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Alachua County Today. March 15, 2007.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00081789/00216
 Material Information
Title: Alachua County Today. March 15, 2007.
Uniform Title: Alachua County Today
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Alachua County Today
Publisher: Alachua Today, Inc.
Publication Date: 10/072010
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Alachua
Coordinates: 29.779286 x -82.479849 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: issn - 1534-7567
System ID: UF00081789:00216

Full Text






More a tgtkrhi t4a


ALACHUA


4 COUNTY


lew look on A2


Address Service Requested

8 ** 4 ** 426 ******* SCH 3-DIGIT 326
Digital Library Center
PO Box 117007
Gainesville FL 32611-7007


. "'* *( The Heartland's only five star small-town newspaper.


Alachua second


By BRYAN BOUKARI
Today Reporter
ALACHUA Even with a sour
economy, some bits of news continue to
shine through the clouds. A recent Yahoo
Finance article named Alachua as the
second in wage increases nationally from
December 2008 to December 2009. With
a 10.1 percent increase in wages, Alachua


was among 15 citie
which are based on
In the Yahoo ar
Coriing Cities,"
Colorado rated hig
wages front. With a
wages over the sam
Carolina trailed Ala
rated the biggest in


By AVANTI JOHNSON
To4ay Reporter
GAINESVILLE He's a
Georgia man. His hands have
picked cotton and cropped tobacco.
His dark blue suit jacket is adorned
with various pins, proclaiming
membership or support- of


numerous causes. At 72, he has
seen Alachua County grow; he
experienced football tragedy and
triumph, shaken the hands of poor
men to politicians, but most of all,
he has made a difference.
Von Fraser is the local tax
collector. When someone needs
to renew a vehicle registration or


Named 2007 Business of the Year Alachua Chamber ofCommerce


nationally in wage increases
-s noted in the findings, the fastest growing cities, highest migration which employs hundreds of highly-skilled
census data. and largest increase in income, and highly-educated workers.
tide titled "15 Up-and- The increased wages may not have In 2009, Santa Fe College opened
only Douglas County, been generated within the city of Alachua, satellite campus in Alachua, focusing on
gher on the increased but are at least attributable to those living biotechnology training and offering one
a9.5 percent increase in in the rural town of about 9,400 residents. of the college's first bachelor's degree
ie time, Durham, North Although it is not clear where the wages programs at the location. That facility is
ichua. The article also were earned, the city ofAlachua has proven ALACHUA
crease in employment, to be a biotechnology and biomedical hub, rCon .a n. A


a

e
e
s
*W


High Springs cleared of



grant fraud allegations


By GLENN COINE
Today Reporter
HIGH SPRINGS The
Florida Department of Law
Enforcement (FDLE) has
cleared the City of High
Springs of illegal activities
with respect to expenditure
of grant funds allocated by
the Alachua County Sheriff's
Office (ACSO).
After a resident alleged that
High Springs had committed


fraud in the use of Byrne
Grant funds, ACSO forwarded
the informal complaint to the
FDLE for review. Though the
documented findings indicate
the sheriffs office initiated a
complaint, Alachua County
Sheriff Sadie Damell clarified
that is not true.
But as a result of the
forwarded complaint, FDLE
HIGH SPRINGS:
Continued on page AS


New rec director


for
By BE
Today
HAWTH(
Hawthorne
Ed Smyth
night's com
to announce
a new park
manager.
Wynkoop,
Sussex Coun
has lived in C
past nine ye
his Bachelor
the Universit


Hawthorne
EA DIEHL Recreation
y Reporter Programming




s and recreation Rereton at Wynkoop
RNE f adis currently
City Manager working on
used Tuesday a Masters
mission meeting in Natural
that the City has Resource
s and recreation Recreation at Wynkoop
. Samuel (Sam) Florida. He
previously from was self employed as a trim
nty, New Jersey, carpenter during college and
jainesville for the more recently worked for the
ar ,. He received Florida State Parks at Paynes


rs Degree from
ty of Florida in


HAWTHORNE:
Continued on page A2


pay property taxes, he is the man
to see. While his office is near the
back of the building, occasionally
he will work the counter, typing in
information and shaking hands, not
because he has to, but because he
wants to.
FRASER:
Continued on page A5


A hope and a prayer

By AMANDA HILL
Today Reporter
NEWBERRY As founder
of the Blessed Hope Foundation,
Evelyn McKoy doesn't just feed
the homeless she invites them
over to sleep on her couch.
McKoy, 72, has opened her
heart and her home to people
from all walks of life, from former
bank executives to convicts and
the mentally ill. She's also not
one to shy away from pulling over
to offer her assistance if she sees
that someone's car has broken
down.
"I'm always looking on the
side of the road to see if anyone is
out there thumbin'," she said.
What may seem like a death ,
wish to some, McKoy explains as
an unrelenting faith in God and a
compulsion to do his work.
Before Blessed Hope, McKoy
owned a convenience store in BRYAN BOUKARI/Alachua Countyv Todav
Newberry called "Nubby's" and Blessed Hope Foundation founder Evelyn McKoy
worked as an assistant manager at relies on herfaith and resolve to help less fortunate
a ooworked as an assistant manager at sville. members of the community. The organization
a Goodwill store in Gainesville. provides food, clothing, blankets, heaters and
MCKOY: furniture as well as financial assistance for rent
Continued on page A4 or utility bills.


Stop for the red-tipped


white cane llthannalwhitcanoesafewalk


By BRYAN BOUKARI
Today Reporter
ALACHUA Every
seven minutes another
person loses their ability
to see. Today there are 15
million blind and visually
impaired people in the
United States. And for 11
years, the Alachua County
Council of the Blind
(ACCB) in conjunction with
local Boy Scout Troop 88,
Alachua Police Explorers
and the Alachua Lions
Club have been educating
the public about Florida's
White Cane Law.
Each October in
the city of Alachua, the
ACCB, scouts, Lions Club
members and community
leaders join for the annual
trek from the now-vacant
lot near Alachua's fire
station to the Troop 88 Boy
Scout hut. The awareness
campaign offers the general
public a glimpse into life


BEN SANDKRS/Special to Alachua County ioday
Photo at top of page by GIB COERPER/Special to Alachua County Today
This past Saturday dozens of area residents learned
what it was like to live a day in the life of a blind or
visually impaired person as they made the annual trek
from the now-vacant lot near Alachua's fire station to
the Troop 88 Boy Scout hut.


as a blind person with the
hope that more people will
adhere to the White Cane
Law, Statute No. 316.1301.
That law requires all drivers
to come to a complete
stop when approaching a


blind or visually impaired
pedestrian attempting to
cross the street and the
visual demonstration is the
white cane.
WHITE CANE:
Continued on page A6


Index
inside
on A2
@2010 Alachua
Today, Incorporated

S 48 i7 It8 2


S 0
l';l I Fr [! '


Ii I`


He's an everywhere man


Von Fraser, County tax collector embraces service


.. :. .. . "


GLENN COINEAlachua County Tbday
At age 72, Alachua County Tax Collector Von Fraser has been on the job for nearly 30 years, and he takes
great pride in keeping his employees happy. Frasier says the office is female-dominated, adding that
they're all great women.


-----_--i-~
________ I I~---- L- I ~--~~II I _.__ ~ _


- -- II I -----
~~---~~~~~-~~~~~~~~~~~~


Loinimimuea n jpagef 6I









A2


Alachua County Today (ISSN
1534-7567) is published week-
ly by Alachua Today, Inc.,
14804 Main Street, Alachua,
FL 32615. All material herein
is the property of Alachua
County Today. Reproduction
in whole or in part is forbidden
without the written permission
of the publisher. Periodicals
Postage Paid at Alachua, FL
32616.

HOW TO REACH US
Phone: (386) 462-3355
Fax: (386) 462-4569
Email: editor@alachuatoday.
corn
Mail: P.O. Box 2135, Alach-
ua, FL 32616
Office: 14804 Main Street,
Suite 200
Open Monday through Friday
9 a.m. to 5p.m.

NEWSROOM
*Managing Editor: Bryan
Boukari, editor@alachuato-
day.com
*Reporters: Glenn Coine,
Amanda Hill, Avanti John-
son. Craig Cox; Bea Diehl

GRAPHICS
*Graphics Manager: Gail Lu-
parello, gail@alachuatoday.
corn
*Graphic Artists: Dallas
Bames, Anjalee Khemlani

ADVERTISING
*Classified/Legal: Gail Lu-
parello, accounting@
alachuatoday.com
ELegal Display: Gail Luparel-
to, gail@alachuatoday.com

SUBSCRIPTIONS
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years
Out-of-county, $35/$60 for
two years
Out-of-state, $40/$70 for two
years

POSTMASTER:
Send changes of address to:
Alachua County Today, P.O,
Box 2135, Alachua, FL 32616.
Annual subscription rate is
$25 in county, $35 out-of-
county and $40 out-of-state.
Subscribe online at www.ala-
chuatoday.com.

HOW TO SUBMIT...
*LETTERS TO THE EDI-
TOR: Letters may be mailed,
faxed or emailed. Letters may
be edited to fit availAble
space. Please include your
name, address, and day and
evening phone numbers for
verification. Letters MUST be
signed.
mA STORY: Do you have a
timely story or news event that
is of interest to the communi-
ty? Email our managing editor
at editor@alachuatoday.com
or call (386) 462-3355.
COMMUNITY CALENDAR,
CHURCH, BIRTH & WED-
DING ANNOUNCEMENTS:
Email to gail@alachuatoday.
corn, call (386) 462-3355 or
fax (386) 462-4569 your infor-
mation. Please include phone
number and name of individu-
al submitting the announce-
ment
Letters, comments and opin-
ions on the Opinions page are
not necessarily those of the
management/ownership of the
Alachua County Today.


INSIDE

ALACHUA

COUNTY

TODAY...


CLASSIFIEDS...B3
EVENTS....... A3
JOBS...........B3
MOST WANTED B1
OPINIONS..... A4
PUZZLE ....... B6
RELIGION......B2


Jesse says,
"Life's greatest
satisfactions include
getting the last laugh,
having the last word
and paying the last
installment."


Information appearing
in this listing comes
from the Alachua County
Sheriffs Office daily jail
log as provided to Alach/ua
County Today.
All individuals are
presumed innocent until
proven guilty. Individuals
listed on this page may be
cited and released or placed
under custodial arrest.
Information provided
is believed to be accurate,
however not guaranteed.
Most abbreviations have
been left as provided to
maintain the accuracy of
the log.

Last name, First name,
DOB, Charges, Agency
Booking: September 29,
2010
Barber, Williams H.,
8/4/1961, Fugitive Virginia,


AI.ACt ll Co1 l; Y TooAY LOCAL NEWS 'Tin URSDAY, O(cioilt 07, 2010


SBARS
tug logi


ASO
Blankenship, Justin
L., 8/13/1990, Trespass posted
prop, false name/ID to Leo,
GPD
Blankenship, Justin
L., 8/13/1990, FTA trespass
structure or convey, ASO
Bryant, Reginald E.,
2/3/1970, Dom. Battery by
strangluation. simple battery,
GPD
Chase, Darlene A.,
5/2/1967, Dom. Battery, GPD
Cordero, Orlando,
7/6/1989, FTA poss liquor by
person under 21, ASO
Cruse, Lonnie M.,
6/14/1957, Poss cocaine, poss/
use drug para, ASO
Denmack, Alphonso,
11/10/1978, Return to custody.
ASO
Flagg, Franklin L.,
1/28/1989, Hit and run, leave
scene of crash, VOP cocaine
sell sch 11, VOP cocaine poss,
ASO
Glover, Ashley,
5/6/1985, Fraud inperson,


false name to LEO, ASO
Green, Patrick L.,
1/20/1976, VOP poss cocaine,
destroy evidence. VOP resist
w/o violence, cocaine poss x's
2, ASO
Hornick, Eric, 9/19/1989,
Attempt poss control sub, marij
poss < 20g, drug equip poss
and/or usage, ASO
James, Olie Donald,
11/10/1987. Sexual battery,
false imprisonment, battery
w/strangulation, dom battery,
APD
Johnson, Erick A.,
10/23/1986, Resist w/o
violence, DWLSR. VOP burg
occ dwell with asslt, DUI, GPD
Johnson, Marcel,
11/26/1981, Escape, ASO
Lewis, Shantell C.,
6/10/1976, Non support, ASO
Melvin, Joseph A.,
11/8/1976, Poss < 20g cann,
GPD
Moss, Virgil Wayne,
12/29/1982, FTA no valid
DL, ASO
Norwood, Antonio,


10/17/1991, False ID, ASO
Palmer, Kenneth J.,
12/25/1975, Agg asslt w/
deadly weapon w/o intent
to kill, domestic battery by
strangulation, deprive of means
of communication, obstruct
police, ASO
Phelps, Carl Afdrew,
3/14/1963, Burglary, ASO
Pongnon, Osner,
2/6/1989, Crim mischief> 300,
GPD
Price, Jr., Harold,
11/2/1970, Tamper/fabricate
drugs evidence, DWLSR, GPD
Reilly, Robert W.,
4/18/1964, Poss cocaine, drug
equip poss/use, ASO
Reynolds, Kelvin,
1/7/1984, DWLS Habitual,
GPD
Ross, Marqusia A.,
9/15/1990, Battery, GPD
Sassany, Louis W.,
3/29/1974, Robbery armed,
poss/use drug para, GPD
Scott, Troice C.,
1/23/1972, Reckless driving,
resist off. Flee/elude w/lights


and sirens, DWLSR habitual,
resist w/o violence, poss
marijuana < 20g, ASO
Simpson, George,
5/30/1961, Parole violation,
ASO
Small, Jr., Keith,
11 2 1991, Ass Batt, off
knew/should have known vic
program, ASO
Smith, Dianna L,
10 27 1967. Robbery armed,
DWLSR, GPD
Stevens, Daniel Lee,
9/1/1971, Battery officer, resist
w/o violence, contempt of
court x's 2, ASO
Strickland, Ashley
Dale, 4/4/1973, VOP -
trespassing, ASO
Teruel,. Carolina I.,
3/23/1991, Battery touch or
strike, ASO
Thurman, Eugene,
7/6/1973, Dom. Battery, ASO
For additional jail
booking logs, see
alachuacountytoday.com.


