Title: Alachua County Today
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00081789/00151
 Material Information
Title: Alachua County Today
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Alachua County Today
Publisher: Alachua Today, Inc.
Place of Publication: Alachua
Publication Date: February 25, 2010
Copyright Date: 2010
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00081789
Volume ID: VID00151
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: issn - 1534-7567

Full Text
Adrs Servic Requested_ _


_I _ __~I


*L eUx. eco
I h-aDle'njge


Hawthorne students in Newberry Feb. 27








nath oa Count! yap
Serving all the Communities of-Alachua County '


T ) The Heartland's only five star small-town newspaper


This newspaper named 2007 Business of the Year Alachua Chamber of Commerce 250


Vol. 10 o.13Alchu, d s ctnS vAau m Th ursdvFbraI


Alachua's first black mayor
in 1977 when he ran for the American to run for office,
Alachua City Commission and he got out there and did it
was elected by a community that for everyone."
trusted him to invest in positive He continued on .to
changes for all races, said former become Alachua's first.
City Manager Clovis Watson Jr. black mayor in 1978 and
"He cared about all of the served on the commission
community, not just the African until health issues led him
American community but all Criswell to retire in 1999.
of the 'community," Watson .Those not ready for
said. "But he paved the way for all a black leader doubted his intellect
of us. He opened that door and took and ability, Watson said, but even
that challenge when no one would.- CRISWELL:
When it wasn't popular for an African Continued on page A4


Early childhood education for the


African American community

'Black history is not a month, it's 365 days a year' Gussie Lee


By TRACEY MCMANUS
Today Reporter
S Two full

decades after.a

Supreme Court

ruling should

have plucked
r: racial teniions

from the day

care havens

where children

nap and play,

Gussie Lee still

" felt an

imbalance at
home in

Alachua.

It was a whole

generation after

Brown vs. Board

of Education


NICOLE CRISP/Alachua County Today
Gussie Lee has spent a lifetime nurturing others, including children who attend
her day care center across from Mebane Middle School. When Lee opened the
doors in 1976, it was the first such center in Alachua for African American children.


made segregation in schools and facilities
illegal, but segregation was still thriving
by simple preference in Alachua after it
had been shunned by the law. In 1976,
parents were still following the silent norm
of placing their children in preschools by
the color Of their skin.
"There'wasn't a black day care center
in Alachua," she said Tuesday, a sad
expression on her face from what sounds


illogical today. "Not because of the law
but because of choice, Even though
any child could have gone in 1976 to a
white child-care center, it was still not a
comfortable enough situation."
As a social worker for the Board of.
County Commissioners, Lee had pledged
to root out needs in the community and
LEE:
Continued on page AS


Police officer


honored for


saving baby's life


ALEX AUSTIN/Alachua County Today
L-R: Officer Adam Joy is shown alongside Alachua
Police Chief Joel DeCoursey Jr. at Monday night's
commission meting. Mayor Bonnie Burgess
presented an award to Joy for conducting CPR and
saving a baby's life.
By ALEX AUSTIN life," said Alachua Police
Today Reporter Chief Joel DeCoursey, Jr.
ALACHUA A woman to the commission Monday
yelled, "Officer, help me!" evening.
Her baby was not DeCoursey said Joy
breathing. reacted based on his training
The officer she was and was able to capitalize
yelling for was Adam Joy. on the rare opportunity a
The 22-year-ord police police officer gets to save
officer wasted little time a life.
and began performing CPR He not only praised
on the baby in the Weridy's Joy'sactions, buthis attitude
parking lot in Alachua.
"He saved this baby's JOY:
-oune oni pag A'fs


4 onnnuea on page At

One day left for connmission


candidates to 1
By ALEX AUSTIN
Today Reporter
ALACHUA Friday.
at noon marks the end of
the qualifying period for
candidates hoping to claim
one of the three commission
seats up for grabs in the
April 13 City of Alachua
election.
For the first time,
citizens will vote for
the mayor directly this
year, instead, of the
commissioners selecting


among themselves as
has been done in the
past. That comes after
electors amended the
city's charter last year,
converting Commission
Seat 1, currently. held
by Commission Jean
Calderwood, to the mayor's
seat.
Calderwood has said
she has no intentions of
running for her current
ELECTION:
Continued on page AS


Wild Spaces and Public Places revenues down

Cities still benefitting from recreation improvements


* By NICOLE CRISP
Today Reporter
ALACHUA COUNTY -
Approved by Alachua county
voters in 2008, the Wild Spaces
Public. Places (WSPP) tax initiative
increased the sales tax rate by half
a. penny. It was expected to bring
in about $40 million to be used to
preserve environmentally sensitive
land and help individual cities
improve their recreation facilities,
using revenue collected from sales in
the county. About 25 percent of the
revenue was expected to come from
out-of-county shoppers and visitors.
The program was originally
expected to bring in $39,783,408
over the course of two years. Right
now those projections are down 24'
percent, adjusted as of December to


a total of $30,307,338.
"This is a sales tax," explained
Ramesh Buch, program manager at
the Alachua County Environmental
Protection Department. "The
estimates that were generated
summer 2008 were a particular set
of estimates at that time. One of the
facts of the recession is that people
spend less money."
A year into the program,
the Alachua Board of County
Commissioners had received
$5,182,799 for the purchase of
land in Alachua County. Another
$5,998,501 had been distributed
between Alachua County's nine
cities for the use of improvement of
recreation facilities. The distribution
is based on population, with
Gainesville receiving 85 percent of
the. funding with $5,108,179 and


LaCrosse the least with $6,951 at
0.11 percent of the revenue. A pre-
determined amount of $1.5 million
was used for the establishment of a
senior recreation center to be used by
all residents of Alachua County.
"It's been really helpful," said
Hawthorne City Planner Kelly
Moosbrugger about the program.
"The city hasn't seen this much
money available in the recreation
center in a long time."
The City of Hawthorne has
already started using the $63,042 of
funding they've received to improve
the city's athletic fields with new
volleyball courts and to help fund a
park pavilion.
"Most of the WSPP money is still
sitting here waiting to be used," said
WILD SPACES:
Continued on page A6


Alachua's wastewater

plant taking shape


NACOLa CRuISiachuin County roeay
The City of Alachua's wastewater treatment plant
expansion is a long way from completion, but
structures at the 233-acre site at the end of NW 126th
Terrace are beginning to take shape. At a cost of
$25.4 million, the expansion will increase the city's
total wastewater treatment capacity by 50 percent
from 940,000 to 1.5 million gallons per day. The
project is being funded by a combination of grants,
loans and wastewater revenues..


Index
inside
on A2
@2009 Alachua
Today, Incorporated

Il4!l!I 082887 2


HI H SN N.M

High Spring


Alachua pioneering icon dies at 74


Gerald Criswell was
By TRACEY MCMANUS
Today Reporter
ALACHUA The Rev. Gerald
Criswell, whose impassioned
leadership in community issues made'
him the first African American, to
hold political office in Alachua as
well as the city's first black mayor,
died Sunday. He was 74.
After years of fighting pancreatic
cancer and other health issues,
Criswell died of a brain aneurism, his
daughter Jennifer confirmed.
Criswell shook racial stigma


Address Service Requested
,11,,1,1 11 1 l ,,,111, lll1,, I ,,I ,,ll. I ,,,111, ,111,, 1
9 ** 1 ** 428 ******** SCH 3-DIGIT 326
Digital Library Center
PO Box 117007
Newberry. School brawl bet Gainesville 32611-7007
students Yin Interlachen and ' ne w ii q


_ ~ ~ __ ~ __


- -- I -- -I


d










ALACHUA COUNTY TODAY LOCAL NEWS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2010


Alachua County Today (ISSN
1534-7567) is published week-
ly by Alachua Today, Inc.,
14804 Main Street, Alachua,
FL 32615. All material herein
is the property, of Alachua
County Today. Reproduction
in whole or in part is forbidden
without the written permission
of the publisher. Periodicals
Postage Paid at Alachua, FL
32616.

HOW TO REACH US
Phone: (386) 462-3355
Fax: (386) 462-4569
Email: editor@alachuatoday.
com
Mail: P.O. Box 2135, Alach-
ua, FL 32616
Office: 14804 Main Street,
Suite 200
Open Monday through Friday
9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

NEWSROOM
*Managing Editor Bryan
Boukari,.editor@alachuato-
day.com
*Reporters: Alex Austin,
Tracey McManus, Nicole.
Crisp


GRAPHICS
iGraphics Manager Gail Lu-
parello, gail@alachuatoday.
com .

ADVERTISING
*Director,6f Sales & Market-
'ing: Bpn Boukari, (386)
462-3355 or email to ben@
alachuatoday.com.
.Classified/Legal: Leila Bou-
kiari, accounting@alachua-
Stoday.com'
"Legal Display: Gail Luparel-
lo, gail@alachuatoday.com

SUBSCRIPTIONS
In-county, $25/$40 for two
years
Out-of-county, $35/$60 for
two years
Out-of-state, $40/$70 for two
years

POSTMASTER:
Send changes of address to:
Alachua County Today, P.O.
Box 2135, Alachua, FL32616.
Annual subscription rate is
$25 in county, $35 out-of-
county and $40 out-of-state.
Subscribe online'at www.ala-
chuatoday.com.

HOW TO SUBMIT...
-LETTERS TO THE EDI-
TOR: Letters may be mailed,
faxed or emailed. Letters may
be edited to fit available
space. Please include your
name, address, and day and
evening phone. numbers for
verification. Letters MUST be
signed.
mA STORY: Do you have a
timely story or news event that
is of interest to the communi-
ty? Email our managing editor
at editor@alachuatoday.com
or call (386) 462-3355.
*COMMUNITY CALENDAR,
CHURCH, BIRTH & WED-
DING ANNOUNCEMENTS:
Email to gail@alachuatoday.
com, call (386) 462-3355 or
fax (386) 462-4569 your infor-
mation. Please include phone
number and name of individu-
al submitting the announce-
ment.
Letters, comments and opin-
ions on the Opinions page are
not necessarily those of the
management/ownership of the
Alachua County Today.




INSIDE

ALACHUA

COUNTY

TODAY...
CLASSIFIEDS. .B3
EVENTS....... A3
JOBS ...........B3
MOST WANTED B1
OPINIONS .... A4
PUZZLE. .... ....B6
REAL ESTATE ..B6
RELIGION......B2

l gy, S


Jesse says,
"The school of expe-
rience never chang-
es. It always issues
its diplomas on the
roughest grade of
sandpaper."


Information appearing
in this listing comes
from the Alachua County
Sheriff's Office daily jail
log as provided to Alachua
County Today.
All individuals are
presumed innocent -until
proven guilty. Individuals
listed on this page may be
cited and released or placed
under custodial arrest.
Information provided
is believed to be accurate,
however not guaranteed.
Most abbreviations have
been left as provided to
maintain the accuracy of
the log.

Last name, First name,
DOB, Charges, Agency
Booking: February 17,
2010
Akins, Michael A., 9/29/1957,
Inhouse Putnam Co., ASO
Anderson, John E.,
9/1/1978, Poss control sub w/o
prescription, poss cannabis <20
g, opiurh traffic, drug equip poss/
use, ASO
Brenalopez, Gerardo b.,
10/3/1974, VOP DUI alcohol or
drugs, ASO
SBrown, Janice, 10/6/1958,
Sentenced, ASO
Carson, Cassandra L.,
10/30/1962, Return to custody,
ASO
Cook, Crystal, 6/9/1991, FTA,
ASO
Crawford, Mark, 2/8/1983,
Inhouse, return to custody, ASO
Davis, Theodore, 4/15/1940,
VOP, marijuana possess < 20 g,
ASO
Dillingham, Robert,
10/18/1954, Attempt burg to
auto, poss burg tools, GPD
Drymon, Ronnie, 5/30/1971,
DWLSR Habitual,; ASO
Dudley, Cassidy, 10/9/1982,
Sentenced, ASO
Garcia, Jason, 5/4/1978,
VOP, FTA, ASO
Hampton, Felisha Samora,
12/10/1975, FTA Larc, fraud theft,
poss forged, FTA DWLS, ASO
Hayes, Bors Nolan,
9/14/1967, Civil, ASO
Heshmat, Ardalan, 6/4/1970,
Court ordered by Nilon, ASO
Huston, Andrew T., 6/7/1978,
DUI, UPD
Johnson, Jonetla,
12/21/1982, No valid DL, leave
scene of acc, give false report,
GPD
Jones, Carlos Jerome,
2/24/1978, VOP, FTA, ASO
Kenny, Richarde, 9/11/1982,
DWLS 2nd off, ASO
Mitchell. Jr., Randolph W.,
11/25/1981, Resist w/o viol, GPD


Mitchum, Dave, 12/4/1975,.
Animals cause cruel, death,
pain, suff x 2, animals unlawful,
ASO
Moore, David M., 9/15/1953,
Fraud fail redeliver lease prop
>300, ASO
Moore, Sylvester,
11/30/1988, Trespass after
warning, GPD
Murray, Shannon E.,
3/5/1987, DUI, GPD
Myers, Terrance T.,
9/23/1972, Poss cann <20 g,
resist w/o viol, GPD
Pinkney, George, 5/29/1938,
CUI 4th, sub off, expired lic >
6 mos sub, attach plate not
.assigned, DWLSR 2nd off, ASO
Roberts, Jerry, 8/16/1982,
Inhouse VOP battery, ASO
Smith, Carlos, 6/18/1991,
VOP, FTA, ASO
Strickland, Derek L.,
9/14/1965, Child abuse, GPD
Taylor, James A.,
10/17/1977, SDWLSR, resist w/o
viol, sentenced, ASO
Thomas, Pamela, 8/13/1973,
FTA, ASO
Thompson, Jr., Sammie,
5/27/1970, Inhouse return to
custody, ASO
Vanhersh, Shawn, 9/1/1971,
Civil, ASO .
VanLeuven, Ty, 12/6/1973,
FTA DUI alcohol, DOJ
Watkins, Kevin A.,
8/19/1991, Reckless driving, flee/
elude, veh theft grand, ASO
Young, Joseph, 4/26/i954,
Lee Co., ASO

