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Alachua County Today. March 15, 2007.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00081789/00214
 Material Information
Title: Alachua County Today. March 15, 2007.
Uniform Title: Alachua County Today
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Alachua County Today
Publisher: Alachua Today, Inc.
Publication Date: 09/23/2010
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Alachua
Coordinates: 29.779286 x -82.479849 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: issn - 1534-7567
System ID: UF00081789:00214

Full Text





Art Festival at Thornebro\:


Jijrn


'


Serving all the Communities ofAlachua County


4 ,*" ) ( -The Heartland's only five star small-town newspaper


By BRYAN BOUKARI
Today Reporter
NEWBERRY A drug deal that
went terribly wrong last Wednesday
night in Newberry was added to what
seems to be a rash of violent crimes in
the area.
James "Peanut" Moment, III,
remains behind bars after he either shot
or struck a 21-year-old man who was


This newspaper named 2007 Business of the Year Alachua Chamber of Commerce 250


Gun stolen, drug deal turns sour


Tonight:
Sept. 23 at 7 p.m.

Alachua

Lions Club

hosts

presentation

on water

resources


k!i*1# Q! Y~


GLENN COINEIAlachua County Today
Pepe Peruyero trains one of his yellow labs at J & K Canine Academy where the family-run
business specializes in training sophisticated scent detection dogs and behavioral training for
family pets.


-Local hopes to
impact community
with canines
By AVANTI JOHNSON
Today Reporter

HIGH SPRINGS The
ability of man's best friend
to detect a bed bug, termites
or even cancer can seen far-
fetched, but for Pepe Peruyero
and his staff at J & K Canine
Academy in High Springs, it is


a part of the job:.
Located just off U.S.
Highway 441 and Barney Road,
the canine academy has become
a global brand, training dogs for
local families, law enforcement
agencies and research projects.
After spending 19 years
in law enforcement, five of
which he was a canine handler,
Peruyero. began his business
with just two kennels, but after
being approached by Alachua
Pest Control, the company was
catapulted into success.
"We were asked if we could


train a dog to detect termites,"
Peruyero explained.
After tests at the University
of Florida and a research
project, Peruyero proved to be
successful in developing dogs'
skills for use with entomology.
Now, there are about 100 dogs
worldwide, from Canada to
London to Tokyo, that have
been trained using the methods
developed by J & K Canine
Academy and UF.
The academy has two
J&K:
Continued on page A9


500 NW 253rd St. at about 8 p.m. last
Wednesday when the incident occurred.
Moment and an unidentified person
reportedly approached Carman's
automobile, at which point Moment
reached through the passenger window
and grabbed a semi-automatic handgun
belonging to Carman.
NEWBERRY:
Continued on page A 7


Moment


Drumm



says budget



forced



him to fire



employee

By GLENN COINE
Today Reporter
HIGH SPRINGS Rumors and
concerns that High Springs City Manager
Jiml Drumlm acted without commission
approval and possibly violated the city's
charter were quelled after a series of
e-mails apparently clarified his actions.
Commissioner John Hill initially took
issue with' Drumm's decision to inform
an employee 'Friday. that his position
was being eliminated and he would be
losing his job. Drumm, meanwhile, says
he acted according to a tentative budget
which takes effect Oct. 1 and restructures
two departments, ultimately reducing
three positions into just two.
The commission couldn't avoid
cutting employment
After weeks of agonizing over how to
balance the budget without cutting jobs,
city commissioners eventually hit a dead
end, realizing that some positions would
have to be sacrificed. But as Mayor Bill
FIRING:
Continued on page A6


apparently attempting to buy drugs,
an Alachua County Sheriff's Office
(ACSO) report states.
Moment, 21, of Newberry, is being
held on a $115,000 bond due to a
probation violation and four separate
felonies related to last week's incident.
According to the ACSO report,
Kyle W. Carman, 21, of Newberry
was attempting to buy narcotics near


By GLENN CONE
TodStill going strong at 96 neay Reporter


STAFF REPORT
Alachua County Today
ALACHUA Johanna
Jackson recently celebrated
her 96th birthday in the
company of her friends at
the Hathcock Community
Center in Alachua.
Jackson enjoys
participating in- the
engaging activities at the
community center, where
she was also thrown a
birthday bash Tuesday,
Sept. 14, including her
favorite treat, layered jelly
cake.
The 96-year-old
Alachua resident was
born just down the road
in the Hainesworth area,


Photo special to Alachua County Today
Johanna Jackson, 96, blows out the candles on her
birthday cake at the Cleather Hathcock Community
Center in Alachua.


near LaCrosse, in 1914.
Since that time, much has
changed, especially in
Alachua, which had only


been incorporated a decade
before her birth. Jackson
JACKSON:
Continued on page A 7


HIGH SPRINGS -
Heavy-footed drivers,
beware.
There's soon to be a
new crime fighter patrolling
the roads in High Springs.
The city police department
won the new Kustom Pro
Laser III in a recent drawing
sponsored by the Florida
Public Safety Institute.
Police Chief Jim Troiano
explained that he and
other High Springs Police
Department (HSPD) o Ticers
attend regular meetings
with the organization, and
it often conducts dre rings,
awarding different prizes to
winning law enforcement
agencies. He said the


noto special to Alachua LCouny Joaay
High Springs Police Chief James Troiano (eight) shows.
off the department's new laser speed gun.
Waldo Police Department monitor speeds of moving
won some money in one vehicles, much like a
of the drawings a couple of RADAR gun.' Troiano said
months ago. the city already has one
The laser, valued at HSPD:
about $1,500, is'used to Continued on page A9


Index
inside
on A2
2010 Alachua
Today, Incorporated

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SHIP YOU. PACKAGES WITH

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ML21BG 1n








A2 ALACIIUA COUNTY TODAY LOCAL NEWS TIJURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2010




Alahua 'Countyy jail booking log


Alachua County Today (ISSN
1534-7567) is published week-
ly by Alachua Today, Inc.,
14804 Main Street, Alachua,
FL 32615. All material herein
is the property of Alachua
County Today. Reproduction
in whole or in part is forbidden
without the written permission
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Postage Paid at Alachua, FL
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POSTMASTER:
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Annual subscription rate is
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HOW TO SUBMIT...
*LETTERS TO THE EDI-
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Letters, comments and opin-
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Alachua County Today.


INSIDE

ALACHUA

COUNTY

TODAY...


CLASSIFIEDS. .B3
EVENTS....... A3
JOBS ...........3
MOST WANTED B1
OPINIONS..... A8
PUZZLE........B6
RELIGION......B2


Information appearing
in this listing comes
from the Alachua County
Sheriff's Office daily jail
log as provided to Alachua
County Today.
All individuals are
presumed innocent until
proven guilty. Individuals
listed on this page may be
cited and released or placed
under custodial arrest.
Information provided
is believed to be accurate,
however not guaranteed.
Most abbreviations have
been left as provided to
maintain the accuracy of
the log.

Last name, First name,
DOB, Charges, Agency


Booking:
2010


Sept. 16,


Adams, Clem,
11/14/1967, Possess left
20g, trespass prop, GPD
Addison, Lori,
11/16/1961, Harassing
felony, 1st lift capital
proceeding, ASO
Ainsworth, Michael,
11/17/1991, Agg battery,
person uses deadly
weapon/ agg battery
offender knew to be
preg, ASO
Brown, Herman Lee,
11/3/1984, FTA- battery
2nd off, ASO
Chisom, Alvin,
7/19/1958, Resist officer
w/o violence, GPD
Clarke, Richard,
8/19/1985, VOP, ASO
Doyle, James,
5/7/1964, Alcohol bev -
sell give to person under
21, GPD
Gibbons, Rolonzo,
3/10/1990, Trespass
after warning, GPD
Houdek, Davis V.,
9/25/1975, DUI, GPD
Ickes, Anthony,
8/17/1981, FVOP, ASO
Jabali, Tajiri Ayana,
2/21/1993, Veh theft
(x2), robbery w/firearm,
ASO
Jackson, Lorenze,
2/3/1981, Habitual
DWLSR, GPD
Jones, Tameka,
12/17/1980, Fraud
misrep fail disclose pub
$200, ASO
Mack, Irish Denita,
4/19/1959, Resist office,
cocaine possess, drug
equip possess, ASO
McKnight, Roderick,
4/10/1990, Resist officer
w/o violence, ASO
Melgarejo, Carla I.,
7/5/1980, DUI, GPD
Miernik, Kristina,
10/25/1972, Fraud insuff
funds check obtained
goods under $150 (x2),
ASO
Miller, Tyrone
Lamont, 11/19/1973,
FTA (x3), ASO .
Moment, James,
12/15/1988, Agg battery,
burg w/ asslt or battery,
ASO


Pena,
Victoria,
FTA- larc,


Melissa
10/19/1991,
DOJ


Pigue, Hollie
Amanda, 12/2/1989,
DUI, GPD
SRentz, Levi,
2/8/1967, Damage prop,
Burglary, larc, DOJ
Richard, John,
11/18/1962, Sexual
battery, domestic, APD
Richardson, James,
9/24/1960, FTA, ASO
Riley, Mark Anthony,
7/27/1993, Drug traffic of
10g or more, ASO
Sanchez, Fernando,
2/17/1988, Open
container, GPD'
Smith, Mark A.,
2/16/1966, Poss/use
drug para, GPD
Snead, Richard LJ.,
8/30/1991, Robbery -.no
firearm or weapon, ASO
Strong, Aubrey


Leander, 11/29/1964, Ross, Charles W.,
FTA- DWLSR, ASO 11/22/1982, DWLSR
Tarbutton, Tina, habitual offender, ASO
12/12/1980, Alcohol bev Russ, Cori Shane,
- sell, give, serve person 7/19/1991, FTA poss
under 21, GPD para, ASO
Tyson, Jamie, Sanford, Thomas
2/10/1985, Fraud pawn Lamont, 12/19/1981,
$300 or more, grand Petit theft, grand theft
theft $300 5K, deal in auto, GPD
stolen prop, ASO Santiago, Larry,
Weber, Eugene, 9/1/1992, Robbery w/
9/16/1953, Trespassing, weapon, ASO
ASO Santore, Dominic,
6/26/1988, Give/sell
Booking: Sept. 17, alcohol to uder age
2010 person, GPD
Ayala, Sahn L., Saraswat, Umerh,
8/16/1983, Battery viol 9/24/1950, Mfg/del drug
of pre-trial rel, ASO para, GPD
Brown, Danny Lee, Tucker, Samuel,
4/5/1982, Child support, 10/8/1961, VOP DWLS
ASO 1st, battery touch or


Brown, Kayla,
11/4/1985, VOP -
Burgarly, ASO
Clark, Johnnie
Mae, 3/30/1986, DWLS
habitual, ASO
,Culverson, Garrett
V., 5/31/1988, Battery,
touch,/strike, ASO
,Dix, John M.,
12/11/1955, Agg Assault
w/deadly weapon, ASO
Dolz, Gregory R.,
5/9/2023, Agg assault,
GPD
Ewell, Vernon J.,
8/20/1956, burglary,
theft petit, poss burg
tools, ASO
Ferrell, Kelvin T.,
11/6/1974, Battery"
domestic, APD
Flarity, Judith,
3//1/955, Poss of alcohol
in park, trespass, GPD
Green, Lorenzo D.,,
VOP lewd lasc behavior
conduct, victimless than
16 yoa, PAP
Hale, Judith,
1/7/1951, Fraud insuff
funds under $150, ASO
Hatfield, Gary,
2/4/1981, DUI, GPD
'James Jr., Ollie D.,
11/10/1987, DWLSR,
APD
Kent, Richard,
2/28/1977, VOP -
burgarly stolen prop,
deal in stolen prop, ASO
,Kent, Richard A.,
2/28/1977, Inhouse -
VOP Burglary, ASO
Markham, Leon E.,
7/11/1952, Possess drug
para, GPD
Markham, Leon E.,
7/11/1952, Sex Pred
violation, fail to report
email address, instant
msg name, ASO
Miah, Mohammed,
1/2/1967, Mfg drug para,
GPD
Mike, Virginia,
5/17/1968, FTA fraud
insuff check, ASO
Mino, Sharifa,
11/4/1971, Mfg/del drug
para, GPD
Newaz,. Akhtar R.,
9/11/1991, Mfg drug
para, GPD
-Patel, Dashrath A.,
7/9/1958, Mfg/del drug
para, GPD
Patel, Ravindra G.,
4/16/1946, Mfg drug
para, GPD
Pinner, Rodney,
6/17/1982, Trespass'
after warning, GPD
Poud, Erica Anne,
1/5/1983, DUI hit and
run, GPD
Robinson, Necole
L, 3/30/1973, VOP -
possess control sub w/o
prescription, fraud insuff
funds under $150, ASO
Robinson, Necole L,
3/30/1973, Grand theft
$300 < $5K, GPD
Rodney, Reginald,
2/2/1952, DUI, GPD


Rodriguez, Jose R.,
5/28/1972, Inhouse out
of county warrant, ASO


strike, ASO
Tyree, David A,
2/1/1977, Loitering and
prowling, GPD
White, Marvin
Notorious, 12/21/1990,
VOP robbery, ASO
.Williams, Dauntre L,
3/5/1993, Robbery home
invasion w/firearm, ASO
Williams, Rodney,
11/23/1980, FTA -
DWLSR, ASO


Booking:
2010


Sept. 18,


Bristol, Valrize
L., 12/7/1979, VOP -
battery, ASO
Coleman, Lewis S.,
10/28/1972, FTA- fraud
insuff funds x's 5, ASO
Craig, Jamie D.,
3/8/1961, Levy Co. -
Burglary, petit theft, ASO
Curry, John M.,
8/12/1977, FTA- possess.
<20g marijuana, drug
para,.GD ,P
Dampier, James F.,
1/7/1977, Resist w/o
violence, drug equip
poss/use, tamper/
destroy evidence, ASO
Daniels, Lekpshan,
12/26/1987, FTA -
DWLSR 1st off,ASO
Davis, Kevin D.,
6/24/1984, Poss of
control sub w/o rx, ASO
Dryer, Greg A.,
12/21/1967, DUI, FHP
Well, Vernon J,
8/20/1956, Inhouse -
Burglary, petit theft, GPD
Fiqueroa, Raul
E., 5/19/1956, Open
container violation, GPD
Flanders, Jonathon
C., 10/23/1991, Petit
theft 2nd degree, ASO
Hughes, Jon M.,
7/24/1956, Levy Co. -
Burglary, petit theft, ASO
Jerkins, Charles T.,
5/22/1980, Grand theft,
GPD
Johnson, Sonya A.,
11/20/1973, Battery x2,
ASO
Jordan, Faye B.,
8/9/1950, DWI, ASO
Lopez, Roberto,
4/15/1956, Disorderly
intoxication, GPD
McNeill, David B.,
11/1/1972, Deal in stolen
prop false owner info
on pawn ticket <$300,
GPD
Mohorn Jr., Willie
B., 10/7/1957, VOP -
battery, ASO
Monaghan, Terri L.,
6/1/1982, DUI, ASO
Padgett, Zim R.,
12/28/1962, Battery 2nd
off, obstructing justice,
ASO
Prendes, Ramon V.,
11/1/1950, DUI & dum
prop, battery, RWOV,
GPD
Pringle Jr., James
A., 10/3/1958, Making
false 911 call, GPD
Roldan, lan,
11/17/1990, Loiter/
prowling, ASO


Roldan, Jason
A., 9/12/1987, Loiter/
prowling, ASO
Smith, John,
5/12/1972, Marion Co. -
DWLSR Habitual, ASO
Smith, Johnny N.,
1/29/1975, Resist w/o
violence, cocaine poss,
poss marijuana <20g,
poss of drug para, ASO
Virgil, Paul T.,
1/17/1990, Kidnap -
adult, robbery home
invasion, ASO
Weaver, Brian P.,
9/7/1982, Burglary,
battery, criminal
mischief, GPD
White Jr., Nigel A.,
11/9/1971, Worthless
check, ASO
Williams, Erica N.,
8/11/1985, FTA- no valid
DL, ASO

Booking: Sept. 19,
2010
Baker, Dana Helaine,
2/11/1991, Poss alcohol
under 21 yoa, WPD
Blackwelder, James
S., 5/6/1966, Bom
battery by strangulation,
GPD
Blount, Keith,


6/29/1980, In house -
VOP DWLSR, drive w/
susp license, FTA -child
support, VOP drug
equip poss/use, ASO
Brown, Otis L,
12/24/1989, Poss < 20g
marijuana, trespass after
warning, GPD
Brunner, Richard
W., 2/11/1969, Poss
cocaine, ASO.
Coburn, Robert
E., 11/21/1991, Sexual
battery, victim 12 yoa or
older x's 3, GPD,
Coleman, James L.,
12/13/1967, Petit theft,
robbery no firearm or
weapon, ASO
Desilva, Javier,
S6/26/1986, DWLSR,
FHP
Fox, Ronald,
4/5/1972, Stalking, ASO
Gaskin, Cornelius
T., 4/25/1985, Disorderly
conduct, GPD
Gutieriez-Escalante,
Jose, 9/12/1980, OP MV
w/o valid DL, ASO
Hall, Caroline,
3/31/1983, In house
trespassing, ASO
Hartman," Kristin
E., 10/23/1990, Poss
alcohol under 21 yoa,
WPD
Holman, Anthony
C., 12/9/1969, Battery
(domestic), hinder
communication to LEO,
GPD
Llerena, Cesar E.,
7/25/1960, DUI, ASO
Martin Jr., Calvin
P., 8/2/1954, Clay;Co.
simple battery, ASO
McNeill, David B.,
11/1/1972, Additional -
Fraud use of credit cards
x's 4, deal in stolen
property organized,
GPD
Milam, Devon M.,
5/6/1990, Poss alcohol
under 21, poss < 20g
cann, drug para, WPD
Milanec, Stephan V.,
2/14/1986, Poss control
sub, poss control sub w/
intent to sell, WPD
Myers, Traci Lynn,
11/17/1990, Burglary of
dwelling, poss controled
sub, intro contra into
dentention facility, GPD
Newell, Ryan Cain,
9/5/1986, Burglary
unoccupied structure
unarmed, grand theft
$300 < $5K, ASO
Norfleet Jr., Charles,
11/29/1981, DWLSR 3rd
or subsq off, ASO
Richardson, Claude


I


Swendson, August,
7/12/1984, Petit theft
(retail), GPD '
Welch, Samuel,
6/2411953, VOP
DWLSR 2nd off, ASO


For additional jail
booking logs, see
alahiilhsnuntv n fdav enm


A., 10/12/1984, DWLSR,
ASO
Rigdon, Janine N.,
11/12/1987, Agg battery,
simple battery x's 5,
GPD
Sauls, Matthew G.,
2/12/1992, Poss control
sub, poss control sub w/
intent to sell, WPD
Saunders, David B.,
9/19/1986, Petit theft,
ASO
Smith, Leon,
10/24/1960, Putnam Co.
(VOP) DWLSR, ASO
Sundage, Brandy L.,
2/14/1984, Columbia Co.
VOP poss controled
sub, GPD
Wil iams,
Demetrius, 3/11/1981,
In house Child support,
ASO

Booking: Sept. 20,
2010
Baker, Curview,
2/4/1987, FTA crim
mischief, larc, petit theft,
battery, ASO
Bernier, Donald A.,
12/17/1968, Burglary
dwelling structure/
convey unarmed, grand
theft $300 < $5K, ASO
Brown, James,
2/23/1970, Damage Prop
crim misch, burglary,
larceny, ASO
Castillo, Cassie.
E., 7/26/1990, (VOP)
petit theft, drug equip
possess, RWOV, ASO ,
Clark, Christopher
A., 2/11/1980, Sumter
Co. VOP DWLS, ASO
Denson, Chandra
D., 12/5/1972, FTA -
drug equip possess/use,
possess new legend
drug w/o prescription,
ASO
Dillard, Obadiah S.,
1/8/1978, Burglary theft
petit, GPD
Edwards, Terry
Van, 11/28/1959, Viol
of pre-trial release,
possess control sub w/o
prescription, ASO
Faupel, Ira Dean,
11/11/1962, Poss control
sub w/o prescription,
traffic in control sub x's
2, DUI & prop damage,
WPD
Green, Tracy
Marcell, 12/23/1974,
DUI, WPD
Hall, Dermetrick,
5/17/1979, Inhouse
- VOP trespassing,
operating MV w/o valid
DL, ASO
Holton, Garrett
Austin, 11/27/1990,
Deal in stolen prop
organized, HSPD,0
Johnson Iil, Albert
4Leroy, 6/8/1986, FTA -
DWLSR, ASO
Knight, Eugene,
9/13/1989, FTA cocaine
poss, drug equip poss.
X's 2, ASO
Larivee, Shaun,
11/12/1982, Inhouse -
order to arrest, ASO
Lloyd Jr., William
D., 7/27/2001, VOP -
DWLSR 2nd off, ASO
Manning, Alphonso
L., 9/29/1991, Battery
Domestic, ASO
Miller, Dennison F.,
12/10/1970, Petit theft
(retail), poss a control sub,
poss drug para, GPD
Slim, Irahim,
11/1/2683, DWLS 1st off,
ASO






ALACHUA COUNTY TODAY COMMUNITY CORNER TUiiRSDAY, Si'.PT.iMll 23, 2010 A3


Common unt Cor




Meetings & Events in the Heartlands


*Archer Meets'the 2nd
and 4th Monday of each
month at 7 p.m. at City Hall,
16870 SW 134 Ave.
*Alachua (City) Meets
the 2nd and 4th Monday of
each month at 6:30 p.m. at
City Hall.
*Alachua County Meets
the 2nd and 4th Tuesday
of each month at 9 a.m. at
,the County Administration
Building, 12 SE 1st Street,
Room 209, Gainesville.
Citizen comments are taken
at 9:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m.
"Gainesville Meets the
1st and 3rd Thursday of
each month at 1 p.m. at City
Commission Chamber, 200
East University Avenue.
* Call for visual
artists in all media for
the 26th Art Festival
at Thornebrook in
Gainesville, Saturday
and Sunday, Oct. 2
and 3. This outstanding
regional festival is juried
and judged with awards.
The application and
submission information
is available on the
Thornebrook Art web site
at www.thornebrookart.
org. Submission deadline
is Wednesday, June 30.
Call 352-692-4466 for
questions or information.
* Alachua County
Beekeepers Club is
accepting new members.
Anyone interested in
learning about bees
from Alachua and the
surrounding counties is
welcome to join. Meetings
are held the third Thursday
of each month at Dadant
& Sons, 17074 NW ,188
Street, High Springs.
For more information,
contact Wayne "Chappie"
McChesney, Club
President 386-462-
2637 or chappiesbees@
windstream.net..
* North Central
Florida Political

D 'rt t e ait...
Ss- *


. Hawthorne Meets the 1st
and 3rd Tuesdays of each
month at 6:30 p.m. at City
Hall.
'High Springs Meets the
2nd and 4th Thursday of
each month at 6:30 p.m. in
City Hall.
*LaCrosse Meets the 2nd
Monday of each month at
7:30 p.m. at Town Hall.
EMicanopy Meets the 2nd
Tuesday of each month at
7:30 p.m. at Town Hall.
*Newberry Meets the 2nd
and 4th Monday of each
month at 7 p.m. at City Hall
EWaldo Meets the 2nd
Tuesday of each month at 7
p.m. at Yerkes Center.