A few words from the Alachua County Today staff


crisper and more vibrant design.


"f""f"""a C"""' 0 """' We believe the updated design
In this edition we unveil
more accurately reflects our efforts


Alachua County Today's new
logo. While former logos have
served the paper well, as we
embark on our I 0h anniversary,
we are moving forward with a


STAFF PI I KI
A twll/l /"..tr 7,,fl..


in bringing today's news about
Alachua County communities to
the public. We hope you like the
new logo and will soon find it as
familiar as those of the past.


0 0 0 0 0 0 *0* S*000 00 0*
* 0

* *

: .t


HAWTHORNE:
Continued from page A 1


Seeking funding to repair pier and dock as

well as beautification of the community


Prairie Preserve State Park
before coming to work at
Hawthorne as the Parks
and Recreation Manager.


Donations are accepted and appreciated.
All proceeds go to the Recreation Dept. in HACF.
SFor more information call Heather 352-317-3995 or
go to hawthornehogfest.com
386-462-2000000000000000000000

*lM# medium
1-Topping Pizza


S4.67

Pick 1 up or have 2
or more celiyered
Coupon Code MM.
15634 NW US HWY A41 1300 Newberry Rd.
386-462-2000 352-333-3333
Serving Alachua/High Springs Servibg Newberry/Jonesville

NOTICE
QUALIFYING
OFFICIALLY OPENS IN
THE CITY OF WALDO ON

OCTOBER 11, 2010.

SEATS OPEN ARE

MAYOR TWO YEAR TERM
COUNCIL SEAT II TWO YEAR TERM
COUNCIL SFAT V TWO YEAR TERM

THERE IS A $25.00 QUALIFYING FEE OR IN PLACE
OF THE FEE THE CANDIDATE MAY SUBMIT A
PF TUITION SIG N FI) BY TWENTY FIVE REGISTERED
ELECT TORS OF THE CITY OF WALDO. THE
PETITION MAY BE OBTAINED AT CITY HALL
ION DAY THROUGH FRIDAY, 8:00A.M-5:00P.M.
THIS PETITION MUST BE PRESENTED TO THE
CLERK AFTER BEING VERIFIED IN WRITING
BY THE ALACHUA COUNTY SUPERVISOR OF
ELECTIONS. IN ADDITION TO THE QUALIFYING
FEE THERE IS A ONE PERCENT (1%) STATE
ELECTIONS ASSESSMENT OF $30.00 (FEES MUST
BE PAID OUT OF THE CANDIDATES CAMPAIGN
ACCOUNT MADE TO THE CITY OF WALDO)
AND

THE C.\1 N II )D.T E MUST BE A PERMANENT
RESIDENT OF THIE CITY OF WALDO (RESIDING
WITHIN THE CORPORATE CITY BOUNDARY
LINES FOR A MINIMUM OF 6 MONTHS PRIOR TO
QUALIFYING DATE OF OCTOBER 11, 2010) AND A
QUAI.I FlF D ELECTOR OF THE CITY OF WALDO.
YOU I IS r PRESENT A CURRENT VOTERS
IDENTIFICATION CARD WHEN QUALIFYING.

QUALIFYING CLOSES ON
OCTOBER 21. 2010 AT 4:00PM
(Published: Alachua County Today October 07, 2010)


Smyth reported that grant
terms for the city's fishing
pier and dock had been
accepted, which is the


In addition to first step toward approval.
recreation, the meeting If the city is successful
focused on the status of in garnering the funding,
various grants and projects the grant would provide
the city has been working money to repair the pier
on as well as beautification and dock. Although it is a
of the community. competitive grant, Smyth
City manager Ed believes the city has a







REQUEST FOR

QUALIFICATIONS
(RFQ)

The City of High Springs is inviting interested
parties to submit a statement of qualifications
for the contract position of Recreation Program
Coordinator.

Minimum performance requirements and
compensation plan may be obtained at the
City Manager's Office at City Hall.

Qualification packet must be submitted by
3:00 p.m. on Thursday, Octo6er 21, 2010,
to City Manager, 110 NW 1st Avenue, High
Springs, Florida 32643.
(Published: Alachua County Today -
October 07 and 14, 2010)


good chance of success.
The wastewater plant
is still in its earliest
stage and no site plan or
engineering drawings
have been created. A
presentation on the
preliminary engineering of
the plant will be held at the
commission meeting on
Nov. 2.
Several citizens
approachedthe commission
with complaints of
unsightly weeds and
overgrown brush, as well
as dilapidated buildings
around the city.
Smyth said that the
old theater building and
the old grocery store have
been cleaned out and are
soon going to be sold.
The old wooden building,
however; was in such a
state of disrepair that it
will be demolished.
Vice Mayor Matthew
Surrency ended the
meeting with -a reminder
to residents to come out to
the city's annual Hog Fest
on Saturday, Oct. 9, from 9
a.m. to 5 p.m.

E-mail bdiehl@
alachuatoday.com


Zi
Bill Deen
352.333.2432


Conventional/FHANA
Construction/ Perm. Financing
Lot Loans I Refinancing
Adjustable & Fixed Rate
USDA Rural Housing
Affordable Housing


0 Capital City
Bank
More than your bank. Your banker.
Apply online at www.ccbg.com


s Al products are suuect to credit and property approval. Program terms and oconditlotS su~tbt to change without
S; Mmber FDIC r'i e Not all Products areavailable in all markets or for all amounts Other resIrCtions and Imitations msy aoply


U


Make a house your home.


I~
oil EBlu








ALACHUA COUNTY TODAY .COMMUNITY CORNER TIURSDAY, Oc'romI 07, 2010 A3


.. ni Cor






Meetings & Events in the Heartlands


. .'I
? K -'-


mArcher Meets the 2nd
and 4th Monday of each.
month at 7 p.m. at City Hall,
16870 SW 134 Ave,
*Alachua (City) Meets.
the 2nd and 4th Monday of
each month at 6:30 p.m. at,
City Hall.'
*Alachua Coimty Meets
the 2nd ,and 4th Tuesday
of each month at 9 a.m. at
the County Administration
Building, 12 SE 1st Street,
Room 209, Gainesville.
Citizen comments are taken
at 9:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m.
SGainesville Meets the
1st and 3rd Thursday of
each monthat 1 p.m. at City
Commission Chamber, 200
East University Avenue
* Alachua County
Beekeepers Club is accepting
new members. Anyone
interested in learning about
bees from Alachua and the
surrounding counties is
welcome to join. Meetings are
held the third Thursday of each
month at Dadant& Sons, 17074
NW 188 Street, High Springs.
For more information, contact
Wayne "Chappie" McChesney,
Club President 386-462-2637
or chappiesbees@windstream.
net.
* North Central Florida
Political Women's Network
holds meetings the second
Wednesday of every month at
11:30 a.mto 1 p.m. at Shoney's
on Archer Road in Gainesville.
- A rummage sale is being
held to raise money for
the Archer Youth Athletic
Scholarships on Saturday,
Oct 9 from 7 am. to 4 p.m.
at the Old Fire Station on
the comer of State Road 45
(US27) and 137th Avenue in
Archer. Donations are needed-
and appreciated. Call Sara
'Brahnn oat 352-514-8431 to
arrange delivery or pick up of
donations.
* A celebration of love
to honor Mother Harriette
Wiliamson will be held
Wednesday, Oct. 13 at 7:30
p.m, Wednesday, Oct 20
at 7:30 p.m. and Saturday,
Oct. 23 at 5 p.m. at the New
Testament Church of God in
Christ; "Strength and .honor
are her clothing; And she
shall rejoice in time to come".
(Proverbs 31:25)
You are cordially invited
to fellowship with us as we
celebrate and honor Mother
Harriette. We invite you to be a
part of this glorious occasion to
show love to someone so well
deserving of the recognition.
Your presence will help to
make the celebration a success!
For additional information,
please contact Missionary
Sandra Cooper at 352-215-
4269. or Missionary Demetra
Williamson at 386-438-8029.
If you would like to make a


*Hawthorne Meets the 1st
and 3rd Tuesdays of each
month at 6:30 p.m. at City
Hall.
iHigh. Springs Meets the
2nd and 4th Thursday of
each month at 6:30 p.m. in
City Hall. .
@LaCrosse Meets the 2nd
Monday'of each month at
7:30 p.m. at TowntHall.
!Micanopy -.Meets the 2nd
Tuesday of each month at
7:30 p.m. atTown Hall.
Newberry Meets the 2nd
and 4th Monday of each
month at 7 p.m. at City Hall
*Waldo Meets the 2nd
tuesday of each month at 7
p.m. at Yerkes Center.

financial contribution, Olease
make check payable to New
Testament COGIC. Mail
checks to P.O. Box 2217;
Alachua, Florida 32615.
The church is located
at 13410 NW 155th Place,
Alachua. Phone: (386) 462-
4891
m' On Wednesday, Oct. 6
through Sunday, Oct. 10,
there will be a "13-years of
appreciation" service for
Apostle Dr. Donald L. Kelly
and Dr. Pastor Queen Hone-
Kelly of the Miracle Word
of Faith Min. COD Church
located at 3809-A. E University
Avenue, Gainesville. The
services will be at 7:30 p.m.
nightly and 11 am. on Sunday
morning. There will be visiting
churches with the Word of God
choirs, soloist and praise dance
nightly. Everyone is invited to
Come out and celebrate with us.
For more information, please
contact 352-372-1943, 352-
,214-5931 or 352-317-2540.
* Theater at the Old
Library in Alachua is
pleased to announce a new
concert series featuring
the band Quartermoon, on
Friday, Oct. 15 at 8 p.m.
Quartermoon has been a
local favorite for many years
playing at festivals across the
state. Enjoy the evening of
pop, folk and rock aid light
refreshments available.
Friday, Oct. 22 at 8 p.m.
is Blues Lightening, bringing
you an evening of old and new
blues.
Proceeds from each
evening goes toward supporting
the Alachua Children's Theater,
yearly arts program, making the
arts available for all children
in the Alachua/High Springs/
Newberry area.
For ticket information
or to reservations, call 352-
225-6741 or 352-672-2122.
Brought to you by Alachua
Children's Theater and
PainterZ productions.
Coming Soon...Ransom of
Red Chief, the play, Shop, Dine