Booking: February 18,2010
Adams, Tonya, 10/27/1982,
VOP, conservation animals:
cause death, suffering, ASO
Bailey, Briah G., 4/17/1975,
FTA DWLSR, ASO
Banks, Karatee, 8/15/1988,
Tamper w/evidence, poss <20 g,
poss of drug equip, maintain drug
dwell, GPqI
Buckhannon, Bryan C.,
3/15/1978, Poss cont. sub, poss:
cann <20 g, poss drug para,
unlawfully transport drugs, GPD
Buono, Daniel K., 2/19/1989,
DUI, UPD
Carr, Janice, 8/29/1963, SUI
out of county, ASO
Cason, Edward, 2/6/1953,
DUI, ASO
Christmas, George,
6/11/1969, VOP, ASO
Dallas, Cestie, 2/5/1990,
Battery, FTA, ASO
Daniels, Lorenzo, 3/26/1963,
Disorderly into, refuse to sign
citation, GPD
Davis, Brandon M.,
2/24/1987, Simple battery, GPD'
Dora, Carter, 10/25/1986,
Disturbing peace, breach peace,
sentenced, ASO
Driscoll, Sean L., 10/21/1971,
Battery, ASO :
Fuentes, Brandon M.,


3/6/1984, Drug possess w/o
prescription, ASO
Gay, Kenneth Shawn,
2/19/1986, Panhandling, GPD
Goggins, Jeremiah,
9/26/1991, Poss control sub w/o
prescript, marijuana <20 g, ASO
Greene, William H.,
7/22/1942, Cocaine sell within
1000 ft of sch, cocaine possess,
dangerous drugs keep shop,
cocaine traffic, cocaine possess,
marijuana possess, ASO
Grigger, Travis Denard,
2/14/1981, DWLSR habitual,
simple assault intent threat to
do violence, ASO
Harvin, Jerry, 2/17/1967,
VOP, poss of marij <20 g, ASO
Irving, Willies, 6/16/1976,
Habitual DWLSR, GPD
Johnson,. Dwayne O.,
4/26/1986, Agg stalking dom,
GPD
Jordan, Brian, 2/3/1989,
Resist w/o violence, fraud x6, ASO
Keith, Davron D., 5/31/1988,
Fraud, impersonation, use false
. name on lic., ASO
Kreitzer, Gary, 5/30/1982,
VOP operate veh w/o valid
license, VOP possess drug equip,
ASO
LaCrory, Claudia, 6/5/1981,
Fraud, insuff funds, ck under
$150, fraud insuff funds, ck under
$150, ASO
Masonet, Candido,
' 6/29/1981, Battery, ASO 5
Mayes, III, Marion J.,
1/20/1981, Inhouse VOP, ASO
McCarron, James F.,'
11/17/1971, Petit theft, GPD
Mclntosh, Jaclyn, 11/9/1979,
Grand theft-fraud, use credit
cards x2, ASO
McKnight, Kiera Desiree,
4/15/1990, Simple battery, touch
or strike, GPD
Mills, Teresa R., 8/14/1964,
VOP, ASO
Myers, Terrance, 9/23/1972,
VOP battery, VOP trespassing,
ASO
Oliver, Dachua L., 12/7/1972,
Court order, ASO
Oscue, Eric, 10/13/1979, VOP
DWLS 1st off, ASO
Rentz, Andre,' 9/15/1986,
Poss <20 g marijuana, resist
officer w/o vio, DWLS habitual,
GPD
Robbins, Jacklyn,
8/26/1963, Larc, grand theft 300
<5K, ASO
Smith, Thomas, 11/26/1987,
Resist w/o, trespassing, GPD
.Starling, Paul, 6/26/1963,
DUI, GPD
Starling, Scott, 5/28/1958,
VOP grand theft, flee/elude Santa.
Rosa County, ASO
Summers, Melanie Rose;:
1/22/1991, FTA resist ofc w/o
viol, ASO .,
Trinder, Patricia, 2/16/1980,
VOP, ASO
Wattenbarger, 'Arelle,
3/21/1991, DUI, ASO
White, Windell Terry,
4/1/1963, Inhouse, criminal
mischief, grand theft, GPD.
Williams, Detran, 8/19/1991,
Concealed -firearm, altered
firearm, operate motor vehicle,
'GPD
Williams, Kerry E.,
2/13/1985, Poss cann w/intent to
sell, GPD
Williams, Matthew,
3/13/1987, Dom battery, GPD

For additional jail
booking logs, see
alachuacounty
today.com.


Obituaries


Rev. Gerald Criswell
Rev. Gerald Criswell,
74, retired Pastor and
former City Commissioner
for the City of Alachua,
Fla., died Sunday, February
21, 2010 at North Florida
Regional Medical Center in
Gainesville.
He was 74.
Rev
Criswell
was born
I in Alachua
County, Fla.
and lived
Criswell in Alachua
all of his


life. He served as Pastor
of the following churches:
Greater Elizabeth Baptist
Church, Lake Butler, Fla.,
St. Paul Baptist Church,
LaCrosse, Fla., Philadelphia
Baptist Church, Lake City,
Fla., Old Shiloh Baptist
Church -of Hainesworth,
Fla. and New Shiloh of
Alachua, Fla. Rev. Criswell
also served as Moderator of
the Jerusalem Association
and the Suwannee River
Progressive Association.'
Survivors include
his wife, Johnnie Mae
Criswell of Alachua, Fla.;
son, Gerald Criswell, Jr.
of Alachua, Fla.; four
daughters, Jennifer Criswell
of Alachua, Fla., Connie
T. James of Gainesville,
Fla., Sabrina lI. Criswell of
Alachua, Fla., and Phobee
Jones ofAlachua, Fla.; three
brothers, Joe Washington,
Charles Washington, and
Sammy Reed; three sisters,
Mary Rhodes, Mary Lee
Criswell and Alma Criswell;
13 grandchildren and 3 great
grandchildren.
Funeral services for
Rev. Criswell will be held
on Saturday, February 27,
2010 at 3 p.m. at the Female
Protective Temple with Rev.
Eugene Gainey officiating.
Burial will' follow in St.
Matthews Cemetery under
the care.of Chestnut Funeral
Home, Gqinesvillel Fla.,
SVisitation will be Friday
at Chestnut Chapel, 2 to 7
p.m. and on Saturday at the
Female Protective Temple
one hour before the service.
There will be no viewing
after the eulogy.

Ora Bell Lee
Ora Bell Lee, 66, died
Thursday, February 18,
2010. She was a native of
Newberry,
Fla.. and a
retired En-
vironmental
Techni-
cian at the
University
Lee of Florida.


BSe a pMofrt NOtaW$ leai childrB' and
matrownky min ejeMlnnCtr
Gahinieie Event aMarch 4 -7th

S and get the kids ready for spring & summer at greai savings!
r* o )your items as a consignor and earn up to 5%! Details online!
Vkw and shop before the public to get the best deals bsit!
Thdamy (3/4), loam-7pm
Friday(315), lOam-7pm
Saturday (316), 10am-7pm
SSunda O3/), 10am4pm


shop. sell save. smart!
Sibfsal. c




Detaul arid consignor regutraton va lab online or call 352.494.6229 lodayl











Juniors & Ladies Clothing (Gently Used)
Collectibles & Decor
FORA WEAR CLEARANCE 40% Off
Hours: Monday & Saturday 10 a.m. 5 p.m., Tuesday through Friday 10 a.m. 6 p.m.
14520 S. Main St, Alachua, FL 32615 386-462-2230


She was a member of Mt.
Nebo United Methodist
Church.
Survivors include her
father, Sylvester Brinkley,
Alachua; five sons, Lamar
McClain, Sr. and. Jammie
McGhee, both of Alachua,
Frederick McGhee, Ar-
cher, James Lee and Tyrone
Lee both of Newberry; six
daughters, Delores Pat-
terson and Letha L. Miller
both of Alachua, Donna
Irving, Gainesville, Lo-
retta Lee, Ft. Lauderdale,
Barbara Lee, Jacksonville,
and Denise Lee, NAvberry;
four brothers, Jimmy Ross,
Sr., Gainesville, James Mc-
Clain, Alachua, Sylvester
Brinkley, Jr. and Albert
Brinkley both of Stuart;
five sisters, Mary Alice Mc-
Ghee, Gainesville, Alice
Davis, Betty Brinkley, Mae
Francis Brinkley and Mary
Ann Brinkley all of Stuart,
21 grandchildren, nine great
grandchildren and a host of
relatives and friends.
Funeral services for Ms.
Lee will be held on Saturday,
February 27, 2010.at 11:00
a.m. at the Female Protective
Temple, Rev. William R.
George officiating. Burial
will follow at Mt. Nebo
Cemetery, Alachua, Fla,,
under the care of Chestnut
Funeral Home. Visitation
will be Friday 2 p.m. 7
p.m. at Chestnut Chapel and
on Saturday at the Female
Protective Temple one hour
before the service. The
cortege will form at the
home of Ms. Lee, 14230
NW 156th Place, Alachua at
10:15 a.m.

Elizabeth "Betty"
Marie Moshier
Elizabeth "Betty" Marie
Moshier of Newberry, Fla.,
passed away on Wednesday,
February 17, 2010 at the E
,T.ork HospiceCare center
in Gainesville, Fla: She was


Mrs. Moshier was born
in Breesport, NY on August
5, 1929.
She was
a member
of the
Breesport
Ba ptist
Church,
where she Moshier
t aug h t
Sunday school classes. She
enjoyed bird watching and
flowers and loved to care for
her family, to whom she was
a loving wife, and devoted
mother, grandmother and
great grandmother.
She was preceded in
death by her sisters, Inez
Rounds, Lila Millard,
and Virginia Coles, and a
brother, Edwin Burlew:
Survivors include
her husband of 61 years,
Richard "Dick" Moshier;
daughters, Carol (Chuck)
Penny of Gainesville and
Kathy (Clate) Mallory of
Horseheads, NY; a brother,
Larry Burlew of Breesport,
NY; four grandchildren,
Randy (Cherish) Brigham,
Tracey LaPierre, Gordon
Mallory, and Susan (Randy)
Smith; and her' six great
grandchildren, Kirstie
Smith, Olivia Brigham,
Garrett Brigham, Ben
Smith, Michelle Smith, and
Kaitlyn Mallory.
Services will be held
privately, and in lieu
of- flowers, memorial
contributions may be made
to Haven Hospice, 4200 NW
90 Boulevard, Gainesville,
Fla. 32606 and the American
Cancer Society, 2121 SW
16 Avenue, Gainesville, Fla.
32608.
Arrangements are under
the care of Milam Funeral
and Cremation Services,
Newberry, Fla.

Obituaries: The obituaries
in this section are considered
news and are published
free of charge by Alachua
County Today. Obituaries
may be edited for style,
space and policy.


NOTICE OF SECOND

READING BY CITY

COMMISSION ARCHER,

FLORIDA

Notice is hereby given that the proposed ordinance
whose title hereafter appears, will have a second
reading onthe 8th day of March, 2010, at the Regular
City Commission meeting starting at 7:00 p.m., or as
soon after as may be heard, in the City Commission
Chambers at City Hall 16870 SW 134th Avenue Archer,
Florida. A copy of said ordinance may be inspected
by any member of the public at the Office of the
City Manager, at the above Address. All interested
parties may appear and be heard with respect to the
proposed ordinance.

Ordinance no. 01-2010

AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF ARCHER,
FLORIDA, ADOPTING AN URBAN SERVICES
REPORT PURSUANT TO THE REQUIREMENTS
OF THE ALACHUA COUNTY BOUNDARY
ADJUSTMENT ACT (CHAPTER 90-496, LAWS
OF FLORIDA) RELATING TO THE ANNEXATIONS
TO THE COUNTRIES OF THE CITY OF ARCHER,
FLORIDA, WHICH ARE REASONABLY COMPACT
AND CONTIGUOUS TO THE CITY LIMITS;
PROVIDING SEREABILITY; REPEALING ALL
ORDINANCES IN CONFLICT; AND PROVIDING
AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

L. L --JI3- 'i..
d--+',- -4 ^-"-




,-- ..7-.4 4

-' _ 1. a -
I* I;1*

.+ .i_. -- \ __..
*- -- ,e --, ; L ~ar.,
.. I a,, .

I, -=- - -







All interested persons are invited to attend and be
heard. Written comments may be filed with the City
Managers Office for consideration. In addition to any
other comments, interested persons are invited to submit
comments on whether the proposal will have a significant
impact on the cost of housing.

All persons are advised that, if they decide to appeal any
decision made at this public hearing or meeting, they will
need a record of the proceedings and, for such purpose,
they may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the
proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony
and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.