Women's Network holds
meetings the second
Wednesday of every
month at 11:30 a.m. to 1
p.m. at Shoney's on Archer
Road in Gainesville.
LaCrosse Baptist
Church presents "Jason
Gray", Contemporary
Christian Recording
Artist, singer of Top Ten
Song "More Like Falling
in Love" in Concert
outdoors on Saturday,
Sept. 18 at 4 p.m. Special
guest artists Jake Cogan
and teen Evangelist
Robbie Brown will open.
For ticket information, see
www.evangelismtickets.
com or contact the Church
at www.lacrossebaptist.
org' for further concert
information. LaCrosse
Baptist Church is located
at 5700 NW 203rd Place,
LaCrosse, Fla. (7 miles
east of Alachua).
A rummage
sale is being held to
raise money for the
Archer Youth Athletic
Scholarships on
Saturday, Oct. 2 and Oct.
9 from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. at
the Old Fire Station on
the corner of State Road 45
(US27) and 137th.Avenue


will be treated to lur
and have the opportun
to participate in activity
that demonstrate da
tasks performed by bli
and visually impaii


PUBLIC MEETINGS


Self-inking
Made to order
STAMPS
Available for purchase at
sBUiness


14804 Main Street, Alachua
386-462-3355


Buses,






S4


in Archer. Donations are
needed and appreciated.
Call Sara Brannon at
352-514-8431 to arrange
delivery or pick up of
donations.
* The Antioch M.B.
Church family will hold
its annual mission's
ministry on Sunday Sept.
19 at 3:30 p.m. The guest
speaker will be Sis. Laura
Williams of the Unity
Faith M.Bb. Church, of
Naples, Fla. where the
pastor/teacher is Rev.
Leon Williams. For more
information or questions,
call Min. Gloria Jackson
386-497-4808.
* Calling All Singers
and Choir Members.
Be part of the "Show
the Love" Community
Choir. Rehearsals at
7:30 p.m. Sept. 20 and
27 at Mt. Hermon M.
B. Church 1510 NE 2nd
Street, Gainesville. Event
sponsored by Lazarus
Restoration Ministries,
Inc. to benefit homeless
families. Lazarus House
provides the services
to restore their lives
and obtain their own
permanent housing. For
more information, contact
Evang. Rashawnda
Young-Washington 352-
377-6115 or Vincent
Washington 352-281-2577
* Archer Church of
God in Christ will be
hosting a Deliverance
Revival with Apostle
Cleopatra Steele of Miracle
Tabernacle Church, Lake
City, Fla. on Sept. 23-24.
Services will start at 7:30
p.m. nightly. For more
information, call Archer
COGIC at 352-495-9811.
Marilyn V. Green, Pastor,
17370 SW 128th Place,
Archer, Fla.
* The Alachua
Children's Theater is
holding auditions for
O'Henry's classic tale
"The Ranson of Red
Chief", Tuesday, Sept.
28 at 5:30 p.m. and


A


individuals. The event
will conclude no later
than noon. Participation








Pick 1
or mo
SCo


Thursday, Sept. 30 at
5:30 p.m. at Theater
at Old Library, 15100
Main Street (downtown
Alachua).
Sam and Bill, a couple
of down-on-their-luck con
men, decide to kidnap the
young son of a prosperous
banker in Summit a small
Alabama town, to finance
one of their crooked land
deals in Illinois. They
kidnap the boy and hide
him in a cave a few miles
from Summit. At the cave
they finalize their scheme
to write a ransom letter
asking for $2,000 ransom
to return the boy. The
boy, an eight-year hellion
loves living in the cave.
He treats the kidnapping
as a wonderful adventure.
Calling himself "Red
Chief' he makes believe
his kidnappers are really
his captives.
Needed boys and girls
between the ages of 8-16.
No experience necessary
and no cost to participate.
For more information call
352-672-2122 or 352-316-
2929.
* The Alachua County
Council for the Blind
(ACCB) will be holding
its 11th Annual White
Cane Walk in Alachua
on Saturday, Oct. 2 at
10 a.m. The walk is held
annually to raise awareness
about Florida's White
Cane Law. Participants
will begin the walk at the
former Alachua City Hall
(intersection of US 441
and CR241/NW140th St.)
and finish at the Alachua
Lions Club (15115 NW
142nd Terrace.). The
approximately three-
block walk will last 15-
20' minutes. Participants


Medium
popping Pizza



1.67
up or have 2
ore delivered!
upon Code MM.


14300 Newberry Rd.
352-333-3333
Serving Newberry/Jonesville


What is your...


e


Enter to win!


Identify the advertiser in this week's edition from
the clue inside of the magnil4ng glass for your
chance to win either free large one-topping
pizza or a baked sub from Domino's Pizza.
Call now (386-462-3355) or e-mail us (contest@.
qlachuatoday.com) to be entered into our
weekly drawing. Be sure to put the Word 'contest'
in the subject line and include your contact
information along with your entry. All correct
entries will be placed into a drawing each week
and at least one winner will be pulled.
ANSWER TO LAST WEEK'S EYE-Q:
El Toro Restaurant
Alachua County Today Advertiser

Vii lahaonttdyco o-


15634 NW US HWY 441
386-462-2000
Serving Alachuo/High Springs


TOWN OF LA CROSSE

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE
2nd Public Hearing for CDBG Grant Application
The Town of LaCrosse is applying to the Florida Department of Community
Affairs (DCA) for a grant under the Neighborhood Revitalization category in the
amount of $600,000.00 under the Small Cities Community Development Block
Grant (CDBG) Program. The activities for which The Town of LaCrosse is
applying are: Fire Protection and Recreation.
Town intends to 1) replace or substantially renovate the existing fire station and
2) construct various recreational improvements to the Park. See below chart
for dollar amounts and low to moderate income benefit percentages:
Activity Amount LMI
Benefit
Fire Protection $550,000 At least 57%
Recreation $25,000 At least 57%
The Town of LaCrosse plans to minimize displacement of persons as a result
of CDBG funded activities in the following manner by avoiding all activities that
would cause displacement of the residents of LaCrosse. If any persons are
displaced as a result of these planned activities, the Town will assist such
persons in the following manner by providing mitigation of any hardship caused
by displacement to the best ability of the Town Council.
A public hearing to provide citizens an opportunity to comment on the
application will be held at 7:30 PM on September 27, 2010 at Town Hall. A draft
copy of the application will be available for review at that time. A final copy of
the application will be made available at upon request to Megan Carter at (386)
752-4675 ext. 114. The application will be submitted to DCA on or before
October 2010. To obtain additional information concerning the application and
the public hearing, contact Megan Carter at (386) 752-4675 Ext. 114.
The public hearing is being conducted in a handicapped accessible location.
Any handicapped person requiring an interpreter for the hearing impaired or
the visually impaired should contact Megan Carter (386) 752-5640 x 114, at
least 7 calendar days prior to the meeting and an interpreter will be provided.
Any non-English speaking person wishing to attend the public hearing should
contact Megan Carter (386) 752-4675 x 114 at least 7 calendar days prior to
the meeting and a language interpreter will be provided. To access a
Telecommunication Device for Deaf Persons (TDD) please call 1-800-955-
8771. Any handicapped person requiring special accommodation at this
meeting should contact Megan Carter, (386) 752-4675 x 114 at least 7 calendar
days prior to the meeting.
Pursuant to Section 102 of the HUD Reform Act of 1989, the following
disclosures will be submitted to.DCA with the application. The disclosures will
be made available by the Town of LaCrosse and DCA for public inspection
upon request. These disclosures will be available on and after the date of
submission of the application and shall continue to be available for a minimum
period of five years.
1. Other government (federal, state and local) assistance to the project in the
form of a gift, grant, loan, guarantee, insurance payment, rebate, subsidy,
credit, tax benefit, or any other form of direct or indirect benefit by source
and amount;
2. The identities and pecuniary interests of all developers, contractors, or
consultants involved in the application for assistance or in the planning or
development of the project or activity;
3. The identities and pecuniary interests of any other persons with a
pecuniary interest in the project that can reasonably be expected to
exceed $50,000 or 10% of the grant request (whichever is lower);
4. For those developers, contractors, consultants, property owners, or others
listed in two (2) or three (3) above which are corporations, or other
entities, the identification and pecuniary interests by corporation or entity
of each officer, director, principal stockholder, or other official of the entity;
5. The expected sources of all funds to be provided to the project by each of
the providers of those funds and the amount provided; and
6. The expected uses of all funds by activity and amount.
(Published: Alachua County Today September 23, 2010)


ner






ich in the walk is an excellent
ity activity for school service
ies clubs and other civic
ily minded groups. For more
ind information, contact the
red ACCB at 352-338-7951.





A4 AI.ACIIUA COUNTY ToDAY LOCAL NEWS THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2010



Alachua Lions Club hosts presentation on




water resources in North Central Florida


STAFF REPORT
Alachua County Today
ALACHUA On Thursday, Sept. 23 at
7 p.m., the Alachua Lions Club will host the
Suwannee River Water Management District
(SRWMD) who will be giving a presentation
on water resources in the North Central Florida
area.
The SRWMD's mission is to protect North
Central Florida's rivers, springs, groundwater,
and coastal estuaries, and to provide
recreational opportunities for the public to


enjoy the region's abundant natural resources.
The program will be shared by David Still,
Executive Director and Jon Dingles, Director
of Water Supply and Resource Management of
the SRWMD.
Everyone is invited to attend to learn all
about water resources. David Flagg, who
represents the area for the SRWMD and is the
Vice-Chairman of the SRWMD Governing
Board will also be attending the presentation.
He will be available to answer any questions
the audience might have about the duties of the


Governing Board.
The public is invited to attend the
presentation at 7 p.m., and join the Lions Club
for dinner at 6:30 p.m. Individuals planning
to eat are asked to contact Gary Hardacre at
386-462-4582 before Wednesday, Sept. 22.
The cost for the meal is $7 per person. The
Alachua Lions Club is located at 15115 NW
142nd Terrace in Alachua, across from Alachua
City Hall.


Still


VOTER


REGISTRATION

DEADLINE

October 4, 2010
LAST DAY to Register for the
General Election


November 2, 2010



EARLY VOTING October 18-30,2010
View our website for dates & locations

Pam Carpenter
Alachua County Supervisor of Elections
www.VoteAlachua.com
(352)374-6252



NOTICE OF PUBLIC

HEARING TO ADOPT

AMENDMENTS TO THE

COMPREHENSIVE PLAN

CITY OF WALDO, FL

The City of Waldo's City Council will hold a public hearing to adopt
the following ordinances to amend ,te Cityof Waldo Future Land Use
Map of the Comprehensive Plan on October 12, 2010, at 7:00 p.m. at
the Yerkes Center, 14245 Cole Street. The City Council will consider
adopting the following item:
Ordinance #2010 07
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF WALDO, FLORIDA, TO
AMEND THE CITY OF WALDO COMPREHENSIVE PLAN
FUTURE LAND USE MAP 2015 FROM AGRICULTURE TO LIGHT
INDUSTRIAL ON AN APPROXIMATELY 9.038-ACRE PARCEL
LOCATED ON US HIGHWAY 301. (TAX PARCEL #16979-000-000,
A PORTION OF (C-2)); PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
Ordinance #2010 08
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF WALDO, FLORIDA, TO
AMEND THE CITY OF WALDO COMPREHENSIVE PLAN
FUTURE LAND USE MAP 2015 FROM AGRICULTURE TO LIGHT
INDUSTRIAL ON AN APPROXIMATELY 9.046-ACRE PARCEL
LOCATED ON US HIGHWAY 301. (TAX PARCEL #16979-000-000,
A PORTION OF (C-4)); PROVIDINGFOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
Ordinance #2010 09
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF WALDO, FLORIDA, TO
AMEND'THE .CITY OF WALDO COMPREHENSIVE PLAN
FUTURE LAND USE MAP 2015 FROM AGRICULTURE TO LIGHT
INDUSTRIAL ON AN APPROXIMATELY 9.084-ACRE PARCEL
LOCATED ON US HIGHWAY 301. (TAX PARCEL #16979-000-000,
A PORTION OF (C-3)); PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
Ordinance #2010 10
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF WALDO, FLORIDA, TO
AMEND THE CITY OF WALDO COMPREHENSIVE PLAN
FUTURE LAND USE MAP 2015 FROM AGRICULTURE TO LIGHT
INDUSTRIAL ON AN APPROXIMATELY 9.056-ACRE PARCEL
LOCATED ON US HIGHWAY 301. (TAX PARCEL #16979-000-000,
A PORTION OF (C-I)); PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
Ordinance #2010 11
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF WALDO, FLORIDA, TO
AMEND THE CITY OF WALDO COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FUTURE
LAND USE MAP 2015 FROM RURAL/AGRICULTURE (ALACHUA
COUNTY) TO COMMERCIAL ON AN APPROXIMATELY
1.41-ACRE PARCEL LOCATED ON US HIGHWAY 301. (TAX
PARCEL #17008-000-000); PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE
DATE.
-7z


Ordinances #20: )-8,B#2010-9;
S- L #2010-10; #21 11

Ordinance #2010-7






At the public hearing, all interested parties may appear and be heard with
respect to the proposed ordinances. Copies of the proposed ordinances
are available for public inspection at City Hall on any regular business
day between 8:30 A.M. and 5:00 P.M. Notice is given pursuant to Section
286.0105, Florida Statutes, that in order to appeal any decision made
at this public meeting, you will need to ensure that a verbatim record
is made. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, any
persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodation in order
to participate in this meeting should call City Hall at (352) 418-1001 at
least 48 hours prior to the public meeting.
(Published: Alachua County Today September 23, 2010)


Southland Waste Systems would like
to announce a service change on Mondays
for the city of High Springs residential and
commercial hand pick up.
Residents and commercial hand pick ups
located on the SE section of 441 starting with
SE 3rd Ave to SE 9th Ave; NW 179th P1 to NW
222nd St; Tilman Acres, Pinecrest, Springstead,
Oak Lane Plantation and Cedar Lane Plantation
the new service day will be Tuesday effective
Sept 28, 2010.
If you have any question or concern please
call Public Work Department at 386-454-2134
or Southland Waste at 877-428-6622 (toll free).
(Published: Alachua County Today September 23, 2010),


S S
AI







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111







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Cable elevi io






Cs of nterne



access


de, Legal Ads
.m Y-M& Displays
*wre Classifieds
T...,3.._j, (386) 462-3355

NOTICE OF BUDGET

HEARING
The Town of LaCrosse has tentatively
adopted a budget for 2010/2011. A public
hearing to make a FINAL DECISION on
the budget AND TAXES will be held on
Monday, September 27th at 7:30 p.m.,
at LaCrosse City Hall.
(Published: Alachua County Today September 23, 2010)


GENERAL
FUND


ESTIMATED REVENUES:
Taxes: Millage per $1000
Ad Valorem Taxes 2.2908
Sales and Use Taxes
Charges for Services
Intergovernmental Revenue
Licenses & Permits
Franchise Fees
Fines & Forfeitures
Interest Earned/Other
Cash Carryover
Cash Carryover/Recreation

TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES AND


BALANCES


EXPENDITURESIEXPENSES
Capital Improvement
Building/Land
General Government
Public Safety
Transportation
Financial & Administrative
Recreation
Other


25,500.
20,500.
6,000.
58,954.
1,049.
19,400.
1,000.
3,850.
16,325.
17,625.


170.203.


2,000.
7,500.
67,173.31

31,000.
35,100.
25,929.
1,500.69


FIRE
FUND





128,264.59
33,143.31


TOTAL



25,500.
20,500.
134,264.59
92,097.31
1,049.


19,400.
1,000.
* 350.10 4,200.10
16,325.
17,625.


161,758. 331.961.


2,000.
7,500.
67,173.31
161,758. 161,758.
31,000.
35,100.
25,929.
1,500.69


BUDGET SUMMARY
TOWN OF LACROSSE FISCAL YEAR 2010/2011
THE PROPOSED OPERATING BUDGET EXPENDITURES OF TOWN OF
LACROSSE ARE 6.4% MORE THAN LAST YEAR'S TOTAL OPERATING
EXPENDITURES.


TOTAL EXPENDITURES/EXPENSES 170.203. 161,758. 331.961.

The tentative, adopted, and/or final budget is on file in the office of
the above mentioned taxing authority as a public record.
(Published: Alachua County Today September 23, 2010)





ALACIIIJA COUNTY TODAY LOCAL NEWS THURSDAY, SEnl'riEMBIR 23, 2010 A5



Investigation clears Troiano of allegations


By GLENN COINE
Today Reporter
HIGH SPRINGS An
investigation covering
three separate complaints
against High Springs
Police ChiefJames Troiano
has yielded a conclusion
that in all three cases, he is
innocent of the allegations
leveled against him.
Responding to the
findings of the report,
Troiano said that after
being the subject of
numerous complaints, he's
glad the public can now
see that the accusations
didn't stick.
He's worked in law
enforcement for more
than 20 years, and usually
he's the one doing the


questioning. But instead,
he's now had to explain
and defend himself to
Karen Morinelli, the
Tampa attorney hired by
the City of High Springs,
to investigate a complaint
made by former High
Springs police officer
Michelle Jones.
Her complaint stemmed
from a 2009 incident
in which she believed
Troiano made misleading
statements to the press
and in a sworn statement
about what happened in a
domestic dispute between
Jones and her brother.
In light of her
investigation, Morinelli
found that the chief did not
lie, and appeared to have


no intention of damaging
Jones' reputation.
At the direction of the
city manager Jim Drumm,
Morinelli also investigated
complaints against Troiano
lodged by officers Steve
and Debbie Holley.
Steve Holley's
complaint, like the Jones
complaint, originated
from a 2009 incident.
Holley alleged that
Troiano implied Holley
had fabricated details of a
police report, and that he
suggested Holley was of
questionable integrity.
Debbie Holley's
complaint stemmed from
an unsigned February
memo alleging that
Troiano had lied during a


meeting and also that he
threatened to fire her.
Morinelli interviewed
five witnesses, including
those who made
complaints and Troiano.
She also evaluated news
articles, sworn statements,
incident reports and inter-
city memos. Morinelli
determined there was
not adequate evidence to
substantiate any of the
allegations under review.
In the report of her
findings, she held that
she could not find any
department or city policies
that the chief had violated,
and she recommended
"these matters be
permanently closed."
Troiano said he hopes


High Springs Candidates



Forum set for Oct. 19


STAFF REPORT
Alachua County Today
HIGH SPRINGS The High
Springs New Century Woman's
Club, Inc will host a Candidates
Forum on Oct. 19 at 7 p.m. at the
Woman's Clubhouse. All candidates
campaigning for the two available
seats on the High Springs City
Commission will be invited to
participate. -


This forum is presented as a
public service by The High Springs
New Century Woman's Club, Inc so
that residents have the opportunity
to meet the candidates and hear their
views on subjects of interest to the
High Springs community. Those
who wish to submit questions for
consideration to be used during the
'forum may do so by sending the
question via email to hswcl019@


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The High Springs Woman's
Club is pleased to continue this long
standing tradition of providing a
time and place for responsible people
to meet and learn the views of the
candidates prior to voting. The club
house is located, at 40 NW 1st Avenue
and the forum will begin promptly at
7 p.m.
# # #


Win Prizes
for reading the newspaper
S Two winners every week
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All products are subject to credit and property approval. Program terms and conditions subject to change without
S Member FDIC notice. Not all products are available in all markets or for all amounts. Other restrictions and Jimitations may apply.


the public will see that
many of the complaints
against him have no merit.
Troiano urged citizens
to speak directly with him
if they have concerns about
the police department or
him. He said he doesn't
hold himself above the


law, and he will always
stand accountable for his
actions.
# # #
E-mail gcoine@
alachuatoday.com


Ask Your Dentist
by Dquglas M. Adel, D.D.S.

Tongue-related problems


Q: What sort of
problems can develop with
the tongue?
A: A relatively common
problem is an inflammation
called glossitis. The
condition is characterized
by disappearance of the
hair-like projections, called
papillae, on the top of the
tongue. The tongue will
take on a reddish-purple
color and can become quite
painful. You may also feel
a burning sensation and
swallowing may be difficult.
In another condition called
geographic tongue, only
patches will lose the papillae
and create borders of yellow
or white. The patches may
heal and the condition is


sometimes called migratory
glossitis because it appears
as though the patches are
moving.
People who suffer with
geographic tongue often
have a condition called
fissured tongue, meaning
the tongue has a deep
fissure that runs along
the top surface. Fissured
tongue is .congenital. One
of its dangers is that food
can collect in the fissure,
causing inflammation. The
only treatment for fissured
tongue is to keep the crevice
clean by brushing and using
mouthwash. Talk with your
dentist about these and other
problems that can affect the
tongue.


