The only cement that should be used for set. AMERICAN MINERAL WOOL CO.
ting and backing Limestone and Granite Fronts. Sample and Circulars Free. Lessee of
It is the strongest and finest ground Cement, of WesternlMineral Wool Co., Cleveland, 0 and U. S. Mineral Wool Co., 2 Cortlandt St., N.Y. City.
light color and will not stain.

JnME-S BRWND,

81 and 83 Fulton St.. N. Y. oe h
RoeblingSTN .Wire Lathing
For estimate on FIREPROOF-DURABLE-ECONOMICAL
ASP T Pays for itself in decreased cost of insurance-will not "sag" under the heaviest coats of mortar-ensures
WORK a perfect ceiling, free from cracks. Its fire-resisting qualities have been demonstrated in three
of every descrip- public tests--detailed accounts of which will be mailed to any address upon request.
tion apply to Man-
ager,
HughBooman, THE NEW JERSEY WIRE CLOTH COMPANY,
N. Y.Mastic Works, 35 Broadway, N. Y nE* T*T a.
Asphalt Mine Owners in France, Sicily, etc. LE T O' C T, W. *T.

New England Material-Men and Contractors.


ARTESIAN WELLS.
C. L. GRANT,
23 Seyms Street,
Hartford, Conn.
ARTIFICIAL STONE.
SIMPSON BROS.
166 Devonshire St.
Boston, Mass.
BUILDING CONTRACTORS.


LITTLEFIELD BUILDING CO.
Incorporated.
Room 57, 166 Devonshire St.
Boston, Mass.
CYPRESS.
A. T.tSTEARNS LUMBER CO.
u Office: o04 Friend St.
Boston.
Mills: Neponset, Mass.


CARVERS, MODELLERS.
JOHN EVANS & CO.
77 Huntington Ave.
Boston, Mass.
ELECTRIC WORK.
BLODGETT BROS. & CO.
383 Federal St.
Boston.
FIREPROOFINC.
BOSTON FIREPROOFING CO.
166 Devonshire St.
Boston, Mass.
FURNACES.


CYRUS CARPENTER & CO.
44 Hanover St.
Boston. Mass.
GRANITE.


GRANITE RAILWAY CO.
z66 Devonshire St.
Boston, Mass.


MANTELS. (Wood)


J. W. BAILEY & SONS CO.
z4 Charlestown St.
Boston, Mass.


MASON CONTRACTORS.

THOMAS J. LYONS,
166 Devonshire St.
Boston, Mass.
PAPER MACHE.

CONLAN & MAYBECK,
65 Wareham St.
Boston, Mass.
SASH CORD.
SILVER LAKE CO.
78 Chauncy St.
Boston. Mass.

SLATE. (Roofing)

H. H. MATHEWS,
178 Devonshire St.
Boston, Mass


HEATING. (Air & Water)
MAGEE FURNACE CO.
30-8 Union St.
Boston, Mass.
HEATING CONTRACTOR.
W. E. FLORENCE,
o10 Beacon St.
Chelsea, Mass.
INTERIOR DECORATOR.
WILLIAM J. DOLAN,
224 Tremont St.
Boston, Mass.
IRON WORK. (Building)
R. F. HAWKINS' IRON WORKS,
Springfield,
Mass.


You can obtain the fi!tt:prOf 2SniIbing.

COMMON SENSE RARITAN HOLLOW # POROUS BRICK CO.,
M-- MANUFACTURERS OF -
FIRE DPROOF BUILING Hollow Fire-Clay and Porous Terra-Cotta Bricks
IF UIL I of Every Description, for Fireproof Buildings.
BUFF AND MOTTLED FRONT BRICK, FIRE BRICK.
At 5% to 10% advance Send fo' new Illustrated Catalogue, giving weight of materials, safe loads, etc.
Over Cheap Wood Construction. Office, 874 Broadway, NEW YORK.
ESTABLISHED 1856.
Complete plans of steel frame work H MAU & S
ADDRESS furnished with the construction. HENRY MAURER & SON,
H. B. SEELY, Sole Manufr, Manufacturers of
Main Office: .L. TROBEL, FIRE-PROOF BUILDING MATERIAL
1740.1741 Monadnock Block, Consulting & Contracting Of every description. Hollow Brick made of Clay for Flat Arches, Partitions, Furring, etc.
CHICAGO, ILL. Engineer Porous Terra-Cotta, Fire-Brick, etc.. etc.
S Works, MAURER, N. J. Office and Depot. 420 EAST 23d STREET, New York.
THE AMERICAN FIRE-PROOFING COMPANY. Send for 1894 Catalogues on Fireproofing 1" and Fire-Brick."
SOLE OWNERS AND MANUFACTURERS QF Manufacturers All Kinds Fireproof Building Materials, etc.
J. G. MERRILL'S PATENT W O :RKS, erta. A boy, T. aT. See ad. on page xx.
SAT- IJ[DlERIDE .





The American Architect and Building News.


_ _ _rich% antb Cerra4totta.