(References Section 286.015, Florida Statutes)
(Published: Alachua County Today February 25, 2010)








ALACHUA COUNTY TODAY COMMUNITY CORNER THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2010 Ai


C(ornrn]mnitv


Corner


/~i~~~-- t~t T ^ ^--- r/^ -*"1 '
M ei -A ie


Meetings & Events in the Heartlands


9-"1~ 1" ~"~


PUBLIC
MEETINGS
EArcher Meets the 2nd
and 4th Monday of each
month at:7 p.m. at City
Hall, 16870 SW 134 Ave.
PAlachua (City) Meets
the 2nd and 4th Monday of
each month at 6:30 p.m. at
City Hall.
*Alachua County Meets
the 2nd and 4th Tuesda)
of each month at 9 a.m. at
the'County Administration
Building, 12 SE 1st Street,
Room 209, Gainesville.
Citizen comments are
taken at 9:30 a.m. and 5:30
p.m.
S Gainesville" Meets
the 1st and 3rd Thursday
of each month at I p.m.
at City Commission
Chamber, 200 East
University Avenue.
*Hawthorne Meets the
Ist and 3rd Tuesdays of
each month at 6:30 p.m. at
City Hall.
lHigh Springs Meets
the 2nd and 4th Thursday
of each month'at 6:30 p.m.
in City Hall.
SLaCrosse Meets the
2nd Monday ofeach month
at 7:30 p.m. at Town Hall.
mMicanopy Meets the
2nd Tuesday of each month
at 7:30 p.m. at Town Hall.
SNewberry Meets the
2nd and 4th Monday of
each month at 7 p.m. at
City Hall
*Waldo Meets the 2nd
Tuesday of each month at
7 p.m. at Yerkes Center.
Vendor Call for the
Eighth Annual Alachua
Spring Festival i sponsored
by Alachua Business
:' League and the City of
S Alachia. The festival will be
held Sunday, April 18 from
11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Main


Street in downtown Alachua.
Booth signup deadline is
April 2. The festival is a
day filled with fun, food and
entertainment.
Vendors are invited
to participate with arts,
crafts, jewelry, home &
garden, writers, artists,
musicians, clowns, children's
activities, inspirational, self-
improvement, music, fishing
tackle and boaters "toys",
home improvement, tools,
and anything that makes
people happy.
Food is popular so a
variety from standard festival
food to healthy foods and
home-baked goods items are
welcome. Professional food
vendors must provide proof
oflicensure.
Charitable organizations
are welcome to share their
information along with
a token gift to the public.
(magnets, pens, etc.). The fee
is waived for these groups.
Booth costs vary from
$45 to $125 depending on
type of vendor. To sign up, go
to www.alachuabusiness.com
and download applications
for general vendor or food/
entertainment vendors.
For more information,
contact rmorse47@yahoo.
cor, 386-462-9552; Joan
Sroka esrokal@yahoo.com,
352-514-1258; Kelly Harris
386-462-5010 or Kelly@
kellyskreations.com.
* The Knights of Coluinbus
will be having their annual
fish fries at St. Madeleine
Church on Friday, Feb. 26,
March 5, 12, and 19 from 4
p.m. to 6:30 p.m.
The fish fries include fish,
corn on the cob, french fries
and homemade cole slaw,
and cheese grits. The cost
is $7 for adults and $3.50
for children and the Church
Women's Guild will have
cakes and cookies for sale.
The church is located at
17155 NW Hwy 441 in High
Springs and all proceeds go


to help the many charitable
activities of the Knights.
* Register now for the
Tortoise 5K Run/Walk at
O'Leno State Park to be
held March 13 at 8 a.m.
Prize money and awards will
be provided by the Friends of-
O'Leno. Race information
and registration' forms are at
www. floridastateparks.org/
olenoevents.cfm or call 386-
454-0723.
* O'LENO OLE CASI
Sanctioned Chili Cookoff is
being held Saturday, March
27 at O'Leno State Park
located six miles north of
High Springs on Hwy. 441.
Festivities begin at 10 a.m.
Turn in time is 1 p.m. Prizes
will be given for first through
10th place and first through
third place for showmanship.
Entry fee is $20 per team.
Bring your favorite chili
recipe and. compete with'
the best! All entries must
follow the CASI rules and
regulations (go to www.chili.
org) or throw out the rule
book and compete in the open
house competition where
anything gpes.
: .Spectators may purchase
sample kits and vote for the
"Peoples Choice Award."
For more information,
contact Harriet Walsh 386-
454-4806. All proceeds go
to the Friends of O'teno for
park improvement projects.
Alachua County
Beekeepers Club is
accepting new members,
Anyone interested in learning
aboutbees from Alachua and
the surrounding counties is
welcome to join. Meetings
Share held the third Thursday
of each month at Dadant &
Sons, 17074 NW 188 Street,
High Springs. For more
information, contact Wayne
"Chappie" McChisney, Club
President 386-462-2637 or
chappiesbees@windstream.
net.


* Hilltop Animal
Hospital is sponsoring a
Bark for. Life fundraiser
walk March 13 at 1 p.m.
at the Progress Corporate
Park. All money raised
at this event will go to The
American Cancer Society
Relay for Life to be held
May 14-15 at Santa Fe High
School. Registration will
be $10.per dog and owner.
The walk will be around the
entire park on the sidewalks.
There will be treats and water
available for your dog. Gift
baskets will be awarded for
the most donations raised.
Please help us. get the word
out by telling all your friends,
family and neighbors. The
more participation there is
the more the donations can
help fight cancer.
m Fantastic Friday "Go
Green" will take place
on Friday, March 5, in
downtown High Springs.
Merchants will be open all
day with $100 cash chance
Sand gift-certificate drawings
at participating merchant
locations throughout High
Springs. This month,
Fantastic. Friday will feature
a sidewalk'sale downtown.
with plant vendors in
conjunction with our "Go
Green" theme. Members of
several local conservation
and waste management
groups will be downtown
making .presentations and
answering questions about
recycling and staying
eco-friendly. Special
entertainment and live music
events start at 6 p.m. There
will also be a free "Kid's
Comer" at the Hair and Nail
Depot parking lot downtown
with throw toss games,
rides and fun for kids of all
ages! The Kid's Corer is
co-sponsored by the First
Baptist Church of High
Springs.
For additional
information, contact
the Main Street office


directly at 386-454-2889
or by email at manager@
highspringsmainstreet.com.
* Haven Hospice "Run
for Haven" at Tioga Town
Center in Gainesville will
be, Saturday, March 20.
Featured a 5K and 10K run,
along with great music, food,
drinks, vendor booths and
more. Registration is at 2
p.m. Twilight run begins at
4:30 p.m. Registration fee
will be $25 until Feb. 13, $35
from Feb. 14 through March
19, and $45 the day of the
race. Registration includes
admission to the post party,
including food. You don't
have to be a runner to enjoy
the party; you can attend for
just $15! To register to run,
visit www.active.com. For
more information, contact


Stephanie Brod at 352-
271-4665. One hundred
percent of the proceeds from
"Tioga Town Center Run
for Haven" supports patient
care, services and the many
programs provided by Haven
Hospice that are otherwise
unfunded.
* High Springs
Community Theater is
holding auditions on
Monday and Tuesday,
March 1 and 2; at 7 p.m.
for "Run for Your Wife"
by Ray Cooney, a hilarious
comedy which ran for
nine years in London's
West-End Theatre before
running successfully on
Broadway. Eight actors are
needed, male and female .
of various ages. Come on
down to HSCT and try out!


Wtthat is your..


Enter to win!
iAeh LuA

Identify the adverfiserin this week's edition from
Sthe clue inside of the magnifying glass for your
chance to win either a free large one-topping.
pind or a baked sub from Domino's Pizza.
Call now (386-462-3355) or e-mail us (contest@
alachuatoday.com) to be entered into our
weekly drawing. Be sure to put the word 'contest'
in the subject line and include your contact
information along with your entry. All correct
entries will be placed into a drawing each week
and at least one winner will be pulled.
4NSWERTO LAST WEEK'S EYE-Q:
Easy Tax & Accounting
Al/achua County Today Advertiser
Vii0aah60utyoa.co6for
addtioal ontst-.s adprzs !


Fire Assessment

Workshop &

Meetings


The Alachua County Board of County Commissioners is hosting an
informational workshop for church officials, and two Special Com-
mission Meetings to discuss the proposed implementation of an
Enhanced Fire Assessment. Representatives from Government Ser-
vices Group, Inc. (the consultant hired to develop the-Enhanced Fire
Assessment Program) will present information about the program and
answer questions.

* The church officials workshop is on March 3, 2010 at the Mount
Carmel Baptist Church Fellowship Hall (2505 N.E. 8th Avenue,
Gainesville), from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.

The two Special Commission Meetings are oh March 16, 2010 and
March 30, 2010 both at 1:30 p.m. in the Boardroom (room 209 of
the County Administration Building, 12 SE 1st Street, downtown
Gainesville). All interested parties are encouraged to attend these
Special Meetings.

The Enhanced Fire Assessment would replace the MSTU-Fire Millage as
the primary funding source for Fire Protection Services. If implement-
ed, the Enhanced Fire Assessment would affect the Unincorporated.
Area of Alachua County. The Cities of Alachua, Archer, Hawthorne, and
Waldo are participating in the study and may choose to implement the
Enhanced Fire Assessment within their municipalities.

In a letter about the upcoming workshop, Alachua County Board of
County Commissioners Chair, Cynthia Moore CheLinut wrote,"The
Alachua County Board of County Commissioners feels strongly about
the need to diversify funding sources. There is a critical need for the
Enhanced Fire Assessment in order to sustain fire protection services in
our community."

For more information, contact the Department of Public Safety at 352-
384-3130.







A4 ALACHUA COUNTY TODAY VOICE OF THE HEARTLANDS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2010 .


1 e of thCOe



Aladjua Countp Iaobap ^ 200l
ESTABLISHED M 2000


HearI an ds
k 4i -


SELEN B. BOUKAR
.Excutive Editor
-. ^ ...:


GAIL G. LUPARELLO
Publisher
ALACHUA TODAY, INC.


Alachua County Today
is dedicated 'to reporting
news and events relevant to
all citizens of the Heartland
Communities. Above all,
the staff is dedicated to
policies of fairness and ob-
jectivity, and to avoiding
what is sometimes charac-
terized as "agenda journal-
ism."
Alachua County Today
is not a Republican news-
S paper, not a Democratic


BRYAN BOUKARI
Managing Editor


paper. Nor is it a liberal or
conservative paper.
Alachua County Today
is a newspaper dedicated
to: (1) balanced reporting
of news and events relevant
to the community, and (2)
reporting on all significant
social, economic and polit-
ical issues and problems
that the staff believes
should be of concern to our
readers.


J 1 Copyrighted Material

tSyndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers
$,a 10 M-&


. -


Vote at AlachuaCountyToday.com __

READER This week's poll: Would you vote to Last week's poll: Do you think
PINION approve another Alachua County the Supreme Court got its
conservation/recreation surtax recent decision on political
once the current one expires? spending right?


Yes,..,.........1,.11,,,,, 50%
NO d...ok................ 41%
I don't know..........9%


Non-partisan is bad politics

Guest Column by Bob Hallman, High Springs resident


In many cities in our. countfrythe city elects, quite often, candidates with little or
councils or commissioners are elected by no experience, and the inability to act in a
what is known as a non-partisan system. timely fashion to make qualified decisions
Candidates run without political party in a local government environment. Some,
affiliation. Most feel that non- ~communities have a large
partisan means no politics. This number of candidates running,
election system is an attempt to without a primary, or run off
eliminate the political party's that should be used to enhance
participation. An accepted i the quality of the candidates.
election system that has elected : This procedure improves the
the presidents, governors, ,,. competitive factor required in
senators, congresspersons, | ^..' I selection. A strong competitive
county, commissioners plus campaign is a necessary
others is still working and has ingredient in electing qualified
always beefi assisted by political individuals.
parties since George Washington. HalmanLocal governments have
The non-partisan terminologyman issues that require decisions in a
in practice has always been an shorter time frame than those of
agreement between the political parties on other levels of government. The new elected
issues of legislation, not election policy, official in the non-partisan structure has little
Our.election process, with political party or no resources for advice from experienced
participation, has a long history of success. individuals. Advice from incumbents, in
Not all political party activity is promoting office can continue the policy that the new
a specific party candidate for office. Their elected official has been elected to change.
responsibility also involves helping to New elected officials may have been
suggest a candidate with experience, elected because of a bad administration of
promote improvement with issues' that financial problems, and have no idea how
concern all constituents no mater what party to resolve these issues. They may be faced
they support, endorse ideological concepts with a special interest group that has taken
that voters feel are important, and establish a advantage of a city or community and they
.competitive campaign that encourages vofer have little knowledge how to proceed. The
participation. political. parties, not always perfect, will
The political process for the non- have resources at all levels of government to
partisan. election is a "free-for-all" that assist.


The individual seeking office with good
intentions and expectation of success, will
find great difficulty with limited experience
and knowledge. He or she has been supported
by those who often want a new direction and
feel their candidate will succeed. So when
this does not happen, or there is a failure
to make a reasonable change, the. local
government goes into an unstable status of
confusion and frustration. The candidate,
now an elected official, is faced with trying
to succeed in an impossible situation.
Historically, our democracy has had a
partisan election process which' has been
accepted and used effectively on all levels of
government, local, state, and federal. Why'
is it necessary to tinker with politics? Non-
partisan is a form of politics also. You can't
take politics out of politics. Developing a
different political culture is not a solution.
Non-partisan as an election process is bad
politics for governing.
Acity inAlachua County is nowthe victim
of this poor non-partisan system. There has
been failure to resolve costly mistakes by city
staffs that need to be replaced. The indecision
and lack of experience by reasonable and
well intended elected officials may very well
cause this city additional financial and legal
problems that have polarized the community.
It needs strong political direction from
those who know how to performinunder such
circumstances.
# .# #


Letters to the Editor
should be brief and to the
point, typed, if possible, and
double-spaced. Letters may
be shortened due to space
constraints.
Letters must be signed
and include the writer's
address and phone number to
be considered for publication.
Letters are subject to
editing. Generally, only one
letter from the same writer
will be printed each issue.


By Mail:
Editor, Alachua
Toda)yP.O. Box
Alachua, FL 32616


Count),
2135,


By Fax:
(386) 462-4569

By E-Mail:
editor@alachuatoday.com


Local___________News______


JOY:
Continued from page Al

Joy's police interest


started with the Explorers


afterward. DeCoursey said he
asked Joy what it felt like to
be a hero, and Joy answered
with great humility.
"God blessed me to be in
a place at a time where I was
needed," Joy told DeCoursey.
DeCoursdy was not the
S only one giving Joy his due.
High Springs Police Chief
Jim Troiano praised Joy's
professionalism. Troiano said
he's known Joy for a long
time, and that Joy shares a
birthday with his daughter.
"You look at
professionalism. It's one word.
It's a very important word
to us in law enforcement,"
Troiano said. "He exemplifies
professionalism."
Joy's interest in police
work goes back to 2001,
when he joined the Alachua
Police Explorers, a group for
adolescents interested in law
enforcement.