PUBLIC MEETINGS


and Stroll and more....
m Due ,to the overwhelming
demand for the recent
production of The Chip
Woman's Fortune, directed by
Carol Velasques Jackson and
starring Dollean Perkins, Stan
Richardson, Tiana Richardson,
John White Jr., and Bonne
Burgess, the Chip Woman's
Fortune will be featured at
the Annual Mebane Alumni
Reunion Weekend, Saturday,
Nov. 27 at 6 p.m. For more
information call the Mebane
Alumni Association at 352-
316-0037.
* Fellowship Church is-
holding a yard sale Saturday,
Oct. 9 from 8 a.m.-12 noon.
The church is located at 16916
NW US HWY 441 between
High Springs and Alachua.,
* LaCrosse Baptist Church
is holding their annual Yard
Sale on Friday and Saturday,
Oct. 15 and 16. All proceeds
of the sale will benefit the
Building Fund. Yard Sale will
start at 8 a.m. until 3 p.m. with a
wide variety of items, including
children's clothes and toys,
appliances, etc. Hamburgers
and hot dogs will be available
for purchase also. The sale will
be held at the Church off SR
121 in downtown LaCrosse
(follow the signs).
m The High Springs Area
AARP will hold its regular
meeting Thursday, Oct. 14,
in the First Presbyterian
Church, 205 N. Main Street.
The meeting will begin
with a social hour starting at
10:30 a.m. followed' by the
business meeting and a covered
dish luncheon.
Anyone over 55 years old
is invited to attend to make
new friends, and discuss issues
facing the senior citizens in our
area.
* Volunteer opportunities
are available at Hospice of
the Nature Coast, which will
conduct its next General
Orientation Class for New
Volunteers on Tuesday, Nov.
2, from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30
a.m. at 150 N. Main Street,
High Springs. This class
.prepares volunteers to help in
the organization% offices, assist
in its Thrift & Gift Shoppes
and participate in community
outreach work. Those who
wish to assist patients and
their families will also need to
complete the Patient Support
Training Class scheduled for
Thursday, Nov. 4, at 9 am.
To reserve your space in
one or both of these classes,
or for more information, call
Volunteer Services Manager
Emily Hines at 386-454-1338.
Hospice of the Nature Coast, a
program of Hospice of Citrus
County, Inc., licensed 1985,
is a not-for-profit charitable
organization serving patients
in 12 counties of North Central
Florida.
* New St Mary Missionary
Baptist Church upcoming
events: The Pastor Aid Care
Team will be having a walk-a-
thon on Oct 9. The meeting
time will be at 6:30 a.m. and
departure time at 7 a.m, at the


of the flea market to get rid of
unwanted items.
Breakfast and lunch will
be served by the Knights of
Columbus and Lilly's Country
store and the garden, book and
toy shops will all be open.
Vendors are encouraged to
sign up early for one of the 12'
X 12' spaces.that are available
for $15 each.
The flea market will be
held on the church grounds
located at 17155 NW Hwy. 441
in High Springs.
Call the church office at
386-454-2358 to rent a space or
for more information.
* Movie under the Stars
- First Baptist Church of
Alachua is showing Disney's
Apple Dumpling Gang
starring Don Knotts and
Tim Conway on Oct. 15 at
7:45 p.m. Bring your blanket
and enjoy this classic with
your family. Movie, popcorn


and drinks are provided at no
charge.
* The African American
Theater is holding'auditions
for the comedy "Choir
Rehearsal" Thursday, Oct. 14
and Sunday, Oct. 17 at 7 p.m.
Needed are 11 women and four
men who must be available for
rehearsals on Thursday and
Sunday evenings. Production
will be held Dec. 3 12 at the
Theater at the Old Library,
downtown Alachua. When
the members of the choir come
to sing, they come for various
reasons that include all the
wrong reasons. A mysterious
man showed up at one choir
rehearsal, but when they started
their antics, he leaves. They
soon learned that .he was the
Holy Spirit and they work hard
to get him to come back. For
more information, call 352-
316-2929 or 352-672-2122.


T


home of Pastor and Daughter
Daniel and Sharon McNish in
Bland.
Oct. 10 at 3 p.m. there
will be a 7-up plus services
at the church (NSMMBC).
Everyone is welcome to join
in these two special events.
For more information, contact
any member of the church
or contact Ist Lady Roberta
McNish at 386-496-0800 or
352-494-8522.
On Oct. 17, there will
be a Fifty-plus Men in
Dark service at NSMMBC.
Women, children and everyone
are welcome to come join in.
See you there at 3:30 p.m. For
more. information, call Rev.
Daniel McNish at 386-496-
0800 oi 386-462-7129, Deacon
Roosevelt Butler at 386-454-
3765.
* First Baptist Church of
Archer is celebrating 90 years
of service in the community.
Nov. 7 the church will host
a homecoming celebration.
Registration begins .at 10
a.m. The service will begin
at 10:30 a.m. The guest
speakers are Rev. Jim Johnson
(Justapreacher Ministries) and
.Rev. Andy Co6k (Bronson
Road Baptist Church).
Bring a covered dish for
the fellowship dinner following
the worship service. For
more information, call the
church office 352-495-2225 or
check out the Web site www.
fbcarcher.com
* The First United
Methodist Church of High
Springs will be holding its
annual Homecoming on
Sunday, Oct. 17. Former long-
time FUMCHS pastorAlan Patz
will be performing the sermons
at an 8:45 a.m. Contemporary
Service and again at 11 a.m.
for a Traditional Service. A
covered-dish luncheon will
follow the Traditional Service.
For more information, call
386-454-1255 or visit www.
fumchighsprings.com
* St. Madeleine Catholic
Church will hold its annual flea
market on Nov. 6 from 8 am.
to 1 p.m.
Over 70 'vendors' are
expected to be selling their
wares and local .residents are
encouraged to take advantage


;,f: -.Idenffy the adverflser in ths week's edllon rom
Sthe clue Inside ofthe magntfyng ass for your
chance to win eer a kfe earge one-opping
pza or a baked sub from Domio's PFa.
Call now (386-462-3355) or e-mail us (contest@
alachuatoday.com) to be entered into our
weekly drawing. Be sure to put the word 'contest'
in the subject line and include your contact
information along with your entry. All correct
entries will be placed into a drawing each week
and at least one winner will be pulled.
ANSWER TO LAST WEEK'S EYE-Q:
Weddings Performed ':,
Aochu.Coun Toda Advetiser
V t0 60. 0 o
additonalcon0 sts nd pizes


Obituary


Tammy R. Calhoun
Tammy R. Calhoun
passed away October 5,
2010 at Shands Hospital at
the University of Florida in
Gainesville, Fla. She was
42.
She was born December
23, 1967 to Lynnwood
and Betty Calhoun in
Gainesville, Fla.
Ms. Calhoun is a
survived by daughter,
Brandace Twitty (Mark);
and son, Travis Garner,
Fla.; and she was expecting
grand baby, Amiyah Twitty;
four brothers, Jeffrey
Williams (Aggy), Terry
Williams, Stacy Calhoun
(Jasmin), and Greg
Calhoun, all of Gainesville,'
Fla.; one sister, Candace
Calhoun-Thomas (Curtis)
of Lake Butler, Fla.; a host
of nieces, nephews and
cousins; best friend Donna
Belcher.
Funeral services for
Ms. Calhoun will be held'
Saturday, October 9, 2010
at 11 a.m. at Compassionate
Outreach, Gainesville, Fla.
and burial will take place in
Newnans Lake Cemetery.


Funeral arrangements
entrusted to the care of A.
Jerome Brown Funeral
Home, 1560 N W 1st
Avenue, High Springs, Fla.


Obituaries: The obituaries in
this section are considered news
and are published free of charge
'by Alachua County Today.
Obituaries may be edited for
style, space and policy.


What is your..


VOING WIS M SY
ASI-.,-$,

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Weekdays: Oct 18-22 and Oct. 25-29
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(352)374-5252
^jj www.VotoAlachJupacom
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Enter to win!







A4 AI., ACIl A CULINIr TODAY VOICE OF THE HEARTLANDS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 07, 2010





0oice of the He art lan



lacjua Counntp tobap I GOP PL G
EtS I AIRICA |N MMOCR AT
ESTABLSHEDw 2000 _________ -__________lr_


ELLEN B. BOUKAm
Executive Editor


GAIL G. LUPARELLO
Publisher
ALACHUA TODAY, INC.


BRYAN BOUKARI
Managing Editor


Alachua County Today

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is dedicated to reporting
news and events relevant to
all citizens of the Heartland
Communities. Above all,
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what is sometimes charac-
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* i. \"-.."..." L. .*' .':'-' ... *,'"1 ... \ \, ,


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conservative paper.
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to the community, and (2)
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Vote at AlachuaCountyToday.com


READER This week's poll: Do you think High Springs City Manager Jim

OPINION Drumm should be fired?


~


Growing

My son fancies himself a
horticulturalist. Not the garden-
variety horticulturalist, but the
sandbox variety.
This year, his interests have
taken him to a place where he likes
to make something out of nothing.
Seeds, which are almost nothing, is
where he started this.past spring.
He planted tomato seeds in an
egg carton, inside the house, and
fussed over them like
a mother hen. He
agonized over whether
to keep them protected
inside the house or
replant them outside
when the time came.
I felt exactly that way <
before my two oldest
sons were ready to start
co!1'ge.
About six plants
actually made it
"through the egg Laura S
carton stage and were
replaced outside. He
mourned the loss of each plant that
didn't make it past the egg carton.
"Mom, how do farmers keep
their plants alive long enough for a
harvest?"
I do not 'have a green thumb
by any stretch of the imagination,
but I know how to grow strong,
independent children. My motherly
advice to my son was:
"Son, the plants that didn't make
it weren't strong enough to develop
into a full-grown tomato. Take good
care of the others.and soon you will
have your harvest."
He planted them in a flower
garden on a side of the house that
doesn't get much sun. He thought
that if he planted them in a safe place
where the sun wouldn't fry them,
he wouldn't have to water them as
often. My would-be gardener was
surprised when their growth was
stunted and they didn't produce...
uh, produce.
"You cannot protect them from
the wind, rain, and sun and expect
them to grow," I said. I was thinking
about his first few months of
Taekwondo. "You have to challenge
them and then support them through
it. Try putting your plants in full sun
and water them often."


children

So he transferred three of the
plants to his old sandbox, which had
plenty of sunshine, and he planted
some pumpkin seeds there to keep
them company.
The' pumpkin seeds began to
grow. As they grew, they wandered
all over the sandbox. One even
started growing up' a nearby tree.
They sprouted plenty of flowers, but
no pumpkins. My son was confused.
They had sun. They
had water. They were
growing, but.... no
pumpkins&
My advice was:
"You have to give them
boundaries. They are
.-1 putting too much effort
into spreading out
and not enough into
production. You need
*to make them stop
spreading and then they
ayder will start producing."
Experimenting
with that advice, my
son cut three feet off the vine that
was growing up a tree. Two days
later, a tiny pumpkin developed just
before the cut.
He was very pleased with his
pumpkin's progress but, now, two of
his tomato plants had invited some
pests to their place caterpillars -
and now the plants looked like they
might not make it.
I told him, "You must be very
mindful about those that they spend
time with, and vigilant against
harmful intruders. Not everything
out there will be good for them.
There are parasites that thrive on
destroying your good work."
He distributed a natural pesticide
on the ground around the remaining
plant and hoped that it would be
enough to deter the caterpillars.
It was. Yesterday, he picked five
tomatoes from his plant. The look on
his face when he held the ripe fruit
of his labors was priceless. He was
amazed. He was in awe. He was so
joyously proud.
...I knew exactly how he felt.
Laura Snyder is a nationally
syndicated columnist, author &
speaker You can reach Laura at
lsnyder@lauraonlife.com or visit
her website www. lauraonlife. com for
more information.


Drumm deserves credit
Last month on the Sunday of Labor Day
weekend, I was driving around High Springs
and noticed Jim Drumm mowing the lawn. Not
surprising, right? Perhaps, but the lawn he was
mowing was not his own. I slopped and asked,
humorously, if he was trying to earn some
extra money. No, Jim said, this property is in
foreclosure and the tall grass made the other
properties look bad. So, he spent his Labor Day
weekend Sunday afternoon, which he could have
been spending with his family, mowing someone
else's lawn so that the neighborhood looked
better.
I agree that is not (automatically) a reason to
keep a city manager, but Jim Drumm's actions
do express alove and dedication to High Springs
that is unparalleled. So let's talk about the
positive impact Jim Drumm has had on the City
of High Springs:
1. As City Manager, Mr. Drumm upgraded the
City's technology, replacing an antiquated
system with new software and hardware,
which red to more accurate financial record
keeping.

2. High Springs has enjoyed exemplary
independent audits for the past several years
and, for the past two, has maintained perfect
independent audits.

3. Mr. Drumm has always been fiscally.
responsible. Nothing has been taken from
reserves in the general fund and funds have
actually been added. Under his management,
the City hasneverspent the entire City budget
to $-0- and rarely has he spent reserve funds
unless it was to replace equipment.

4. Mr. Drumm managed Phases One, Two and
Three of the Sewer System a system that
was voted in and brought to High Springs by
the City Commissioners.

5. He has done a great deal to professionalize
City staff including sending existing
personnel to training. New appointments
have had a higher level of experience and
education.

6. Mr. Drumm's staffing decisions have led to a-
professional fire department.


7. He worked with planning consultants to
conduct community visioning meetings and
include the feedback for a more workable
comprehensive plan.
8. Mr. Drumm workedwiththe City Commission
'to create citizen advisory boards to allow
more residents ownership and involvement
in City government. These boards included
The Mayor's Youth Council, The Parks


and Recreation Board, The Housing Needs
and Improvement Committee and The Tree
Board.

9. He worked with State and Federal officials
to gain grant funds for several City projects,
including the old High Springs Elementary
School, the downtown parking project, new
homes for low income residents living in
sub-standard housing and the construction
of the sewer system. The School project
demonstrated Mr. Drumm's interest in
preserving the history of High Springs.

10. He organized the recent update of the Civic
Center bathrooms using specially designated
recreation funding from the Wild Spaces
grant money.

11. In order to encourage more building in High
Springs without the delays associated with
Alachua County bureaucracy, Mr.' Dnrmm
hired a Building Official in 2006.

12. On his own time, he has served on the Board
of The Chamber of Commerce for many
years, thereby demonstrating his interesting
making High Springs a welcoming place for
visitors and businesses.

13. Demonstrating his kIowledge and
understanding of revenue sources and. the
City's needs, Mr. Drumm has prepared
budgets from 2004 through 2010 that mapped
out the goals of the City Commissioners at
the time.