HYDRAULIC BRICK,
PLAIN O MOULDED
OF .a6rw coX-o:El.
RED, BUFF, GRAY, BROWN,
PINK, MOTTLED, GRANITE.
Total Annual Capacity, 100,000,000.
HYDRAULIC-PRESS BRICK CO.,
ODD FELLOWS' BUILDING,
ST. LOTTIS. MIO-

FRONT BRICKS
TERRA-COTTA
-- IN OVER TWENTY COLORS.
Chimney Flue Linings, Chimney Tops, Drain
Pipe, Cement and all Masons' Materials.
Send for Catalogues.
WALDO BROTHERS,
86 WATER STREET. - BOSTON.
THE
Northwestern Terra-Cotta Co.
Manufacturers of
Architectural Terra Cotta,
WORKS & MAIN OFFICE: CITY OFFICES:
Cor. Olybourn & Wright- Room 1118 Rookery Bldg.
wood Avenues, cor. La Salle & Adams St.
CHICAGO.
Estimates given on application. Send for
Catalogue and Samples.
INDIANAPOLIS-
TERRA-COTTA CO.
Works: Brightwood, Ind.
ESTIMATES ON SPECIAL DESIGNS PROMPTLY
FURNISHED. WRITE FOR CATALOGUE
AND DISCOUNTS.
SEMI-GLAZE OR DBAD-FINISH.
.Az.T. Co0"r .COXL o.

THE WINKLE TERRA COTTA COMPANY,
Manufacturers of


ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA



Estimates and Designs
Furnished on Application.

Office : Itoom 47, Telephone Building,
ST. LOUIS, MO.
WORK: CHELTENHAM, IO.


NEW YORK
ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA
OFFICE, COMPANY WORKS,
38 PARK ROW, CUUIPANY, LONG ISLAND CITY,
New York City. New York.

TIFFANY PRESSED BRICK CO.,
Manufacturers of
Pressed and Enamelled Brick,
Plain and Ornamental,
403 Ohamber of Commerce B'ld'g,
CHICAGO.


PERTH AMBOY
TERRA-COTTA COMPANY,
OF
PERTH AMBOY, NEW JERSEY.
OFFICE, 289 Fourth Ave., NEW YORK.


PHILADELPHIA
OFFICE,
DREXEL BLDG.


SOSTON AGENTS,
WALDO BROS.,
88 Water Street.


BROOKS, SHOOBRIDGE & CO.,
PORTLAND CEMENT.
Works: Grays, Essex, England.
New York Office: 7 Bowling Grees.


POMPEIIAN, OF ANY COLOR
BUFF AND RED PRESSED, AND
ALSO ORNAMENTAL I OF ALL SHAPES.
FACI BRICK MANTEL. CAPACITY, 100,000,000 PER ANNUM. BsiroxICTaLAoXs.
J'A.tI.D'- BRICKK C0OM[PA T ,
BRICKS GROUND FOR ARCHES A SPECIALTY.
Send for our illustrated catalogue with price-list. Office, INo. 9 N. 13th Street, PHILADELPHIA, PA.
C. PARDEE WORKS, Pr~e ombo, .J.
FIRE, FRONT, and PAVING BRICK, SEWER and FLUE PIPE, WALL COPING, ART TILE,
FIREPROOF BUILDING- 1M ATERIALS. ETC.

TO ARCHITECTS SUPERIOR ENAMELED BRICKS
B UILDERS Snow White, Cream, Buff, or Fancy Colored.
O WNERS AND n- MANUFACTURED BY
ON RSAO The American Enameled Brick and Tile Company,
CONTRACTORS. SOUTH RIVER, NEW JERSEY.
SUPERIOR STANDARD ENGLISH SIZE,
Edges are square and true. Will make a perfect wall.
Write for samples. DECORATED BRICKS. BERNARD JACOUART, Supt.

I- -


INO. 3 SPANISH.


BALTIMORE ROOFING TILE CO.
BURNS, RUSSELL & CO., Proprietors,
535 Columbia Avenue, Baltimore, Md.,
MANUFACTURERS OF
Spanish, Roman, French, Shingle and all other
styles of Clay Roofing Tiles in all colors,
glazed or unglazed.
CATALOGUE ON APPLICATION.


1".SA S


I


WHY?


n


d


The coating is AMALGAMATED
with the Black Plate and NOT
SPREAD OVER,by rolls as in
the modern process.
N. & C. TAYLOR CO., Philadelphia.
Sole Manufacturers of the Genuine OLD STYLE brand of Roofing Tin.


I


m $

Porcelain Bath Tubs !POMPEIIAN" and "FRENCH SHAPE,"

___ "SLUICE "" Water Closet.


MINTON'S TILES
S"- -: For Bathrooms, Halls and Vestibules; Glazed,
Unglazed and Enamelled.

_____ __MILLER & COATES 279 PEARL STREET
=-________ -- --__-__ NEW YORK.
260 of our Pompellan Bath Tubs were put In
Waldorf Hotel, New York.


Why does THE GENUINE


raylor "OLD STYLE" bra
OF ROOFING TIN
remain sound after all the IMITATIONS rust out?
BECAUSE


[VOL. XLVII. -No. :I,.04`.


II


diL,




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