Commissioner


Jean


Calderwood said she's seen
Joy grow from the Explorers.
to working as a police officer,
and that she's proud of him.
"I've seen you conduct
yourself not only in this heroic
measure but in your day-to-
day service where you're
always professional, you're
always gracious, you're
always there and willing to
serve," Calderwood said. "I
hope these young explorers
look at you as a mentor and
grow up and can walk in your
shoes one day."
Joy accepted a
commemorative plaque and
assured everyone that he has
plenty of work still to do.
"I look forward to being
here for the rest of my career
and elevating hopefully to
being in some of the positions
that you guys are."
# # #
E-mail aaustin@
alachuatoday.com


CRISWELL:
Continued from page Al

Preached at several area churches


more supported him for his deep
connection to Alachua's residents.
He caught a disparage of racial
opposition in his running, others
say, but also helped move the
community away from that era into
integration.
But before being a politician,
Criswell was above all a reverend,
his family says. He most recently
preached at Greater Elizabeth
Baptist Church in Lake Butler,
but his sermons also echoed in
Lacrosse's St. Paul Missionary
Baptist Church and New Shiloh in
Alachua.-
-In politics he was instrumental
in bringing today's wastewater
treatment facility to the city in
the late 1970s, which is currently
under expansion and has created
hundreds of jobs in the process.
Criswell is also known for cleaning
up Alachua's Main Street by
helping launch the Community
Redevelopment Agency there and
designating it a taxing district
where businesses could thrive.
But. many also remember
the dynamic reverend for his


outreach to the community
outside of government, religion
and race. He was a tremendous
champion for children's rights, said
Commissioner Jean Calderwood,
who .filled the vacancy left by
Criswell when he stepped down
from the commission in 1999.
"He did not want children to be
neglected," Calderwood said. "Ifhe
saw a child out on the street during
school days, he would approach the
child from the standpoint of 'hey,
shouldn't you be in school?' He
would talk with the child and talk
with the family to say 'this child
doesn't need to be in the streets.'"
Criswell earned his following
by simply strolling throughAlachua
neighborhoods and downtown,
talking with kids, business owners
and residents about their needs. He
was a mentor for future political
leaders like Calderwood and
Watson, who remember evening
chats on his front porch.
"I would stop by his house and
talk with him on his porch, either
standing or sitting with him,"
Watson remembers. "We talked


about everything, everything!
Politics, personal things, his illness,
family, Alachua and division."
Criswell was also a father and
husband, whose daughter Jennifer
described as "warm, friendly and
always funny." He is survived
by his wife of 45 years Johnnie
May Criswell of Alachua; son
Gerald Criswell Jr. of Alachua;
four daughters Jennifer Criswell
of Alachua, Connie T. James of
Gainesville, Sabrina N. Criswell
of Alachua, and Phobee Jones of
Alachua.
Funeral services will be held
Saturday, Feb. 27 at 3p.m. at
the Female Protective Temple
located at 12610 N.W. 39th Ave. in
Gainesville. Burial will follow in
St. Matthews Cemetery. Visitation
will be held Friday at Chestnut
Chapel from 2p.m. to 7p.m. and on
Saturday at the Female Protective
Temple at 2p.m.
# ,# #
E-mail tmcmanus@
alachuatoday.com


Alachua County Today

Policy Statement


VOTES
46


4: re
5 ~


,,












ContinuedfrompageA Lee attended two-room schoolhouse with no electricity


find pioneers to fill them. But
since banks were granting most
African Americans apologies
instead of loans, no black
entrepreneur was willing to take
a chance in launching a day care
for the minority community, Lee
said.
Because of her passion for
social work and knack to fix what
is broken, Lee went on to open the
day care center herself that year,
which provided for black children
but encouraged integration for all.
Now Lee's Preschool and Nursery
Center on 166h Place is a symbol
of progression for those who can
remember why it was built and
a home away from home for the
70 children who walk through the
door today.
Lee boasts the secrets to
daring for .children starts with
boosting their self-esteem. But
what's more-is providing a quality
environment for children to learn
despite their race,
The early years
Growing up in'a farming
community just north of Alachua,
Lee remembers starting her
education in church pews since
no preschool existed in Alachua
County for blacks in the 1930s.
Her family, like most black
and white households in the
town of Bland, was a farming
family and grew peanuts, tobacco
and hay on the land they owned
and worked. For an eight-hour
workday, Lee remembers being
paid little more than $1 when
her family sold its crops to white
residents.
Her family of eight brothers
and sisters thrived on everything
they grew'on their land from
drinking their own cows' milk
to eating their fertilizer-free
vegetables.
When it came time for


elementary school, Lee spent.
from September to May at the only
schoolhouse in the community
that taught black children, Ogden
Elementary.
Ogden Elementary was a two-
room schoolhouse built in the
early 1900s for African American
children in Bland. The school had
no electricity or new textbooks
and had two teachers that taught
all the children from 1" to 6'"
grade.
"They just never expected
the blacks to go further than the
6h grade," Lee said. "School was
just something to keep us busy."
Lee continued on to attend the
Alachua County Training School,
a twelve-grade school that taught
black children in northwest
Alachua County from 1922 until
1956. To a teenage Lee, the
constant divide and separation
of races was a way of life a
mindset that she says helped her
and her siblings to never grow
resentful.
"It was just that blacks went
here and whites went here, that's
the way it was," Lee said, her
eyes squinting as if searching for
the memory. "Was it right? It was'
right then because that's the way
it was."
Making a difference
Lee continued her education
after high school at Edward
Waters College in Jacksonville
for cosmetology school, but she
soon returned to the Alachua area
to delve into social work.
SIt was then she began work
with Alachua County in the
1960s, and it was also a time
she watched a somewhat slow
progression of integration in her
community.
"The majority of the people
in my day saw. division as 'that's
the way it was,'" Lee said. "As I.


grew older and I saw the way it
was, it wasn't the way I wanted
it to be."
Division reached into the
conditions at schools, she said,
where all children were not
getting quality materials. Children
were not being taught about the
Emancipation Proclamation and
often felt no self-worth in their
African American history.
,"We had the impression
whites 'were the important
people," Lee remembers. "They
were the biblical characters, they
were the Santa Clauses. When we
saw a black character, they were
ugly and had no self worth."
But this began to change in.
the late 1970s, she said, with the
election of Alachua's first black
mayor Gerald Criswell and other
black leaders emerging in the
community.
Lee herself pioneered
programs for low-income
families, emergency food and
medical services, and a mini-
bus system and activities for
community seniors.
By the time she acted on the
need for a day care center in
Alachua for Africani American
children in 1976, Lee had 45
children lined up for the center
she ran with help from her family.
It wasn't until 10 years later,
though, that Lee saw integration
begin to take place at her school.
The school today
Today the 70 children at Lee's
bustling day care are a mixture of
minorities and whites, a testament
to the progress made in Alachua
from Lee's memories of her
segregated Ogden Elementary.
The preschool went through
a series of renovations and
expansions in the 80s and 90s to
better cater to each age group that
spans from infants to 12-year-


NICOLE CRISP/Alachua County Today
Lee stands in front of the jungle gym that still stands from days
just after she opened Lee's Preschool and Nursery Center.


olds. Her 11 employees, including
her son Greg, dote on children
from when some are dropped off
at 6:28 a.m. until working parents
pick them up at 6:15 p.m.
Lee's center has acquired
non-profit- status as well as
accreditation from the National
Association for the Education
for Young Children. The Early
Learning Coalition of Alachua
County supports children. of
lower income families looking to
enter Lee's center by offering an.
income assessment to fund their
tuition. *-
Lee, said some parents may
only pay $5 per day to her center
while the coalition funds' the
remaining $20, and others pay 80
cents per day with the coalition
supporting the rest. ,
The children, who simply
call her Miss Gussie, sprint from
sprawling playgrounds to pint
size tables where they dine on
two meals per day and snacks
between nap times.
On one of her three
playgrounds, Lee describes most
of the equipment as newly bought
through county grants, except one
towering jungle gym that still


stands from days just after she
opened doors.
"We had someone from the
community repair and paint it,
but people said there was just too
much history in it to get rid of it,"
Lee said.
After more than 30 years of
business, Lee describes her daily'
role as more of a supervisor to the
children begging for her attention
on the -playgrounds and' to
routines of setting up meals and
putting kids down for naps. But
she says her door is always open
for parents looking for a safe
place to leave'their kids: seeing
the need just as strong today as
it was for the reason she 'opened
doors in 1976.
"If I had .not had the
experiences I had growing up) I,
would not be where I am today,"
Lee said., "I've learned if you
love your neighbor as you love
yourself then the things we can't
change, we'll be able to accept
Themm"
# :# #
E-mail tmcmanus@
alachuatoday.com


ELECTION:
Continued from page Al


Only three qualified as of Wednesday afternoon'


seat, which expires 'this'
year. Commissioner >Gib
Coerper, however, has
already tossed his hat in
the ring to seek the mayoral
seat and submitted a post-
dated resignation for his
current commission seat.
That move leaves Coerper's
seat, Seat 3, up for grabs in
the April 2010 election.
Mayor Bonnie Burgess
has not indicated an interest
in seeking re-election to her
expiring commission seat,
Seat 2. Though Burgess
has been selected by her
fellow-commissioners to
be Alachua's mayor, that
practice will officially end
with the 2010 election'


when voters make the:
choice.
Both Seat 1 and Seat 2'
are up for full three-year
terms. Seat 3,beingvacated
by Coerper's resignation
will expire in April 2011,
meaning this year voters
will elect a candidate to fill
that spot for one year.
Ben Boukari Jr. was the
only candidate to qualify for
Seat 3 and Robert Wilford
was the only candidate
to qualify for Seat 2 as of
Wednesday afternoon.
Also as of press time on
Wednesday, Gib Coerper
was the only candidate to
qualify so far to run for the
mayor's seat, Seat 1.


Anyone interested in
qualifying as a candidate.
for one of the commission
seats has until noon on
Friday to do so. To qualify,
candidates must be a citizen
of Alachua, pay a $165
State of Florida election.
assessment fee and a $25
qualifying fee to the City of,


Alachua. Candidates must
also' complete a loyalty
oath, appoint a campaign
treasurer and file a host of
qualifying forms.
# # #
E-mail editor@
alachuatoday.com


EA SYl TA& A CCOUN TING
Maria Copeland Esty, B.A., E.A.
, Full Accounting and Tax Service iOver 30 Years Experience

P:(386) 4548 59. Fax;(386)454-8958
easytax@windstream.net .
640 NE Santa Fe Blvd. (Oaks laza), High Springs
Electronic Filing & Express Refurds
We are able to obtain your previous year's tax records, if


Federal^^f~ and State Reur s(Se UpadTaxPreparation)
(Curetf and Prior ear) PyrolHSrvies it


Walk-Ins Welcome.
Evening and Saturday Appointments Available,
Lowest Prices Around Town! I
WE IHONORCOMPETITOR'OUPONS &EATANYPRIC


Motorize Your Gate and Secure Your
Property for Less Than You'd Expect
,* 2-year warranty
* Built-in radio receiver compatible with Security+
" For single swing gates up to 16' long or 550 Ibs
* One remote control opens both gate and garage door
* Powerful 24V DC motor offers smooth slow start/stop operation

$729. 00
INSTALLATION EXTRA
We offr complete service on all brands of garage doors
and operators...with unmatched customer satisfaction.


imu


ALACHUA DOOR COMPANY, INC.
14980 NW US Hwy 441, Alachua, FL 32615
386.418.0100
www.AlachuaDoorCompany.com '


Q:- How much does diet
affect dental health?
A: Your decisions about
what you eat affect not only
your dental health, but your
overall health as well. So here
are some things to consider
when planning your meals.
There are lots of products
on the market designed to
whiten teeth. There are some
foods that will do it naturally.
Apples, oranges, carrots,
celery and high-fiber greens
like broccoli, lettuce and
spinach contribute to teeth
whiteness. That's because
they require lots of chewing
which stimulates saliva
production and inhibits stain-
producing bacteria.
Fruits, vegetables,


legumes peas and beans -
and nuts are good for general
health and therefore good
for your mouth. Milk and
cheese are good sources of
calcium, which helps keep
bones strong and healthy.
Studies have found that
eating fresh cranberries
interrupts the bonding of oral
bacteria before the can form
plaque. If you crave sugary
or high-carbohydrate food,
it's better to eat them as part
of a meal rather than alone.
The saliva you produce while
consuming a meal will help
neutralize the acids those
foods will generate before
they can damage enamel.
Talk with your dentist about-
good dietary choices.


For more information or free brochures, please call our office.
Presented as a service to the community by:

Douglas M. Adel, D..s., PA

Family Dentistry







EM R A NDT.I appointment) Making your teeth
MBbeautiful nd stronger than before!
ME WH IN PROGM Found exclusively at Dr Adel's office.
"386-462-4635
14211 NW 150th Ave., Alachua


Waldo Lodge #10 F&AM is sponsoring two events:

Child ID, Saturday, Feb. 27 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
and Sunday, Feb. 28 from noon to 3 p.m.
at Gainesville Nissan, 3915 N. Main St.

Child ID, Thursday, March 4 from 3-7 p.m.,
and Child ID with blood drive on Saturday,
March 6 from 11 a.m.-4 p.m. at Piccadilly Restaurant,
2620 NW 13 St., Gainesville next to the Lowe's store.

PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE OF HEARING ON

PROPOSED ORDINANCE

The High Springs City Commission will hold a public hearing on
the following proposed Ordinance on Thursday, March 11,2010 at
6:30 PM. The hearing will be held at the High Springs City Hall,
110 NW 1stAvenue, High Springs, FL. The proposed Ordinance is:

ORDINANCE 2009-19
AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE ZONING MAP OF THE
OF THE CITY OF HIGH SPRINGS; PROVIDING FOR THE
REZONING OF TAX PARCEL NO. 00302-0000-000,00302-04-
000,AND 00304-000-000; FROM HIGH SPRINGS INDUSTRIAL
(I), TO HIGH SPRINGS COMMERCIAL (C-3), PROVIDING AN.
EFFECTIVE DATE.
Ord.l2009.19 '














N lIT7PL


7i lPL 8 Subect Prmlpty

I a in P.


A copy of these documents may be reviewed at the Office of the
City Clerk, Monday through Friday, 8:00am to 4:30 pm. Interested
parties in the above item are invited to attend and express their
concerns.
JAMES D. DRUMM.
City Manager/Clerk

PLEASE NOTE: PURSUANT TO SECTION 286.015,
FLORIDA STATUTES, IFA PERSON DECIDES TO APPEAL
ANYDECISION MADE BYTHE CITY COMMISSION WITH
RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED DURING THIS
MEETING HE OR SHE WILL NEED TO ENSURE THAT A
VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS IS MADE,
WHICH RECORD INCLUDES THE TESTIMONY AND
EVIDENCE UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED.

IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICAN WITH
DISABILITIES ACT, A PERSON WITH DISABILITIES
NEEDING ANY SPECIAL ACCOMMODATIONS TO
PARTICIPATE IN CITY COMMISSION MEETINGS,
SHOULD CONTACT THE OFFICE OF THE CITY
MANAGER, 110 N.W. 1ST AVENUE, HIGH SPRINGS,
FLORIDA 32643, TELEPHONE (386) 454-1416.
(Published: Alachua County Today February 25,2010)


Ask Your Dentist
by Douglas M. Adel, D.D.S.