For more information or free brochures, please call our office.
Presented as a service to the community by:

Douglas M. Adel, DDS.,sPA

Family Dentistry


I tEMBRANDT bej | and'shongertan'belbre
Found exclusively at Dr. Adel'sboflice.
386-462-4635
14211 NW 150th Ave., Alachua


NOTICE OF BUDGET


HEARING

THE CITY OF ARCHER has tentatively adopted a budget
for Fiscal Year 2010 2011.

A public hearing to make a FINAL DECISION on the
budget AND TAXES will be held on

Monday, September 27,2010,
at 7:00 p.m. at
Archer City Hall,
16870 SW 134th Avenue,
Archer, Florida 32618
(Published: Alachua County Today September 23, 2010)


Alrchun Business


Alachua Business


BUDGET SUMMARY

City of Archer Florida- FY'2010-2011

THE PROPOSED OPERATING BUDGET EXPENDITURES OF THE CITY OF ARCHER ARE 9.1%
MORE THAN LAST YEAR'S TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES.

GENERAL FUND Millage Rate 5.0000 mills

GENERAL ACC WATER GARBAGE WILD SPACES USDA
ESTIMATED REVENUES FUND FUND FUND FUND FUND GRANT TOTAL
TAXES MILLAGE PER $1000
AD VALOREM TAXES 5.000 160,000 $160,000
LOCAL OPTION GAS TAXES 105,000 $105,000
FRANCHISE FEES 46,640 $46,640
UTILITY TAXES 85,750 $85,750
COMMUNICATION SERVICES TAX 30,000 $30,000
LICENSES & PERMITS 9,250 $9,250
INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVENUE 142,254 24,128 $166,382
CHARGES FOR SERVICES 5,500 168,480 154,000 $327,980
MISCELLANEOUS REVENUE 13,714 1,000 24,059 $38,773
FINES AND FORFITURES 2,500 4,500 $7,000
GRANT REVENUE 70,355 98,000 $168,355
TOTAL SOURCES 670,963 1,000 197,039 154,000 24,128 98,000 $1,145,130
TRANSFERS IN 25,000 5,000 11,611 $41,611
FUND BALANCES/RESERVES/NET ASSETS 83,541 95,872 $179,413
TOTAL REVENUES, TRANSFERS &
BALANCES $695,963 $89,541 $208,650 $154,000 $120,000 $98,000 $1,366,154

EXPENDITURES
GENERAL GONERNMENT 281,980 118,385 126,000 526,365
PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT 238,005 36,000 274,005
CULTURE/RECREATION 25,163 25,163
PUBLIC SAFETY 0.
OTHER NONOPERATING 100,155 34,100 134,255
BUILDING/MAINTAINENCE 5,000 89,541 13,750 120,000 98,000 326,291
DEBT SERVICE 40,660 6,415 47,075
'TOTAL EXPENDITURES $690,963 $89,541 $208,650 $126,000 $120,000 $98,000 $1,333,154
TRANSFERS OUT 5,000 25,000 30,000
FUND BALANCES/RESERVES/NET ASSETS 3,000 3,000
TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES
TRANSFERS, RESERVES AND BALANCES $695,963 $89,541 $208,650 $154,000 $120,000 $98,000 $1,366,154
The tentative, adopted and/or final budgets are on file in the office of the above referenced taxing authority as a public report.
(Published: Alachua County Today September 23, 2010)






A6 ALACHUA COUNTY TODAY LOCAL NEWS THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2010


Hill concedes, Drumm acted witi


Coughlin reminded his colleagues, they
were not cutting people.
They were cutting positions based
on financial viability of individual
employment .positions, rather than based
on the merits' or seniority of the specific
people currently holding the positions.
Though it was a decision they flip-
flopped on at least once, commissioners
ultimately decided to split the city's
public workdepartmient into two separate
divisions, public utilities and public works.
The three supervisor positions that had
been in place with the single department,
tW of whih wer4 superintendents, the
third being the director, were all cut.
The twos new divisions were to be
headed by its own superintendent.
iThe ideg.was to economize the chain
otcominan?, and maximize the number


of people working in the field while
minimizing upper management.

The City Manager's decision
As the city manager, Drumm is tasked
with hiring and firing to accommodate the
budget approved by the commission.
He is required to inform anyone whose
position is being cut at least two weeks in
advance of the date their termination will
go into effect.
With Oct. 1 approaching, the day all
budget related terminations will go into
effect, Drumm had to decide who would
.fill the two new superintendent positions
for the public works and public utilities
divisions, and who would be out of a job.
He requested the opinion of the
remaining department heads, as they have
all worked with the three individuals


in question for years. He received a
memo dated Sept. 15, from Police Chief
James Troiano, Fire Chief Verne Riggall,
Licensing and Billing Director Rita
Troiano, Finance Director Helen Mclver
and Deputy City Clerk Jenny Parham.
They recommended that former Public
Works Department Director LaVerne
Hodge be named the new public utilities

superintendent, With the Oc
and Don
Deadwyler, quickly
former ly difficult decisic
one of the
superintendents made as to wh
under Hodge, and who would
be named the
new public
works superintendent.
Drumm said this recommendation
served to reaffirm the choice he already
had in mind. Hodge and Deadwyler had the
best credentials overall, he said.
This left him having to inform Jerry
Bratcher, the other former superintendent,
that because his position had been cut from
the budget, he would be out of a job as of
Oct. 1.
Drumm said he authorized paid leave
for Bratcher until then, so that he could
start looking for a new job. According to
city policy, Bratcher will remain on a call
list for the next 18 months, so that if an
appropriate position opens up, he can be
rehired.
Drumm also noted that both Hodge and
Deadwyler have taken significant pay cuts
with their new positions.
On Friday night, Drumm sent an e-mail
to notify the commission of Bratcher's
termination.


t
a



d1
re
KI


FIRING:
Continued front page A 1


BUDGET SUMMARY

i


CITY OF ALACHUA FISCAL YEAR 2010/11


OTHER
GENERAL SPEC.REV.
FUND FUNDS


DEBT
SERVICE
FUNDS


CAPITAL
PROJECTS
FUNDS


ENTERPRISE
FUNDS


ESTIMATED REVENUES:


TAXES ; AD VALOREM (5.5000 MILLS)
DEL. REAL & PERSONAL PROP
SALES SURTAX
FUEL
FRANCHISE FEES
UTILITY SERVICE
COMMUNICATION SERVICES
S LOCAL BUSINESS TAX
LICENSES ND PERMITS
INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVENUE
CHARGES FOR SERVICES
FINES ANEFORFEITURES
MISCELLAEOUSeREVENUE

TOTAL OPERATING REVENUE:


NON-OPERATiNG REVENUE:
OPERATING TRANSFERS IN
EBT PROCEEDS
LESS: REMRVE ibR UNDERCOLLECTION

TOTAL NO -OPERATING REVENUE:
OSE OF F D B.AANCE
TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES:


EXPENDITURES I EXPENSES:
GEN GOV/DEBT SERVICE
GENERAL*GOVERNMENT
PUBLIC SAFETY
PHYSICALENVIRONMENT
TRANSPORTATION
ECONOMIC ENVIRONMENT
HUMAN SPICES
CULTURE/RECREATION
COURT RELATED

TOTAL OP RATING EXPENDITURES


4,040,496
5,000
0
228,208
298,939
800,000
422,476
45,000
0
623,188
931,184
60,000
61.500


0
0
0
0
0
0.
0
0
176,518
268,183
S4,514
0


$7,515,991 $455,855


1,621,117
0
(5.599)


$1,615,518
$Q
$9.131.509 -


0
3,044,159
2,803,307
777,474
668,908
0
0
623,049
0


183,242
0
(8.411)


$174,831
$1.277.891
$1.908.577


0
7,226
214,386
11,000
0
1,617,416
0
8,509
Q


0
0
109,227
0
0
0
0
0
0
3,134,531
0
0


$200 $3,243,938


630,087
0


$630,087
($199)
$630.088


630,088
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
P


185,000
1,687,825
.Q

$1,872,825
$461.592
$5.578.355


*0
0
0
4,822,356
0
0
0
570,999
0


$7,916,897 $1,858,577 $630,088 $5,393,355


0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
19,080,696
0
235.400

$19,316,096


0
0
(570.278)


($570,278)
(252,026
$18.493.792


0
0
0
15,479,990
0
0
0
0
Q


0 4,040,496
0 5,000
0 109,227
0 228,208
0 298,939
0 800,000
0 422,476'
0 45,000
0 176,518
0 4,025,902
0 20,016,394
0 60,000
Q 303.920


$0 $0 30,532,080


1,154,797
0


$1,154,797
$s
$1.154.797


0
1,154,797
0
0
0
0
0
0
Q


$15,479,990 $1,154,797


3,774,243
1,687,825
(584.288)


$4,877,780 .
$1.487.258
36.897.118


630,088
4,206,222
3,017,693
21,090,820
668,908
1,617,416-
0
1,202,557
o


$0 $32,433,704


NON-OPEATING EXPENDITURES:
GONTING CY 271,958 50,000 0 0 167,213 0 0 489,171
OPERATING TRANSFERS OUT 742,654 0 0 185,000 2,846,589 0 0 3,774,243
OTHER NON-OPERATING 200.000 Q Q Q 0 0 0 200.000

*TAL N -OPERiATING EXPENDITURES $1,214,612 $50,000 $0 $185,000 $3,013,802 $0 $0 $4,463,414

TOTAL EXPENDITURES $9.131.509 $1.908.577 $630.088 $5.578.355 $18.493.792 $1.154.797 $0 $36.897.118

THIENTAAVE, ADOPTED, AND/OR FINAL BUDGETS ARE ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE ABOVE MENTIONED TAXING AUTHORITY AS A PUBLIC RECORD.
(Published: Alachua County Today September 23, 2010)


^ .4


in his rights
Hill needed clarification
Commissioner Hill said he found the
e-mail lacking in detail, particularly salary
figures and estimated savings. It was not
clear to him how Drumm's action reflected
the budget he and the other commissioners
approved.
Hill said it appeared that Drumm made
his own decision that could change the
budget, possibly
1 deadline violating the
city charter. The
approaching, result was Hill's
ns had to be follow-up e-mail to
Drumm demanding
o would Stay a more detailed
have to go. explanation.
Hill later said
that Drumm's
response explained everything sufficiently,
and ifhe had done that in the first place, there
wouldn't have been a misunderstanding.
Hill said he now sees how Drumm's
decision was based on implementing the
budget as the commission approved it, and
he recognizes that the city manager acted
fully within his authority as set forth by the
charter.
However, Hill still questions where this
leaves the power of the commission. He
noted that the only people the commission
can fire or hire are the city manager and the
city attorney.
"We have very limited power," he said.
The power to hire and fire city
employees rests with the city manager, and
Drumm said the division of responsibilities
between the commission and city manager
is part of a system of checks and balances
in High Springs' form of city government.
Drumm added, "I select people [for
employment] based on qualifications, not
for political reasons."
## ##
E-mail gcoine@alachuatoday.com


NOTICE OF BUDGET HEARING


The City of Alachua has tentatively

adopted a budget for Fiscal Year 2011.

A public hearing to make a FINAL

DECISION on the budget AND TAXES

will be held on


Monday, September 27, 2010, at 6:30 p.m.

at

Alachua City Hall, James A. Lewis

CoMmission Chambers, 15100 NW

142nd Terrace, Alachua, Florida.
(Publi hed: Alachua County Today September 23, 2010)


* i 1


GEN. FUND
MILLAGE
PER $1,000


INTERNAL
SERVICE
FUNDS


TRUST &
AGENCY
FUNDS


GRAND
TOTAL
BUDGET







ALACHUA COUNTY TODAY LOCAL NEWS THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2010 A7


NEWBERRY:
Continued from page Al


Still not clear if victim

was struck or shot


Both Moment and
the unidentified person
apparently fled the scene,
but Carman attempted to
follow them. After failing
to locate the pair, Carman
allegedly returned to the
same location where the
gun theft occurred.
Moment reappeared
and approached the driver's
side of Carman's car, the
report states. An argument
between Carman and
Moment about the handgun
apparently followed.
Carman reportedly saw
Moment reach into his
waistband, and Carman was
then struck in his left eye
with an unknown object.
ACSO detectives say
Carman could not "advise if
he was shot or struck in the
face with another object."
Carmanwas ableto drive
himself to a convenience
store in Newberry, where
authorities were notified.
He was flown via helicopter
to Shands Hospital in
Gainesville.
Referring to the person
who allegedly struck or
shot him as "Peanut,"
Carman identified Moment
from a jail photograph.
It is still unclear if
Carman was shot or struck,


said Art Forgey, ACSO
spokesman.
"We are analyzing some
evidence and working with
the doctors that treated him
to make a determination,"
Forgey said, adding that
Carman claimed in his
interview that he was shot.
Carman reportedly
suffered from a ruptured
left eye and orbital fractures
for which he underwent
surgery and was ultimately
released from the hospital.
Moment has been
charged with twb first-
degree felony counts of
burglary with assault or
battery and two second-
degree felonies for
aggravated battery causing
bodily harm or disability.
ACSO officials say that
don't yet know if Carman
will also be charged
with a crime because of
the reported attempt to
purchase narcotics.
The incident last week
comes on the heels of
complaints that ACSO
deputies were harassing
residents in the area of
NW 252nd St., where the
altercation occurred.
# ,# #
E-mail editor@
alachuatoday.com


Have expired and unwanted pills?

Also get screened for diabetes and more


STAFF REPORT
Alachua County Today
ALACHUA The Alacl
Police Department (APD) a
other local law enforcement
agencies want to help a
residents properly disp<
of expired and unwani
prescription medication.
The effort is being conduct
in conjunction with the Di
Enforcement Administrati
(DEA) in hopes of reducing 1
street sale of prescription dru
especially narcotic pills.
Dubbed "National Tal
Back Initiative," the program
aims to collect expire
unwanted or unused prescripti
drugs anonymously and
dispose of them safely.

JACKSON: I
Continuedfrom page A '

has seen Alachua, once a
railroad town, go through
the ups and downs of
economic change.
Jackson is still mentally
sharp, her son Ralph
explained as he joked that
the secret to her longevity
must be genetics. Jackson
never has been a smoker or
alcohol drinker and "takes
absolute care of herself,"
he added.
On Friday, the family
celebrated the matriarch's
birthday in grand style at


In Alachua, the event 4
will take place Saturday, "
Sept. 25 from 9 a.m. until
1 p.m. at Hitchcock's
Foodway, on U.S.
Highway 441.
The event is one-stop,
also including a host of ,
health-related initiatives. g
Free diabetic
screening is being
offered compliments of
the Alachua Lions Club.
Hithcock's Hometown
Pharmacy is providing *'m' i
free glucometers, and .--
University of Florida
pharmacy students are
performing blood pressure
checks.
# # # W'.. ,


las 20 great-grandchildren


Ivy House on Alachua's
Main Street. Jackson was
joined by her eight children,
nine grandchildren, 20
great-grandchildren and
one great-great-grandchild.
About the week of


festivities celebrating
her birthday, Jackson
said, "I really had a good
celebration. ... I enjoyed
it so much that I couldn't
get to church on Sunday
because I was so tired."


The greatest part of her
birthday wasn't turning a
year older, but seeing all of
her family, Jackson said.
# # #
E-mail: editor@
alachuatoday.com

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A8 ALACHUA COUNTY TODAY VOICE OF THE HEARTLANDS THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2010


01Ce0 he
Yo1(e oft1i
/ '^C / UK


MaOeWua Countop obap
ESTABLISHED IN 2000


ELLEN B. BOUKARI
Executive Editor


GAIL G. LUPARELLO
Publisher
ALACHUA TODAY, INC.


BRYAN BOUKAR
Managing Editor


Hearlan ds

\ -. "i .


Alachua County Today NE r WISo UNh Rt

Policy Statement AME. AMENT. AMENM
Alachua County Today paper. Nor is it a liberal or
is dedicated to reporting conservative paper.
news and events relevant to Alachua County Today
all citizens of the Heartland is a newspaper dedicated
Communities. Above all, to: (1) balanced reporting
the staff is dedicated to of news and events relevant
policies of fairness and ob- to the community, and (2)
jectivity, and to avoiding reporting on all significant
what is sometimes charac- social, economic and polit-
terized as "agenda journal- ical issues and problems
ism." that the staff believes E
Alachua County Today should be of concern to our
is not a Republican news- readers. I
paper, not a Democratic f,, /

Vote at AlachuaCountyToday.com

READER This week's poll: Do you believe the Last week's poll: Yes
OPINION federal court was correct in declaring Should Reggie Bush have No.
Florida's gay adoption ban unconstitutional? had to forfeit the Heisman?


........................... 72%
720

1111 om....................a 28%

VOTES 56


The battle for the future


For most of the life of America, things out and takes our tax money."
and when it grew fastest, government Well, yes.
spent just a few hundred dollars per Those are "libertarian fairytales,"
person. Today, the federal government Hill says. "In real life, thegovernment
alone spends $10,000. Politicians talk is us."
about cuts, but the cuts rarely happen. Government is not "us." Well, it's
The political class always needs more, us in the sense that we pay the bills.
I see the pressure. All day, But it ain't us. It's, them, the policy
Congress listens to people who say elite and their patrons.
they need and deserve help. What percent of the economy does
The cost of any one I Hill think government
program per taxpayer is I should be?
small, but the benefits "For me, housing,
are concentrated on well- health care and education,
organized interest groups. in addition to national
It's tough for a weak defense, are things that
politicA t~a ~ no ,"i.: the governmexi, must
Buthli1ylbe1jing: ate ,; lf. roride for people. So if
changing. Rep. Paul Ryan, that means 20 percent,
R-Wis., believes that I'm OK with it. If it
"more and more people means 30 percent, I'm
in America are beginning OK with it. I don't think
to wake up to the fact it'll ever get that big."
that this thing is coming John Stossel Give me a break. It's
unglued." already at 40 percent!
I asked Ryan why his colleagues All that spending is taken from
say it's OK.to spend more. Are they your and my pockets some in
just stupid? Don't they care? Or are taxes, much in sneakier ways like
they pandering for votes? government borrowing. The national
"Pandering could be a part of debt now $13 trillion simply
it," he said. "But ... they believe represents future taxes or the erosion
that the government should be far of the dollar..
larger." They are taught that by the Yet progressives want us to pay
progressives who rule academia, like more. One woman activist told our
Columbia University Professor Marc camera, "It costs to live in a civilized
Lamont Hill. society, and we all need to pay our fair
"We have to make .sure that the share."
most vulnerable people are always Our "fair share" sounds good.
protected," Hill says. Everyofie Progr~ssives say taking from the rich
benefits when we pay a little bit to help the poor is simply fair.
more to create universal health care. I put that to Arthur. Brooks,
Everyone benefits when we pay a little who heads the American Enterprise
more to have better public education iInstitute.
systems." "No, the fairest system is the one
Progressives use the word "we" that rewards the makers in society as
too often. When I argued the that "we" opposed to rewarding the takers in
and "government" are not the same, society."
he said, "We always talk about the Brooks wrote "The Battle," which
government like it's this monster in argues that the fight between free
the hills that comes down and hands enterprise and big government will


shape our future.
"The way that our culture is moving
now is toward more redistribution,
toward more progressive taxation,
exempting more people from paying
anything, and loading more of the
taxes onto the very top earners in our
society."
But it seems "kind" to take it away
from wealthier people and give it to
those who need it more.
"Actually, it's not;" Brooks says.
"The government does not create
wealth. It uses wealth that's been
created by the private sector."
He warns that "Americans are
in'open rebellibni today because the,
'government is threatening to' take u"'
from a maker nation into taker nation
status."
Americans in "open rebellion"?
I'm skeptical. Handouts create
fierce constituencies. The tea party
movement is wonderful, but it takes
strength to say no to government
freebies. When I've said to tea
partiers, "We should cut Medicare,
eliminate agriculture subsidies,
kill entire federal agencies," the
enthusiasm usually fades from their
eyes.
I hope that I am wrong and Brooks
is right.
John Stossel is host of "Stossel'"
on the Fox Business Network. He's
the author of "Give Me a Break"
and of "Myth, Lies, and Downright
Stupidity." To find out more about
John Stossel, visit his site at www.
johnstossel.com. To read features
by other Creators Syndicate writers
and cartoonists, visit the Creators
Syndicate Web page at www.creators.
com.
COPYRIGHT 2010 BY JFS
PRODUCTIONS, INC.
DISTRIBUTED BY CREATORS.
COM


!-





Language Diversity Immigrants have
= Divisiveness to learn English and
The U.S. is an English our children have to be
speaking country, not a proficient in English..
bi-lingual or multi-lingual It can be beneficial
speaking country. Our for people to be fluent in.
government conducts all a second language such
business in English, Our as ,Spanish, Chinese,
military communicates Arabic, etc. Our country
only in English. Can needs expertise in foreign
you. envision mijit, lautaes, bui this should
commanders iig ~ ~ Cto nufl ..
commands to attack in 'ksh. gS.-citz e


numerous languages?
U.S. businesses
typically communicate
in English. One of the
many strengths of this
country is its outstanding
communications system.
All roadside signs,
instructions, business
correspondence, school
classes, and general
communications should
be in English, with no
references to any foreign
languages.


who cannot speak and
.write English as a primary
language are probably
placing themselves at a
disadvantage on the ladder
to success in this country.
We should not promote
language diversity,
because it will lead to
divisiveness, the same
type of divisiveness we
see in numerous foreign
countries.
Donald A. Moskowitz
Londonderry, NH


Il [ocel Y urii WUI


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Letters are subject to


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By Mail: Editor, Alach-
ua County TodayP.O.
Box 2135, Alachua, FL
32616
By Fax: (386) 462-4569
By E-Mail: editor@ala-
chuatoday. cor


Random acts and tacos


To the man who reached out and gave me a taco...
thank you! ,
People in every city and town all over the world
perform random acts of kindness every day. These acts
are random, which means they can happen to anyone
at any time. The kindness bestowed is
random as well.
However, those that perform these acts
are not random. You know the one or two
people in your life who would bake a pie
and drop it off at your house even when
it isn't your birthday. They would totally
get it when you are "in a mood" and do
something that makes you smile. These
people perform random acts of kindness on
a regular basis; which would make those
acts... not random, I guess.
They are not performing the act of Laura Si
being kind. They simply are kind.., all the
time.
I was sitting in a Taco Bell with my son today when
a man approached our table and said, "Excuse me..." I
looked up. "I don't mean to interrupt but" and somehow
he got sidetracked (I suspect ADD) and made a joke, "are
you gonna eat that?"
He seemed so serious at first that I looked down to


see what part of my meal I was going to have to give up.
Because if someone is desperate enough to walk up to
a total stranger and ask for their food, he needs it more
than I do. He immediately smiled, though, and said,
"Just kidding. Would you like this taco?" He held out a
paper-wrapped taco with a questioning look
on his face.
The look on my face must've broadcast
suspicion because he started babbling about
how there was nothing wrong with it...
honest. "I didn't do anything to it," which, of
course, made me think he did do something
to it. Who gives perfectly good tacos to total
strangers?
If this was the elusive "random act of
kindness" I keep hearing about, he was really
bad at it. I took pity on him, though, thanked
yder him, and took the taco, mostly because I
yU didn't want him to fail at something at which
he was obviously a rookie.
My chalupa supreme had already begun to fill the
holes in my hunger, but I thought I would take the taco
home to my husband.
On the way home, I made a promise to myself: If I
ever decide to try a random act of kindness, I would not
start with a taco. But again, I suppose that deciding to


do it would make it no longer random. You simply have
to do it when the urge hits you. If you happen to be
holding a spare taco at the time, well, I guess that's about
as random as it gets.
I can only hope that when the urge hits me, I'm not
holding a dead trout or my son's boxershorts. Of course,
that would not be considered a kindness. Trying to pawn
off a dead fish or sweaty undergarments on a stranger
would be considered an assault, I think, not a kindness.
So... it wouldn't count.
Let's recap. To perform a random act of kindness
correctly, one cannot plan it or decide to do it.
If the urge strikes to give a stranger something, you
must resist that urge if said something is, in any way,
repulsive.
If the act benefits you in any way, it doesn't qualify.
Like, if watching another episode of Deadliest Catch
prompts you to give your husband's big-screen TV to a
homeless man?... It doesn't qualify.
If, after the act is performed, you feel warm and tingly
inside and have a smile on your face all day, you can be
pretty sure you've done it correctly.
Laura Snyder is a nationally syndicated columnist,
author and speaker. You can reach Laura at lsnyder@
lauraonlife.com or visit her website www.lauraonlife.
com for more information.