City Manager Drumm is a consummate
professional who cares very deeply about the
citizens, the history and the needs of High
Springs. Let's not forget that.
Lucie Regensdorf
High Springs. Fla.

Voice YiourSOinion


Letters to.the Ed-
itor should be brief
and to the point,
typed, if possible, and
double-spaced. ,Let-
ters may be shortened
due to space con-
straints.
Letters must -be
signed and include the
writer's address and
phone number to be
considered for publi-
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Letters are subject
to editing. Generally,
only one letter from
the same writer will
be printed each issue.
By Mail: Editor,
Alachua County
Today, P.O. Box
2135, Alachua, FL
32616
By Fax: (386) 462-
4569
By E-Mail: editor@.
alachuatoday. corn


Loc alN wI


MCKOY:
Continuedfrom page A


Honored for community service


She said that she didn't feel that she was able to reach
people on the level that she wanted to in either of her
previous positions.
"I never saw that one on one connection," she said.
In 2000, McKoy started giving away food and clothing
out of a watermelon shed on a piece of property that was
lent to her by a friend.
Margaret Daub had only been in Newberry for about
two months when she lost her job, her house and her car. To
make matters worse, her husband was sent off to war and
she found out that she was suffering from end stage renal
failure. She had never asked a stranger for help before,
but without another option, she took the locals' advice and
went to see "Ms. Evelyn."
Daub said that McKoy didn't just give her food, she
gave her hope. She has since been able to get back on her
feet and is now a volunteer in the pantry section at Blessed
[lope.


McKoy, Daub and seven other volunteers hand out food
to the community on the first and third Tuesday of every
month. As the only organization of its kind in Newberry,
Blessed Hope supplies the less fortunate members of
the community with all of the-supplies that they need to
survive.
"We don't have the base like Gainesville or some of
the larger cities. When people are homeless here, there is
nowhere to go," Daub said.
In addition to food, Blessed hope gives away a number
of other items including clothing, blankets, heaters and
furniture. It also provides monetary assistance for those
who need help paying rent or utility bills.
Over the years, Blessed Hope has expanded into one
building and six storage sheds, all of which are located on
the original property. Operating entirely on revenue from
its thrift store and a combined total of $475 in donations
from the City of Newberry, local churches and individual
donors, Blessed Hope gave food to 759 people last month.


In addition, it aided 200 more people with monetary
assistance and other supplies. Daub said that the number of
people coming to Blessed Hope for help has almost tripled
in the past two years.
McKoy was honored with a proclamation of
appreciation by the City of Newberry on Sept. 27. Upon
presenting her with the award, Mayor Harry Nichols called
McKoy a "saint if there ever was one."
"She must have the word sucker written across her
head because every time someone tells her a sad story she
falls for it," he joked.
McKoy said that although she was grateful for the
recognition, she felt guilty accepting the award because
she the praise should go to God and the other volunteers.
"I just love people and I try to put myself in their
position," she said.
E-mail ahillalachuatodayom# # #
E-mail ahill@alachuatoday.com


PI hIDIST o EDI*TO


U=


n









Ai.Acwolli, ci v\t v TO,( y LOCAL NEWS TtRSDAYoY, OCTORR 07, 2010 A5


HIGH SPRINGS:
Continued from page A

Several cities had minor errors


officials visited both the
City of High Springs
and ACSO to conduct an
administrative review of
the grant.
Robyn Rush, a High
Springs resident who has
raised concerns about
various issues regarding
local government and law
enforcement, approached
the city commission
several weeks ago about
the Byme Grant. At that
time she claimed the police
department was requesting
grant reimbursements from
the sheriff for money that
was never spent.
The findings of the
administrative review,
which High Springs police
chief Jim Troiano received
in the mail Wednesday
morning, state "The office
of executive investigations
found no evidence of
criminal misconduct
that would warrant
further investigation.
Therefore, this case will be
administratively closed."
S In response to the
FDLE's findings, Troiano
said, "I hope'this answers
Ms. Rush's questions."
The review did
find several instances
where High Springs had
incorrectly reported hours
for reserve and part-time
officers who did not work
overtime, and another
officer's timesheet did not
matchup with overtime
paid.
These mistakes will
amount to a total of about
$400 in grant funds that


have to be paid back by
Oct. 31.
However, the. findlin..
also indicate that other
municipalities, including
the Gainesville Police
Department, had similar
issues, and ultimately, it
falls to the sheriff's office
to ensure that grant money
isi not misallocated.
"Itismy understanding,"
said Troiano, "these are
-common errors it just
happens.'"
He said he hopes that
in the future there will
be better communication
between the sheriff's office
and the police department
to help prevent such
misunderstandings.
SheriffDarnell,whowas
en route from Tallahassee
Wednesday afternoon, had
not yet seen the findings
when she commented, but
she said she di-agree, that
there is any problem with
communication.
She said the Byrne
Grant and the process and
rules that go along with
it have been in place for
several years, and there is
no reason anyone should be
having misunderstandings
at this point.
She was pleased to hear
that the review confirmed
what both she and Troiano
were confident of, which
was there had been no
illegal expenditures from
grant monies.
# # #
E-mail gcoine@
alachuatoday.com


First river festival flows smooth


By I(. 1 I N's COINE
h Au,sco;,
IIIGII SPRINGS
Last x\wekcnd, the first
annual ligh Springs River
Festival attracted a crowd
of locals, fellow Floridians
from niLh:Il',hi ini towns
and visitors from as far as
Georgia.
The three-day
fikndh.iin_'x event, hosted
by the High Springs Main
Street Organization, saw
about 2.000 attendees,
estimated Main Street
Manager Ashley
McDonough.
The organization spent
over a year planning for
the weekend, and when
it finally arrived loads of
volunteers worked to ensure
its success. Daily activities
and attractions ranged from
sporting events to concerts,
with endless amounts of
food and crafts in between.
Saturday'slP'daJ I'ddlec
event, sponsored by the
local cycling club, the High
Sprinll, Yellow Bellied
Sliders, was a success.
.Ci'IIpctii'I.s bicycled half
way and kayaked or canoed
the other half toward the
finish line.
Tom Ilewlett, president
of the Yellow Bellied
Sliders, said that the Pedal/
Paddle event, combined
with river tube racing,
raised between $1,500
and $2,000. Some of that
money, he said, will go to
Main Street and some of it
will go to 'the Oleno State
Park Citizens' Service
Organization to help fund a
new outdoor nature lab.
Two rounds of tube
races were held at the River
Rise Resort, located just off
US Highway 441, on the


GLENN COINEIAlachua Couny Today
Dr. Jerry Johnston holds a yellow-bellied slider to show the audience as he leads
"Turtle Talk" at the River Rise Resort Saturday as part of the High Springs River
Festival.


banks of the Santa Fe River,
where on shore children and
parents gathered around
one of several event tents
to listen to "Turtle Talk,"
with Dr. Jerry Johnston,
a biology professor from
Santa Fe College who is
also an expert on local
turtle populations.
Ilcwlctt said he wasn't
expecting a huge turnout
because this was the first
time doing the River
Festival, but the focus was
to make sure that everyone
there had fun. And in that,
he was successful.
Meanwhile, in
downtown High Springs,
a "fall festival" was going
on in James Paul Park that
featured booths from local
artists and businesses. The
High Springs Community
Gardens, the recently
opened Autism Oasis for
Kids and even the new city
Code Enforcement Board


attorney, Brent Baris, were
some of the community
faces that set up shop.
Bounce houses, face
painting, ball toss games
and pony rides kept
children entertained as the
grown-ups chatted and
eyed the jewelry, flowers
and Gator-wear on display.
McDonough said
one of the highlights
of the weekend for her
was on Friday night
when renowned local
photographer Jill Heinerth
hosted a screening of a
documentary about the
area's springs.
Heinerth talked to a
"jam-packed crowd" with
standing room only in the
High Springs women's
center, which she did for
free. She also brought a
stack of posters of her
photographs that handed
out and signed for audience
members.


Main Street is still
working to figure out how
much money came in
from the three-day event,
McDonough said. Right
now the tally is up to at least
$500 from a downtown
bake sale and raffle tickets
to win a custom-made quilt,
handcrafted and donated
by High Springs resident
Suzie Ann Clark.
The goal was to bring
people downtown, and
it was nice to see that
happening, the Main Street
manager said.
Profits from this event,
she explained, will help to
offset the loss of $30,000
in grant funding that the
city commission chose to
discontinue this year.
# # #
E-mail gcoine@
alachuatoday.com


Tax collector strives to


"Even though I am management," Fraser said, "I am a
laborer at heart."
His business is money; his passion is helping. In his
own words, he "shattered the view of the tax collector."
On any given day Fraser can be found at a local
elementary school, where he is a part ofthe PTAs, SACs,
Arts Council and numerous other programs.
"My three groups are seniors, babies and young
adults," Fraser said. "Everyone else is on their own."
Fraser makes sure to attend as many events held for
children as possible, reading and supporting in any way
that he can.
"'Mr.,Fraser, you missed our last play' they all said in
unison,'" Fraser recalled laughing. The children of a local
elementary school made it known that his presence was
missing and they had noticed.
"Young people are our hope," Fraser said before going
into another story about the local school children.
He is a lifetime member of the Alachua County
Education Association, placing education as one of his top
priorities.
S "Education is key to freedom. I don't just want them
to graduate from high school and go to college to get their
Bachelor's; I want them to get their Ph.D.," said Fraser. "I
want the children to reach their highest potential."
As he sits, his hands move, helping to tell countless
stories about the individuals he's mret, the children who
have hugged him around the legs, or the possibilities of a
better tomorrow. Despite being born in 1938, Von Fraser
is not a man to take things sitting down. *
"The only way a public official can solve problems is
to get out in the street," Fraser explained. "You can't solve
anything from behind your desk."
At his office, Fraser got his employees to become
involved in Cell phones for Soldiers, a national cell phone
recycling program, which donates calling cards to soldiers
stationed overseas. The office collects used cell phones,
which are then sent to a recycling center. The center pays
for the phones, allowing Cell phones for Soldiers to buy
enough calling cards for the soldiers.
Out of the 1,531 sites participating in Florida, the
Alachua County Tax Collector's office is number one as
they approach nearly 10,000 donated phones.
Fraser is passionate about military families, as he
spent three years in the Army, and is part of three veterans'
organizations.
''I don't go looking for recognition," Fraser said. "I let
it find me."
Through his work in the community, he has been
honored numerous times and is a member of 11"'s
prestigious Florida Blue Key. While he attended UF for
his bachelor's in business administration he worked full
time, putting himself through college.
"I took 11 years to get from a small Georgia school
to UF," Fraser recalled. "1 took 21 hours the first four

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semesters; I didn't know there was an hour's limit. My
social life was church on Sunday."
Fraser still goes to church, connecting himself with
many pastors and religious leaders in the community,
going not to campaign, but to worship.
"I pride mncll on only having left a service early
once, and 1 asked the congregation for permission," Fraser
said. "I go because I want to worship with them, not come
to just speak and lea\ e."
'As he spoke, his voiced filled with soft tones of
adoration and love for the community he calls home.
"I almost wish I had been raised here," said the Doerun,
Ga., native.
In his work life, it is easy to be detached, concentrating
on the numbers rather than the people, but Fraser doesn't
want it to be that way.
"They have done' a lot for me and 1 try and give it
back," Fraser said.
Fraser's office only sold 38 properties out of 100,000
last year for back taxes, compared to neighboring counties
that sold 600 and 800. The most the county has sold with
him in office is 50, and Fraser wants to make sure the
number does not get any bigger than that.
"I have been here almost 30 years and we have never
sold a Mom and Pop homestead," Fraser said. "I will do
everything in my power to not sell."
As he bustles around Alachua County, Fraser hopes to
not just make a difference but influence others to do so as
well.
"1 am the guy you will see at most events," Fraser
admitted. "But I just like taking care of my community, I
have adopted these people."


To Our Wonderful Pastor,
Thank you for all you do.


We as your ..'l.nuLcr.iLion would like to personally thank you for
answering God's .,llin'. on your life. We appreciate the Work that
you do and being willing to be used by God to accomplish great
ilin,;g' We love you! "For I am sure of this very thing, that the one
who began a good work in you will perfect it until the day of Christ
Jesus." Phil, :6
Pastor Jay Cochenour is the Pastor of Lighthouse Community
Church in High Springs. le has a heart beat for children, and along
with the support of the church holds two Community Outreach
Kids Krusades a year. one in the Spring, and Fall. This year the Fall
Kids Krusade will be held at Deese Park Nov. 13 from'12-5pm.
Hope to see you there! Ile is also very active with other sister
church outreaches in the area and visits over 15 nursing homes.