Foods good for oral health


I


ALAcKuA COUNwY ToDAY LOCAL NEWS T~IuRSDAY, FEBRuARY 25, 2010


A5









A6 ALACHUA COUNTY TODAY LOCAL NEWS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2010


WILD SPACES:
Continued from page A 1


Two-year, half-centsales tax set to expire Dec. 31,2010


Moosbrugger. "We're waiting to get
approval for a bathroom facility. That
would be better for all the people who
use the [Hawthorne-Gainesville] trail.
It's going to use solar power, so it'll be
green and sustainable."
Moosbrugger said the city hasn't
really noticed the impact of decreased
revenue from the program.
S"The difference isn't that big for us
because we're not getting that much
in," she said. "We're just happy to get
what's coming in."
Alachua city officials are hoping
to see the difference made by the extra
recreation funding in the future as well
as immediately for residents.
"Investing in the Hal Brady center
is an investment in the future," said
Alachua City Commissioner Jean
Calderwood about recent improvements
at the city's recreation complex. "Our
recreation center benefits many through
the course of the year, especially when
Swe host sports events. When you invest
resources into a space like that you also
have the opportunity to bring in extra
funding for the city."
The "Babe Ruth 12 and Under Girls
Softball 2010 World Series" being held
at the recreation complex in August is


expected to bring thousands of people
into Alachua for the week.
The Wild Spaces Public Places tax
will expire Dec. 31, 2010, and there'is
question of whether a similar initiative
might be put to the vote in November.
"There's talk of it," said Robert
Hutchinson, executive director of
Alachua Conservation Trust. "There's
an idea floating around that would be
for a wide range of open improvements
- some wild space, some transportation,
some solar energy improvements and
some of it economic development.
Exactly how the money would be
distributed hasn't been decided yet."
Ultimately it will up to Alachua
County residents whether they feel
they have seen success from the current
program and would like to continue its
efforts. Some officials have already
expressed their hope for a new initiative
and voter approval.
"A half cent sales tax is really not
a lot when you look at each individual .
consumer," said Hawthorne City
Planner Kelly Moosbrugger. "The
overall effect that it makes is huge,
though."
# #.#nc
E-mail ncrisp@alachuatoday.com


. Alachua County Affordable Housing Coalition

FREE HOMEBUYER'S

EDUCATION

CLINIC
Topics Include: 'CL
-Lender Programs for 1st Time Home Buyers
- Understanding Your Credit
- GettiiT41h -Mortgage
- Role of a Realtor...and more -
Meet with local realtors, builders, lenders, housing
counselors and many more. *Lunch provided.


Wild Spaces, Public Places
Revenues after one year
^(L LaCrosse ^ -
SRevenues Received: R(
S j$6,951
Projects in Progress: Wild
d: I5 Pub


Alachua County.
revenues Received:
$5,182,799
SSpaces Projects: 13
ic Places Projects: 4


S Waldo
Revenues Received:
$29,622
Projects in Progress:
3


Illustration by NICOLE CRISP/Alachua County Today


High school brawl results in arrest of 10 students


By ALEX AUSTIN
Today Reporter
INTERLACHEN
Students from Interlachen
High School and
Hawthorne Middle/High
School were arrested Feb.
16 after a fight broke out
at Interlachen High School,
according to the Putnam
County Sheriffs Office.
The fight erupted while
families were meeting


RSVP Required
(352) 317-7700
Limited to 100
Attendees


with school administrators
to resolve a verbal and
physical altercation that
took place earlier in the
morning. The earlier
altercation stemmed
from an incident over the
weekend, where a mentally
challenged individual was
allegedly beaten by several
Hawthorne and Interlachen
students.
It was noted in the
report that one student
sent a text message back
to Hawthorne, to come to


fight.
The'


confrontation


started in the parking
lot and then continued
in the hallways. School
administrators and a Putnam
County Sheriff deputy
Attempted unsuccessfully to
breakup the fight. Several
students jumped into two
cars and attempted,to leave
as several patrol units and
detectives arrived. The
students' cars were stopped
before they could exit the
campus, and the students
were temporarily detained.
The Hawthorne
students were arrested on
charges of trespassing and


disorderly conduct and
the Interlachen students
were arrested on charges
of disorderly -conduct.
Seven of the students were
juveniles, and three were
18 years old. They were
all taken to Putnam County
Jail and booked. :
All of the students
were then released to their
parents, except the three
18-year-olds, Denzell
Randall, Adonis J. Williams
and Aaron D. Harriot..
# #. #
E-mail aaustin@ '
alachuatoday.com'


SCrunch Lu I tqS.q with drink,


FFull at: th, Bull!
Open 7 Days Week 4
Swww.eltorogainesville.com
15202 NW 147th Drive, Suite 1100, Alachua (386) 418-1039


GAINESVILLE CHRYSLER DODGE JEEP


Your ON STOP Shop!

with parts,service & sales


'' J-jeep


3000 North Main Street
Gainesville, FL 32609

352-372-4343


I .MR


v









'':i


Business aieCp



CenteSr aduhor!

*Outlet


nn Crime Stoppers Most -


Sponsoredb IIgCOUNTYhCIME STOPPE '] CRIER S J A LACHUA 1OUNTYTODAY


lA~aZpI


Recently, a history of the
Alachua. County Sheriff's
Office was compiled for an
internal project. Many facts
of interest were uncovered
during the research. Did
you know that the Sheriff's
Office has been around
since 1824? In those days,
sheriffs travelled a much
larger Alachua: County
via horseback, serving as
tax assessor and collector


A message from the desk of


Sheriff Sadie Darnell
An historic look at the Alachua County Sheriff's Office.


~,
---

,

-~-


committed by the populace.
For example, ten cents per
mile' was earned for each
prisoner removed and one
dollar was earned for each
prisoner committed to the
jail. In a sense, crime really
did pay in those days -.at
least for law enforcement. .
In 1848, a new law
established the Clerk of
the Court system freeing
sheriffs from their,taxing
responsibilities. The law.
also lengthened terms to four


years instead of two. The
first Alachua County Sheriff
under this arrangement was
Thomas C. Ellis. Between
Sheriff Ellis' short tenure,
the end of the Civil. War, and
the election of Sheriff L.W.
Fennell in 1890, Alachua
County was lawless frontier
country where shootings
and other crime were such
everyday occtirrences that
citizens became desensitized
to the violence. Stay tuned.


S* 0 * * "* "S * **' 6 5******* S S 0 S S 0 6 0 0 0 t 0


Isaac Ivory


:-:Peterson Jr.
Black Male,
08/07/87
5'07", 140'
Ibs
Black Hair,
Brown Eyes

Currently
wanted for:
S Kidnap,
Intimidating
Victim or
Witness x2,
Battery on Law
.: Enforcement,
Resist Arrest
with Violence
!'- 0


Anthony
Eugene
Lucky
Black Male,
10/11/65
5'07",
180 Ibs
Black Hair,
Brown Eyes


Currently
wanted for:
Animal Cruelty


w" nuyrone


Detron
Kirksey
Black Male,
02/08/84
5'07", 155
Ibs
Black Hair,
Brown Eyes

Currently
wanted for:
Flee and Elude
Police, Driving
While License
Suspended
2nd Offense


Jonatnan
Bartley,
White Male,
6'0",
1/28/1982
Brown Hair,
Brown Eyes

Currently
wanted for:
Trespassing


.Kojrin Narada


Bradley
Black Male,
02/02/79
5'11", 155
Ibs
Black Hair,
Brown Eyes

Currently
wanted for:
Kidnap/False Im-
prisonment, Assault,
Contributing to the
Delinquency of a
Minor, Violation of
Pre-Trial Release for
Domestic Violence
x2, Threaten Victim
or Witness x2, Re-
sisting without Vio-
lence


Laverne
Brown
Black Male,
01/09/1959
6', 165 Ibs
Black Hair,
Brown Eyes

Currently
wanted for:
Civil Order -
Child Support


. Eddie Lee :
Glenn
Black Male,'
12/02/70
6'00", 170
Ibs
Black Hair,
Brown Eyes

Currently
wanted for:
Possession of,
Cocaine,
Possession of
Marijuana not
more than 20,
Grams


Carrie Lynn
Dillard
White
Female,
5'04",
1/7/84
Brown Hair,
Blue Eyes

Currently
wanted for:
Child Neglect


Anna .
Suzanne
Hoovler,
White
Female,
04/14/1990
5'5",
Unknown
: Weight
Brown Hair,
Blue Eyes

Currently
wanted for:
Fraud -
Worthless
Checks (2
Counts)


Telise Moore
Black
Female,
5'01",
6/18/84
Black Hair,
Brown Eyes

Currently
wanted for:
Fraud (2
Counts)


Jesus
Gonzalez-
Rojo
Hispanic
Male, 6'00",
5/5/78
Black Hair,
Brown Eyes

Currently
wanted for:
Battery, Co-
tributing to the
delinquency of
a minor


Kevin
Spaulding
Black Male,
5'10",
1/22/1990
Black Hair,
Brown Eyes

Currently
wanted for:
Robbery with
a Firearm


* Henry ,J.
Jackson Jr.
Black Male,.
6'03",
7/15/68
Black Hair,
Brown Eyes

Currently
wanted for:
Resisting
arrest without
violence


Ronnie
McCray
Black Male,
6'2",
3/9/1984
Black Hair,
Brown Eyes

Currently
wanted for:
Drug
Equipment
Possession


Nicholas? P
Dewayne
Williams
Black Male,
01/31/84
5'07",
.150 Ibs
Black Hair,
Brown Eyes

Currently
wanted for:
Battery,
Criminal
Mischief


Willie
Griffin
Black Male,
5'7",
10/20/1962
Black Hair,
Brown Eyes

Currently
wanted for:
Felony Fraud


What should I do?
Review the pictures above. If you know the location of any of these wanted
individuals, please contact the Combined Communications Center at
352-955-1818 or remain anonymous by calling Crime Stoppers at 352-372-STOP.
Callers are eligible for a reward of up to $1,000.
DO NOT APPROACH OR ATTEMPT TO APPREHEND ANY OF THESE INDIVIDUALS.
IF NECESSARY, CALL 911.


ALL WARRANTS

ACTIV AT IM


Make the Call,

Earn a Reward












Call (352) 372- Step


ALACHUA COUNTY TODAY CRIME STOPPERS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2010


B1


II


in, addition; to lawman;'
The original sheriffs were
appointed by the governor,
though that. did change
in 1828 when a bill was
'passed requiring sheriffs and
other county officials to be
popularly elected and hold
office for two years.
New sheriffs had to
post a $5,000 bond before
taking office. Sheriffs and
their deputies worked on
a fee system, earning a set
dollar amount for each crime


1.
I:'
r
I`
''
i
4
C


''




:,







B2 ALACHUA COUNTY TODAY RELIGION THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2010



God as the Householder


You have to learn to crawl before you
can walk. Do you know what happens if
you start walking before you crawl? It's
not a good idea. You see, when a baby
learns to crawl, it is developing hand/eye


coordination. If that learning
experience is bypassed, the
child's overall development is
hindered and it can take months
of training to gain that essential
coordination. Imagine the
frustration of having to learn
to crawl if you can already
ambulate everywhere you want
to go. Shortcuts are usually
counter-productive and can end
up being destructive.
Throughout our lives,, we
are guided through a series
of events that develop our
character. We learn that success
can't always be achieved on
the first try, and by attempting
it repeatedly, whether those
attempts fail or you come in


their unsuccessful attempts. In our self-
centered lifestyle, we're constantly being
told that the most important thing is that
some effort was made.
Some people have tried to make the


THE VEN. JOHN E.
PLEASURE
All Saints Anglican
Church, Gainesville.
A parish of the
Christian Episcopal
Church


second, we get the wisdom to keep pressing
on, discovering the value of perseverance.
Some will resent the process of striving,
thinking that any kind of effort is enough
and that they should also be rewarded for


SHARE YOUR


CHURCH


EVENTS


Let everyone know about

special activities your

church has on the

horizon. Call (386) 462-

'3355, fax (386) 462-4569

or email to gail@

AlachuaToday.com. All

community

announcements are

found on A3.


parable in Matthew, chapter
20, fit this idea. The parable
is about the householder
who paid all his laborers
equally at the end of the
day, regardless, of the hours
that they worked. There
is a name for this kind of
theology,. it's called the
social Gospel, and I reject
it. Let's be clear here, Jesus
isn't using the parable to
justify a secular government,
particularly Socialism. The
social gospel has absolutely
nothing to do with the
reason for Jesus' message
given in response to Peter's
question, "we have left all
and followed you. Therefore


what shall we have? "
What, we see in this parable is God
calling men who were idle in the market
place and putting them to work. The
householder looked for men, offering


them a denarius (a penny), and dealt
ethically with the men he hired. Another
principle we can take from this is, that the
householder did nothing wrong when he
paid the workers he hired late in the day
any wage he wanted. His agreement with
them was that he would pay "whatever is
right, or, he wouldn't pay them less than
their work deserved. The fact that he paid
them more than they expected shows the
householder's goodness, and definitely
that it isn't unjust. The ones hired first
complained that the later workers should
have gotten less than them; it was a protest
about the graciousness of the employer,
not a complaint that he had been unjust
in paying them an honest day's pay for an
honest day of work. It is safe to say that the
householder treated all the workers justly
and he was gracious toward all of them.
You might ask, "How was he gracious to
the men who worked all day and received
the. proper wage?" There is nothing
commendable or extraordinary about that.
Remember, the householder not only paid
his workers but he went out and found
them while they wbre without work, idle
and in need. Think of it this way: a man
sits idle without work, without the money
for his daily bread, and worse yet, doesn't


do anything to find work; suddenly a man .
knocks at the door and offers him the
equivalent pay as a trained Roman soldier
if he will come to work in his field.
In this we are shown the principle
of God's sovereignty and His' absolute "'
graciousness towards those that are called
into His kingdom. We need to consider the' -
true meaning of serving God. The calling
of God does not result in meekness. To
be born of God is to be made a servant
of God. None of the men standing in the
market place were paid to lean against the '
wall for the rest of the afternoon, and none
thatare called of God are called to be idle .
in the building of His Kingdom. Some -
Christians don't seem to understand this-'i -
principle in today's climate of rewarding,
the non-workers to keep from hurting their
psyche. -God's call carries with it a sense of
responsibility and accountability.-.-
We must work to understand what it,,-
means to be Christians. Christ has called'''
us to follow Him, to take up our cross .
and endure the trials of.this life as He did.
But, Heliasn't left us without His grace. :
If we're to learn to crawl before walking, '.
we must be willing to trust our trainer and
submit to the training. .-
'# # #' .