7Ea nRSiAM~hlDMF~S~ aDISI;Uc~ON


nt







ALACHUA COUNTY TODAY LOCAL NEWS THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2010 A9


cancer survivors."


GLENN COINEAlachua County Today


difference is important to the Peruyero family


Continuedfrompage Al Making a di
divisions behavioral As Peruyero
training such as obedience talked, it was .
and manners, and the not- 'evident that w, hile
so-common scent division, he runs a canine
About 90 percent of academy, the
the dogs used are beagles business and the
because oftheir good noses, Peruyero family
work ethic and small size have been silent
that appeal. to consumers. benefactors of the
Instead of using puppies, Alachua County
Peruyero opts for other community for
ages. years.
"Most dogs are rescue "We have
dogs saved from a shelter," been very blessed
Peruyero added. "Most are with the success
about 9 months to about 2 of our company,"
years old." Peruyero said,
But these are not "and one of
unlimited resources once our campaigns
they are trained. Peruyero this year is to
recommends a retirement have more of a
age to companies that use physical presence
the four-legged employees, in the community.
"We recommend to The children
about 10 years old to stop want the public to
working," Peruyero said. know what we are
"We like to see companies doing and what
tame down the dogs work we support."
load or retire them flat out The company
about then." donated three
Among the dogs in dogs to the
the scent division is a pair Columbia County .'
that works with SHANDS Sheriff's Office, ., ,
Hospital .in the detection as well as one
of Melanoma cancer. A dog to High L-R:, Pe
dog trained for entomology Springs Police half year
use can cost around Department.
$10,000 and a fully-trained "It allows
narcotics dog can reach the department to get dogs
as much as $30,000. The for far less than what the
cancer-detecting dogs are cost is," Peruyero said. "It
not for sale, allows us to cover expenses,
"How can you- put a but to donate locally, and as
price on a dog that detects a law enforcement family,
cancer?" Peruyero, asked, it's something we want,to
"Both my wife and I are do."


Named after Peruyero's
son and daughter, J & K
Canine Academy is truly a
family business. Jose is the
general manager; Katrina
heads public relations, and
Peruyero's wife handles
book keeping and the
financial aspects of the
business.
The foundation of J &
K began with behavioral
training, and many
families bring in dogs that
have behavioral issues -
anxiety or aggression most
commonly.
"The best part about
this job is being able to see
the relationship develop
between an owner, who
thought the dog, wasn't
Going to be able to ,be6
a part of the family,"
Peruyero said,. "and a dog,
when all of a sudden they
realize, 'Yes, this dog is
salvageable.'"
Peruyero uses his years


in interrogation and his
daughter's knowledge and
background in psychology
to better help their business
be more than a school, but
a healing and bonding tool
for families.
S"We are more
relationship builders,
between owner and the
dog, husbands and wives,
children and parents,"
Peruyero explained.
"When you have a low-cost
emotional tool with you
24/7, like a dog, it allows


for the family to bond."
With a network of
more than 30 veterinarians,
numerous supporters and
offices nationwide, J & K
Canine Academy is always
looking to see what is next.
Pepe's dogs can detect
termites, bedbugs, search
and rescue cadavers,
narcotics, cancer and
more. Currently they are
in the process of potentially
havitig dogs help sniff out a
citrus grower's nightmare -
citrus canker. With Pepe's


dogs, there is always room
for growth and possibility,
as he makes sure research
and development are an
integral part of the business.
"Our success has
allowed us to do more
and give back to the
community," Peruyero said
with a smile. "We are very
lucky and very blessed."
# # #
E-mail ajohnson@
alachuatoday.com


HSPD:
Continued from page Al

'It's just another tool we'll be

able to use,' said Troiano


identical to this, which was
won in a similar drawing
about two years ago.
He said the. new
equipment has to be sent to
Gainesville to be calibrated
before it is put into use,
which is being done now.
* It also has to be recertified
every six months, which
will amount to about $70


to $100 that the city will
have to pay twice a year
to maintain it. But the
department received the
device one hundred percent
for free.
"It's just another tool
we'll be able to use," said.
Troiano, "to. go out and
provide enforcement."
"Everybody knows,


speeding kills."
# # #
E-mail gcoine@
alachuatoday.pom


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GLENN COINE/Alachua County Today
pe Peruyero; his wife, Maggie Peruyero; son, Jose Peruyero; daughter, Katrina Gomez along with their one-and-a-
t old beagle Carl and three year old yellow lab Tebow.













Hundreds of People Cash In at the Gainesville Roadshow Yesterday!


By Jason Delong
Treasure Hunters Roadshow
STAFF WRITER

Yesterday at the Courtyard by
Marriott, hundreds lined up to
cash antiques, collectibles, gold and
jewelry in at the Roadshow. The free
event is in Gainesville all week buying
gold, silver antiques and collectibles.
One visitor I spoke with yesterday

"It is unbelievable, I
brought in some old coins
that had been in a little
cigar box for years and
some old herringbone
necklaces and in less than
fifteen minutes I left with
a check for $712.37."

said "It's unbelievable, I brought
in some old coins that had been in a
little cigar box for years and some
old herringbone necklaces and in less
than fifteen minutes I left with a check
for $712.37. That stuff has been in my
jewelry box and dresser for at least 20
years." Another gentlemen brought
an old Fender guitar his father bought
years ago. "Dad had less than fifty
bucks in that guitar." The Roadshow
expert that assisted him, made a few
phone calls and a Veterinarian in
Seattle, Washington bought the guitar
for $5700.00. The seller continued,
"I goti another $150.00 for a broken
necklace and an old class ring. it's
not .everyday someone brings six


thousand dollars to town with your
name on it."
Jeff Parsons, President of the
Treasure Hunters Roadshow
commented, "Lots of people have
items that they know are valuable but
just don't know where to sell them.
Old toys, trains, swords, guitars,


pocket watches or just about anything
old is valuable to collectors. These
collectors are willing to pay big money
for those items they are looking for."
This week's Roadshow is the place to
get connected with those collectors.
The process is free and anyone can
brings items down to the event. If the


Roadshow experts find items their
collectors are interested in, offers
will. be made to purchase those
items. About 80% of the guests that
attend the show end up selling one or
more items at the event.
Antiques and collectibles are
notf' tonll itepm the fRoadshow'


Gold and Silver pour into yesterdays Roadshow
due to highest prices in 40 years.


Collectors desire vintage military items,
Items from both U.S. and foreign
origins from the Civil War, World War
I, World War II, Spanish-American
War, Revolutionary War and Calvary
times have great value. Items such as
swords, daggers, medals, hardware
bayonets, etc.


All sports memorabilia is in high demand including:
Pre 1970's baseball cards; autographed baseballs, foot-
balls & basketballs, jerseys; signed photos; etc..


roaasnow ,orin and gorl expert raul
Dichraff examines a large presentation of
coins, gold and collectibles.


. Here is how it works:
SGather items of interest from your
attic, garage, basement, etc There is
no limit to the amount of items you
.can bring
No appointment necessary
If interested in selling, we will
consult our collector's database to see
if a buyer exists. 90% of all items have
offers in out database
The offer Is made on the spot on
S ehslflaf ouf r collectors making the

If you decide to accept the offer, we
will pay you on the spot and ship the
item to the collector. The collector
pays all shipping and handling
charges
SYeN et IO10 of the offer with no
hidden fees
blrmim nuts






The Treasure Hunter's Roadshow
event continues through Saturday
in Gainesville.


www.treasurehuntersroadshow.com

























Cash in with the power of the
International Collectors Association
Treasure Hunters Roadshow represents over.
5000 members worldwide who are paving
TOP DOLLAR the following types of Items.


. COINS Any and all coins made before 1964. This includes all
silver and gold coins, dollars, half dollars, quarters, dimes, nickels
and pennies. All conditions wanted!

. GOLD & SILVER PRICES AT 40 YEAR 'HIGH! for platinum, gold
ard silver during this event. Broken jewelry, dental gold, old coins,
pocket watches, Kruggerands, Gold bars Canadian Maple Leafs, etc.

* JEWELRY Gold, Silver, Platinum. diamonds, rubies. sapphires and
all types of stones, metals, etc. Rings, bracelets, necklaces, all others
including broken jewelry. Early costume jewelry wanted.

* WATCHES & POCKET WATCHES Rolex, Tiffany, Hublot, Omega.
Chopard, Cartier, Philippe, Ebel, Waltham, Swatch, Chopard, Elgin.
Bunn Special, Railroad, Illinois, Hamilton, all others.

.TOYS, TRAINS & DOLLS All types of toys made before 1965
including. Hot Wheels, Tonka, Buddy L, Smith Miller, Nylint,
Robots, battery toys, Mickey Mouse, train sets, all gauges,
accessories, individual cars, Marklin, American Flyer. Lionel,
Hafner, all other trains, Barbie Dolls, GI Joe. Shirley Temple.
Characters. German, all makers accepted.

* MILITARY ITEMS, SWORDS Civil War, Revolutionary War. WWI.
WWII, etc. Items of interest include swords, badges, clothes, photos.
medals, knives, gear. letters, The older the swords, the better. All
types wanted.

* ADVERTISING ITEMS Metal and Porcelain signs, gas companies,
beer and liquor makers, automobile, implements, etc.



Silver and Gold Coin Prices Up
During Poor Economy.
Collectors and Enthusiasts in
Gainesville with $200,000 to
Purchase Yoursl
Got Coin" II might be. usi the time to cash m
SThibs eek starting Tuesdai and continuing
through Saturday. the International Collectors
Association in conjuncuon with Treasure
Hunters Roadshow will be purchasing all types
of siler and gold coins direct from the public
All are welcome and the event is free


aw













We represent many of the
world's tOejunmismatic..
coin colleIors
We have been directly involved in
millions of dollars worth of rare cash
and coin sales over the past 15 years.
Our private collectors are seeking all types of
rare coins and currency.
We-have the resources available to pay you
top prices for all types of rare coins or entire
collections We can arrange a prnate discreet
meeting th you at sour bank or in one iofour
private suales Whether you are ready to sell ycur
lite long collection or vou are senling an estate "e
are at Nour service We are professional. honest
and discreet
From a single item to complete collections. the
most sought after types of coins are
* Any coins dated pnor to 1820, especially those dated
1700's High Grade Early Coins Graded Coins *
Proof Coins Gold Coins with C. D,0 and CC mint
marks Rare Dates Complete Coin Type sets *
Rare Paper Currency


rmic
'BOS


"15 "


", ... .' :,' .., 5 ^ ,,'.' *' . "
'l-4 : 4,.- V. ft.. ." '
W'*?"? ^;: *


is buying. "Gold and silver markets
are soaring." says Archie Davis, a
Roadshow representative. "Broken
jewelry and gold or silver coins add up
very quickly. I just finished working
with a gentleman that had an old class
ring, two bracelets, and handful of

"If you go to the
Roadshow, you can cash-in
your items for top dollar.
Roadshow representatives
will be available to assess
and purchase your items at
the Courtyard by Marriott
through Saturday in
Gainesville."

silver dollars,... his check was for over
$650.00. I would say that there were
well over 100 people in here yesterday
that sold their scrap gold."
One gentleman holding his check
for over $1250.00 in the lobby of the
event yesterday had this comment, "I
am so happy I decided to come to the
Roadshow. I saw the newspaper ad for
the event and brought in an old German
sword I brought back from World War
II and some old coins and here is my
check. What a great thing for our
community. I am heading home now
to see what else I have they might be
interested in."
The Roadshow continues today
starting at 9am. The event is free and
no appointment is needed.


Above A couple waits with anticipation while Roadshow expert examines their antiques
and gold items. The Roadshow is at the Courtyard by Marriott this week.


.- A-1


ALACHUA COUNTY TODAY ADVERTISEMENT THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2010


A10


ntIIU neL 1 ontly Le s Inem*






ALACHUA COUNTY TODAY CRIME STOPPERS THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2010 BI









S; Business









l /ra Crime Stoppers Most -


Sponsore: A hiCONYRIME STOOPPERSALCHASOUTYT ODA YM IV I (ij
_________________________________________ PEPRS __________________


An estimated 50 percent
of all crime in the United
States goes unreported.
People are embarrassed, fear
repercussions, or simply feel
reporting crime will not do
any good. Deputies cannot
solve crimes if they do not
know about them or help
prevent crimes in the future
it they do not know about the
problem.


A message from the desk of


Sheriff Sadie Darnell

Report all crime


Regardless of the size
of the crime make a
report with your local law
enforcement agency. Your
report, along with other
similar reports may help
officers recognize a trend or
pattern in your area. This
helps us in law enforcement
identify problems and
address specific needs
unique to the area. Reports
can be filed 24 hours-a-day,


seven-days-a-week, either in
person or by phone. If we can
predict crime, hopefully we
can reduce crime.
Information we need
from you when you call us:
* Nature of the incident.
* Location.
* Date and time of the
incident.
* Any suspect information
you may have.
* Any vehicle information


you have.
Anyone who may have
information on a crime or
the identity of a suspect
observed may also remain
anonymous and be eligible to
receive a reward up to $1,000
by calling Crime Stoppers
at (352) 372-STOP (7867).
You may also anonymously
submit crime tips to the
Sheriff's Office by visiting
www.alachuasheriff.org.


Make the Call,

Earn a Reward


*I 4

*$


Call (352) 372- Stp


0*@ 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 S 0 0 0 0


Levi
Rentz
Black Male,
6'1", 2/8/67
Black Hair,
Brown Eyes

:Currently
wanted for:
Burglary of a
Conveyance,
Grand Theft,
Criminal
Mischief


Pittman
Black Male,
513",
10/12/71
Black Hair,
Brown Eyes

Currently
wanted for:
Burglary,
Grand Theft


Pierre L.
Dixon
Black Male,
5'2",
10/5/83
Black Hair,
Brown Eyes

Currently
wanted for:
Possession of
Cocaine with
Intent to Sell
or Deliver,
Possession of
a Controlled
Substance


Rutledge
Black Male,
6'1",
6/10/83
Black Hair,
Brown Eyes

Currently
wanted for:
Battery,
Criminal
Mischief,
DWLSR x2


Pedro Leon
Ramone Vincent
Peace Henry
Black Male, Black Male,
6'00", 5'10",
6/6/1985 3/8/1982
Black Hair, Brown Hair,
Brown Eyes Brown Eyes


Currently
wanted for:
Habitual
Driving While
License
Suspended/
Revoked


Holmes
Black Male,
5'09",
8/15/1991
Black Hair,
Brown Eyes

Currently
wanted for:
Prevent/
Hinder
Firefighter,
Burglary


Currently
wanted for:
Criminal
Mischief,
Burglary,
Grand Theft


Jesse
Hall
Black Male,
5'7",
3/10/1982
Black Hair,
Brown Eyes

Currently
wanted for:
Felony Battery
and Child
Support X's 3


Jennifer Amanda
Ann Lee Martin
White White
Female, Female, 5'1",
5'05", 2/20/1984
10/23/1974 Brown Hair,
Brown Hair, Blue Eyes
Brown Eyes


Currently
wanted for:
Possession of
Drug Parapher-
nalia, Driving
While License
Suspended/Re-
voked, Posses-
sion of a Can-
celled/Revoked
Drivers License
F ~]


Willie
Littles
Black Male,
519",
2/8/1979
Black Hair,
Brown Eyes

Currently
wanted for:
Child Support
X's 3


Currently
wanted for:
Fraud
Insufficient
Funds


Lyntez
Jones
Black Male,
5'01",
9/3/1990
Black Hair,
Brown Eyes

Currently
wanted for:
Burglary, Theft


Christian
Rich
Black Male,
5'07",
3/7/1983
Black Hair,
Brown Eyes

Currently
wanted for:
Civil Order
(Child Support)


sann L.
Ayala
Black Male,
5'10",
8/16/1983
Black Hair,
Brown Eyes

Currently
wanted for:
Battery


Toccara
Smith
Black
Female, 5'5",
3/4/1982
Black Hair,
Brown Eyes

Currently
wanted for:
Sell of Cocaine


Dylan
Gray
White Male,
5'09",
7/10/1985
Brown Hair,
Hazel Eyes

Currently
wanted for:
Burglary,
Theft


What should I do?
Review the pictures above. If you know the location of any of these wanted
individuals, please contact the Combined Communications Center at
352-955-1818 or remain anonymous by calling Crime Stoppers at 352-372-STOP.
Callers are eligible for a reward of up to $1,000.
DO NOT APPROACH OR ATTEMPT TO APPREHEND ANY OF THESE INDIVIDUALS.
IF NECESSARY, CALL 911.


ALL *ARRANTSOOO


ACTIVAT IM
OFAPRINTING


19
**


Alihandro R. Frank


)" V







B2 AI.ACI UA COUNTY TODAY RELIGION THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2010


The Trinity Season


Unless you. don't
watch TV or you've
been extremely lucky, no
doubt you've seen a TV
commercial. Some of them
seem to go on forever,
but they actually only last
about 30 seconds. These
commercials try to sell
you something you don't
need or politicians and
their political agenda. No
matter what it is, they dress
it up and package it to sell
to a susceptible American
public in small, easy to
swallow doses. For the
most part, the attention
span for the general public
is about an hour with
commercial interruptions
about every 10 minutes.
What does this have to
do with the Trinity Season?
Well, if we can understand
this time challenged
handicap that Americans
suffer from, we can see
why the value of the Trinity
Season is almost lost on
Christians who can hardly
make it through a video
without a break.
Anglo-Catholics keep
theological themes for
weeks on end, and we do


this so that we can explore
and realize the importance
of the Incarnation,
the Atonement, the
Resurrection, the Ascension
and the Coming of the Holy
Ghost.
There's a way to prepare
for the Trinity Season, to


keep it and
to persevere
through to the
end with all of
the benefits that
the Anglican
tradition
intends. The
first real key to
understanding
the season is
contained in
the Collect, or THE VEN
LEA
the prayer, for LE"
Trinity Sunday. Church,
Almighty A pari!
a n d Christian
Everlasting -Ch
God, who hast
given unto us
thy servants grace, 'by the
confession of a true faith,
to acknowledge the glory
of the eternal Trinity, and
in the power of the Divine
Majesty to worship the
Unity; We beseech thee


N.
,S
Ga
sh

hu


that thou wouldest keep us
steadfast in this faith and
evermore defend us from all
adversities, who livest and
reignest, one God, world
without end. Amen.
As Anglicans, we give
special consideration to
collects that set Seasons
apart from
the rest of the
Church year.
In Advent
and Lent, we
repeat the
collect for
the season
every week
to remind us
to keep the
theme of the
JOHN E. season. In
iURE Advent, we're
Anglican reminded
ainesville. rmn
i of the of Christ's
Episcopal S e c o n d
rch Advent, when
He will come
to be our judge
and gather the faithful.
During Lent, the collect
calls us to account for our-
failings and lean only on
God for forgiveness and
grace
All time is sacred and


redeemable for the sake of
the Kingdom of God and
this is the lesson of the
Christian kalendar. The
collect for Trinity Sunday
sets the season apart and
draws our attention to its
purpose.
There are two themes
that stand out in this
message: Grace to
acknowledge the true Faith,
and Power to worship the
Unity of the Godhead.
The Trinity season
teaches us that our Faith is
God given, not man-made.
The doctrine of the Trinity
is unique to Christianity
and comes from God's
self-revelation. Man's
invention of gods can be
seen in the half-man and
half-beast gods of Greek
mythology or ones with
beastly moral character.
These so-called gods can't
inspire the kind of lasting
praise that the True God
in His perfection of nature


can inspire. Fallen Man is
still higher in dignity than
the beasts of the field that
pagans worship.
The Trinity Prayer
attributes our confession
of the true Faith (the
Trinitarian Faith) to
the Sovereign pleasure,
initiative, and grace of God
alone. God has revealed
Himself to us and by His
grace we confess this Faith.
The Trinity Season reminds
us that our confession and
acknowledgement of the
True Faith, comes purely by
an act of God's Trinitarian
self revelation, and always
by His grace.
We also are called to be
witnesses of this Faith, and
we should acknowledge
this it by living in obedience
to the Word of God. In
St. John's First Epistle
Christians are encouraged
to submit to God, to
expect resistance from the
world if we live the life of


Christ, and to trust in Him
even when we're in severe
tribulation for standing fasi
to the unchanged truth ol
God's word.
Secondly, we see God's
enabling us to worship
Him. It's not entirely ar
act of human strength
that we worship God
Although we must offel
ourselves every day as g
living sacrifice to God, we
must always remember thai
the power to worship, the
will to bend the knee, the
ability to lift empty hands
at the Altar for heavenly
food, comes from God. We
must remember that we are
called to obedience and tc
martyrdom, which is the
Greek word for witness. A,
the Trinity season extends
for weeks on end, we musl
submit to God and enlist
His assistance for strength
in order to fulfill our highest
calling, to worship Him.
# # #


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l YORitCIHRCH. EVENTS-

SLeteveryone know about special activities

ypur church has on the horizon. Call

(386) 462-3355, fax (386)462-4569 or email

to gail@AlachuaToday.com.. All community

S announcements are found on A3.