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elp community

He urges people to just be as "one-third active" as he
is, helping to strengthen the youth into "taxpayers, not tax
takers."
He is cautious with how money is spent at his office,
wanting to be conscious of money that comes in and
money that goes out.
"I am not frugal, I am stingy," Frasersaid with a
laugh. "I am generous with my staff; I am generous in my
community. I believe in sharing the wealth. If I made a
difference in government, so can you."
In Orange County, the current tax collector is 93 years
old. Fraser wants to be the first to be 100.
"I want to be here for the people. I pray to the Lord
to give me a long life," Fraser said softly. "I love people;
my goal in life is to help as many people as I can before I
leave Earth."
With each hand he shakes, or with each child he reads
a book, Fraser is doing just that.
"I am an elected official, but I am still earning it,"
Fraser said. "Helping people is what I do."
# # #
E-mail ajohnson@alachuatoday.com




Ask Your Dentist
by Douglas M. Adel D.D.S.

Dental trivia


Q: Did George
Washington really have
wooden teeth?
A: Our first president
was plagued with dental
difficulties, losing most of
his teeth to periodontal, or
gum disease while still in his
20's. Contrary to popular
belief, Washington never had
wooden dentures. They were
made from gold, elephant
ivory, hippopotamus tusk
and human teeth. A set is
on display at Mount Vernon,
his Virginia home. Modem
dentures are commonly made
with acrylic and porcelain.
One of Washington's
dentists was a fellow named
John Greenwood. In 1790,
Greenwood adapted his


mother's foot operated
spinning wheel in creating
the first known dental drilling
machine. Washington lost
his teeth long before 1913,
the year the phrase "dental
hygiene" was coined in
Bridgeport; Conn., where
Dr. Alfred Civilion Fones
started a school of hygiene.
The school remains in
operation today as part of the
University of Bridgeport.
The earliest known
reference to a dentist dates
to 2600 BC. An inscription
on the tomb of an Egyptian
scribe named Hesy-Re calls
him "the greatest of those
who deal with teeth." The
practice of dentistry has
come a long way.


For more information or free brochures, please call our office.
Presented as a service to the community by:

Douglas M. Adel, D..S., PA

Family Dentistry






SR? E1M R AtN -I:", appmunrl7 Mangyour hee1h
Rbtautgul and stronger than beimtl
..W.i.. ING PROAM Fouhd exclusively at Dr. Adel's office.
,SMILEIWIIENING ROC RAM
386-462-4635
14211 NW l 0th Ave., Aiachu


FRASER:
Continuedfrom page Al








A6 AL.ACH A CouNiY TODAY LOCAL NEWS TiiRSDAY, ():,o.crm 07. 2010
I- Ill I I I


WHITE CANE:
Continued from page A I

Participants could have their names


As on Saturday in years
past, Alachua's annual
White Cane Walk kicked
offwith sighted participants
taking a two-block walk
along U.S. Highway
441 while blindfolded.
Organizers of the event led
the group of area residents
as they experienced a world
of darkness. The Alachua
community answered the
challenge issued years
ago by visually impaired
Jack Vamon to "walk a
mile in my shoes" through
participation in the annual
white cane safety awareness
walk.
Saturday's walk was
a family affair for 10-year-
old Webelos scout Jarrod
Sanders whose younger
brothers also attended the
event.
"There was -a surprise
at the end of the walk for
everyone hotdogs and
sodas and .chips," Sanders


The youngster also
said he learned a lot about
how hJ.llInCgir,,- it is for a
visually impaired person do
the same things he takes for
granted.
Imagine pouring a
glass of water, counting
money, or unlocking a door
in total darkness. Yet, every
day, millions of blind or
visually impaired people
do just that and more.
Consider using a computer,
voting, or crossing the street
in total darkness. Everyday
tasks that sighted people
take for granted present
special challenges for the
visually impaired, and
unfortunately, in the case of
crossing the street, can lead
to injury or death.
i'.1lcip.mini. learned
how a blind person counts
out change without being
able to see it and had the
unique opportunity of


written in Braille
having their names \\rinen
in Braille.
The "blind walk" began
11 years ago as area resident
Adam Boukari's Eagle
Scout project designed to
create awareness about the
Florida White Cane Law.
Over the course of the past
11 years, the ACCB has
teamed up with the Alachua
Lions Club, Boy Scout
Troop 88, Cub Scout Pack
88 and the Alachua Police
Department (APD) to bring
the message of safety to the
public.
Among area residents
on hand for this year's walk
were city officials including
Alachua Mayor Gib
Coerper, Commissioner
Orien Hills, City Manager
Traci Cain and Chief of
Police Joel DeCoursey.
This was just the latest such
whk for Hlills, who has the
distinction of participating
in the event each year, fiom
the first step ofthe inaugural
walk in October 2000.
This past Saturday
dozens of area residents,
young and,old, many with
their eyes blindfolded,
learned what it was like to
live a day in the life of a
blind or visually impaired
person.


Santa Fe High School home(


N1h-r,1- .p' 31 W.,'ho "C.-unli 7rod
Oct. 18 is Homecoming Week at Santa Fe High School. Events include Raider
Rally on Thursday, Oct. 21 at 7 p.m. and the homecoming football game against
Baldwin at Raider Field on Friday, Oct. 22 at 7:30 p.m. The Santa Fe High School
2010 Homecoming Court includes (above) senior boys Tim Odom, Kyle Ward,
Shaquan Jone, Stephen Tapia-Ruano, and Robert Carney, and senior girls Lauren
Schmidt, Caroline Stinson, Shelby Campbell, Mandy Harrell, and Kylie Snead.
Underclassmen (below) represented on the Homecoming Court include Nate
Gentry, Ashanti Givens, Hunter Robertson, Jenna Gainey, Marcus Archer, and
Ashley Robinson.


E-mail editor@-
alachuatoday.com M
ALACHUA: Nearly $30 ilionin grants awarded to Mlhua companies in lat month
Continuedfrom page A I a
of right from located along U.S. Highway 441, biotechnology companies in Alachua. In 2007, the Sid Martin Biotechnology
.. across from Progress Corporate Park, Most recently, Banyan Biomarkers, Incubator was first runner-up in
Some to University of Florida Sid Inc. announced Tuesday that it had competition for National Business
Martin Biotechnology Incubator and been awarded S26 million by the Incubator Association's (NBIA)
n The latest news -dozens of biotech companies. Department of Defense to develop Incubator of the Year Technology
SwithinAlahua Dozens of Alachua companies a diagnostic test for traumatic brain Category. The Alachua incubator was
County have been catapulted to success in injury (TBI). It is estimated that up to edged out by Montpellier Business
recent years. The largest company 20 percent of combat veterans serving and Innovation Center in Montpellier,
GrapeMm*f r lddit in Progress Corporate Park, RTI in Iraq and Afghanistan have been France.
AW y vblp yR. ua fdobe Biologics, got' its beginnings as the afflicted with TBI as a result of bomb In addition to Alachua's thriving
wm DaonL Lotsa b6 University of Florida Tissue Bank blasts. biotechnology industry, the city
before becoming Regeneration Last month, Applied Genetic has also been home to three major
prop"ny a.ws duaow.Ataou b ,I b Technologies, Inc. The company Technologies. Corp. was awarded distribution centers run by Dollar
sa '"rm* '"""WI.& .. di -r later merged with Tutogen Medical. ,wih S2 million in grants to find General a,-aiart and Sysco Foods.
,- '-r.. another tenant in the park. and the two treatments "for emphysema and *Those ditribt$itn centers emp1Ty in
became RTI Biologics, a worldwide blindness resulting from genetics. excess of a thousand workers.
leader in sterile surgical implants. The Yahoo Finance article published # # #
In recent months, several million Sept. 17 is not the first time the E-mail editor@alachuatoday.com
dollars in grants have been awarded to spotlight has been shined on Alachua.










Top 10 List of SunState Advantages

#1 You belong At a bank, you are a customer. At SunState, you're a member, and you belong.

#2 SunState works for you As a SunState member your own part of the credit union. SunState employees work for
you. Their primary goal is to make sure all your needs are met.

#3 You pay lower interest on loans and earn higher dividends on deposits Banks consistently are among the most
profitable companies in the world. They are in business to make money for their shareholders. Whereas SunState is a not-
for-profit organization and any profits are returned to you in the form of lower fees, higher dividends, and improved service.

#4 People, not profits, are the No. 1 priority Members-not money-are SunState's most valuable asset. At the
credit union, you're much more than just an account number.

#5 Your money is protected at SunState Like bank deposits, money in SunState is insured for at least $250,000
per accounts Instead of the FDIC, which insures bank deposits, the coverage is provided by the National Credit Union
Administration, but both agencies are backed by the full faith and credit of the federal government.

#6 SunState can help you make better financial choices Whether it's buying a car or home, building an emergency
fund, or planning retirement, you can turn to SunState for the facts to make wisechoices. Part of SunState's philosophy is
ensuring that members understand financial options.

#7 SunState is for everyone, including the Little Guy SunState is for all people, Credit unions serve everyone-from
the elderly on small, fixed- incomes to single mothers to well-to-do families. At SunState everyone is welcome.

#8: Convenience SunState is located in your communities-including regions that other'financial institutions choose
notto serve. SunState offers many or all of the same services banks do, but SunState focuses their attention on individual
consumers.

#9 We listen to you SunState gives you the opportunity to make suggestions and vote for the board of directors. You
can even run for a position on the board of directors. No matter how large (or small) your account balance is, you have
one vote, which means it's not those who have the most money who are running the show.

#10 SunState is a part of your community Whether it's sponsoring local community events, or working to educate all
consumers about better ways to manage money, SunState strives to make a positive difference in our communities.


ALACHUAs eck

SCOUNTYSn
TY OUA!
-d ice






ALACHUA COUNTY TODAY CRIME STOPPERS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 07, 2010 B1









A P Business









Crime Stoppers MostA -


Sponsored byALACHUA COU NTY C gig STOPPERSP, P.1"I
I J, I:I&, LA:CHt VRA C|r~OUNvb/T bY, TODA


Did you know that more
than *800,000 teenagers are
registered ,o drive in Florida?
That number is frightening
when onht considers also that
vehicleicrashes are the number
one cause of death among
teenagers not only in Florida,
but nationwide.
In 2008, more than 32,000
teens were involved in traffic
accidents and 383 people lost
their lives in an accident where a
teen was an involved driver.


A message from the desk of


Sheriff Sadie Darnell

Teen Driver Challenge


Unfortunately, not all of our
Alachua County high schools
have a driver education program
to educate young drivers in the
safest possible environment.
That is where the Teen
Driver Challenge Program
comes in. This free program is a
partnership between the Alachua
County Sheriffs Office and the
Florida Sheriffs' Association.
Alachua County teens ages 15-
19 with a restricted or operators
license are taught by sheriff's
deputies on a closed course how


to navigate many of the common
dangerous situations that arise
while driving our roadways.
The class is held on Friday
evenings and then continues
all of the following Saturday.
The Friday portion is a 4-hour
classroom session. Saturday is
an.8-hour hands-on session and
teens will need to bring- their
automobile.
Students will practice
backing, figure 8s, evasive
maneuvers, threshold braking,
forward and reverse serpentines,


cornering, skid control and off-
road recovery.
Parents don't let their
yearbook picture be their last.
Sign your teen up for the Teen
Driver Challenge.
For more information
or to register, please visit
our website at http://www.
alachuasheriff.org/news_media/
announcements/teen driver/*
or call our Juvenile Relations
Bureau at 352-367-4099.


0 0: 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 S 0 6 0 S 0 0 0 0 S 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 S 0e 0 0


Make the Call,

Earn a Reward


U,


*%
*5a


4*


Call (352) 372-Stop


Jacob
Houghton
White Male,
11/30/83
W6",
200 Ibs
Brown Hair,
Blue Eyes

Currently
wanted for:
Burglary of a
Conveyance
and Grand
Theft


Eugene
King
Black Male,
12/29/61
5'11",
185 Ibs
Black Hair,
Brown Eyes

Currently,
wanted for:
Battery


Kendall
O'Brian
Spann
Black Male,
6'01",
12/19/1984
Black Hair,
Brown Eyes

Currently
wanted for:
Discharging
Firearm in
Public


Lawrence
Crawford
Black Male,
5'8",
10/14/1975
Black Hair,
Brown Eyes

Currently
wanted for:
DWLSR


Michael A.
Bragg
Black Male,,
8/6/90
5'7",
150 Ibs
Black Hair,
Brown Eyes

Currently
wanted for:
Burglary of a
Dwelling and
Petit Theft


Black Male,
5'7",
3/10/1982
Black Hair,
Brown Eyes

Currently
wanted for:
Felony Battery


Michael
Bakum
White Male,
5'10",
11/4/1988
Blonde Hair,
Hazel Eyes

Currently
wanted for:
Possess
Marijuana;
Possess Drug
Equipment


Kimberly
Howell
White
Female,
5'4",
4/1/1966
Brown Hair,
Blue Eyes

Currently
wanted for:
Cocaine
Possession


Dion
Levonne
Johnson
Black Male,
5'10",
12/7/1990
Black Hair,
Brown Eyes

Currently
wanted for:
Possession of
Cocaine, Sale
of Cocaine,
Tampering
with Evidence


Lyndon
Boykins
Black Male,
6'1",
8/30/1969
Black Hair,
Brown Eyes

Currently
wanted for:
Child Support


Lamicka L.
Gunn
Black
Female,
5'05",
5/7/1987
Black Hair,
Brown Eyes

Currently
wanted for:
Aggravated
Battery with a
Deadly
Weapon


Jarvis
Young
Black Male,
5'06",
8/8/1991
Black Hair,
Brown Eyes

Currently
wanted for:
Possess
Cocaine


Elronrico
Washington.r
Black Male,
12/30/68
6'0",
260 lbs
Brown Hair,
Brown Eyes *


Currently
wanted for:
Burglary with
Battery


Luis
Polanco
Hispanic
Male, 5'06",
6/27/1991
Black Hair,
Brown Eyes

Currently
wanted for:
Larceny


Mckenson
Subrun
Black Male,
5'11",
10/9/1982
Black Hair,
Brown Eyes


Currently
wanted fdr:
Disorderly
a Conduct


Michael
Piader
White Male,
6'00",
5/14/1979
Brown Hair,
Brown Eyes

Currently
wanted for:
Grand Theft


What should I do?
Review the pictures above. If you know the location of any of these wanted
individuals, please contact the Combined Communications Center at
352-955-1818 or remain anonymous by calling Crime Stoppers at 352-372-STOP.
Callers are eligible for a reward of up to $1,000.
DO NOT APPROACH OR ATTEMPT TO APPREHEND ANY OF THESE INDIVIDUALS.
IF NECESSARY, CALL 911.