I Oil Change Special imPre-Winter Inspection
Most VehiclesE '
Oil Chn Plus Env. Fees I I
*I r inACT e COMPLETE VEHICLE
BrakeINSPECTION
Io Drain Oil & Change Filter II INSPECTION
I Add up to 5 Qts. w -30 Kendall Brakes, cooling system,
Soiln *Top Off Fluids performance & more. ACT
EPIRES 02/28/10: Not valid with other discounts I EXPIRES 02/28/10. Not valid With other discounts
or offers. Redeem only at City Boys Te & Brake oroffers. Redeem only at City Boys Tire & Brake.
-m m- m anmm -- -


cIjua nt pomb TO


The Heartland Community Places of Worship


Alachua church of Christ
14505 NW 145th Avenue
Sunday Bible.Classes.9:30 a.m.
Assembly at 10:30 am.
Evening Service 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Class 6:30 p.m.
Minister DougFiazier
(386) 462-3326



7FIellowship
S Church
Contemporary Praise & Worship
Sunday at 9:30 a.m. & 11 a.m.
16916NWUS Hwy 441, High Springs
386-454-1700
www.FellowshipOnline.org


List your Place of
Worship
here
Call (386) 462-3355
ext. 9503
for more information.


HIGH SPRINGS CHURCH
.OF CHRIST
520 NE Santa Fe Boulevard
BibleClasses forAllAges 930 am.
Worship 10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship 6 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Classes 7 p.m.
highspringscofc@alltel.net
Pastor. CoriLewis (386)454-2930

New Oak Grove Baptist Church
Sunday School 10 a.m.,
Worship 11 am, Evening Service 6 pm.
Wednesday Fellowship Meal 6 p.m.
Bible Study 7 p.m.
RAs, GAs & Students 7 p.m.
Nursery Provided
Terry Elixson, Jr., Pastor
386462-3390 18100NW262Avenue


EU of Life
Assembly of God

Located at 14200 NW 148th Place
Downtown Alachua
www.riveroflifeassembly.org


Ail saints tnaglitan Cburtl)
ApvriofilrOnimpJ a lpdaot*h
Where worship is our central act
Where the apostolic tradition is
upheld
Where we kneel to pray
Where worshipful music
is the standard
Where traditional liturgy
is the norm
e Where the Holy Scriptures
are proclaimed
ft Where a prayerful and quiet
atmosphere is provided
* Where traditional values are taught
* Where we seek to proclaim a risen
Savior in our daily life and work
Come Join Us
Bible Study 9:30 am. Church 10:30 am.
and other special services as announced.
8100 SWArcher Road (Shrine Club)
(352) 317-5757 wwwAllsaintsXnEC.org

First Presbyterian
Church of Alachua
Rev.nginia McDanielPastor
14623 NW 140 Street'
(386) 462-1549
Sunday School 9 ani., Worship
Service 10:30 a.m. Nursery provided.
www.firstpresalachua.org


List your Place of
Worship
here
Call (386) 462-3355
ext. 9503
for more information.


New St. Mary Missionary
Baptist Church
13800 NE 158thAvenue, Alachua 32616
Rev. Daniel H. McNish, Pastor
Phone & Fax (386) 462-7129
Services: Sunday School 9:30 am.
Morning Worship 11 amL-st, 2nd, 3rd Sunday
Quarterly 11 am. 4th Sun. Birthday Rally
Service; Tuesday Evening 7 p.m.
Prayer Meeting & Bible Study


Services
Sunday: 11:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m.
Children's Church 11:30 a.m.
Wednesday:
Adult & Children Bible Study 7 p.m.
Consumed Youth Service 7 p.m.
Nursery provided for all services.
Pastor Greg Evans 352-870-7288


Bethesda Outreach
Ministries of
Alachua
Reaching
Sthe lost at
ANY cost and
Sustaining the
Saints behind
the cross.
Services:
Every Sunday at 11 a.m.
Bible Study:
Thursday at 7:30 p.m.
at
Quality Inn of Alachua
15960 NW US Highway 441
Alachua, Florida
Elders Nyron and LaShandra Jenkins

First United Methodist
Church of Alachua
14805 NW 140th Street 462-2443
Pastor Dr. Adam Zele
JeffVanValey,Youth & Children's Minister
Worship, 10:45 am.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
www.alachuafirstunitedmethodist.org


List your Place of
Worship
here
Call (386) 462-3355
ext. 9503
for more information.


St. Luke A.M.E. Church
Rev. Jessie L. Steele, Pastor
14950 Martin Luther King Blvd/Hwy 441
Alachua 32616
386.462.2732(church) 386.462.4396 (Fax)
Email: stlukeamechurch@windstream.net
Morning Worship: 11 a.m.;
Church School 9:45 a.m.
Bible Study: 7 p.m. (2nd & 4th Wednesdays)
Theme: PUSH-Pmy UnrlSomedAngHqCle


I AC First Baptist Church of Alachua
I pAC One Block east of Main Street in Alachua
s ......-.....(386) 462-1337

Sunday. 9:30 a.m. Bible Study 10:45 a.m. Worship
Wednesday: 6 7:30 p.m. Children's Ministries, Youth Activities
and Choir Rehearsal 6:15-7:15 p.m. Mid-Week Bible Study


PASSAGE
Family Church
"Reaching people vwher they are


IME 2020 NE 15 Street
Pator George and Gainesville
Lady Michele Dix (352),336-8686
Sunday Services:
8 a.m. "Flying High" Morning Worship
9:30 a.m.. Sunday School
11 a.m. -Morning Glory Worship
S& Children's Church ,
Wednesday Services:
12 noon Noon Day Prayer
7,p.m. Prayer & Bible Study
Youth Services:
7 p.m. Wednesday
7 p.m. Fourth Fridays
www.passageministries.org


List your Place of
Worship
here
Call (386) 462-3355
ext. 9503
for more information.

Miracle Word
of Faith Min. Inc.
3809-A E. University Ave.
Gainesville, FL 32641
Pastors -Apostle Elect Dr. Donald L. Kelly
& Pastor Dr. Queen Horne-Kelly
The church where everybody is somebody.


Church order of Services Every Sunday
Sunday School- 10 a.m.
SMorning Service 11 am.
Bible Study & New Beginners Class -
Wednesday Night 7 p.m.
Friday Night Live & Prayer Service.- 7 p.m.
4th Sundays 11 a.m. Youth Day Service
Outreach Ministries
Jail & Prison Ministries Evangelism Outreach
Food Outreach Clothing for the Needy
Marriage & Singles Counseling
Praise Dance Lessons (Adult/Youth)


List your Place of
Worship
.'here,,. .
Call (386) 462-3355
ext. 9503
for more information.


;


~



c




,-











I
I
''
;


( ,



,

I-


CBe&oad/ dJ ox
dfinity QnL ~tLtat, Qipe
Elder Cynthia Taylor, Pastor
has moved to'a new location
530 N. Main Street, High Springs, FL
(behind Hardees)
Bible Study.Wed. 7 p.m
Sundays- Pastoral Teaching 9:30 am.
Morning Worship 11a.m.
Church: (386) 454-2367
Cell: (386) 878-9568


christian cife Fellowship
Assembly of God
Contemporary WorshipMinisty -AllAges
Sunday: SS 9:30 am/Worship J0:30 am.
Wed. 7 p.mJChildren/Youth/Adults.
19817 W.Newberry Rd. (4 mi. E. of
Newberry, 4 mi. W. of Jonesville)
(352) 472-5433
www.clfbest.org


Foundation Chapel Church
,of God bry '."-
Sunday: Sunday School 10 p.m.; Mid-Day
Worship 11:30 am.; Children's Church 6
p.m.; Evening Worship 6 p.m.; Tuesday:
YSB7p.m. Wednesday: Outreach
Fellowship Dinner 6 pm; General Prayer
Service 7:30 p.m.
13220NW 150thAvenue,Alachua
PastorWillieJ.McKnight,Sr. 462-2549


im a^c Service Times
SSunday 10:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m.
FA MI 'LY YCU RCH Wednesday 7:30 p.m.
SLvs Youth Service Wed. 7:30 p.m.
~lp'cing otof Senior Pastors: Edwin & Angela Anderson
it hthe rord." 386-454-1563
Ciot's www.impactfamilychurch.com
S16710 NW US 441 Between High Springs & Alachua


I I I I


~


-i


I


'


"' "
..
.


.












j
i


1








ALACHUA COUNTY TODAY CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2010 B3


Zlajua Countp T'obap



Slis I1iedS
*' I "^


BY PHONE
Call (386) 462-3355
Hours to place, correct or cancel ads:
Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
BY E-MAIL
accounting@alachuatoday.com


BY MAIL-
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
Alachua County Today
P.O. Box 2135; Alachua, FL 32616


BY FAX
(386) 462-4569


forft Thursday'sft uftcatio. -,Display adsNooftonTusayfrThU, dy'pblct


Notice of Second
Reading
City of Archer
March 8, 2010 7:00 pm

The City Of Archer will have
second reading of the
SPblic Schools Facilities
El~tent Ordinance at the
Cit Commission Meeting
on tme 8h of March at 7:00
pm. ithe City Commission
Chambers. This ordinance
amend the text of the City
of Archer Comprehensive
Plan by adding'a Public
.Schoolz Facilities
Element and amending
the Intergovernmental
Coordinatioh Element and
the Capital Improvements
Element.

If any accommodations: are
needed for persons with
disabilities, please contact
Archer City Hall (352) 495-
2880 (voice) or (352) 495-
9337 (tdd)

(Published: lachua
County Today February
25, 20 10)

EIGHT JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND.FOR
, AL afUA COUNTY,
\ FLORIDA

CASE NO.: 2009-CA-4010
DIVISION: J

MERCHANTS &
SOUTHERN BANK
a/k/a M&S BANK,

Plaintiff,

vs.

MAURICE STEWART and
JANET


>TEWART, husband and
ife; ASSET
ACCEPTANCE LLC;
TATE OF
LORIDA.

defendants.

NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
;IVEN that pursuant to
linal Summary Judgment
bf Foreclosure dated
lebruary.15, 2010, in Case
Iio. 2009-CA-4010 in the
Circuit Court of the Eighth
Judicial Circuit, in and for
Alachua County, Florida,
n which MERCHANTS &
SOUTHERN BANK alkla
M&S BANK is the Plaintiff
and MAURICE STEWART
and JANET STEWART,
husband and.wife, ASSET
ACCEPTANCE LLC and
J.K. "BUDDY" IRBY as
ALACHUA COUNTY
CLERK OF COURT are
the Defendants, I Will sell to
the highest and best bidder
for cash in the lobby of the
Alachua County Family
and Civil Justice Center,
201 E. University Avenue,
Gainesville, Alachua
County, Florida, at 11 :00
a.m. on March 16. 2010,
the real property described
in the attached Exhibit "A",
tax parcel number 19622-
001-000.

IF YOU ARE A PERSON
CLAIMING A RIGHT TO
FUNDS REMAINING
AFTER THE SALE. YOU
MUST FILEA CLAIM WITH
THE CLERK NO LATER
THAN 60 DAYS AFTER
THE SALE. IFYOU FAILTO
FILE A CLAIM. YOU WILL
NOT BE ENTITLED TO
ANY REMAINING FUNDS.
AFTER 60 DAYS. ONLY
THE OWNER QF RECORD
AS OF THE DATE OF THE
LIS PENDENS MAY CLAIM
THE SURPLUS.


Dated this 22 day of
February 2010.


J. K. "Buddy"IRBY
Clerk of the Court
P. O. Box 600
Gainesville, FL 32602-
0600
By: /s/ Erika Powell
Deputy Clerk


Published in Alachua
County Today on 2/25/10
and 3/4/2010.

Nancy E. Yenser
NANCY E. YENSER, P.L.
9958 SW 52nd Road ,
Gainesville, Florida 32608-
7105
(352) 378-8544
(352) 335-4871 Fax
Attorney for Plaintiff
Florida Bar No. 222348

IF YOU ARE A PERSON
WITH A DISABILITY
WHO NEEDS ANY
ACCOMMODATION IN
.ORDER TO PARTICIPATE
IN THIS PROCEEDING,
YOU ARE ENTITLED,
AT NO COST TO YOU,
TO THE PROVISION OF
CERTAIN ASSISTANCE.
PERSONS WITH A
DISABILITY WHO NEED
ANY ACCOMMODATION
IN ORDER TO
PARTICIPATE SHOULD
CALL JAN PHILLIPS,
ADA COORDINATOR,
ALACHUA COUNTY
COURTHOUSE, 201 EAST
UNIVERSITY AVENUE,
GAINESVILLE, FL 32601,
AT (352) 337-6237, WITHIN
TWO (2) WORKING DAYS
OF YOUR RECEIPT OF
THIS NOTICE. IF YOU
ARE HEARING OR VOICE
IMPAIRED, CALL (800)
955-8771 OR IF YOU ARE
VOICE IMPAIRED CALL
(800) 955-8770.

'EXHIBIT'A

,BEGIN AT THE N.W.
CORNER OF SEC 26, T'


I


3:00 p.m., Friday, March 5,
2010.


I


Make a house your home.
Ada Conventional/FHA/VA Lot Loans I Refinancing
Adjustable & Fixed Rate I USDA Rural Housing
Affordable Housing I Construction/ Permanent Financing


www.ccbg.om a Bank City
Bill London Beverly Magee CB apnk
352.548.4777 352.337.2296 More than your bank. Your banker.


SAll products are subject to credit and property approval. Program terms and conditions subject to change without
I iSi Member FDIC notice. Not all products are available in all states or for all amounts. Other restrictions and limitations may apply.


SOUTHEAST


PLASTERING,
A. LLI .


The Stylist












*Cuts





SColor






* Perms






* Highlights



Ho r:Iu s-St, 1J0] Iam.-7p .
500 o ..3thSret ig ayVlagGlhsi


I T o lae an ad00


)


I


I


10 S, R 22 E, AND RUN
N. 88003'05" E ALONG
THE NORTH LINE OF
SAID SECTION 360.34
FEET TO A POINT ON
THE WESTERLY RIGHT
OF WAY LINE OF STATE
ROAD NO. 200 (U.S. NO.
301) 106 FOOT RIGHT OF
WAY, SAID POINT BEING
ON A CURVE HAVING A
TOTAL INTERNAL ANGLE
OF 14056'30", A RADIUS
OF 3766.72 FEET AND
BEING CONCAVE TO THE'
SOUTHWEST; THENCE
RUN SOUTHEASTERLY
ALONG THE ARC OF SAID
RIGHT OF WAY CURVE
555.66 FEET, THENCE
RUN S. 88005'07" W., 381
FEET TO THE EASTERLY
RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF
SEABOARD COAST LINE
RAILROAD (100' RIGHT
OF WAY); THENCE RUN
N. 22025'52" W., ALONG
SAID RIGHT OF WAY
LINE 267.93 FEET-TO
THE WEST LINE OF SAID
SECTION 26, THENCE
RUN N. 0111'12" W.,
ALONG SAID SECTION
LINE 292.85 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING,
ALL BEING AND LYING IN
THE N.W. 1/4 OF SECTION
25, TOWNSHIP 10 SOUTH,
RANGE 22 EAST, IN
HAWTHORNE,. ALACHUA
COUNTY, FLORIDA.