Cabletelevisionsubscription:

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A ua Count obapAachua Business
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The Heartland Community Places of Worship


Alachua church of Christ
14505 NW 145th Avenue
Sunday Bible Classes 9:30 a.m.
Assembly at 10:30 a.m.
Evening Service 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Class 6:30 p.m.
Minister Doug Frazier
(386) 462-3326



oel3lowshIp
S Church
Contemporary Praise & Worship
Sunday at 9:30 a.m. & 11 a.m.
16916NW US Hwy441, High Springs
386-454-1700
www.FellowshipOnline.org


HIGH SPRINGS CHURCH
OF CHRIST
520 NE Santa Fe Boulevard
Bible Classes forAlAges 9:30 am.
Worship 10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship 6 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Classes 7 p.m.
highspringscofc@alltel.net
Pastor: Cori Lewis (386)454-2930

New St. Mary Missionary
Baptist Church
13800 NE 158thAvenue, Alachua 32616
Rev. Daniel H. McNish, Pastor
Phone & Fax (386) 462-7129
Services: Sunday School 9:30 am.
Moming Wotdp 11 am.-lst, 2nd, 3rd Sunday
Quarterly 11 am. 4th Sun. BirthdayRally
Service; Tuesday Evening 7 p.m.
Prayer Meeting & Bible Study


l1l saints nglican Clllurc
Apuij hfdCiea rC pisEpal&urh
Where worship is our central act
Where the apostolic tradition is
upheld
Where we kneel to pray
Where worshipful music
is the standard
Where traditional liturgy
is the norm
S* Where the Holy Scriptures
are proclaimed
.Where a prayerful and quiet
atmosphere is provided
* Where traditional values are taught
* Where we seek to proclaim a risen
Savior in our daily life and work
Come Join Us
Bible Study 9:30 a.m. Church 10:30 am.
and other special services as announced.
12880 NW 39thAvenue
(352) 317-5757 www.AllsaintsXnEC.org


First United Methodist
Church of Alachua
14805 NW 140th Street 462-2443
Pastor Dr. Adam Zele
Jeff Van Valey, Youth & Children's Minister
Traditional Worship, 8:45 & 11 a.m.
Contemporary Worship 6 p.m.
Sunday School 9:45 am.
www.alachuafirstunitedmethodist.org


Impact Service Times
Sunday 10:30 a.m. & 6:30.p.m.
,AM ., o H uR C Wednesday 7:30 p.m.
i vsYouth Service Wed. 7:30 p.m.
pact1rathi tf Senior Pastors: Edwin & Angela Anderson
ith te ord." 386-454-1563
God's www.impactfamilychurch.com
16710 NW US 441 Between High Springs & Alachua

Services
f Sunday: 10:30 a.m. & 6 p.m.
f Life Children's Church 10:30 a.m.
Assembly of God Tuesday: Youth Service 7 p.m.
Wednesday:
Located at 14200 NW 148th Place Adult & Children Bible Study 7 p.m.
Downtown Alachua Nursery provided for all services.
www.riveroflifeassembly.org Pastor Greg Evans 352-870-7288


The Beatitudes
September 26th
Blessed are the Pure in Heart
October 3rd
Blessed are the Peacemakers
October 10th
Blessed are Those Who are Persecuted
October 17th
Homecoming: Guest Speaker, Rich Layer


New Oak Grove Baptist Church
Sunday School 10 a.m.,
Worship 11 a.m., Evening Service 6 p.m.
Wednesday Fellowship Meal 6 p.m.
Bible Study 7 p.m.
RAs, GAs & Students 7 p.m.
Nursery Provided
Terry Elixson, Jr., Pastor
386-462-3390 18100NW262Avenue

St. Luke A.M.E. Church
Rev. Jessie L. Steele, Pastor
14950 Martin Luther King Blvd/Hwy 441
Alachua 32616
386.462.2732(church) 386.462.4396 (Fax)
Email: stlukeamechurch@windstream.net
Morning Worship: 11 a.m.;
Church School 9:45 a.m.
Bible Study: 7 p.m. (2nd & 4th Wednesdays)
h7rne: PUSH.-Pn,ut SonelhiyHqpw


Archer Church of God in Christ
Services:
Sunday School 9:15 a.m.-
Sunday Morning Worship 10:30 a.m.
5th Sunday Morning Worship 8:00 a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Youth Ministry 6:30 p.m.
17370 S W 128th Place, Archer, FL 32618
Marilyn V. Green, Pastor
352.495.9811

First Presbyterian
SChurch of Alachua
S Rev. ViginiaMcDal, Pastor
14623 NW 140 Street
(386) 462-1549
Sunday School 9 am., Worship
Service 10:30 am. Nursery provided.
www.firstpresalachua.org

Foundation Chapel Church
of God by Faith
Sunday: Sunday School 10 p.m.; Mid-Day
Worship 11:30 am.; Children's Church 6
p.m.; Evening Worship 6 p.m.; Tuesday:
YSB 7p.m. Wednesday: Outreach
Fellowship Dinner 6 pm.; General Prayer
Service 7:30 p.m.-
13220 NW 150th Avenue, Alachua
Pastor Willie J. McKnightSr. 462-2549

PASSAGE
Family Church
"Reaching people where they are"

2020 NE 15 Street
tor eorge and Gainesville
Lady Michele Dix (352) 336-8686
Sunday.Services: '
8 a.m. "Flying High" Morning Worship
9:30 a.m. Sunday School
11 a.m.- Morning Glory Worship
& Children's Church
Wednesday Services:
12 noon NoornDay Prayer
7 p,m. Prayer & Bible Study
Youth Services:
7 p.m. Wednesday
7 p.m. Fourth Fridays
www.passageministries.org


Bethesda Outreach
Ministries of Alachua
Services;
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship 11 a.m.
2rid Sundays Street Ministry at Criswell Park 4 p.m.
Thursday Bible Study 7:30 p.m.
13205 NW 157 Avenue, Alachua, FL 32616
(Two streets behind Criswell Park)
352-339-4466
Elders Nyron and LaShandra Jenkins


8e5ond cT e Box
f&l&atty# tn 6tftt, en
Elder Cynthia Taylor, Pastor
has moved to a new location
530 N. Main Street, High Springs, FL
(behind Hardees)
Bible Study Wed. 7 p.m
Sunday Pastoral Teaching 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship 11a.m.
Church: (386) 454-2367
Cell: (386) 878-9568


M First Baptist Church of Alachua
ImPAcINo One Block east of Main Street in Alachua
"iiMM "1 (386) 462-1337

Sunday: 9:30 a.m. Bible Study 10:45 a.m. Worship
Wednesday: 6 7:30 p.m. Children's Ministries, Youth Activities
and-Choir Rehearsal *6:15-7:15 p.m. Mid-Week Bible Study


I= m


i I







Al.A'uIIiA COUNTY TODAY CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2010 B3


-lacl-ub Count obap BY PHONE BY MAIL
0 0 Call (386) 462-3355 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
Hours to place, correct or cancel ads: Alachua County Today
Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. P.O. Box 2135, Alachua, FL 32616
C la ssiicotaat BY E-MAIL BY FAX
accounting@alachuatoday.com (386) 462-4569

t; P ..:- ? ." .~ ... .., , . .. .,: -. -' .. I


NOTICE OF PUBLIC
SALE: A-1 AUTO
REPAIRS OF ALACHUA
INC gives Notice of
Foreclosure, of Lien
and intent to sell these
vehicle on 10/15/2010,
10:00 a.m. at 14515 NW
PEGGY RD, ALACHUA,
FL 32615-5449, pursuant
to subsection 713.78 of the
Florida Statutes. A-1 AUTO
REPAIRS OF ALACHUA
INC reserves the right to
accept or reject any and/
or all bids. '

1G1NE52J716206658
2001 CHEVROLET

(Published: Alachua
; County Today -
S September 23, 2010)
IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT FOR ALACHUA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION

SFile Number: 2010-CP-
1188
Division: A

IN RE: ESTATE OF JAMES
D. GAMMAGE,
DECEASED.

NOTICE TO
CREDITORS


I.,

a



A.


The administration of
the estate of JAMES D.
GAMMAGE, deceased,
whose date of death was
August 2, 2010, and whose
social security number is
265-20-5032, is pending
in the Circuit Court for
Alachua County, Florida,
Probate Division, the
address of which is 201
East University Avenue,
Gainesville, Florida,


32601. The names and
addresses of the personal
representatives and the
personal representatives'
attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the
decedent and other
persons having claims
or demands against
decedent's estate on whom
a copy of this notice is
required to be served must
file their clain)s with this
Court WITHIN THE LATER
OF 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of
the decedent and. other
persons having claims
or demands against
decedent's estate must
file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT
FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH
.IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE
CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING
THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER
THE DECEDENT'S DATE
OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first
publication of this Notice is
September 16, 2010.

Attorney for Personal
Representative
/s/ Peter C.K. Enwall
PETER C.K. ENWALL,
P.A.
Attorney for Petitioners
4110 NW 37th Place,.Suite
B
Post Office Box 357117
Gainesville, FL 32635-7117


(352) 376-6163
Florida Bar No. 161601

Personal Representative:
/s/ Catherine G. Collins
CATHERINE G. COLLINS,
Petitioner
1415 NW 12th Road
Gainesville, FL 32605

/s/ Bethany G. Willis,
Petitioner
BETHANY G. WILLIS,
Petitioner
P.O. Box 1546
Lake City, FL 32056

(Published: Alachua
County Today -
September 16 and 23,
2010)








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C&R Produce, 13789 NW
US Hwy 441, Alachua.
Georgia Peaches,
Cucumbers, Florjda
Broccoli & Cauliflower,


*e Bines
140 Man teeAlcuam s


(386 4623355Fax:(386 462456


Acre Peas, Butter Beans
& Fordhooks, Bell Peppers,
Organic Glueberries,
Shelled Pecans, Local
Yellow Squash & Zucchini,
Cabbage, Local Honey,
Brown Eggs, Foothills
Butter, Fresh Local Silver
Queen Corn, Amish Jellies
and Jams, N. Carolina
Apples & Apple Cider.
CANNING QUANTITIES
AVAILABLE. Call 386-
462-6158.






FARMWORKS, FARM
AND RANCH ANIMALS
New Haven, Vermont Area.
6 temporary positions at
Misty Knoll Farms. Workers
needed to slaughter and
pack meat. Will perform
slaughtering task and
meat cutting standards. To
start approx. 10/11/10 to
11/26/2010. A great deal of
heavy lifting, standing and
bending for long periods of
time. Wage is $ 10.16 per hr.
Prod. standards required.
Work is guaranteed for
3/4 of contract period.
Tools are provided without
cost. Housing provided
at no cost to workers
who reside outside of
the normal commuting
distance. Transportation
cost reimbursed after 15
days or 50% of contract
period, whichever comes
first. Contact the nearest
Department of Labor Office
for application and referral.
Job order number: 83868
DRIVERS--ASAPI New
Pay Increasel 37-43 cpm
Fuel Bonus -up to 4cpm!
Need CDL-A & 3 mos
recent OTR (877)258-8782
www.meltontruck.com


Drivers-CDL-A drivers.
No experience, no
problem Need more
training? We can help.
Must be 23. (888)632-
5230. www.JoinWiltrans.
com
Drivers FOOD TANKER
DRIVERS NEEDED
OTR positions available


NOW! CDL-A w/ Tanker
REQ'D. Outstanding pay
& Benefits! Call a recruiter
TODAY! (877)484-3042
www.oakleytransDort.com
Colonial Life seeks
entrepreneurial

CLASSIFIED
Continued on page B4


BUYING!!

BUYING!!

BUYING!! .
COINS DIAMONDS
ESTATE JEWELRY PAPER MONEY
GOLD SILVER PLATINUM
STERLING FLATWARE_

COIN & JEWELRY GALLERY
(Formerly National Coin Investors)
IN THE MILLHOPPER SHOPPING CENTER
2007 NW 43Rb ST., GAINESVILLE, FL
1-800-330-1555 OR 352-378-3983




How much coverage do
you get for $72?

More than you think.
BlueOptions lower-cost health insurance policies for
Individuals Under 65. It's the same high-quality
coverage you expect at a lower price you can afford.
Call 352-373-0775 to learn more
about this affordable coverage.
Chip Williams & Associates, Inc.
3669 S.W. 2nd Avenue
Gainesville, FL 32607
A Contracted General Agency for
S BlueCross BlueShield
of Florida


S**








* Cuts





* Color





* Perms





* Highlights







3 74






B4 AI.ACl'IIUA COUNTY TODAY CLASSIFI!EDS TI'lIHURSDAY, SII'TEMBFR 23, 2010


CLASSIFIED:
Continued fiom page B3
professional with sales
experience to become
a District Manager. Life/
Health license is required.
Substantial earnings
potential. Please contact
meredith.brewer .
coloniallife.com or call
(904)424-5697
Drivers-CDLIA $2,000
SIGN-ON BONUS Start
upto.42CPM. Good Home
Time and Benefits. OTR
Experience Required. No
Felonies. Lease Purchase


Available. (800)441-4271
x FL-100
DRIVERS:
CRST NEEDS YOU!
IMMEDIATE
opportunities!
No CDL, No problem!
CDL Training Available.
Great Benefits & Start
Earning $750-800/wk!
Call Today!
1-866-457-6236
Cash paid for junk cars.
$150 and up. Running or
not. Free pick up. 352-
771-6191.


BURIED IN CREDIT
CARD DEBT?
e CanSate YO0 TOUSANDS of Dollats& Help YOUEiBminate YOUR
1ATED 'A' WITH THE BBB! Lo.er our nalrensiop aaran --


FARMWORKS, FARM
AND RANCH ANIMALS
New Haven, Vermont
Area. 4 temporary
positions at Misty Knoll
Farms. Workers needed to
slaughter and pack meat.
Will perform slaughtering
task and meat cutting
standards. To start approx.
10/11/10 to 12/23/2010. A
great deal of heavy lifting,
standing and bending
for long periods of time.
Wage is $ 10.16 per hr.
Prod. standards required.
Work is guaranteed for
3/4 of contract period.
Tools are provided without
cost. Housing provided
at no cost to workers
who reside outside of
the normal commuting
distance. Transportation
cost reimbursed after 15
days or 50% of contract
period, whichever comes
first. Contact the nearest
Department of Labor
Office for application and
referral. Job order number:
83869


$Lawsuit Cash$
Advances. Waiting for
a legal settlement? Get
Cash NOW! Lowest Fees!
Fast Approval! (888)495-
8931
Buried in Debt? Want
to Save Thousands &
Eliminate Your Debt up
to 60%? We Can HELP!
Call NOW for a FREE
Consultation! (888)496-
3167 Rated "A" with the
BBB!
IT'S YOUR MONEY
Lump sums paid for
structured settlement or
fixed annuity payments.
Rapid, high payouts. Call
J.G. Wentworth. (866)294-
8772. A+ Better Business
Bureau rating.


Alachua Vil[as Apartments
2 Bedroom Apt.
starting at $494/mo.

Available NOW!
Call 386-462-5832
STDD# 1-800-955-8771 F
y 14000 NW 154 Ave., Alachua
This institution is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer"


NEW Norwood
SA W M IL L S -
LumberMate-Pro
handles logs 34" diameter,
mills boards 28" wide.
Automated quick-
cycle-sawing increases
efficiency up to 40%!
www.NorwoodSawmills.
com/300N (800)661-7746
Ext 300N


BUY N.C. MOUNTAIN
LAND NOW! Lowest
prices ever! Bryson City
2.5acres, spectacular
views, paved road. High
altitude. Easily accessible,
secluded. $45,000. Owner
CLASSIFIED
Continued on page B6


WEL BEAT ANYLOCAL COMPETITOR'SPRICE* I
h uin l *Must present written quote. Alachua Business Center will beat sign quotes
rlechuaU usie"rss of like materials and quantities.
W 14804 MAIN STREET, ALACHUA (386)462-3355


SunState Federal Credit Union

& Alachua County Today


Partners in Education


SunState Federal Credit Union and Alachua
County Today are partnering to bring you "Young
Patriots." The purpose of this campaign is to get young
people reading. Alachua County Today will publish
an 8-chapter serialized short story, "Young Patriots"
as part of our Newspapers in Education program. The
newspapers will be sent home with the students after
the project for the week is completed so that parents can
share the stories with their children.


Ben'Collins and his two friends are America's
first "Young Patriots." Self-appointed spy catchers,
they help America fight for independence. At his
grandfather's livery stable in Philadelphia in 1776, Ben
meets delegates to the Continental Convention. From
them, he learns the value of education and is button-
busting proud when John Adams calls Ben and his
friends "Young Patriots."


chapter Three- by Kay ively


With his work'done at the livery stable, Ben raced home. As
he rushed through the back door, the warm kitchen felt good.
Although it was spring, it had been a cold day. Grandmother was
setting the little table with three plates. Grandfather always sat
in the big chair with arms. Grandmother satacross from him,
and Ben had a small chair between his grandparents.
Since his parents died, Ben had lived with his grandparents. He
missed his parents very much and thought about them every
day. But his grandparents were good to him and watched after r
him. His grandmother was a good cook and she made all his
clothes. His grandfather let him work at the livery stable. That
was something he liked more than anything else in the world.
At the livery he met many people, earned money and was
learning to work with horses. Ben hoped one day to have
his own stable and blacksmith shop.
Ben loved his grandparents. The only thing he didn't like was
when his grandmother talked about him going to school. Ben
didn't think he needed to go to school. He wouldn't need to
read or write to be a blacksmith.
Just as he always did when he came home each day, Ben brought
in firewood for his grandmother. While he was washing his hands
and face, Ben saw his grandfather coming up the front walk. It
was time to eat
When they finished supper, Ben and his grandfather rested from
their long day at work. By the light of a candle, Grandfather began
to read. Ben asked what he was reading. Grandfather said it was
called "Common Sense." Then Grandfather told Ben that he
should start learning to read.
Ben admitted that he would like to know what the papers said.
He could see that people loved to read, but he did not want to
go to school. Maybe, he thought, he could teach himself to read.



Classroom Extensions
Things to Think About and Do -
A. Why did Grandfather read by candlelight? Grandfather
was reading "Common Sense." Find out what "Common
Sense" was about.
B. What time did Ben go to bed? What time do you go to
bed? Should Ben have sneaked out of the house?

Net0ek:Cape Fur-Lo 6dI


SUNSTATE \ '-
SFEDERAL CREDIT UNION O
Your one trusted financial partner
A message from the sponsor: Parents interested in
teaching their kids about finances will find an array of
financial literacy resources available at www.sunstatefcu.
org. SunState Federal Credit Union has financial
literacy modules and more for children of all ages and
adults too. Many of the tools for children are fun to work


When it was very dark outside, Ben's grandfather
said it was bedtime. Ben looked at the clock on
the parlor wall. It was 8:15.
In his room under the stairs, Ben put his copper
in a little bank, took off his shoes and crawled
into bed fully dressed. Not long after he was
under the covers, Ben heard his grandparents
call good night to him as they started up the '
narrow'steps to bed.
The house was quiet when Ben slipped out
of bed, picked up his shoes and crept out the
back door. It was only a short way to the old
church.
Ben stayed in the dark alley as he made his way toward the meeting
place. Only a barking dog and two howling cats broke the stillness.
Ben could see almost nothing because clouds iid the moon.
Suddenly a tremendous crash rattled Ben's ears. As he turned
to see what had happened, he heard hoof beats racing down
the alley. In the dim light, he saw a man on horseback bearing
down on him, Ben could not get out of.the way there was
no place to hide.


Author Kay Hively and Illustrator Billie Gofourth-Stewart are
both of Neosho, Missouri Produced in partnership with this
newspaper and the Missouri Press Foundation with support
from Verizon Foundation. Copyright2002.


cjuaO QCoumrttj aObap
srJ nl kr Cominmtlrs fAlachdua COwn
with and include games, puzzles, and more. SunState
Federal Credit Union strongly supports literacy both in
the classroom and at home, and we encourage parents to
start teaching their children early about the importance
of financial responsibility.