AL ..... e ...e.l
ACTIEhT IME
OFPITN








B2 ALACHUA COUNTY TODAY RELIGION THURSDAY, OCTOBER 07, 2010



Our faith is one of words


If I told you earthly
things, and ye believe not,
how shall ye believe, if I
tellyou ofheavenly things?
What fitting words
from our Lord as we focus
on the complexity of
the doctrine of the Holy
Trinity. For Anglicans, the
Athanasian Creed affirms
the doctrine of the Holy
Trinity, arid that same
doctrine is preserved in the
First Article of Religion
found in the Anglicans'
Book of Common Prayer.
Undoubtly, it's essential
to our belief, and when we
confess that we believe in
One God in Three Persons,
we are moving into sacred
and mysterious ground.
There are those who
feel perfectly comfortable
confessing to a, set of
beliefs but never wrestle
with their implications.
They are known as
"confessionalists" because
their religion is fully
contained in subscribing to
the creed or confession.
While others, at
the other end of the
spectrum, prefer to reject


the importance of creeds
and confessions simply
because they're the words
of human authors, and
as such, fall short of the
essence of true religion that
they see as something that
can't be put into words-
something that touches
the heart and bypasses
the mind. A literal belief
in anything objective,
especially a Bible as the
Word of God is anathema to
them. John Shelby Spong
is among the supporters
of such thinking. In his'
book, "Rescuing the Bible
from Fundamentalism,"
he writes "a literal bible
presents me with far more
problems than assets.
It offers me a God I
cannot respect, much less
worship... I meet in the
literal understanding of
Scripture a God who is
simply not viable..."
An ancient question
posed by philosophers
and theologians is how
can these crude tools
of assembled letters be
vehicles communicating
truth? Obviously, the


THE VEN. JOHN E.
PLEASURE
A All Saints Anglican
Church, Gainesville.
A parish of the
Christian Episcopal
Church
integrity of Holy Scripture
and the usefulness of
Creeds and confessions
depend on the answer to
that question. Assume
that words are useful. and
necessary instruments in
our quest for understanding
truth, and take it on faith,
if necessary, that our
existence is intimately tied
to the expression of words
to ideas. Without these
instruments, our existence
has no meaning, and in
spite of their limitations,
words are the divinely


ordained vehicle for
communicating truth.
Long before His birth
in Bethlehem, Jesus
Christ was revealed in
the Words spoken to the
prophets. The absence
of a physical body didn't
mean that the Son of God
was unknowable before
the Incarnation, however,
the Divine Wisdom of the
Eternal Trinity determined
that the Son of God-the
same that St. John calls
the Word of God-would
be revealed in flesh. The
Word of God, which
came by the mouth of the
Prophets, would come
among men, Emmanuel
God with us! We have
Been permitted to see what
only angels in heaven once
were blessed to witness -
the glory of God. We have
the testimony of faithful
witnesses that the Son of
God walked among us, and


taught His Disciples what
we should know for our
eternal blessedness. He
left His Apostles specific
instructions that when we
gather together according
to His Word, and in the
breaking of bread, He is
with us. So, our Faith
is one of words one of
confessions and creeds
- an objective and true
revelation. Actually, it's
that and much more.
Christian Faith
transcends reason, but
it doesn't defy reason.
Jesus didn't confuse His
followers, He discipled
them. He taught them.
with simple illustrations,
with parables, with
examples that are taken
from everyday life. A
good example is the
exchange that took
place between Jesus and
Nicodemus, who admits
to intellectual defeat,


but Jesus reminds him
that truth is within grasp
and has not been hidder
from him, responding
to his desperation with
the comment "If I have
told you earthly thing.
and ye believe not, how
shall ye believe if I teli
you of heavenly things?'
Christians can apply these
words to the basic problem
of understanding the
Trinity.
The Trinity is
unquestionably a doctrine
that's above our reason,
but it's not unreasonable
The Son of God is revealed
in the Incarnation, One
who walked among us and
has left us His teaching
and the promise of the
Holy Spirit to guide us ir
understanding His Word.
# # #


WINGS PERFORMED sta $59

SProfessional minister/officiant,

any location, 24/7,

all types of ceremonies.

.. l Don't let these tough times keep you
from having your dream wedding!
'Many upgrades and catering
services available upon request.

Call. an ie352-317-7340 or 317-0846




RE YOUR-CHURCH EVENTS

Let everyone know about special activities

your church has on the horizon. Call

(386) 462-3355, fax (386) 462-4569 or email

to gail@AlachuaToday.com. All community

announcements are found on A3.


Si a Cornttp lacua Business
I- --- f~l>AC-i --elCi' ** ^^B ~l(J^


The Heartland Community Places of Worship


Alachua church of Christ
14505 NW 145th Avenue
Sunday Bible Classes 9:30 a.m.
Assembly at 10:30 a.m.
Evening Service 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Class 6:30 p.m.
Minister DougFrazier
(386) 462-3326



P.Fellowship
0 IChurch
Contemporary Praise & Worship
Sunday at 9:30 a.m. & 11 a.m.
16916 NWUS Hwy 441, High Springs
386-454-1700
www.FellowshipOnline.org


HIGH SPRINGS CHURCH
OF CHRIST
520 NE Santa Fe Boulevard
Bible Classes forAllAges 9:30 am.
Worship 10:30 a.m.
SEvening Worship 6 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Classes 7 p.m.
highspringscofc@alltel.net
Pastor Cori Lewis (386)454-2930

New St. Mary Missionary
Baptist Church
13800 NE 158th Avenue, Alachua 32616
Rev. Daniel H. McNish, Pastor
Phone & Fax (386) 462-7129
Services: Sunday School 9:30 am.
MomingWorship 11 am-lst, 2nd, 3rd Sunday
Quarterly 11 am. 4th Sun. Birthday Rally
Service; Tuesday Evening 7 p.m.
Prayer Meeting & Bible Study


al 1Saintt o nglitan Cturrb
AprishofdQerisianFpiscopdu0nch
Where worship is our central act
Where the apostolic tradition is
upheld
Where we kneel to pray
Where worshipful music
is the standard
Where traditional liturgy
is the norm
a a Where the Holy Scriptures
are proclaimed
Where a prayerful and quiet
atmosphere is provided
* Where traditional values are taught
* Where we seek to proclaim a risen
Savior in our daily life and work
Come Join Us
Bible Study 9:30 am. Church 10:30 am.
and other special services as announced.
12880NW39thAvenue
(352) 317-5757 wwwAllsaintsXnEC.org


First Baptist Church of Alachua
One block east of Main Street in Alachua
S386-462-1337
Sunday: Wednesday:
9:30 a.m. Sunday School 6:15 p.m. Youth (6th 12th grades)
S10:45 a.m. Worship 6:15 p.m. Choir rehearsal
4:30 p.m. Awana (2 yrs 5th grade)
5:15 p.m. Adult Bible Study www.fbcalachua.com
College Bible Study Doug Felton, Pastor

First United Methodist The Beatitudes
Church of Alachua October 10th
14805 NW 140th Street 462-2443 Blessed are Those Who
Pastor Dr. Adam Zele
Jeff Van Valey, Youth & Children's Minister are Persecuted
Traditional Worship, 8:45 & 11 am. October 17th
Contemporary Worship 6 p.m.
Sunday School 9:45a.m.Homecoming: Guest
www.alachuafirstunitedmethodist.org Speaker, Rich Layer


Service Times
Imp t Sunday 10:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m.
FAMILY C H U R C H Wednesday 7:30 p.m.
gsYouth Service Wed. 7:30 p.m.
ties
ptp l; ,tft1 of Senior Pastors: Edwin & Angela Anderson
"it st ,4" 386-454-1563
God' www.impactfamilychurch.com
16710 NW US 441 Between High Springs & Alachua

Services
.j' j Sunday: 10:30 a.m. & 6 p.m.
of0 JLIj Children's Church 10:30 a.m.
Assembly of God Tuesday: Youth Service 7 p.m.
Wednesday:
Located at 14200 NW 148th Place Adult & Children Bible Study 7 p.m.
Downtown Alachua Nursery provided for all services.
www.riveroflifeassembly.org Pastor Greg Evans 352-870-7288


New Oak Grove Baptist Church
Sunday School 10 a.m.,
Worship 11 am., Evening Service 6 p.m.
Wednesday Fellowship Meal 6 p.m.
Bible Study 7 p.m.
RAs, GAs & Students 7 p.m.
Nursery Provided
Terry Elixson, Jr., Pastor
386-462-3390 18100 NW 262 Avenue

St. Luke A.M.E. Church
Rev. Jessie L. Steele, Pastor
14950 Martin Luther King Blvd/Hwy 441
Alachua 32616
386.462.2732(church) 386.462.4396 (Fax)
Email: stlukeamechurch@windstream.nct
Morning Worship: 11 a.m.;
Church School 9:45 n.m.
Bible Study: 7 p.m. (2nd & 4th Wednesdays)
Thene: RUSH -P tAwUt, lilSo #thingHHxyn


Archer Church of God in Christ
Services:
Sunday School 9:15 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship 10:30 am.
5th Sunday Morning Worship 8:00 am.
Wednesday Bible Study 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Youth Ministry 6:30 p.m.
173 S W 128th Place, Archer, FL 32618
Marilyn V. Green, Pastor
352.495.9811

First Presbyterian
? Church ofAlachua.
Rev. Virginia McDaniel, Pastor
14623 NW 140 Street
(386) 462-1549
Sunday School 9 am., Worship
Service 10:30 am. Nursery provided.
www.firstpresalachiia.org

Foundation Chapel Church
of God by Faith
Sunday: Sunday School 10 p.m.; Mid-Day
Worship 11:30 am.; Children's Church 6
p.m.; Evening.Worship 6 p.m.; Tuesday:
YSB 7pnm. Wednesday: Outreach
Fellowship Dinner 6 p.m.; General Prayer
Service 7:30 p.m.
13220 NW 150th Avenue, Alachua
Pastor Willie J. McKnight, Sr. 462-2549

PASSAGE
family Church
"Rtaching people ivher thy are"

2020 NE 15 Street
Pastor eorge and Gainesville
Lady Michele Dix (352) 336-8686
Sunday Services:
8 a.m. "Flying High" Morning Worship
9:30 a.m.- Sunday School
11 a.m. Morning Glory Worship
& Children's Church
Wednesday Services:
12 noon Noon Day Prayer
7 p.m. Prayer & Bible Study
Youth Services:
7 p.m. Wednesday
7 p.m. Furth Fridays ,
www.passageministriesorg


Bethesda Outreach
Ministries of Alachua
Services:
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship 11 a.m.
2nd Sundays Street Ministry at Criswell Park 4 p.m.
SThursday Bible Study 7:30 p.m.
13205 NW 157 Avenue, Alachua, FL 32616
(Two streets behind Criswell Park)
352-339-4466
Elders Nyron and LaShandra Jenkins


egiond cAe B8ox
dtizatty 9a 6 tLit, 9nac
Elder Cynthia Taylor, Pastor
has moved to a new location
530 N. Main Street, High Springs, FL
(behind Hardees)
Bible Study Wed. 7 p.m
Sunday Pastoral Teaching 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship Ila.m.
Church: (386) 454-2367
Cell: (386) 878-9568








Ai.Am IuA CoI'NirY Tl)AY CLASSIFIED TITURSDAY, OCTOBER 07, 2010 B3


llacbua Count ,Pobap



Classifieids


BY PHONE
Call (386) 462-3355
Hours to place, correct or cancel ads:
Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
BY E-MAIL
accounting@alachuatoday.com