(Publishedi Alachua:
County Today February
25 and. March 4, 2010)
Personal and household/
commercial goods
belonging to the following
tenants will be sold at public
auction on March 9 2010
at 10:00 am at Barracuda
Boat & RV Storage located.
at 6401 NW 120 Lane
Alachua FL 32615:
Unit C079 Charles
Gilbreath
Unit A012 Kashawnda
Harrison
Unit C097 Henley
Construction


Unit A028 Ridgeway Trim,
LLC
Unit B041 Patita Scott/
Cassandra Stephens
Unit A007 Tasha L. Smith

(Published: Alachua
County Today February
18 and 25, 2010)
Notice of Intent
Notice is hereby given that
under the provisions of
Section 121.055, Florida
Statutes, it is the intent of the
City of Alachua to designate
the Compliance and Risk'
Management Director -
Position No. 000000001.0
to be included in the Florida
Retirement System (FRS)
Senior Management Class.

(Published: Alachua
County Today February
25, 2010)
CITY OF HIGH SPRINGS
INVITATION TO BID
TREE REMOVAL.

The City of High Springs is
now accepting bids for the
removal of approximately
twenty-eight.(28) trees,
located at various locations
throughout the City.
Specifications and a list of
tree locations are available
by contacting Public Works
Secretary Donna Smith at
(386) 454-2134. Licensed
and insured tree removal
companies are invited
to submit prices for the
removal of the trees, to,
include: cutting down and
prompt removal of logs,
limbs, debris, and grinding
the stumps to grade.

Interested bidders should
submit sealed bids, marked,
"Tree Bids," along with proof
of licensing and worker's
compensation insurance
to: City Manager, City of
High Springs, 110 NW 1st
Avenue, High Springs,
Florida 32643, no later than


THE CITY OF HIGH
SPRINGS RESERVES
THE RIGHT TO REJECT
ANY OR ALL BIDS. THE
CITY ALSO RESERVES
THE RIGHT TO ACCEPT
THE BID WHICH IS IN
THE BEST INTEREST OF
THE CITY, WHICH MAY
BE, OR MAY NOT BE, THE
LOWEST BID.

(Published: Alachua
County Today February
18 and 25, 2010)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT,
EIGHTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT,
INLAND FOR ALACHUA
COUNTY, FLORIDA

Case No. 01-2007-CA-
1909

STEVEN SCOTT
GARRETT, TRUSTEE,

Plaintiff,

vs.

S. R. JOHNSON, etc., et
al.,

Defendants.


NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: S. R. JOHNSON,
a/k/a SAMUEL R.
JOHNSON
a/k/a S..ROBERT
JOHNSON
Address Unknown.

ELMER R. SHELL
Address Unknown

DONNIE BELL
MUNNERLYN
Address Unknown


CLASSIFIED
Continued on page B4








B4 ALACHUA COUNTY TODAY CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2010


CLASSIFIED:
Continuedfrom page B3
AS WELL AS any and
all other parties claiming
by, through under or
against either of them
or their respective heirs,
administrators and assigns,
as well as all parties having
or claiming to have any
right, title or interest in the
property herein described.

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action to quiet title to
the following property in
Alachua County, Florida,
to-wit:

HAWTHORNE EST PB
A-120 COM NW COR LOT
2 BLK 11 POB E 125 FT S
100 FT E 435 FT N 25 FT E
100 FT S 25 FT W 100 FT
S 150 FT E 100 FT S 49.10
FT W100 FT S 260.9 FT W
75 FT S 100 FT TO S LINE
SAID LOT2WALG S LINE
242-FT N 110 FTW35 FT
N 310 FT W 208 FT TO W
LINE OF SAID LOT 2 N 240
FT POB LESS R/W PER
OR 1219/689 DEEDS IN
S ERROR OWNERS: 1/2 INT:
S R JOHNSON 1/4 INT: A
SHELL & 1/4 INT: E SHELL
OR 1183/842, SECTION 27
S TOWNSHIP 10 RANGE
22, ALACHUA COUNTY,
FLORIDA. (Parcel No.
19828-000-000)

has been filedagainst
..you;and you dre required
to. serve a copy of your
written defenses to it, if


any, on CHARLOTTE J.
WEIDNER, Plaintiffs
attorney, whose address
is Post Office Box 1354,
Bronson, Florida 32621,
on or before March 15,
2010, and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court
either before service
on Plaintiffs attorney or
immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for
the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.

Dated this 9th day of
February 2010.

First date of publication:
February 11, 2010.

J. K. BUDDY IRBY
Clerk of Court

By: /s/ Erica Powell
Deputy Clerk

IF YOU ARE A PERSON
WITH A DISABILITY
WHO NEEDS ANY
ACCOMMODATION IN
ORDER TO PARTICIPATE
IN THIS PROCEEDING,
YOU ARE ENTITLED,
AT NO COST TO YOU,
TO THE PROVISION OF
CERTAIN ASSISTANCE.
PERSONS WITH A
DISABILITY WHO NEED
ANY ACCOMMODATION
IN ORDER TO
PARTICIPATE SHOULD
CALL JAN PHILLIPS,
ADA: COORDINATOR,
ALACHUA COUNTY
COURTHOUSE, 201


E. UNIVERSITY AVE.,
GAINESVILLE, FL 32601
AT (352) 337-6237 WITHIN
TWO (2) WORKING DAYS
OF YOUR RECEIPT OF
THIS NOTICE; IF YOU
ARE HEARING IMPAIRED
CALL (800) 955-8771;
IF YOU ARE .VOICE
IMPAIRED, CALL (800)
955-8770.

(Published: Alachua
County Today February
11, 18, 25 and March 04,
2010)








Advertising that Works.
Put your ad in Over 100
Papers throughout Florida
for one LOW RATE! Call
(866)742-1373 or visit:
www.florida-classifieds.
com



Free Weight Loss Clinic
The METABOLIQ System
is the result of-more than
three decades of award-
winning research by Dr.
Donald Layman, Professor
Emeritus of Nutrition,
Illinois State University. The
results of his breakthrough
findings to build a simple
90-day system where you
can achieve real, reliable,


healthy results. Call (386)
965-7399 to schedule or
email: deniselhoffman@
cox.net.







Drivers IMMEDIATE
NEED! OTR Tanker
positions available NOW!
CDL-A w/Tanker REQ'D."
Outstanding pay & Benefits!
TEAMS WELCOME!!!
Call a recruiter TODAY!
(877)484-3042 www.
oakleytransport.com


S




Sstaf fin g
Meeting All Your
HealthCare Staffing Needs
RNs
LPNs
CNAs
(800) 442-5441


SunState Federal Credit Union

& Alachua County Today



Partners in Education

SunState Federal Credit Union and Alachua The story of.Hannah, a little girl on the American
County Today are partnering to, bring you "Hannah's frontier, who makes history by sending one of the first
Diary: A Tale of the Pony Express." The purpose of letters on the Pony Express.
this campaign is to get young people reading. Alachua Hannah learns that you can keep old friends while
County Today will publish an 8-chapter serialized short making new ones.
story, "Hannah's Diary" as part of our Newspapers She also discovers fun on the riverboats and how,
in Education program. The newspapers will be sent by working hard, anyone can make a dream come true.
home with the students after the project for the week
is completed so that parents can share the stories with .
their children.
I


HANNAH'S DL

A Tale Of The Pony Express

Chapter Six by Kay Hively


As Christmas neared, Hannah began to plan gifts for her family.
Her grandparents were coming to visit so there would be gifts for
them. Hannah asked her parents for extra chores. She swept her
father's office one Saturday morning and he gave her a dollar
Hannah had never had a dollar before.
One Saturday, Hannah's mother let her take all the feather beds
outside and beat them with a rug beater It was a sunny November
day and Hannah had fun taking whacks at the beddiig. While she
was outside, she saw two big flocks of geese. Hannah thought it
was funny that while she was beating the feather beds, the birds
were taking their feathers to a warm place for the winter.
Hannah got another dollar from her mother. She was now ready
to shop for Christmas.
When Hannah asked if she could go Christmas shopping, her
mother agreed to take her the very next Saturday morning. Then
her mother asked Hannah what she would like for Christmas.
Hannah said she wanted five dollars for Christmas. If she could
have five dollars, Hannah said she would not ask for anything
for her next birthday, and she wouldn't ask for a candy stick on
Saturday for a whole year
Mrs. Evans asked her daughter why she wanted five dollars.
Hannah said that Mr Cole had told her the Pony Express would
be starting soon after Christmas. He said it would cost five dollars
to send a letter Hannah said she was already writing a letter to
Betsy. She also said she would just die if she couldn't send it with
the first Pony Express rider to leave St Joseph.
On Christmas morning, Hannah found a five dollar gold piece in
her stocking. Under the tree, she found a doll from her father.
He had bought it from one of the riverboat captains. Her mother
gave her a new diary because the one from last Christmas was



Classroom Extensions
Things to Think About and Do -
A. What kind of bed did Hannah sleep in? In the story,
how did Hannah clean her bed?
B. What did Hannah's father give her for Christmas? And
where did he get it? Draw a picture of all the things
Hannah got for Christmas.


nearly full. And Hannah's grandparents gave her a fur muff to
match her new coat.
That night Hannah put her five dollar gold piece in a little sack
and laid it in the trunk beside her new diary.
Then Hannah wrote in the last page of her old diary:
"Dear Diary, It was a wonderful Christmas. We went to an extra
church service tonight. We had a goose and a turkey. Grandpa
shot them for our dinner. We had fruit cake, too. I hope Betsy
had a merry Christmas."


Kay Hively of Neosho, Missounri, is a freelance author songwriter
and historian who writesfor the Neosho Daily News. Artist Billie
Gofourth-Stewart, also of Neosho, has illustratedfour book
reAorcw h.nnlro book ndintored a ruthneo mril Pmdra da


a ,. t tev.lif Lrrv t/ itw Uttu jlalrtcu a viu e miL# J ural. r o UUcLu
in cooperation with this newspaper and The Missouri Press
,Foundation, www.mopress.com.


^LSUNSTATE 44Ct ty
FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
Your one trusted financial partner &A.tSnih Cawntsi WcAin fAertw Cio'W
A message from the sponsor: Parents interested in with and include games, puzzles, and more. SunState
teaching their kids about finances will find an array of Federal Credit Union strongly supports literacy both in
financial literacy resources available at www.sunstatefcu. the classroom and at home, and we encourage parents to
org. SunState Federal Credit Union has financial start teaching their children early about the importance
literacy modules and more for children of all ages and of financial responsibility.
adults too. Many of the tools for children are fun to work


Industry's #1 Lease
Purchase Program! Low.
Monthly Payments! High
% Pay Package No Credit
Checks! Owner Operators
Welcome! (800)767-6918
www.JoinCRST.com
HeatinglAir Tect
Training. 3 weel
accelerated program
Hands on environment
State of Art Lab. Nationwid
certifications and Loci
Job Placement Assistanci
CALL NOW: (877)99-.
9904.
Temporary Horticultural
Laborers: FourtemporaV
horticultural workers ae
needed for nursery wor:,
including planting, pruning,
cultivation and related
outdoor work. Workers ae
needed between March 5h
and December 15th 2010
for Landmark Landscaping,
Inc. located in Frederict,
Maryland Wage is $9.00
per hour. If H2-A workers
are used, 75% of contracted
hours guaranteed. Supplies
equipment and tools are
provided by the employer.
Housing is available if.
travel time is unreasonable.
Please apply at local SWA
and refer to job order MD
0815364.
Part time cleaner/floor tech
needed for commerical
office building on US 441..
Must have floor experience,
ability to lift over 40 Ibs and
pass background check.
$7.50/hour. Call Pat at 352-
870-0363.
Drivers: Consistent High
Miles Freight for Teams.or
Solo's willing to Team. Top
Pay, Great Benefits & More!
Werner Enterprises: 1-888-
567-3101



SIGNS& E


FRANCHISE
ALERT
In our 45-year history, there's
never been a better time than
now to become a Huddle
House franchisee!

Huddle House, THE 24-hour
family diner and community
gathering spot, is looking for
qualified franchisees for
development in Alachual

For a limited time, take
advantage of our amazing,
new development incentive
program, which includes a
$5k Franchise Fee (normally
$25k) and NO ROYALTY for
your first five months! Certain
restrictions apply, so call
today 800-418-9555 x1393 or
visit www.HuddleHouse.com
to leam morel ,





ALL CASH VEN INGI Do
you earn $800 irja day? 25
Local Machinesnd Candy y -
$9,995. (888/629-9968
B02000033 COLL US: We
will not be undersold!





- *

N A't 0 NW I D E
FOREC OSED HOME
AUCTIO 600+ Homes
I BIDS O EN 3/1 Open
House: 2/2 27,28 View Full
SL SSIFIEDS
Continue onpage B5



JANNE, I


-For Real

a Pain Therapy...

Thera-Gesic' Pain Cream

It Really Works...Compare and SAVE.


BUYING!! -

BUYING!!

BUYING!!c
COINS DIAMONDS
ESTATE JEWELRY PAPER MONEY
GOLD SILVER PLATINUM
STERLING FLATWARE


COIN & JEWELRY GALLERY
(Formerly National Coin Investors)
IN THE MILLHOPPER SHOPPING CENTER
2007 NW 43RD ST., GAINESVILLE, FL
1-800-330-1555 OR 352-378-3983




How much coverage do

you get for $72?

More than you think.
BlueOptions- lower-cost health insurance policies for
Individuals Under 65. It's the same high-quality
coverage you expect at a lower price you can afford.
Call 352-373-0775 to learn more
about this affordable coverage.
Chip Williams & Associates, Inc.
3669 S.W. 2nd Avenue
Gainesville, FL 32607
A Contracted General Agelcy for
g g i BlueCross BleShield
i of Florida
U\9tM*ll-di


I

J
i '


t


I






ALACHUA COUNTY TODAY BUSINESS & SERVICES DIRECTORY THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2010 B5


CLASSIFIED:
S Continuedfrom page B4
\ Listings www.Auction.com
REDC I Brkr CQ1031187


5 AC Alachua
S Beautifully wooded on
paved road frontage.
Great area! Convenient to
Gainesville. Dev Potential!
Only $877/mo. $99,900
Total 352-215-1018.