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ALACHUA BUSINESS CENTER
14804 MAIN STREET, ALACHUA
386-462-3355, EXT. 0

Answers for SUPER CROSSWORD on B6
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A.ACIIUA COUNTY TODAY BUSINESS & SERVICES DIRECTORY THURSDAY, SI''vI-EMBni 23, 2010 B5



Business & Services Directory


Call (386') 462-3355 today
for more, InIfo --ion.
[t'iTi riIji:: fTfrTT'TrTT
i^^^^rr~r^Th^4^>^^
|^ ^TT^~3^atn'e '7*,


MKM Electrical Services, Inc.
RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL


SERVICE REPAIRS REMODEL WORK
NEW CONSTRUCTION COMPETITIVE RATES
LIC. #EC13003662 FREE ESTIMATES

S. HAY FARM .
SCOTT HAY FARM

85/Coastalnermuda $50
full size round bale per bale
Cow Bermuda $38
full size round bale per bale



G- & CQP.YXNG SERVICES,

~3Alachua
1 Printing

15281 NW US Hwy 441 Alachua
386-462-5997


On Main Street
in Downtown
Beautiful Alachua


"Family dining with
a little something
for everyone"

Mon.-Sat.at 11 a.m.
(386) 462-1294


K- K.%


BOUTIQUE


-kL T


Yrtssy Ym4s
Unique Items & Grifs 9 Monogamin)af ila ble

386-462-9671
www.pjrissypOs.com
1486 N in Str)eet, Atchua
CLEANING AND LAWN CARE


RESIDENTIAL &
COMMERCIAL
Pressure Wash/Painting
Mobile Car Detail
Free Estimates Low Rates
Se Habla Espanol
Licensed and Insured
352-225-3798 Cell: 352-225-1094
GOOD THINGS TO EAT
C & R PRODUCE
13789 NW U.S. Hwy. 441 Alachua, FL 32615






Local Produce (386) 462-6158




LOver 25 years experience, one-on-one & classroom setting
.Taught in Santa Fe College, high schools and in countries
Such as Bolivia, Colombia & Dominican Republic
.Teach the whole gamut from pre-algebra to AP Calculus AB
.Average grade of high school students I taught was 90.



PRINTING & COPYING SERVICES
< High Springs
Copy Center
Lower your printing costs, not your expectations
We guarantee we will beat any
printing store's written quotes
by 20% or more
(386) 454-0001


RESTAURANTS



6 JT6 $500 maw



5202- NW 1h De -00 A -418-
15202 NW 147th Drive, Suite 1100, Alachua (386) 418-1039


CARPET CLEANING SERVICE
A-1 Academy Carpet Cleaners
Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning


* Residential/Commercial
* Free on Location Estimates
* Family Owned & Operated


I Meeting Professional Industry Standards
Er orn6 4 I


MEDICAL SERVICES
FAMILY MEDICAL CENTER
A Dietes, your b s











Providing care for the whole family

SCardiovascular Disease NEW HOURS:
SAnnual PE's Monday-Thursday
oDrug Screening omainm
DOT, Sports & School PE's. \ a.f'-6 m
SMost Insurance Accepted 9 Friday .m.

MichR erigM, A 3646-12


SONNY'S REALPIT- BAR- U.S. 441' 17S! Alachua (386) 4623180
ROOFING SERVICES.

MAC JOHNSON

ROOFING
S- 104 Southwest 266 St, Newberry
352-472-4943
-! 866-376-4943
**m www.macjohnsonroofing.com


SENIOR SERVICES





Making Life Easier"
386-462-3339
*Companionship 'Light Housekeeping *Laundry 'Meal Preparation
*Personal Emergency Response System 'Errand Services 'Medication Reminders


1. 9 ADOPTiONr


IW RESPOND


32750 I m3 2 4i


Florida Home Auctions Sep 21 Oct 8
A 1 Nominal Opening Bids
S- from $1,000


S FL R [LIC K3223097 DANIEL NELSON BROKER AUC
LIC cAUI23R 1ONY IANGDON AULIK)ONLR BUYI.R S
PR'HEMIUM MAY ArPLY


For details, see
williamsauction.com
Many Available -b
for Online w' II*AM & AWIRLIAM
Bidding -" "'"" "'t
800.801 8003


STIia 11


I| ELECTRICAL SERVICES


r-


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c







B6 ALACHUA COUNTY TODAY CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2010


CLASSIFIED:
Continued from page B4
financing: (800)810-1590
www.wildcatknob.com
5 AC Alachua
Beautifully wooded on
paved road frontage.
Great area! Convenient to
Gainesville. Dev Potential!
Only $877/mo. $99,900
Total 352-215-1018.
1 AC GILCHRIST
COUNTY
Paved road frontage on
CR 138. Cleared homesite.
High and Dry! OWNER
FINANCING! NO DOWN
PAYMENT! Only $256/


mo. Total $24,900. Call
352-215-1018.







NATIONAL ARMS SHOW
GUN SHOW SEPT. 25-26
SAT. 9-5 & SU.N. 10-5
ATLANTA EXPO CENTER
(3650 JONESBORO RD
SE) EXIT #55 OFF 1-285
BUY-SELL-TRADE INFO:
(563)927-8176


Moving Sale
352-359-2222
Dresser, excellent
condition. TV stand,
miscellaneous items.
A rummage sale to raise
money for the Archer
Youth Athelic Scholarships
will be held on Saturday,
Oct. 2nd and Oct. 9th from
7 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Old
Fire Station on the cormer
of State Road 45 (US27)
and 137th Ave. in Archer.
Donations are needed and
appreciated. Please call


Sara Brannon at 352-514-
8431 to arrange delivery or
pick up of donations.



For Sale:
Steel burn barrels with
removable lids $10.00 ea.
Plastic storage barrels with
removable lids $15.00 ea.
Washer, Westinghouse
H.D. large cap. Like
new with Hotpoint dryer
$250.00. Call 386-454-
3553.


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- Train for high paying
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Utility Credit Get a
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$150 and up. Running or
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of Attorney and the General Power of
today Attorney in that it can remain in effect even
y' is a legal if the Maker becomes incapacitated, unlike
rson by which the other two which terminate when the
ves, to another Maker becomes incompetent or unable to
-half of the first handle his or her own affairs. The Durable
Sof the "Power Power of Attorney has been called a 'poor
man's guardianship.' There are certain
ranted by the exceptions as to when a Durable Power of
ecific language Attorney may not be used if the maker is
Lttomey. It can incapacitated.
ted to a certain Any of the three Powers of Attorney
listed above may be terminated at any
es of Powers of time by the Maker. If the Attorney in Fact
called a Limited believes the Maker to be incompetent,
authorizes the unless it is a Durable Power of Attorney,
of Attorney is then the Power of Attorney given him
torney in Fact," or her is invalid. If the Attorney in Fact
of 18, to do a is uncertain as to the competency of the
it may be used Maker, he or she should consult with
ite. a lawyer and bring the matter before a
ver ofAttorney' Circuit Judge.
Attorney which However, while a Power of Attorney
to perform any can be a very useful tool to assist those
laker. Usually,. who have difficulty doing various tasks for
es of activities one reason or another, there are dangers
lorized to do is involved. Three Rivers Legal Services
sees many people, usually relatives or close
'er of Attorney friends, who see abuses committed by
r of Attorney, those to whom Powers of Attorneys have
Limited Power been given. The problem becomes more
serious when the Maker is incapacitated.


school after a loss


Help children to know they are not alone


By DIANA WAYNE
Special to
Alachua County Today
Some students have
returned to school after
a recent loss a parent,
sibling or someone else
they were close to.
For children who may
need special attention
this school year, Haven
Hospice Bereavement
Counselor Vonceil Levine
tells guidance counselors
about Haven's grief support
services. The free services
include individual and
family counseling as well
as Camp Safe Haven, a day
that brings children who
have experienced a loss
together to support each
other.
"When guidance
counselors are aware
of kids' needs, we're a
resource for them," said
Levine. "We're here to
support children through
grief and loss."
Richard Rowell, a
Gainesville father of two,
learned about Haven's
grief support services at
the hospital the day his
wife died. "I had no idea
Haven Hospice would be
able to help me with this,"
said Rowell, who lost Jill
after a 10-month battle with
leukemia. "I wasn't aware
of the support services
Haven provides." Jill had
been in remission, but
developed an infection and
died unexpectedly, which
left Rowell wondering how
to tell his seven-year-old
daughter Carlie and two-
year-old son Evan. Carlie
knew her mother was sick,
but her parents had done all
they could to keep things as
normal as possible at home
and at school.
"For Carlie, her
Mommy's death was pretty
shocking," Rowell said. "I
wondered what to do next."


Levine advised him how to
tell Carlie what was wrong
with Mommy and what had
happened.
At Levine's suggestion,
Rowell enrolled Carlie in
the next session of Camp
Safe Haven for 6 12
year-olds. Carlie met other
children who had lost a
parent, including a girl her
age.whose father had died.
"She understands," Carlie
told her dad.
"Our camps give
children the peer support
they need," Levine said.
"They also help families
to know that it's okay to
grieve."
"The four parents who
attended were all close
in age and we had all lost
our spouses," Rowell said.
"We all had kids around the
same age, so it was a nice
connection to make.
"One of my concerns
about taking Carlie to this
camp was that she's doing
well," her father added.
"I don't want to open
something she's not ready
to talk about. At the same
time, I don't want to miss
anything she might want to
talk about.
"It's been good for me
to meet with Vonceil to
make sure I'm doing what


I need to do for my kids,"
Rowell said. "I feel like
I'm doing pretty well." He
plans to bring Carlie to see
Levine every six.months or
so, "just to make sure I'm
not missing anything."
Camp Safe Haven
has served more than 100
children and adults this year
and Haven has provided
counseling sessions to 25
families with children.
Levine also works with
children at risk and gives
talks to kids. For more
information, contact her at
352-692-5105 or 800-727-
1889.
Haven Hospice is North
Florida's expert in end-of-
life and palliative care and
is one of three 2008 Circle
,of Life Award winners
nationwide to be recognized
as leaders in improving the
care of patients near the
end of life or with life-
threatening conditions.
Haven Hospice has served
more than 45,000 patients
and families since 1979 and
has been licensed in Florida
as a not-for-profit hospice
since 1980. For more
information, visit www.
havenhospice.org or call
800-727-1889.
# # #


Usually, it will require a judge or a jury to
determine who is telling the truth and what
it just and proper.
As with many other things, the best
advice is that if a Power of Attorney
is being considered, to consult with an
attorney and ask him or her to create one
for you. If you cannot afford an attorney,
you may call Three Rivers Legal Services
to find out if you qualify for our services.
The material in this article is intended
only to offer general information and is
not intended as legal advice. It is always
best to consult an attorney about your legal
rights and responsibilities regarding your
particular case.
The foregoing information is provided


by the lawyers at Three Rivers Legal
Services, Inc., a non-profit corporation that
receives funds from various local agencies
and individuals, as well as from the federal
government through Legal Services
Corporation (LSC).
If you live in Alachua, Baker, Bradford,
Gilchrist, Levy or Union counties, you
may call our Gainesville office at 352-
372-0519. If you live in Columbia, Dixie,
Hamilton, Lafayette, Madison, Suwannee,
or Taylor counties, you may call our Lake
City office at 386-752-5960. If you live in
Clay, Duval, Nassau or St. Johns counties,
you may call our Jacksonville office at 904-
394-7450.


Super Crossword

CAMP JINX Answers to SUIER CROSSWORD on B4


ACROSS
1 Obscene
5 Vino center
9 Hydrotherapy site
12 Advanced deg.
15 "The Screwtape
Letters" monogram
18 Concept
19 An Everly brother
20 Shape
22 Chou En- -
23 "The King and I"
setting
24 Bakery display
25 Supermodel
Warren
26 Pantry pest
27 Camper's
comment
31 Munch on a
mango
32 Born
33 Tyrant
35 She got an A in
literature
39 Slap on
41 Seafood selection
45 81 Across' river
46 breve
47 Vientiane's nation
49 German
philosopher
51 Transmit
electronically
52 Camper's
comment
58 Serling or Steiger
59 Troop grp.
60 "There atheists in
the foxholes"
61 Way up
64 "Man bites dog,"
e.g.
66 "You can horse
to ....."
69 Hardware item
70 '70 Jackson 5 hit
73 Camper's


comment
78 "- whizl"
79 Baby bovine
81 Joan of Arc site
82 Perry's creator
83 Beethoven
symphony
86 Delibes opera
89 de la Cite
90 Mimic
93 Camper's
comment
98 Honest name
100 Lucifer
101 Learning method
102 Weft's opposite
103 Remora's host
105 Musical symbol
107 Word form for
"equal"
108 Amontillado, e.g.
110 Table d'-
111 Cruces, NM
113 Cry of satisfaction
114 Camper's
comment
126 Herd word
127 Esteemed
128 Geraint's lady
129 Praise
passionately
130 Caravansary
131 Venezuelan river
132 "Heavens to
Betsy!"
133 Congregational
comeback
134 Order
1135 Clerical abbr.
136 -diem
137 Say it isn't so
138 Ebb

DOWN
1 Actress Virma
2 Touch up the text
3 Disaccustom
4 Knight's wife


5 Enter the picture
6 Haberdashery buy
7 Row
8 "Casablanca"
character
9 Tantrum
10 Western bands
11 Against
12 Ms. Falana
13 "To Sir with Love"
singer
14 Pull
15 Taxonomists job
16 "Evil Ways" group
17 Illuminated
21 Word with take or
hang
28 Center of gravity?
29 Like some pools
30 Colorado native
34 Smith or Stout
35 Salon concern
36 Admiral Zumwalt
37 Coasted
38 Highlander's hat
39 Ginger -
40 "Star Trek"
android
42 Dayton denizen
43 Aspin or Baxter
44-trip
45 Open an envelope
48 Cave man?
50 Pulver's rank:
abbr.
53 Paul of "Scarface"
54 Secondhand
55 "It's Never" ('60
smash)
56 Lollapalooza
57 Large tub
62 Regret
63 Sault Marie, MI
65 -Cat
67 Casino cube
68 Lofty spaces
70 Parker of football
71 Saloon


S72 Nearby
74 Louisiana
university
75 Tolerate
76 "- Want for
Christmas" ('50 tune)
77 Require
80 Fiver
84 Barrel
85 Alias initials
87 Certain
Communist
88 Newts
90 Way over yonder
91 Engine sound
92 Discern
94 Catchall abbr.
95 Marchiano or
Mineo
96 Rock's -
Speedwagon
97 Be obligated
98 Hibachi residue
99 "- Junction" ('56
film)
104 Actor Stephen
106 Warm lining
108 Inferior
109 Producer Prince
112 Passion
113 Oriental
115 Adventurer
Heyerdahl
116 Irritated
117 Part of UCLA
118 Negative prefix
119 Parachute
invasion
120 Take into account
121 "Bus Stop"
playwright
122 Tie
123 Dalai -
124 Kitchen appliance
125 Passed-on item
126 Pinafore part


1 t 1


Powers of Attorney...What are they?


How do they work?


Special to
Alachua County T
A 'Power of Attorne
document created by a pe
that person delegates, or gi
person the right to act on be
person, who is the "Maker"
of attorney."
What authority is gr
Maker depends upon the sp
contained ip the Power ofA
be broad or it may be limit
specific act or acts.
There are three basic typ
Attorney. The first type is c
Power of Attorney which
person to whom the Power
given, who is called the "Atl
who must be over the age
specific act. For example,
to sell a home in another sta
The second type of 'Pow
is called a General Power of.
allows the Attorney in Fact
legal act on behalf of the M
or often, a list of the type
the Attorney in Fact is auth
included in the document.
The Third type of Pow
is called a Durable Powe
which is different from the



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Alachua County Today Art Festival at Thornebrook October 2 & 3, 2010


VyStar Is A Proud Supporter Of The 26th AnnuaL Art Festival At Thornebrook.


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pay generous interest instead of charging fees, to lower cost loans and credit services. Because we are member owned,
we always have your best interest in mind. As a VyStar member, you'll enjoy the convenience of a full range of financial
w service offerings, more than 30 branches, 154 ATM locations and 24/7 access with Internet
banking and billpay at www.vystarcu.org. Join us today and learn how we can help you.

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S Lobby Hours: M-Th: 9:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m. Cal
SFriday: 9:00 a.m. 6:00 p.m. Saturday: 9:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m.


T12 FEDERALLY
INSURED
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VyStar
Credit Union
We never forget that it's your money.


1 352-372-1645 or 1-800-445-6289, stop by a VyStar
branch or visit our website at www.vystarcu.org.


VYSTAR MEMBERSHIP IS OPEN TO ALL PEOPLE WHO LIVE OR WORK IN THE FOLLOWING COUNTIES:
ALachua Baker Bradford Clay Columbia Duval Flagler Gilchrist Hamilton Levy Putnam Marion Nassau St. Johns Suwannee Union Volusia


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Alachua County Today Art Festival at Thornebrook October 2 & 3, 2010


26th Annual GFAA Art Festival at Thornebrook
Publisherda c.
Alachua Today, Inc.


Executive Editor
Ellen Boukari/Alachua County Today Newspaper

Writers
Bill Hutchinson
Roz Miller
Lyn White

Cover Artwork
Diana Fava

Poster Design & Graphics
Aliye Cullu


Graphic Design
Anjalee Khemlani
Dallas Barnes
Gail Luparello
Roz Miller

Marketing
Roz Miller


Ala h.. 1o

V 4 I . tm S
,f*a*


Alachua Today, Inc. has made every attempt to ensure the accuracy of the information provided. Alachua Today,
Inc. accepts no responsibility for errors or omissions in fact or materials furnished by advertisers or contributors.
No part of this publication may be reproduced without written consent of the publisher. Copyright 0 2010 by
Alachua Today, Inc.


Bagels will spreads
-_ and/or salads
Platters Omelettes & Scrambled
Eggs Sandwiches Pizza Bagels
...- Salad Dessert Cappuccino


Thornebrook Village
2441 NW 43rd St. Suite 6-C Gainesville, FL
Hours: 6 am 6 pm Weekdays
7 am 2 pm Sat. & Sun. 352-371-3354


Bring in this coupon and receive a FREE fountain drink or coffee


Contents


26th Annual GFAA Art Festival at Thornebrook....................... 4
Gainesville Fine Arts Association serving artists and
community since 1923 ............................................ 4
26th Annual GFAA Art Festival at Thornebrook Judges................. 5
Diana Fava Poster Artist.......................................... 6
Festival Highlights ......... .................................. 6-9
Artists Listed by Medium .......................................10-11
Children's Activities.............................................. 12
Food......................................... 12
Festival Map............................................... 12-13
Non-Profit Concessions .......................................... 13
Additional Parking.............................................. 13
Entertainment Schedule ....................................... 14
Festival Entertainment ........................................ 15-16
Art Festival at Thornebrook Producers............................... 17
Festival Sponsors ................................................ 17
List of Contributors............................................. 17
Glass as art............................. .. ................. 18
List of Program Advertisers ...................................... 20
Art Festival Committee .......................................... 22
Special Thanks to Our Volunteers .................................. 23
Artists'Awards.................................................. 23

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Is a serendipitous experience

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(across the street from Thronebrook)
bookgallerywestgainesville.com 352 371-1234


___ __1____II_111--X----~i-~C~-----~--~-l


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Alachua County Today Art Festival at Thornebrook October 2 & 3, 2010



26th Annual GFAA Art Festival at Thornebrook


Preview Party Friday, October 1, 2010, from 6- 9 p.m.
Saturday and Sunday, October 2- 3, 2010 from 10 a.m. 5 p.m.
WHERE: The Shops at Thornebrook Village, 2641 NW 47
Avenue, Gainesville, FL

The 26th Annual GFAA Art Festival at Thomrnebrook begins
its weekend with a new addition -A Friday Night Preview
Party for the serious art collector or the casual buyer.
There will be Piano Jazz with the renowned Frank Sullivan
Quartet and Samba's Refrain performing swing and
ballads. A lot of The Shops at Thorebrook will be open
to welcome you, too! Please join us for this fun new addition to the
weekend art festival.
The festival will continue on Saturday and Sunday with 130 fine
artists and fine craftsmen throughout the shaded park-like setting of
Thorebrook Village. The show enters its 26th year under the auspices
of the Gainesville Fine Arts Association (GFAA) and the Thomebrook
Merchants Association. Attendance of more than 40,000 people is
anticipated over the three day free event.
The map located in the center of the festival guide is designed to
help orient visitors to the best places to park and provides locations of
food vendors, entertainment venues and restroom facilities. A list of
artists and craftsmen are also shown along with corresponding color
zones and booth locations throughout the festival grounds.
Local, regional and national artists and fine craftsmen are
displaying their finest work in many media including: Paintings oils,
acrylics, watercolors and pastels; Photography black and white,


color, still life, nature studies and digital; Mixed Media in clay, fused
glass, paint, paper and other materials; Sculpture in metals and wood;
Fiber Arts quilts and weaving, baskets and clothing; Clay/Ceramics
- traditional, sculptural, stoneware and porcelain; Jewelry in silver
and gold with semi-precious stones, and beaded pieces; Glass stained,
blown and fused; Wood turned vessels and furniture; Graphics/
Drawing from hand-colored pencil work to digital; and the Other
category with interesting pieces which do not fit into the other media.
In addition to the fine artwork on display, during the festival,
entertainers will be performing on the grounds in four separate venues.
(See the center spread map for specific locations or just keep your ears
tuned to locate performances throughout the grounds). Entertainment
Director Bill Hutchinson is presenting a selection of some of the best
local and regional musicians to perform jazz, blues, classical and
country music among other fare such as jugglers throughout both
days of the festival. Many festival goers will recognize the names of
performers such as The Killer B's, The Dave Sloan Jazz Project, Long
Over Duo, Boulware & Stewart, Jana Horton, The Alachua Consort,
The Barbergators, the House of Flying Cards magic act, Megan Smith
and members of The University of Florida Juggling Club.
The Children's Area will once again feature the talents and fun of
Gainesville Creative Kids and John Brothers will bring his instruments
to introduce children to a hands-on musical experience.
Prominent High Springs artist Diana Fava provided the original
artwork used on the poster and the front cover of the show program.
A renowned painter, Fava's work will be displayed at the festival
(space Green 13) and posters and t-shirts featuring Diana's image will


be available for purchase at the Information booth during the show.
Anyone purchasing a poster may take it by Diana's booth for signing
during the show. (Please see the center spread map for booth location.)
While drinks and snacks will be provided by various non-profit
organizations throughout festival grounds, several food vendors will
be providing various festival fare such as Kettle Kor, Italian Ices,
roasted cinnamon nuts, and Latin Food. There will be tables and chairs
provided for your dining comfort.
Three restaurants located in Thorebrook Village will be providing
special foods for the festival offering a step-up from usual festival
fare. Bageland will have a selection of bagels and breakfast platters,
gourmet sandwich plates, sweets and drinks, including gourmet coffees.
On festival grounds they will be providing hamburgers, hot dogs,
spaghetti and other good choices. ChopStix will feature Pan-Asian fare
on the deck outside the restaurant. Mario's Bistro will provide tapas,
salads and sandwiches take a break with a quality glass of wine.
Rounding out the choices for food and drink, Emerald's Lounge will
provide libations of all kinds; TCBY has frozen treats and Thornebrook
Chocolates will have the best hand-made candy around.
This year again we have non-profit organizations joining us
providing information on their groups and services: 4-H, Friends of
Alachua County Elementary Arts Program, the Supervisor of Elections
and Choices Health Services.
For last minute changes and the most up-to-date information about
this year's Art Festival at Thomebrook, please check out our website -
www.thomebrookart.org.