BY MAIL
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
Alachua County Today
P.O. Box 2135, Alachua, FL 32616
BY FAX
(386) 462-4569


a .


~~~~~~. I I~ $-,SiOB1lsPsc ~ pqq 7YYWYpr~ p rsasPY sa ~- ~, .L~f


CITY OF HAWTHORNE,
FLORIDA
NOTICE OF PUBLIC
HEARING

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the following Item(s) will
be heard at a meeting held
by the City Commission
of the City of Hawthorne,
Florida, at a public hearing
on October 19. 2010 at 6:30
p.m., or as soon thereafter
as the matter can be heard,
in the Commission Meeting
Room, City Hall located at
6700 Southeast 221st Street,
Hawthorne, Florida.

AN ORDINANCE OF THE
CITY OF HAWTHORNE,
ALACHUA COUNTY
FLORIDA, AMENDING
PART II, CHAPTER 22,
ARTICLE II OF THE CITY
CODE OF ORDINANCES
BY CLARIFYING
THE DUTIES AND
RESPONSIBILITIES OF
EACH PROPERTY OWNER
TO .MAINTAIN THEIR
PROPERfY; INCLUDING
PORTIONS OF RIGHT-
OF-WAYS; PROVIDING
FOR SEVERABILITY;
PROVIDING FOR REPEAL
OF CONFLICTING
ORDINANCES; PROVIDING
FOR CODIFICATION; AND
PROVIDING FOR AN
EFFECTIVE DATE.

On the date, time and place
'first above mentioned, all
interested persons may
appear and be heard with
respect to the proposed
actions.. This/ These
ordinance(s) may be
inspected by the public
prior to the hearing at City
Hall located at the address
above.
(Published: Alachua
County Today -
October 07, 2010)


City of Alachua
Surplus Property Sale

The City of Alachua will be
accepting sealed bids on six
(6) surplus vehicles. Three
(3) of these vehicles are
police pursuit Ford Crown
Vics, '99, '01 & '02; one (1)
'91 GMC pick up truck; one
(1)'92 GMC Jimmy; and one
(1) '89 Chevy S10 Blazer.
All vehicles are in running
condition and will be sold "as
is" to the highest bidder on
an individual item basis with
no warranty expressed or
implied. There are also two
(2) equipment trailers with
no titles that will be sold as
scrap/salvage.

On-site inspection of
vehicles will be on 13 Oct
2010 from 8:00 AM until
4:30 PM behind the Alachua
Police Department. The
trailers are located near the
electric substation at the end
of Cellon Creek Blvd off US
441. Bid sheets will be made
available during this time.

All sealed bids must be
received in City Hall by 5:00
PM on 14 Oct 2010. Bids
should be addressed to
Frank Sodek, Administrative.
Services Director.
Successful bidders will be
notified on Monday, 18 June
2010. Payment will be by
either certified check or
money order made payable
to the City of Alachua.
(Published: Alachua
County Today -
October 07, 2010)
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE:
NORTHWOOD TOWING
& REPAIR gives Notice of
Foreclosure of Lien and
intent to sell these vehicles
on 10/20/2010, 11:00
am at 1540 NW 53 AVE
GAINESVILLE, FL 32653,
pursuant to subsection
713.78 of the Florida Statutes.
NORTHWOOD TOWING &
REPAIR reserves the right
to accept or reject any and/
or all bids.


1FMZU63P21UB23229
2001 FORD

1G2NW12E6YM817727
2000 PONTIAC

1G3NL52TXXC351377
1999 OLDSMOBILE

1HGEJ8147VL137687
1997 HONDA

2MEBP95FOGX633758
1986 MERCURY

(Published: Alachua
County Today -
October 7, 2010)








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US Hwy 441, Alachua.
Georgia Peaches,
Cucumbers, Florida
Broccoli & Cauliflower,
Acre Peas, Butter Beans &
Fordhooks, Bell Peppers,
Organic Glueberries,
Shelled Pecans, Local
Yellow Squash & Zucchini,


Cabbage, Local Honey,
Brown Eggs, Foothills Butter,
Fresh Local Silver Queen
Corn, Amish Jellies and
Jams, N. Carolina Apples
& Apple Cider. CANNING
QUANTITIES AVAILABLE.
Call 386-462-6158.







CITY OF HIGH SPRINGS

POLICE OFFICER (2)
POSITIONS Applicants.
must have a Law Enforcement
Certificate issued by the
Florida Department of
Law Enforcement Criminal
Justice Standards & Training
Commission. Successful
applicants must undergo
pre-employment physical,
psychological testing,
substance testing, and
background investigation
prior to final approval. All
applications subject to
Florida Public Records Laws.
Apply at High Springs City
Hall, 110 NW 1st Avenue,
8:00 am 4:30 pm, Monday
through Friday. Applications
accepted through Friday,
October 15, 2010.

THE CITY OF HIGH
SPRINGS IS AN
EQUAL EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY
EMPLOYER
(Published: Alachua
County September 30
and October 7,2010)


Resdenia Autos


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Properties Including
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plus Multi-Famlly A Commercial
Piopertles
Located In: Blairsvllle, s
Blue Ridge, JI
Clayton, Dawsonvlle, "Y
Hlawasee, Helen,
& Morganton, GA


1:00 PM1
Sa t Ra is
Atlana 'vrlHo


TRAVEL, WORK, PARTY,
PLAYI Now hiring 18-24 guys/
gals to travel w/fun young
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2wks PAID Training! Hotel/
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Return guaranteed. Call
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Part time cleaner/floor tech
needed for commerical


office building on US 441.
Must have floor experience,
ability to lift over 40 Ibs and
pass background check.
$7.50/hour. Call Pat at 352-
870-0363.
Drivers FOOD TANKER
DRIVERS NEEDED OTR
CLASSIFIED
Continued on page B4


BUYING!!
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BUYING!!
COIN DIAMONDS
ESTATE JEWELRY PAPER MONEY
GOLD SILVER PLATINUM
STERLING FLATWARE

COIN & JEWELRY GALLERY
(Formerly National Coin Investors)
IN THE MILLHOPPER SHOPPING CENTER
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1-800-330-1555 OR 352-378-3983




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you get for $72?

More than you think.
BlueOptions lower-cost health insurance policies for
Individuals Under 65. It's the same high-quality
coverage you expect at a lower price you can afford.
Call 352-373-0775 to learn more
about this affordable coverage.
Chip Williams & Associates, Inc.
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Gainesville, FL 32607
A Contracted General Agency for
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of Florida


Al Soellno:
Homes In
the Metro
Atlanta Area


1 i Business












1 8 465x 6)62-5


* Cuts






* Color






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.. S


B4 AI.A('I IIA COUNTrY TOO)AY CLASSIFIES TiuitSDAY, OcT'oBmiu 07, 2010


CLASSIFIED:
Continued from page B3
positions available NOWI
CDL-A w/ Tanker REQ'D.
Outstanding pay & Benefitsl
Call a recruiter TODAYI
(877)484-3042 www.
oaklevtransport.com
ATTN: DRIVERS Top 5%
Pdyl Excellent Benefits
Latest Technology. Need
CDL-A & 3 mos recent
OTR. (877)258-8782 www.
meltontruck.com
Colonial Life seeks
entrepreneurial
professional with sales
experience to become
a District Manager. Life/
Health license is required.
Substantial earnings
potential. Please contact
meredith.brewer(c
coloniallife.com or call
(904)424-5697
Cash paid for junk cars.
$150 and up. Running or
not. Free pick up. 352-7711-
6191.
Drivers-CDLIA $2,000
SIGN-ON BONUS! Start
up to .42 CPM. Good Home


Time and Benefits. OTR
Experience Required. No
Felonies. Lease Purchase
Available. (800)441-4271 x
FL-100









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Screening, Background
Checks. Easy, Inexpensive,
Needed Business Service.
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Handy man special. '95
3BR/2BA DWMH on one
acre oak shaded homesite.
Gilchrist County. Owner
financing, no down


SunState Federal Credit Union

& Alachua County Today



Partners in Education


SunState Federal Credit Union and Alachua
County Today are partnering to bring you "Young
Patriots." The purpose of this campaign is to get young
people reading. Alachua County Today will publish
an 8-chapter serialized short story, "Young Patriots"
as part of our Newspapers in Education program. The
newspapers will be sent home with the students after
the project for the week is completed so that parents can
share the stories with their children.


SKay Hliv


Sloshing his way through the cemetery, Ben made it to the old
church. The dry boards on the little porch felt good. and the
roof kept away the rain.
As Ben wiped water off his face, he was suddenly yanked off
his feet, dragged through a doorway, and dumped on the floor.
In the glow of a small candle he saw two figures. Blinking his
eyes, Ben saw Will and Davey. Will put a finger to his lips.
Whispering, Davey said they didn't want anyone to know
the spy catchers were meeting.
Soon the three boys were seated on the floor. Water from Ben's
clothes dripped into little puddles all around him. Will set the
candle on the floor among them. Then he took a piece of
paper out of his pocket
Leaning over so the candlelight could fall on the paper, Will
read the paper. All it said was "G. Washington in New York.
Harbor clean"
The paper was signed "S. M."
Ben could see the words, but he could not read them. What
did they mean, Ben wondered. They sounded like a spy message.
Davey said it meant the British were going to attack George
Washington in New York. He had heard that the British had
a big, strong navy.
Will said he thought the message meant that the British would
attack Philadelphia because there was no militia to defend the city.
The army was with General Washington in New York. Everyone
knew that.
When Ben heard General Washington's name, his mind snapped
to attention. He had met Mr. Washington many times when
the great man had been a delegate at the State House meetings.
Mr Washington had kept his horse and saddle at Grandfather's
livery stable.


classroom Extensions
Things to Think About and Do -
A. How do you think the boys got into the church at night?
What do you think the note means?
B. What do you know about General George Washington?
Read about him and then make a list of ten things about
him. What was his wife's name?


Ben Collins and his two friends are America's
first "Young Patriots." Self-appointed spy catchers,
they help America fight for independence. At his
grandfather's livery stable in Philadelphia in 1776, Ben
meets delegates to the Continental Convention. From
them, he learns the value of education and is button-
busting proud when John Adams calls Ben and his
friends "Young Patriots."


rely
Ben remembered that Mr. Washington was a big
man, but he had a kind face and was always
friendly. Ben was happy that Mr. Washington
was made general of the continental army. He
knew General Washington would defeat the
British. When that happened, everyone in the
colonies would befree of the British king.
As he listened to his friends talk, Ben was glad
he had come to the old church. Maybe as a spy
catcher he would be able to help his friend,
General Washington. Ben's thoughts about the
general were interrupted by WilL Folding the
note and putting it back in his pocket, Will said
they needed to find out who had written it.
Ben asked Will where he got the note. Will said he often came
to the church with his father, who was pastor of the church. Two
days ago, white he was playing in the churchyard, Wil found the
note under a bush. It looked like it had blown there from out of
the street.
After they talked it over, the three boys decided on their first spy
catcher assignment. They needed to find the spy whose initials
were "S. M."
Ben knew that was a big job. But if the spy catchers could find
him, they might save General Washington and his army.
They might even save the whole city of Philadelphia.


SAuthor Kay Ilively and Illustrator Billie GofourthStewart are
both ofNeosho, Missouri. Produced in partnership with this
ndoamna nor nA n ,th Aeiccm.o Prce Tm,,ndatlnn it4th nnnrtrf


i neiwziapr n UMe IV IIWU rTei PUi TIUdlU' rl Wi fI wyfrL n
from Verizon Foundation. Copyright 2002.




FEDERAL CREDIT UNION cbua Ct up Ip
Your one trusted financial partner snV aCoun> er ri nafc..r
A message from the sponsor: Parents interested in with and include games, puzzles, and more. SunState
teaching their kids about finances will find an array of Federal Credit Union strongly supports literacy both in
financial literacy resources available at www.sunstatefcu. the classroom and at home, and we encourage parents to
org. SunState Federal Credit Union has financial start teaching their children early about the importance
literacy modules and more for children of all ages and Qf financial responsibility.
adults too. Many of the tools for children are fun to work


payment. $49,900. $513/
mo. 352-215-1018 www.
LandOwnerFinancing .com.



5 AC Alachua
Beautifully wooded on paved
road frontage. Great area
Convenient to Gainesville.
Dev Potential! Only $877/
mo. $99,900 Total 352-215-
1018.
BUY N.C. MOUNTAIN
LAND NOWI Lowest prices
ever! Bryson City 2.5acres,
spectacular views, paved
road. High altitude. Easily
accessible, secluded.


$45,000. Owner financing:
(800)810-1590 www.
wildcatknob.
BANK ORDERED
AUCTIONS: Oct. 21 294.
16+/-ac. Camden Co., GA
Oct. 22 48 ac. & 94 ac.
Morgan & Meriwether Co.,
GA 10% BP GAL AU-
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com
1 AC GILCHRIST
COUNTY
Paved road frontage on
CR 138. Cleared homesite.
High and Dry! OWNER
FINANCING NO DOWN
CLASSIFIED
Continued on page B6


REA ESAT AUCIN


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 27TH 2 PM
OVER 12,000 SQCFT. ESTATE HOME 2 LOTS
ADJOINING GOLF COURSE LINVILLE RIDGE, NC
SELLING AT OR ABOVE A MINIMUM BID OF $1,990,000
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JOHN C. PRACHT, IV
AUCTIONEER, NCAL #2786
In ConjunHon with
Rowell Realty & Auction Co, Inc, NCAL #8935
NATIONWIDE: 800-877-3044 AUCTIONS


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Answers for SUPER CROSSWORD on B6

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NV NV V31 NV I I -I AAIN
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WE'lL BEAT ANY LOCALCOMPETITOR'S PRICE* *
A* *Must present written quote." Alachua Business Center will beat sign quotes r rlw 3
U aU ua u ness of0like materials and quantities.
a a14804 MAIN STREET, ALACHUA (386)462-3355


Young

chapter Five- b


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STDD# 1-800-955-8771
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This institution is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer"


I


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AI.,ou(' C ouNT"'Y TODAY BUSINESS & SERVICES DIRECTORY THURSDlAY, Oc'i()ol~( 07, 20()1 B5


Business & Services Director
r / \--


MKM Electrical Services, Inc.
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RERINTING & COPYING SERVICES

S. Alachua
Printing

15281E NW US Hwy 441 Alachua
386-462-5997
*Stopby or ourfre poketcop
ofth US.Costtuio


'GGREATSTEAKS




On Main Street
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Beautiful Alachua (386) 462-1294
SENIOR SERVICES




Making Life EasierTM
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'Companionship 'Light Housekeeping 'Laundry 'Meal Preparation
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OCTOBER 7 T -10TH, Z010
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BOUTIQUE


irssy 1^s
UDique Items & Gqifts MonognOmg Awilable
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18g56 .X Mgin Street, Alrcht u
CLEANING AND LAWN CARE

l Cean 67
RESIDENTIAL &
COMMERCIAL RI
Pressure Wash/Painting
Mobile Car Detail
Free Estimates Low Rates
Se Habla Espanol
Licensed and Insured
352-225-3798 Cell: 352-225-1094
GOOD THINGS TO EAT
C & R PRODUCE
13789 NW U.S. Hwy. 441 Alachua, FL 32615


MATH TUTORING SERVICES


.Over 25 years experience, one-on-one & classroom setting
.Taught in Santa Fe College, high schools and in countries
such as Bolivia, Colombia & Dominican Republic
.Teach the whole gamut from pre-algebra to AP Calculus AB
.Average grade of high school students I taught was 90.



PRINTING & COPYING SERVICES
c High Springs
-- Copy Center
Lower your printing costs, not your expectations
We guarantee we will beat any
printing store's written quotes
by 20% or more
(386) 454-0001


RESTAURANTS



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7162i N. University Dr. Tamarac, FL 33321


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11.-1- -1 --







B6 ALACUA COUNTY TolUDA CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, OCTOeR 07, 2010
i - i i N


CLASSIFIED:
ComtinuedJfiwm page B4
PAYMENTI Only $256/mo.
Total $24,900 Call 352-
215-1018.








Enjoy country living. Ten
minutes to Gainesville.
Fenced, 3BR/1.5BA,
SWMH, 30x40 carport.
Very nice, must see. $725/
month. By appointment
only 352-485-1445 or cell
352-494-3199.




Alachua Villas Apartments
2 Bedroom Apt.
Starting at $494/mo.
Available NOW!
Call 386-462-5832
TDD# 1-800-955-8771
"This institution Ls an Equal
Opportunity Provider and
SEmployer."
High Springs great
apartment in private setting
close to tow, on river and
state park. Excellent
kayaking and bicycling.
$500/month 352-318-4602
leave message.







St. Madeleine Catholic
Church will hold its annual


8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Over 70
vendors are expected to be
selling their wares and local
residents are encouraged
to take advantage of, the
flea market to get rid of
unwanted items. Breakfast
and lunch will be served by
the Knights of Columbus and
Lillly's Country store and the
garden, book and toy shops
will all be open. The flea
market will be held on the
church grounds located at
17155 NW Hwy, 441 in High
Springs. Call the church
office at 386-454-2358 for
more information.
LaCrosse Baptist Church
is holding their annual Yard
Sale on Friday and Saturday,
October 15&16. All proceeds
of the sale will benefit the
Building Fund. Yard Sale will
start at 8:00 am until 3:00 pm
with a wide variety of items,
including children's clothes
and toys, appliances, etc.
Hamburgers and Hot Dogs
will be available for purchase
also. The sale will be held at
the Church off SR121 in
downtown LaCrosse (follow
the signs).
YARD SALE-Saturday,
Oct.9th 8am-12pm @
Fellowship Church
16916 NW US HWY 441
between High Springs and
Alachua.
A rummage sale to raise
money for the Archer Youth
Athelic Scholarships will
be held on Saturday. Oct.
2nd and Oct. 9th from 7
a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Old
Fire Station on the cormer
of State Road 45 (US27)
and 137th Ave. in Archer.
Donations are needed and
appreciated. Please call
Sara Brannon at 352-514-


8431 to arrange delivery or
pick up of donations.



AIRLINES ARE HIRING -
Train for high paying Aviation
Maintenance Career. FAA
approved program. Financial
aid if qualified Housing
available. CALL Aviation
Institute of Maintenance
(866)314-3769.



Cash paid for junk cars.
$150 and up. Running or
not. Free pick up. 352-
771-6191.



BANKRUPTCY AUCTION.
Powder Horn Estates, (25)
Tracts, 3-11 Acres. Sat.,
Nov.6th, 11am. Gated
Community. Clubhouse,
pool, tennis, (3)lakes. Near
Boone, Blowing Rock,
NC. (800)442-7906 www.
RogersAuctionGrouo.com
NCAL#685








PUBLIC AUCTION 150+
Travel Trailers & 'Camp
Houses Online Bidding
Avail. NO MINIMUM PRICE
Saturday, October 9th 10am
Philadelphia, MS www.
hendersonauctions.com
(225)686-2252 Lic#266
Firm Lic#462F


Take a WALK on the



WILDflower side with us!


Special to
Alachua County Today
GAINESVILLE The
Jean Domey Memorial
Wildflower Walks begin
Saturday, Oct. 9, at
Morningside Nature
Center. The walks will take
place every Saturday in
October and start at 9 a.m.
The walks are guided.
by a Morningside Nature
Center staff member.
During the walk,
participants will enjoy the
spectacular fall wildflower
bl6om at the park. Each
week, the walks will
be different in focus,
participants are asked to
please call the office if
they would like to find
out the theme for the dates
they wish to attend.
Meet at the Education


Office and


wear


Win Prizes
for reading the newspaper

wo winners every we


Cm


I I.-


flea market on Nov. 6 from I

Division of Forestry outdoor burning tips Super
Special to occupied buildings LABOR-INTENS
Alachua County Today Burn only yard waste, no household ,


In recognition of Fire Prevention
S Week (Oct. 3-9) the Division of Forestry
recommends that residents abide by
outdoor burning regulations and use
recommended outdoor burning tips. As
fall approaches, it will bring with it cooler
and drier weather conditions. This will be
followed by the hard freezes of winter that
kill grasses and other light vegetation that
' contributes to the spread of fire.

Check with your local fire department
and the Division of Forestry office to
make sure it is legal to burn in your area
Burners must comply with county/
city as well as Division of Forestry fire
ordinances
*Make sure you .meet the required
setbacks: 25 ft. from your house and
forested areas, 50 ft. from a public
paved road and 150 ft. from other


garbage (includes paper products and*
newspapers)
Don't burn on windy days
Never leave a fire unattended
Keep a water hose or shovel handy in
case your fire escapes
Make sure your smoke does not
obstruct visibility on nearby roads
-Be sure your fire is completely .out
before you leave
Use solid waste pick up in the city
1 limits
Visit our website www.fl-dof.com
or call 352-955-2010 for more
information.

Remember...If your fire escapes, you
* may be liable for costs of suppression and
damage to the property of others.
# # #


106 1e
114 115
121 122
125 1

ACROSS
1 Tumult
7 Singer Dottie
11 Ignominy
16 Hydrotherapy site
19 Disquiet
20 "Nabucco"
number
21 Bile producer
22 Son of Noah
23'79 Judy Davis
film
26 Literary collection
27 Bit of butter
28 Lummox
29 Forestall
30 Surprise test
31 Funnyman Foxx
33 Feta marinade
36 Lght weight
37 Telescope view,
40 Donahue of "Get
a Life"
41 Besch or
Andersson
43 Came around
44'31 Marx Brothers
movie
49 Toody and
Muldoon
52 Monte Rosa, e.g.
53 Machu Picchu
native
54 Vivacity
55 "My Sweet _"
('7Q smash)
56 With enthusiasm
59 "The Subject Was
Roses" star
60 Norwegian
composer
62 Bridge term
63 Conductor's
concem
64 Mini, to
MacTavish
67 Kirk's command
72 Itch
73 Explorer


Sebastian
75 Elwes o
76 Dodge
78 Spirited
79 Attempt
82 Obstac
83 Salt ser
87 Mediter
port
88 Skater I
89 Sciorra
Fever"
91 "Double
_" ("Mac
refrain)
97 Heaver
98 "Dies
99 Jim Va
character
100 Had a k
101 Clear th
104 Dutch e
105 Take-ou
106 Pull she
107 Valhalla
110 Calende
111 Wie
114 Goal
115 Peter G
series
121 Middlin(
122 Comic
123 Hodgep
124 Verdi hi
125 Hamilto
126 Effluvia
127 Wordin(
128 Basket

DOWN
1 Phreno
2 "Orinoc
singer
3 Liability
4 House
5 "A Fool
('59 hit)
6 Tune
7 Street u


comfortable walking
shoes. It is also suggested
to bring ary guide that may
be of use along the walk.
Wildflower walks
at Morningside Nature
Center, 3540 E. University
Ave., are offered free to the
public courtesy of a grant
from the Friends of Nature
Parks in honor of charter
member Jean Domey.
Jean, a Texas native,
moved her family to
Gainesville in 1972. She
quickly became involved
with the Alachua Audubon
Society and was a founding
member of Friends of
Nature Parks (formerly


Friends of Morningside).
Through the years, Jean
was an active advocate of
adult education programs
at the nature parks and
participated in many
wildflower walks and
natural history classes.
SFor more information
about attending the
walks and exploring the
natural parks as Jean
loved to do, visit www.
natureoperations.org or
call 352-334-3326. Take a
WALK on the WILDflower
side with ust
# # #


1.5 Acre Parcel Available
kIhr MGm *,LC 0 POBa. 990 ALe F 6 32616
Jim Shlr 352665.8570 or Phil Hwley 352.32.260


Crossword

IVE Answers to SUPER CROSSWORD on B4































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I steed 11 Bondage brother14 15














Ie 13 Maintain 74 Cleopatra's
16 Rocker Cassidy Gertrude
46,


s 55














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ney businst isian Calaseak's
33 Fair 90 Cook in a
10 Make lace 70 A Karamazov
Steed 11 Bondage brother
t12 Take on board 71 0s a long story
ie slate 3 35 Cephalopod's 92 Exist















1rply 37 Rubbemeck 95 Burmese
ing 8 14 y Competition Needle, fmanroe
















arabbr. 39 "Damn Yankees" 96 You can retire

40 Material e 100 More nervous
ranean 15 Drop a brick u 77 Swimmerb
16 Rocker Cassidy Gertrude
Babilonia 17 Lose control 79 Empedocles'last
ofJungle 18 Sptun 10stand?
24 Housman's "A 8 Lose luster
, double Shropshire 81 Robust rai
beth" 25 Lake sight 82 Taco toping
S 30Malaria treatment 84 Landed
nly hunter 31 Leaves work? 85 Gin flavoring
m32 Small 86 Round of
mey businessman? applause
33 Fair 90 Cook in a
nightjob? 34uTinTin cauldron
6e slate 35 Cephalopod's 192 Exist
export squirt I93 Gets back
ut order? 36 Kimono closer 94 Maine town
arplyS 37 Rubbereck 195 Burmese
VIP 38 Way off base? statesman
ar abbr. 39 "Damn Yankees" 96 You can retire
dersehen" siren t r on it
40 Materialize '100 More nervous
braves 41 Vatican document 101 Tape-deck button
42 Culp/Cosby series 102 Actress Atoree
g mark 45 Spoiled 103 "As You .keit
Sherman 46 Foe setting
podge .47 Word form for 105 Couple
ero "view" 107 Unrestrained
)n bill 48 Upscale shop 108'52 Winter
50 '_ Coming" ('69 Olympics site
g song) 109 Tyrant
material 51 Berg and 110 Detect
Drabowsky 111 Blindas
56 Put on guard 112 Radius' sidekick?
logy term 57 Be different 113 Sinn
o Flow" 58 Rapscallion 115 Hua's
61 Furrow predecessor,
62 Firmament feature 116 "1 kid you
hold deity 63 Rocker Nugent .117 'du Diable
Such 64 Barely there 118 Combine
65 "Tosca" tenor 119 Mexican Mrs.
66 Problem solvers? 120 Part of UPI
urchin 68 Sgt, or cpl.


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