Gainesville Fine Arts Association serving artists and community since 1923


The Gainesville Fine Arts Association
(GFAA) was formed in 1923 by three
close friends (Mrs. F.W. Buchholz, Miss
Nelly Trezerant and Mrs. C. Addison
Pound) to "foster and encourage the
study of the Arts theoretically and
practically through every medium." During its early
years, it brought exhibits to the city and presented
art lectures. The programs offered were varied:
Furniture, Interior Decorating, Fine Arts, Oriental
Rugs, etc. The Association's monthly meetings were
held on the second floor of the Thomas Hotel.
In 1934 a studio of three rooms was rented
at 131 Union Street (on the south side of the
"courthouse square") where traveling exhibitions


and classes were taught. In December of 1936,
Gainesville's first ARTMART was held on the
Square. The questions asked were, "Do the people of
Gainesville know their artists? Do Gainesville artists
know their public?"
Continuing through the war years and the
growth of the 1950s, the Association kept to
its original goal of offering painting classes for
adults, children, sidewalk art shows, art jamborees,
auctions, and children's exhibits. The first
Newsletter was sent out in 1963. The Gainesville
Mall Show started in 1968 and Oaks Mall Show in
1978-2007.
In 1973 the Association was re-chartered by the
state of Florida and granted tax exempt, non-profit


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Brown's Country Buffet
Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner Buffet!
Mon. Fri 7 a.m. 8 p.m. Saturday 7 a.m. 2 p.m.
Sunday Buffet 8 a.m. 2:30 p.m.
Friday Night Seafood Buffet
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14423 US Hwy 441 South, Alachua
(Between Edward Jones and Kangaroo) 386-462-3000


status in 1978. In 1985 the Thorebrook Shopping
Village hosted the "Outdoor Autumn Show"
which has grown into the successful and exciting
"Art Festival at Thomebrook" which is annually
produced by GFAA.
The Winter Fine Art Fair @ Tioga Town Center
in Jonesville was added in 2007 as another venue for
GFAA members and artists to connect with the art
collecting community.
Over the years, GFAA has steadily contributed
to the art scene in Gainesville. GFAA continues to
produce and sponsor shows and exhibits about town
- three shows per year at the Central Park Medical
Plaza on west Newberry Road, the Florida Artists
Juried show in the President's gallery at Santa Fe,




4 MILML
XeW4r) 8


Winter Juried exhibit at Trinity United Methodist
Church, Thomas Center summer show and various
other alternative art spaces about town.
GFAA publishes a monthly E-News, providing
interesting and informative programs for its monthly
membership meetings, and has begun fundraising
and other necessary planning to establish an Art
Center for Gainesville. Donations are tax deductible
501(c)(3).
GFAA continues to make a positive contribution
to the area cultural environment as an active
organization, providing a variety of events of
interest to artists and art enthusiasts. Visit our Web
site for more information or to access a membership
application form www.gainesvillefinearts.com.

O Friends gather to create
beautiful jewelry

0 Fun, creative classes,
parties, groups and
girls' night out

O Custom jewelry created
especially for you

2441 NW 43rd Street, Ste 19
Thornebrook Village,
Gainesville, FL
352-375-8198






Alachua County Today Art Festival at Thornebrook October 2 & 3, 2010


26th Annual GFAA Art Festival at Thornebrook Judges


Jayne Grant


City of Gainesville Department of Parks, Recreation
and Cultural Affairs where she directs the Thomas
Center Galleries and one-percent Art in Public
Places Trust.
Her previous work experience includes Curator of
Education and Special Events at the Ormond Memorial Art
Museum and Gardens, Ormond Beach, Fla.; Public Art and
Design Project Manager at the Broward Cultural Affairs '
Division; Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.; and Program Specialist at
the Florida Division of Cultural Affairs, Tallahassee, Fla.
She participated in work and studio programs abroad at the Peggy Guggenheim
Collection, Venice, Italy; the Museum of Women's Art, London, United Kingdom; and in
San Miguel de Allende, Mexico.
Erin has judged art festivals and exhibitions throughout the state, and served as a
consultant for national art and museum projects.
Erin earned a Master of Arts in Arts Administration degree with Museum Studies
certification, and a Bachelor of Arts degree in Art History and Art Criticism from Florida
State University in Tallahassee, Fla. She is a member of the Florida Association of Public
Art Administrators, Florida Association of Museums, Americans for the Arts and the
Rotary Club of Gainesville.


n 2003, Jayn6 Grant was hired as the Curator of the
Santa Fe Gallery and six satellite venues. Before
joining the Gallery staff, Jayn6 taught for 23 years
at Santa Fe having established the Graphic Design
program in 1980. She has also taught graphic design
and advertising at the University of Florida for over
20 years. Jayn6 has authored four graphic design and
advertising textbooks and serves on numerous boards
and committees in Gainesville and around the state. For
three years, Jayn6 was also the Special Projects Manager
and Publicist for Santa Fe's Visual and Performing Arts
Department.
In 2006, Jayn6 took over the helm of the Galleries as Manager. Since then, she has
curated or collaborated on over 100 exhibits.
Jayne is a native Floridian who was born and raised in Jacksonville. She holds a
bachelors degree in advertising with an art history minor from UF. She also earned a M.Ed.
from UF in Instructonal Design & Educational Media.
Jayn6 has been married to Joe Grant for 37 years and together they have two adult
children, two cats and Katie the beastly beagle!


Erin Friedberg






Alachua County Today Art Festival at Thornebrook October 2 & 3, 2010


Diana Fava Poster Artist


By ROZ MILLER
Gainesville writer, artist and storyteller
Special to Alachua County Today
"Without art, there would be a hole in my
life," says Diana Fava, festival poster artist and
High Springs resident since 2000. She likes
learning all mediums in art. Because of her
passion to learn, Fava enjoys exploring various
techniques, supplies and the application of the
paints.
Before concentrating on two dimensional
art, Fave devoted her creative skills to being
a custom jewelry designer for 30 years in


Keystone Heights.
The poster technique is the result of a
scratch art method, on art board with layers of
proclaim and colors then sprayed with India
ink. After this is thoroughly dried, using a
sharp pointed scratching tool Fave creates the
dramatic image.
Her appetite for learning continues. Fava
believes that art workshops is continuing
education for practicing artists. Fava likes to
engage in various ways of producing an artful
image smoke art with torch, pencil portrait
art, watercolor, scratch art are a few of the


techniques she uses.
Fava's love of teaching allows her to teach
watercolor classes at the UF Reitz Union
through its Leisure Life classes to Shands
cancer patients at Hope Lodge. She and several
other art friends like capturing the personally
and images in various art mediums of people
using the services of St. Frances House. It is a
way of showing they are important as models
capturing their expressions and a hint of the
stories behind lives lived on the streets.
Critique helps the students see their work
FAVA:
Continued on page 19


Festival Highlights


Mike Styga Wood
Styga enjoys working with exotic and natural hardwood shaping unique hollow forms on a wood
lathe. The past several years, Styga focuses his efforts in the area of segmented bowls and vases.
Utilizing the color pallet of nature's woods, these complex hollow forms feature geometric forms
used in Southwestern Native American themes and unique grain patterns of highly figured wood. He
currently lives in Jacksonville.





Tina Corbett Painting
Learning to paint at age 12, creating has always been Corbett's goal and passion.
Over the years she has studied with several talented artists and has earned two
Certificates for Commercial Art at Miami Lakes Technical Institute. Corbett held
the job of South Florida District Artist Illustrator for the United States Postal Service
for 17 years. After moving to High Springs, she is now devoted to fine art and
her true love of creating the things she dreams about with oil painting. Corbett is
concentrating on creating all those places, people and animals that fascinate her by
their uniqueness and beauty. She strives to inspire emotions through deep color and
layers of oil painting.





Jessie Sibert Painting

Drawing and painting have always come naturally to Sibert you could say his artistic talent is God-given at least that is bow the self-
taught Merritt Island artist sees it. He feels God has been pushing him to paint throughout his life. After high school, Sibert abandoned
art for more reliable work and a steadier paycheck. He took up his pens, pencils, and brushes four years ago for another stab at his
heart's passion. Since his re-induction into the art world, Sibert has been making up for lost time with quantity and diversity of subject
matter. "I don't consider myself so much of an artist as much as a human Xerox machine real art is the beauty God has already
created. I just try to mirror it." www.sibertart.com


^







Alachua County Today Art Festival at Thornebrook October 2 & 3, 2010


Stephen Koury Painting
Splitting his time between winters in Florida and summers in the Colorado Rockies, Koury is a very fine
contemporary wildlife artist, the painter of little jewels. Sought after by museums, galleries and collectors, Koury
pays tribute to the wonders of the natural world through his paintings. "It is up to each of us to do our share and
preserve the precious natural world for your future generations."








Carol Barber Painting
Barber works in acrylic paint using mediums and water to begin the process in a fluid state. Sketches made of
natural subjects provide a starting point to organize her inventive colors, shapes and marks. It is important that
the painting process feels like a true creation, culminating in something new. Barber loves to paint where she
becomes lost in the painting process: she is not thinking of anything, but intuitively applying colors and texture.
The connections between organic forms and the elements of art line, shape, texture, color and composition
are a never ending source for her.







Katherine Worthington Jewelry
After studying art history at Vassar College, Worthington taught both
Art History and History for several years. During the 25 years spent
teaching and working in the corporate world, she continued her interest
and involvement in art work. The work is a combination of wood working
and jewelry fabrication. Using traditional metal-smithing, woodworking
and woodturning techniques she creates unusual jewelry pieces using
highly figured exotic woods, acrylics and metals. Worthington enjoys
highlighting the natural beauty and organic nature of the woods and
presenting the contrast between the natural material and modem materials
such as acrylic. She strives to create simple and elegant pieces where form
and material are central in the presentation.






Jim Hogan Photography

Hogan has been an avidphotographer for years, working both in the darkroom and digital mediums. Mostly self-taught,
he did study photography at Elgin Community College for a semester. He is currently residinmg and producing prints on a
sailboat in Palmetto, Fla. Photography has always been a passion for Hogan and he enjoys taking photographs and is pleased
; and grateful others appreciate the images he creates.







Alachua County Today Art Festival at Thornebrook October 2 &3, 2010




Shelagh Forrest Jewelry
Nature inspired jewelry handcrafted merging sterling silver, strands of precious metals with freshwater sea pearls, gems and crystals to create a sophisticated
and sensual line of art to be worn. Self taught in the art ofjewelry making Forrest has come to find much peace and stillness in the creative process. Her
sincere desire is to infuse this essence into each piece of jewelry -for it to be experienced by the wearer.







Jackie Schindehette Painting
Schindehette has received many accolades in her painting life. Governor Bush invited her to design a Christmas ornament
representing Florida for the White House Christmas Tree. This Ocala painter's work has appeared in text books, she has
received recognition in numerous fairs and festivals, and her work represented in many corporate collections and selected
publications.






Becky & Jeff Baldwin Ceramics
The Baldwins' work from a studio on acreage shared by their home and a tree farm. Working in clay six years and without formal training has been a
challenge from learning the wheel to handmade glazes. The pleasure of making forms that attract attention has been Becky's intrinsic nature all her life.
She has created with ladies hair, cloth, food, threads, reeds and now clay. For 10 years they produced purebred hogs and now are back in the mud! It is a
mesmerizing "zen" world forming clay on the wheel such a challenge, and they take as much effort in the handmade glazes to achieve the draping and
pooling to complement the forms. To start with a lump of clay. add natural earth elements and fire at 2250 degrees is like Christmas every time the kiln is
opened.



Stephen Huss Painting UA-
After practicing law for 30 years, Huss retired to pursue painting, sculpture, collage and photography full time. His paintings
include representational and non-representational art and explores figurative and portrait painting, landscape and object studies.
Recent sculpture uses non traditional materials such as iron pipe and PVC as well as found objects. Website: www.stevenwhuss.
com








Millard & Linda Kirk Glass
Wizards of Glass & Wood. Millard and Linda Kirk manufacture unique glass decorations using
recycled glass from various glass manufacturers such as Fenton Glass and the Paul Wissmach
Glass Company. Their custom designed molds, masks, male and female torsos and sculptures
helped them in establishing a varied customer base. By using recycled glass, they are able to
provide a "'Green Based Art" for the ECO-Art enthusiast.






Alachua County Today Art Festival at Thornebrook October 2 & 3, 2010


Miriam Novack Painting and Ceramics
Novack is both a sculptor (working in mahogany, clay and alabaster) and a painter who creates works that combine for her; the most
appealing aspects of each medium. Her latest acrylic paintings are a tapestry of color and overlapping designs with the luminosity of
stained glass windows, intricate forms create a kaleidoscope of ever changing images as one design merges with another. A graduate of
Brooklyn College of the City of New York with a BA and Honors in Art, Novack has won many ribbons and awards.









Michael Lee Painting
Lee began to develop his creativity and artistic talent at a very young age. Once he learned to draw and color, Lee knew he
had found his passion in Life. During high school. Lee began to evolve under the guidance of his Commercial Art Instructor.
Lillian B. Brooks and credits this mentor for all the successes he has enjoyed. Lee began his career as an illustrator with the
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. After working for over 20 years in corporate America, Lee decided to channel his energy into
art. His signature style is his use of bold colors and strong brush strokes throughout his paintings. The method Lee uses to
capture movement is best described as poetry in motion captured in oil.





Tim Malles Painter
Landscapes, public art and astronomy themes are some of the targets of Malles' work. His passion to paint the Florida
landscape is inspired by the extreme changes in environment experienced by this generation. He feels challenged by the
attempt to capture something of the beauty that is still here while expressing the emotions that witness it being lost forever.
Water themes are recurrent in his work and he is particularly drawn to the springs of Florida, their beauty and number unique
in the world. Malles grew up during the birth of the space age and his art reflects that experience. At the dawn of civilization
awakening to these amazing new images of faraway places, he finds an infinite cosmos of inspiration and creative possibilities
there. "Always seeing the path to higher creativity, I love diving into the blank canvas."








Anna Kern Mixed Media

Kern has been active in the art scene since moving from Pennsylvania to Ocala, Fla., a few years ago. A self-taught
artist, she has studied with several national and internationally known artists. Her medium of choice is watercolor with
its unpredictability and spontaneity. Added to this is her compelling interest in textures and abstraction using a wide
variety of materials and techniques to achieve a unique style. Website: annakerartist.com






Alachua County Today Art Festival at Thornebrook October 2 & 3, 2010


SArtists


Blue
Green
Purple
Turqouise
Yellow

Glass


City


Becky & Jeff Baldwin
Dale Cole
Darryl Jackson
John Kopf
Geoff Walsh
Bill Schwentzer
Frank DiGangi
Sally Douglas


Sarah McCarthy
Elizabeth Strickland
Harriet Heywood
Candace McCaffery
Jean Yao


Green 53 Marianne Gamble
Green 7 Robin Sapp
Pink 100 Sue Ayala
Purple 138 Bobbie Matus Pain
Purple 124 Debbie S. Hagstrom
Purple 107A Nancy Wadelton
Purple 142A Millard & Linda Kirkpatrick
Red 42 Lin & forrest Glore & Butcher
Yellow 80 Carolyn Ledbetter

Graphics/Drawing
Green 5 Tom & Helynn Byers
Purple 144 Reuben Wilkerson
Purple 119&120 Jim Wilson
Yellow 72 Leslie Peebles
Yellow 82 Christine Flanagan


Jewelry
Blue 95
Blue 87
Blue 84
Blue 92
Green 15


Jeanne Smith & Donna Buntir
Susana Langlois
Karen Hatfield
Shelagh Forrest
Katherine Swift
Marie Sundquist
Megan Graham
Shirley McCaffrey C
C. Richard Schamel, Jr.


Deland
Archer
Gainesville
Satellite Beach
Sarasota
Ocala
Hawthorne
St. Johns


Gainesville
Gainesville
Homosassa
Gainesville
Ft Lauderdale


Gainesville
Paisley
Daytona Beach
n Beach Gardens
Ocala
New Smyrna
Apopka
Satsuma
Nokomis


Ocala
Alachua
Gainesville
Alachua
Live Oak


lg Gainesville
Gainesville
Newberry
Gainesville
Gainesville
Coral Springs
Gainesville
:rawfordsville, IN
High Springs


I Zone


Space


Name


Jewelry continued


Pink
Plum
Plum
Plum
Purple
Purple
Purple
Purple
Purple
Purple
Purple
Red
Turqouise
Turqouise
Yellow
Yellow
Yellow
Yellow

Mixed


Green
Green
Green
Pink
Plum
Plum
Plum
Purple
Purple
Purple
Purple
Red
Red
Turqouise
Yellow
Yellow


Painting
Blue 83
Blue 90
Blue 86
Blue 93
Green 8
Green 3
Green 21


Blue
Green
Green
Green
Purple
Purple
Red
Turqouise


Eleanor Blair
Valerie M. D'Ortona
Amanda Hering
Jane Slivka
Ben W. Essenburg
Tina Corbett
Barbara Tench


City


Zone


Space


Name


Ceramics/Pottery


98 Debbie S. Lowe
58 Peter Senesac
54 Lesie Lambert
66 Mary Lee
116 Silvestre Hernandez-Reyes
137 Barbara J Flood
109 Ann or Henry Jalsa
143 Katherine Worthington
122 Diana Kirkpatrick
111 Alison Dvorchik
128 Veronika Zakharow
31 Sandra Mikel
49 Cathy Martin
46 Sharon Vogel
76 Christine & David Goshorn
78 Linda Poole
81 Douglas Giffen Brandon
73 Beverly Symes

Media
13 Diana Fava
6 Kevan Breitinger
9 Cindy Hirt
97 Anna Kern
57 Bob Senesac
56 Roz Miller
60 Kate Hanson
121 Wes & Deb Lindberg
125 Christina Cassidy
117 Jacquelyn Shifrin
107 Beryl Bayer
33 Malgorzata Deyrup
41 Ronald C. Marr
45 Lyn Novak Hise
70 Hugo Cruz
71 Mandy Macias


Fiber/Textiles


85
14
135A
51
70A


Green
Green
Green
Green


1
24&25
4
11


Flagler Beach
Gainesville
Gainesville
Tallahassee
Gainesville
Ocala
Gainesville
Miami
Gainesville
Gainesville
Alachua
Hawthorne
Gainesville
Newberry
Largo
Sarasota
Stuart
Gainesville


High Springs
St. Augustine
Hawthorne
Ocala
Archer
Gainesville
Micanopy
Gainesville
Gainesville
Gainesville
Morriston
Gainesville
Gainesville
Inverness
Gainesville
Gainesville


Gainesville
Gainesville
Hallandale
Mt. Dora
Englewood
High Springs
Gainesville






Alachua County Today Art Festival at Thornebrook October 2 & 3, 2010


Artists (continuedJ


Zone Space Name

Painting (continuedJ
Green 2 Jackie Schindehette
Green 28 Cindy Carpenter
Pink 101 Galina Herndon
Pink 99 Jessie Sibert
Pink 105 Peter Carolin
Plum 64 Cirginia Chen
Plum 61 Sydney Diuguid
Plum 55 Julie Warmke Robitaille
Plum 67 Robert Nemecek
Plum 63 Mike Segal
Purple 112 Michael Oyenarte
Purple 127 Alyne Harris
Purple 108 Miriam Novack
Purple 123 Carol H Barber
Purple 118 Tim Malles
Purple 134 Stepehn W Huss
Purple 115 Karen McGinnis
Red 35 Michael Lee
Red 32 Amos & Mary Reid
Turqouise 44 Barbara Batchelder
Turqouise 50A Stephen Koury
Yellow 74 Laurel D'Agnillo

Photography
Blue 91 Wade Trimble
Green 116 John Moran
Pink 98 Max & Antonia Leimer
Pink 104 James Gary Richmond
Plum 62 H.J. Hererra
Plum 68 Jay Canterbury
Purple 114 Katherine Pierce
Purple 141 Holly Merton
Purple 113 Jim Hogan
Purple 137A william Flood
Red 39 Carole Worthington
Red 37 Cathy Laurenzi
Turqouise 50 Bett Miley
Yellow 75 Lance Cooper
Yellow 8A Sherry L. Hunter


Sculpture
Blue 88
Green 17
Green 18
Plum 69
Purple 136


Don Shaw
Randy Pardue
Judith A. Wolfe
Alan Leising
Jeff Morgan


City Zone Space Name


Wood
Pink
Purple
Purple
Red
Red
Red
Yellow
Yellow

Other
Green
Pink


Ocala
Gainesville
Roswell, GA
Merritt Island
Gainesville
Gainesville
Gainesville
Gainesville
Ocala
Chiefland
Gainesville
Gainesville
Gainesville
Gainesville
Gainesville
Gainesville
Ocala
Alpharetta, GA
Gainesville
Summerfield
Lakeland
Jacksonville


High Springs
Gainesville
Lady Lake
titusville
Alachua
Holmes Beach
Gainesville
Gainesville
Palmetto.
Ocala
Hawthorne
High Springs
Frostproof
Gainesville
Belleview


High Springs
Hawthorne
Dunnellon
Getzville, NY
Melrose


City


Ernst Kallenbach
Larry Schorfhaar
Greg Nason
Jim Deyrup
Scott Anderson
Barrie N. Harding
Mike Styga
Antone L. Forneris


Arlene Smith
Francine E Schulze


Gainesville
Ocala
Homosassa
Gainesville
Crystal River
Dunnellon
Jacksonville
Gainesville


Salt Springs
Gainesville






|I Alachua County Today Art Festival at Thornebrook October 2 & 3, 2010


Children's Activities
Gainesville Creative Kids Gainesville Creative Kids provides an
outlet where children can express themselves through the arts in an
environment that puts each child at the center of his or her own
experience. Each child is respected and nurtured as an intelligent,
unique, whole person capable of imagining, exploring, an creating.

Gainesville Creative Kids will offer a variety of activities, including
face painting, for children of all ages. Please visit their booth located
in the Children's Area to play and to learn more about their classes
and programs. They will also sell lemonade and bottled water.

Guitar for Kids Guided by John Brothers, children learn basic
musical concepts using small guitars and ukuleles.


Food
1C. Kettle Korn That delicious original kettle korn we all know and
love!

2C. Original Nut Hut All hand crafted sweet glazed pecans, almonds
and cashews spicy, hot and garlic peanuts. Mmmm.

3C. Little Scoopers Italian ice

4C. Mi Apa Latin Cuisine

There are also several restaurants throughout Thornebrook Village for
your enjoyment: Bageland, Mario's Bistro, ChopStix Bistro, TCBY and
Thornebrook Chocolates.


26th Annual GFAA Art


I Food



.Q entertainment

3 Picnic Tables

ZONES
m rem 1.29
SRed 30.42
Teas 43.51
mPm 5n4



IPink 96-106
mPu ple 17144


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For info. on dates & times of
events, visit our web sites:
nm.lm"NUhmdewy-mm
www.hnlrostuMyarigaHy.co
www.sbMyal qrts.og

Easy walking between the art
galleries in Melrose 18 miles
east of Gainesville on SR 26.


Melrose Bay Art Gallery
October 2 31
Ph Robnkwon
Humane Society Benefit
Receptions: Oct 8 & 9
Nov 8 Dec 20
Siwe by SiWe
Affordable work of 40 artists
for collecting or gift giving


Bellamy Road Fine Arts
OcthrVW~rld A Saiefae

Reception: Sat Oct 9
Advice ftior Vteioario
When he Wat&~
Not jAfteli
Reception: Sat Nov 13


Shake Rag Art &
Culture Center
Every Wed.- Coffee Talk. 10 to noon
am HNot Summer. Reflections"
Reception: Fri, Oct 8
November 3
AudubaMART Bird House Sale
November 13
Qad Openwig Reception


small towwith the big art scene.


I..-
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I






Alachua County Today Art FestiVal at Thornebrook October 2 & 3, 2010


estival at Thornebrook


Non-Profit Concessions

1. Friends of Alachua County Public Schools Elementary Arts
Programs The purpose of the Friends of Alachua County Public Schools
Elementary Arts programs is to promote and support quality elementary
Art and Music education programs, not covered by tax dollars, in the
Alachua County Public Schools. This fund will provide additional cultural
opportunities for our students outside the Art and Music classrooms. Please
visit www.gnvcf.org for more information.
2. Alachua County Supervisor of Elections voter registration, voting
demonstrations, poll worker information The Supervisor of Elections
conducts elections, voter registration and other duties for Alachua County.
5. Gator Paws 4-H Dog Club, Alachua County 4-H We are a non-profit
organization. We invite all youth 5 to 18 to join. Our motto is "Learn by
doing." We also provide many opportunities for community service and
using knowledge learned to teach others.
8. Alachua County Community Support Services/CHOICES Health
Services Choices is a health services program offered by the Alachua County
Board of County Commission. The program is designed to help uninsured
residents of Alachua County stay healthy.



Additional Parking


Bank of America back lot
only (east side)
Campus Credit Union -
Sunday Only
Capital City Bank (corner of
41st Street and 23rd Blvd)
*easy parking, short walk!


Eye Surgicenter
Spain Construction
Gionet and Pierstoff
A Better Massage
Carr, Riggs & Ingram
Gateway Bank (Sunday only)


Many thanks to our neighbors who graciously
offer additional parking for our customers.


ProvdiUy S support the 2 6th A vniu A rYt Fe4tVvad Wa 7t Torveabrck


ERA
ERA Pmduwm


4915 NW 43rd Street
Gainesville, FL 32606
(352) 373-3132


"ALWAYS THERE FOR YOU"


ERA



190 Thrasher Road
Bronson, FL 32621
(352) 486-0334


. ii i i..i .i. ....i ........i !... i... iL.....j.'






Alachua County Today Art Festival at Thornebrook October 2 & 3, 2010


Entertainment Schedule

Saturday 11:00 am 12 noon 1:00 pm 2:00 pm 3:00 pm 4:00 pm
North Entrance Killer B's Killer B's Killer B's

On the Bridge Dave Sloane Jazz Dave Sloane Jazz
Project Project
West Entrance Long Over Duo Long Over Duo Long Over Duo
On the Square Visit With The Magic House of Flying Cards & Amazing Ms. Megan
Sunday
North Entrance Boulware Boulware Boulware
& Stewart & Stewart & Stewart
On the Bridge Alachua Consort Alachua Consort
West Entrance Jana Horton Jana Horton Jana Horton
On the Square Visit With The Magic House of Flying Cards & Amazing Ms. Megan

Watch for special appearances of the Barbergators throughout the Thornebrook show.


Yarnworks
WWWYorMwrKScm


4113NW13thSt. 1
Gr-WuvU, FL 32609
352-337-965


Karen Kearney Museum Quality Framing
Master Framer A Shadow Boxes


" '^"~ ~~ ~'~"""~~ ~~


----- ---






Alachua County Today Art Festival at Thornebrook October 2 & 3, 2010


Festival Entertainment
Once again Thomebrook's annual art festival offers music as varied as the visual arts that set the stage. Some of the
area's most-loved performers will be on hand to play a variety of music that's sure to please almost every taste and still
leave plenty of space for conversation.


PIANO JAZZ- The renowned jazz master Frank Sullivan
will be featured on Friday night's Artist Reception and
Preview Sale. He is joined by Nick DeCarlis on coronet,
David Ottenberg on Bass and Bill Hutchinson on drums.
Vocalist Jennifer Johnson will stop by to sing some favorites
with this all-star quartet in two sets between 6 and 9 p.m.


I Sumba's Re


SAMBA'S REFRAIN is
a popular piano-based duo
around town that plays swing
and ballads. They have agreed
to perform a couple of sets at
the reception as well, to keep
the music going throughout.


MEGAN SMITH will
be doing her variety act
throughout the festival and
will invite interaction with
the kid in all of us.


COUNTRY &
AMERICANA -
Boulware & Stewart
will cook up some lovely
sounds with great, sincere
vocals and a reliable
guitar twang. This band
will make a believer
of you as you wait for
a "Merle moment" or
a light-hearted look at
"Hick Hop".





CLASSIC POP from
the 60s through the 90s.
The Killer B's create
quite a buzz with their
great guitar duo offering
very pleasant pop. This
father/son band performs
three sets on Saturday anc
we are willing to bet that
a lot of your favorites wil
be included


MEMBERS OF THE
UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA JUGGLING
CLUB will amaze
everyone with their skills,
but those who wish to can
learn the basics from them
near the North Entrance to
the show.


THE BARBERGATORS
singing and entertaining
in four-part harmony
will wander throughout
the show and stop now
and then for a little fun.
Hearing favorite songs
Swill make you want to
join in.


SAXOPHONE JAZZ-
Saturday features the Dave
Sloane Jazz Project with the
best saxophone moods around.
Dave Sloane and his band
take the stage to set a mood
of relaxing and elegant jazz,
playing two great shows to
.brighten the day.


15





Alachua County Today Art Festival at Thornebrook October 2 & 3, 2010


Entertainment


I 14i


(continuedJ
S: FOLK AND POP- Jana Horton is
l a remarkable singer. She's a lifelong
Gainesville resident, known for her
work with the Centerline Band and
her current band, Another Fine Mess.
Today she appears with the much-
respected musician, Jon Alexander to
create some very pleasant sounds.


CLASSICAL MUSIC We are proud MAGICIANS The House of
to announce a return appearance by the Flying Cards will be "shuffling
Baroque virtuosos of The Alachua Consort. thoughts and dealing realities,
one card at a time" for visitors
Violin, oboe and harpsichord unite to e r t tie for
make timeless, elegant music and a lovely while strolling through the festi-
atmosphere. val. Each magician is an animated
performing character specializing
[M12I 0 m-mo mom= 6 mm mS SmmI Imm ma uni que style of
C^ ^ C ] ^xs1 ^ magic.
S20s & 30s JAZZ-
Over Duo offers a
i look into the hot j
Europe and Ameri
SKi ]early 20th Century
lively duo of guita
I ,I play compelling sc
reminiscent of dimr
and scratchy 78s.
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Toastmasters International

embers in developing good speaking, presentation
hip skills since 1924 personal development is
g, preparing members to accept opportunities
speaking skills are powerful, develop yours.
Find a Gainesville area club to visit
oastmasters.org you will be glad you did!


I The ouse f Fll


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playful
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Alacua County Today Art Festival at Thornebrook October 2 & 3, 2010 0_


GFAA Art Festival at Thornebrook is Produced by


GfiiAA
Gainesville Fine Arts Assoaation


The Gainesville Fine Arts Association


Festival Sponsors


Thornebrook Merchants Assiciation...


WCJB TV20 .................


lKr 0iua Ciontpy 0obap..

WKTK Radio..........


. Alachua County Today .......

...'... The Gainesville
#1 For The Best Variety


Sun ...........


Gainesville CW


12b ^ iL


97. I....................WSKY Radio


List of Contributors
Bageland complimentary coffee and bagels for
artists set-up day
Bead All About It water for artists
Dr. Frank Lozano water for artists
Publix gift card for ice and water for artists
Thornebrook Gallery water for artists,
framing of posters for sponsors
Leslie Lambert Santa Fe Student Volunteer
Coordinator

Electronic marquees:
Alarion Bank West Newberry road at 43rd
Street
M & S Bank Hunter's Crossing
Florida Credit Union 43rd Street
1 st Credit Union -
NW 16th Avenue at NW 43rd Street


*The special offer details: Get up to $1600.00 in free website design and consulting
services simply by signing up at ThorebrookArtFestival.com for website
hosting in the amount of your desired discount. Most website designs can be
completely built with the maximum $1600.00 design budget.
Artists, do you want to sell your art online?
D.o you want an easy to use eCommerce website?
S To you want to have sole control of the
content design and creative process?
Do you want the convenience of editing
S y1your website from an iPad*, or iPhone*?
*(3G or Wi-Fi internet connectivity
and software required)
Local Thornebrook Websites
http://www.thomebrookgallery.com
http://www.paddiwhack.com
S http://www.stitchdragon.com
Artists Vendors Retailers Entrepreneurs
Your website design and content is customizable and editable 24/7 online.
You can edit your website products and instantly add any content
(including pictures and movies) from your Mac or Windows PC easily and quickly.
Use your own domain (www.YourName.com).
Learn more about the special Offer:
http://www.ThornebrookArtFestival.com
Call 1-877-252-3602 to sign up.
Website Design Process Contact: http://www.filemakerwebdesign.com


~kc5krppcr







Alachua County Today Art Festival at Thornebrook October 2 & 3, 2010



Glass as art


By ROZ MILLER
Gainesville writer, artist and speaker
Special to Alachua County Today
Glass, a slowly-cooled liquid of ordinary materials, sand
transformed by intense fire, has captured our attention and
imagination with its light capturing transparency, reflective
qualities and stationary fluidity.
Phoenician merchants in Syria discovered a molten opaque
liquid substance resulting from intense heat about 5000 BC.
Opaque glass beads were found in Egypt around 3500
BC. There is evidence of hollow glass emerging from
Mesopotamia, Greece and China during the 16th Century BC.
Syrian craftsman are attributed with the glassblowing
breakthrough using a long metal tube giving greater variety of
shapes for hollow glass items.
Roman craftsman did much to spread glassmaking
technology and incorporating the use of glass for architectural
purposes. Venice, Italy evolved as the glassmaking center
during the Middle Ages and continues as a major modem day
art glass production hub.
Dunng the mid 16th Century, several leading Murano,
ltall glassblowers moved to London where they became
a fa\ orite of Queen Elizabeth I. The Queen's support and
the Venetian influence encouraged Englishman George


Ravenscroft to develop lead crystal using higher proportions amounts with the fluid liquid glass. Iron oxide makes bluish-
of lead oxide Venetian glass, creating a high refractive index, green, while chromium creates a richer green. Sulphur
suitable for cutting and engraving, together with carbon makes shades of yellow, cobalt yields
The Industrial Revolution brought scientific research that blue glass, copper oxide produces turquoise, depending on the
took glass from craft into industry in the late 19th Century. concentration, nickel results in violet or black glass. There is
Glass is a part of all our functional lives. But, much science that goes into the making of glass used
as art, glass presents another perspective by artists who in turn create beautiful visual


documented by a monk for craftsmen amps, sculpture, vases and glass jewelry
about 1100 AD, describing methods or personal adornment. Chandeliers
that have had little change over 900 become hanging works of art. Beautifully
years. Stained glass art is both beautiful designed hanging stained glass panels at
and functional. It is used in architectural windows capture and reflect light and colors
projects both commercial and residential in amazing ways.
but it is always colorful and attention getting. The only museum in the world devoted
Contemporary fused glass methods exclusively to contemporary glass art is the Museum
evolve by layering or stacking thin sheets of Marianne Gamble of Glass Art in Tacoma, Wash. There are glass societies
glass varying colors to create patterns and and associations easily found on the internet for further
designs. Many fused art works are ideal as wall art or small research.
easel displays, glass tiles and functional pieces. Including glass art in one's personal collection adds much
Much science goes into the formulation of glass colors, pleasure and dimension
Colored glass is the result of combining chemicals in various






Alachua County Today Art Festival at Thornebrook October 2 & 3, 2010


oAVAndfrom page "Art will take me into my old age!
from different perspectives. Critique at the end of each class and during workshops give
students feedback on things they have done well and suggestions for changing, improving
and enhancing composition, technique and application of the project at hand.
Fava is a co-founder of the High Springs Artists' co-op. She devotes time to serving
on the board and volunteering time on a regular basis to staff the gallery. Each artist
member is required to volunteer a shift staffing the gallery. The co-op members are intent
on maintaining high quality work. The gallery is a jewel of a retail shop on Main Street in
High Springs, two blocks south of the light on US441.
Receiving her first award in 1983, one area of the studio wall displays a variety of


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ribbons received. Some' f the ribbons represent cash awards and other simply the honor of
winning. Fava says she has participated in Thomebrook too many years to remember when
she first exhibited. She is always requests the same spot so her collector friends can easily
find her.
Membership in the Gainesville Fine Arts Association allows Fava participation to show
her work in group shows and exhibitions throughout the year. Fava invites visitation to her
Web site. www.dianafave.com
Fava says, "Art will take me into my old age!"


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2- Alachua County Today Art Festival at Thornebrook October 2 & 3, 2010

List of Program Advertisers
1st Credit Union of Gainesville Crevasses Lost Art/Renaissance Appraisals
Alternatives d'Lites Emporium Lozano Dental Care
Bageland ERA Preferred Properties Melrose Bay/Bellamy Road Galleries
Bead All About It FileMaker Wesb Design Picture This! Frame Shop
Book Gallery West Flying Biscuit Cafe The Grande Event
Brittany's Fine Jewelry Francesca's Trattoria Thornebrook Gallery
Brown's Country Buffet Gainesville Community Playhouse Toastmasters
Buddha-Belly Gateway Bank Vystar Credit Union
Cake Classics Gifts of Avalon Wild Birds Unlimited
Carpet Systems Plus Kitchen & Spice Winter Fine Art Fair @ Tioga
City of Gainesville Parks & Recreation Klaus Fine Jewelry Yarnworks
Please support the program advertising partners that support the arts. If you are interested in being a festival program advertising
partner next year, please contact gail@alachuatoday.com.


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Alachua County Today Art Festival at Thornebrook October 2 & 3, 2010


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1A- & a ua nty Arts, Cultural and Eco-Heritage Orgnizations.
ing ktefk out the wide variety of dance, visual arts, theatre, music, eco-
folkl that has become an integral part of our community.
once
Dance Alive National Ballet dancealive.org
Dance Theatre of Santa Fe sfcollege.edu/finearts
Danscompany danscompanyofgainesville.org
Gainesville Ballet Theatre gainesvilleballettheatre.org
UF School of Theatre & Dance arts.ufl.edu/theatreanddance


museum goillerles
Archer Historical Museum www.afn.org~ archer
Bellamy Road Fine Arts, Literature & Film bellamyroadarts.com
Florida Museum of Natural History flmnh.ufl.edu
Gainesville Artisans' Guild Gallery gainesvilleartisansguild.com
"the gallery" union.ufl.edu/gallery
Samuel P. Ham Museum of Art www.harn.ufl.edu
Hawthorne Historical Museum hawthomeflorida.org/museum.
Matheson Museum mathesonmuseum.org
Melrose Bay Art Gallery mbagallery.smugmug.com
Micanopy Historical Society Museum uwww.afn.org/~micanopy
Santa Fe Galleries sfcollege.edu/finearts
Thomas Center Galleries gvlculturalaffairs.org
University Galleries: Grinter, Focus & University Gallery arts.ufl.edu/galleries


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rtory Theatre acrosstown.org
ieatre& Dance arts.ufl.edu/theatreanddance
munity Playhouse gcplayhouse.org
immunity Theater highspringscommunitytheater.com
te Theatre/ Center of Modem Art thehipp.org
CenteratPKYonge pkyonge.ufl edu
prts performingarts utl edu
* sfcollege.edu/fineam n I
;e-- so


music
Alachua County Youth Orchestra acyo.org
Gainesville Barber Gators barbergators.com
Gainesville Chamber Orchestra gcomusic.org
Gainesville Civic Chorus gcchorus.org
Gainesville Community Band gnvband.org
Gainesville Friends of Jazz & Blues gnvfriendsofjazz.org
Gainesville Harmony Show Chorus gainesvillechorus.com
Gainesville Youth Chorus gainesvilleyouthchorus.com
North Central Florida Blues Society ncfblues.org
SFC Department of Music sfcollege.edu/finearts
UF Department of Music arts.ufl.edu/music


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eco-herltoge
Cofrin Nature Park, Morningside Nature Center natureoperations.org
Devil's Millhopper floridastateparks.org/devilsmillhopper
Dudley Farm State Historic Site floridastateparks.org/dudleyfarm
Historic Haile Homestead hailehomestead.org
Kanapaha Botanical Gardens kanapaha.org
Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings State Historical Site marjoriekinnanrawlings.org
The Matheson House mathesonmuseum.org
Palm Point Nature Center, Alfred A. Ring Nature Center natureoperations.o
Paynes Prairie floridastateparks.org/paynesprairie
The Thomas Center gvlculturalaffairs.org
Gainesville/Hawthorne Rail Trail floridastateparks.org/gainesville-hawthorne


J





Alachua County Today Art Festival at Thornebrook October 2 & 3, 2010


Art Festival Committee
Lyn White, Director
Pamela Morgan, Co-Director
Bill Hutchinson, Entertainment Director
Karen Markey, Information Tent Coordinator
Elliot Tucker, GFAA Coordinator and Treasurer
Patsy Lindamood, GFAA President
Aliye Cullu, Graphic Design Posters, postcards,
t-shirts
Marianne Gamble, Website Design
Roz Miller, Public Relations, Program Sales






Alachua County Today Art Festival at Thornebrook October 2 & 3, 2010


Special Thanks to

Our Volunteers

The Santa Fe College Art History class
And so-far unidentified lovers of the arts


Artists' Awards

Best in Show .........................$ 750
2 Awards of Excellence ................$ 500
2 Awards of Distinction ................$ 300
2Awards of Merit ....................$150
2 Judges Choice ......................$ 250


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Since 1981 Thornebrook Gallery has
provided Gainesville and the communities of
North Florida with the finest in art, crafts jewelry
and custom framing.
We invite you to view our selections, we
bring you the art of acclaimed fine artists such as
Margaret Ross Tolbert, Trish Beckham, Vivian
Jendzio, C. Ford Riley and many others. These
artists provide you with original art as well as
graphics such as lithographs, serigraphs, etchings
and giclees.
Our craft artists bring their skills to bear
in mediums as diverse as wood, glass, ceramics,
basketry, and metal in both functional and purely
decorative items.
The artisan designed and crafted jewelry
that we carry will amaze and delight you with it's
quality. The metals and stones are used in concert
to create sculptural pieces that will endure
timelessly.
Custom framing is an art in itself and
with nearly three decades of experience we will
create framing for you that you will be proud to
live with and display for years to come.


GALLERY


THORNEBROOK VILLAGE 352 378-4947 THORNEBROOKGALLERY@GMAIL.COM


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