LAKE LOT SALE! 5 acres
only $24,900 includes
FREE BOAT SLIPS! (was
$59,900) Sale March 6th!
Beautiful mix of woods/
meadows- walk to private
fishing lake. Quiet country
road, utilities, warranty


deed. Low financing. Call
now (888)792-5253, x.3427
LAND OR DEVELOP-
MENTS WANTED. We buy
or market development lots.
Mountain or Waterfront
Communities in NC, SC,
VA, TN, AL, GA, FL. Call
(800)455-1981, Ext.1034
UPSTATE NY BANK
SAYS SELL!. 11 acres -
$29,900! Borders State
Land. Stream, woods, fields,
great valley views! Must
sell to avoid repo! Hurry!
(888)464-9551. www.
NewYorkLandand Lakes.
comr
Crawford Co., GA 49 AC -
$1,325/AC Near Flint River!
Mature hardwood and pine!
Great hunting! (478)987-
9700 St. Regis Paper Co.


Duplex for Rent
Turkey Creek 2BR 2BA
2Car Garage. Screened
porch, very energy
efficient, quiet and private.
$900 month available
2/22/10 386-462-3066




Carolina Golf Getaway
for Couples. Enjoy 3 days/
2 nights, unlimited golf &
FREE breakfasts. Luxury
.accommodations. Only
$149. Call (866)334-
3253, x 2468 or
carolinagolfaetaway.com


DENTAL TREATMENT.
Need extensive dental
treatment, implant? Top
quality at affordable
rates. Must visit us! www.
KreativDentalClinic.com
or call (888)573-2848,
and get bonus vacation in
Europe.


JUST BETWEEN
FRIENDS Gainesville's
Largest Consignment
Event is coming March 4th-
7th to the Alachua County
Fairgrounds Children /
Teen/Maternity clothing,
Baby gear, Furn. & toys
galore. www.jbfsale.com


" us iness
Ie I. ,


BOUTIQUE




ONique Items S a it a ftlmmbg AI lble


WW~.p~~PrsSay S.Com
14956 X. MAD nStred~, Avchupu


GUN SHOW! FEB 27-28
SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-5
ATLANTA EXPO CENTER
(3650 JONESBORO RD
SE) EXIT #55 OFF 1-285
BUY-SELL-TRADE INFO:
(563)927-8176
AIRLINES ARE HIRING
- Train for high paying
Aviation Maintenance
Career.. FAA approved


program. Financial aid
if qualified Housing
available. CALL Aviation
Institute of Maintenance
(888)349-5387.
DISH. $19.99/Month. Why
Pay More? FREE Install
w/DVR (Up To 4 Rooms.)
FREE Movie Channels (3
Months.) AND $570 Sign-
Up Bonus! (888)593-7040.


UPS &SHIPPING SERVICES.


Director



CARPET CLEANING SERVICE
A-1 Academy Carpet Cleaners
Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning
Residential/Commercial
Free on Location Estimates
/ 1 Family Owned & Operated

Meeting Professional Industry Standards
E ,ade- ;,' 4;i0


CLEANING AN



RESIDENTIAL &
COMMERCIAL
Pressure Wash/Painting
Mobile Car Detail
Free Estimates Low Rates
Se HablaEspanol
Licensed and Insured
352-225-3798 Cell: 352-225-1094


MKM Electrical Services, Inc.
.:. RESIDENTIAL. &- C 0 MMER AL AL




SERVICE REPAIRS .-REMODEL WORK
NEW CONSTRUCTION.- COMPETITIVE RATES
LIC. #EC13003662 FREE ESTIMATES


HAY.FARM

SCOTT HAY FARM
Horse quality Tifton


85/Coastal Bermuda
full size round bale


Cow Bermuda
full size round bale


$55
per bale


$38
per bale


MEDICAL SERVICES

FAMILY MEDICAL CENTER
Providing care for the whole family
" Appointments Recommended
SDiabetes, HTN
Cardiovascular Disease NEW ROURS:
Annual PE's Monday-Thursday
* Drug Screening M a.m.-6 p.m.
* DOT, Sports & School PE's 9 a.m.-6 p.m.
* Most Insurance Accepted Friday
9 a.m.-1 p.m.




Advertise in over 100 papers

One Call One Order One Payment

www.national-classifieds.com

info@national-classifieds.com

1-866-742-1373

Put US to work

for you!


ANF


CLEANING AND LAWN CARE


House Cleaning *Yard & Lawn Care

Debris Removal

No Job Too Small or Too Big!
Weekly & Monthly Rates Available




GOOD THINGS TO EAT
C & R PRODUCE
13789 NW U.S. Hwy. 441 Alachua, FL 32615


Loa J




Local Produce (386) 462-6158













RESTAURANTS

Sonny's BBQ of Alachua

.Come by for some of the best
y authentic southern B-B.Q
Y Beef *Pork Chicken Ribs
S. PEN days. a eek Ii nl. ,: fp.m.

SONNY'S REAL PIT BAR-B-Q' 2 U.S. 441 & 1-75! Alacha (386) 462-3180


GOOD THINGS TO EAT

STEVEN DAVIS FARMS, LLC
PEAS: Acres, Black-eyes, Pink-eyes; Green Butterbeans,
Speckled Butterbeans, Zippers, OKRA, Squash,
Cabbage, Strawberries, Yard Eggs and more!
BEANS:Green, CUT Green, Kentucky, Yellow Wax
GREENS: COLLARD, MUSTARD and TURNIP
S At the Packing Shed in LaCrosse!,
20915 N SR 121, LaCrosse
Phone: 386-418-0511 *Fax: 386-418-0544

MATH TUTORING SERVICES



.Over 25 years experience, one-on-one & classroom setting
.Taught in Santa Fe College, high schools and in countries
such as Bolivia, Colombia & Dominican Republic
.Teach the whole gamut from pre-algebra to AP Calculus AB
*Average grade of high school students I taught was 90.




[ RESTAURANTS


On Main Street
in Downtown
Beautiful Alachua


GREAT STEAKS
SEAFOOD & BURGERS
"Family dining with
a little something
for everyone"


Mon.-Sat. at 11 a.m.
(386) 462-1294


Available from Commercial News Providers

g..m. @


I E. BEAUTY SERVICES


Hair Wax 'Nais
A Full Service Salon ri
".- 386-454-9844 1
125 NE Santa Fe Blvd., High Springs
Monday Saturday by Appointment


I


__ C


UGINApVC
Lamm Care
COMMERCIAL &
RESIDENTIAL
Free Est mates Lom Rates
N iscellalleolls Ph-ills
Se flabla Espanol
Licensed and Insured

3,,2-22,,-3798 Cell: 352-225-1094


'
; ,

-I








B6 ALACHUA COUNTY TODAY LOCAL NEWS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25,2010


Students continue win streak


for environmental efforts


Photo special to Alachua County Today
The landlwater team during one of their events to raise money to
buy the seedlings they distributed and planted for their reforestation
project. L-R: Front row Madison Karelas, Kristi Duncan, Katie Pabst
Back row: Linda Buys, Tiffany O'Connell, Brian Skipper, Naomi Daniels, Shelby
Deen, and Cody Thomas.


Special to.
Alachua County Today
NEWBERRY The
tradition of producing
environmentally-conscious
and award-winning -
young people continues at
Newberry High School.
Two teams of students
at the school have won
two first place awards in
*the Lexus Eco Challenge,
a national competition
sponsored by the Lexus
automotive company and
Scholastic, a national
educational publishing
company. Their first win
was in the competition's
land and water category, the
second was in the air and
climate category. Those
wins mean the school is
now eligible to compete in
the final overall challenge
of the contest.
It's the third straight
year that students from
Newberry High have taken
first place awards in the
Eco Challenge.
"We're so proud of
these students and their
teacher, Cynthia Holland,"
said principal Hershel
Lyons. "They've made
Newberry High a national
leader in environmental
education."'
For the .land and
water category, a team of
nine Newberry students
planned and implemented
a community reforestation
project. That team
was made up of Kristi
Duncan, Naomi Daniels,
Katie Pabst, Linda Buys,
Cody Thomas, Tiffany
O'Connell, Shelby Deen,
Brian Skipper and Madison
Karelas. The students had
to raise enough, money to
purchase 1,500 seedlings,
educate the community
about the project and
recruit local citizens to
get the seedlings: in;: the
ground. They also worked
with Nevberry city leaders
on a plan to have the city
officially designated as a
Tree City through the Arbor
Day Foutidation's national
Tree City USA program.
The students involved
in the project say they are
happy knowing that their
work will have a significant
impact on the future of the
community.
"Thirty or forty years
from now when those
little seedlings are tall
trees, we'll know we're
the reason they're there,"
said O'Connell, a senior at
Newberry High.
Promoting a 'Green
Christmas' was the focus
of the team working
on the air and climate
challenge. That team
included Duncan, Daniels,
Thomas, Pabst, Deen,
O'Connell and Karelas and
three new members, Alex


Black, Brian Skipper and
Courtney Ray. As part of
their project, the students
produced and sold reusable
fabric bags to replace the
traditional gift wrapping
and boxes. They created
ornaments out ofpine cones
and other natural materials
rather than using store-
bought, and used energy
efficient LED lights for
their holiday decorating.
More importantly, they
campaigned to encourage
their fellow students and
other citizens to do the
same in their own homes.
"Ten kids can't do
it .by themselves," said
Skipper, a senior. "It's
really important to get the
community involved in
helping us."
While the students
are all much 'more
knowledgeable about
environmental issues than
they were, Holland says
working on the projects has
also helped them develop
other important skills.


"They've learned to use
new technologies, they've
learned to organize, to
communicate, to work as
a team, to meet deadlines,"
she said. "Those skills are
invaluable."
For each first place
award in the contest, the
school receives $2000
award,. Holland receives
a $1000 award and the
students split .$7000
in prize money. And
while winning awards is
gratifying, Holland says it's
not the ultimate goal of the
projects.
"It's -about these
students, going on to
become' active in the
community and learning
how one person can make
a positive change in the
world," she said.
"Our generation is
going to have a big impact
the environment," said
Daniels. "We have to know
about it so we can fix
what's been going on."
# # '#.


Annual student archery tournament


going live in Newberry


Special to
Alachua County Today
NEWBERRY The
2010 Florida National
Archery in the Schools
Program (NASP) State
Tournament will be held in
Newberry on Feb. 27.
The tournament will
be conducted in two
formats: a live tournament
competition that will
take place at the Easton-
Newberry Sports Complex
and a virtual tournament
for schools that cannot
afford to travel, according
to Steve Robbins of the
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
(FWC), Florida's National
Archery in the Schools
Program coordinator.
"The virtual tournament
will allow schools to
shoot for score in their
own gymnasium and have
their results compiled in a
database of live and virtual
tournament participants,"
Robbins said. Schools
started shooting Feb. 8 and
will continue through Feb.
19, and then they'll mail in
their results.
Scores from the
live tournament, will be
compared to the results of
the virtual tournament, and,
winners will be selected
and announced in three
divisions: elementary,
middle and high school.
"Trophies will be
awarded to the top three


Super C

Imt I t~


rossword
.a AM0 *e a ewpddm*bp j*


9 *


a F

0*


I


r

''F'





--- -P-,,
(i f .*
9 | ^ .


I-,


p


.---- Copyrighted Material "

-. - Syndicated Content Z z

Available from Commercial News Providers
o It-f *
K t ...... 1 f* a .. .a, "
S ... ..." ..

t l. .. .... ......
WI II- "" *1 MA' -- *W**


* a.~r
""; ~*tE"' *L

* -e -

A W~p -*mi.b ":*
:. .. -e -* jt
* *i:a.::
* 4b ......^.


* 41||t ::: a'
lh
* c. .. -e-



* at



a.t aH.... *
"1.
a



a a
at IE- a.- (I
a ifc ******
3 tl^


.. ::: ::
', i:.

,..W
-e





t .......
,,.-
4M9









*SH~
at" 'S




'"'"'C
C'S.










*
S r


* a.9t. a...

* aF ,a"
*.
a r *
-* -'; "

He.* I~
A -


,, i .... :.
,* :-:
;*c



a t- -
*ft-**IMF- *-
"A '
a.I ~


schools in each division,
with each team member
receiving a medal. Trophies
will also be awarded to the
top boy and girl shooter
in each division, with a
Genesis bow presented to,
the top overall boy and girl
shooter," Robbins said.
Every participant,
whether shooting in the live
or the virtual tournament,,
will receive a T-shirt and a
certificate.
"Archery is a great
sport," Robbins said.
"It helps build muscle
endurance and flexibility,
develop hand-eyj
coordination, and grip and
body strength. You don't
have to be 6-foot-2 and
able to dunk a basketball
to participate. Girls can
compete with boys, and
youngsters with physical
disabilities : can also
participate."


This is the third year
of the Florida NASP State
Tournament. The first
two tournaments were
conducted entirely in a
virtual format, with 592
kids shooting in 2008, and
751 in 2009.
NASP,is a cooperative
effort between the FWC
and the Florida Department
of Educatioh. Before
presenting the two-week
archery course, teachers
undergo -an eight-hour
NASP Basic Archery
Instructor Training
Program. The FWC has
certified teachers from 230
Florida schools to be basic
archery instructors.
SThe Easton-Newberry
Sports complex held its
grand opening in October
2009, and is' an .ideal
location to conduct the
State Tournament.
S # #.'#


FWC photo by STEVE ROBBINS/Special to Alachua County Today
Students from West Nassau High School take aim
during the 2009 NASP tournament.


PROFESSIONAL OFFICE

SPACE/BUILDING

FOR LEASE

1,500 sq. ft.
Partially furnished.
GREAT LOCATION
$1,000 per month


3864184000

Hwy 441 near Progress Corporate Park Alachua, FL


1.5 Acre Parcl Available
nof Omitsr p LCl*PD Ol # ALaua FL 32116
ihSUw: 5.6.6,1MwPoil Hawt) 3S1332.2600


ALACHUA SELF STORAGE
NO A AVAILABLE FREE
TRUCK RENTAL WITH MOV IEN*

Sizes from 5 x5 to 12.x 40
I -. ol -, .
Commeriai Storage with' 14fCeilings
"," "". -Vdeo Sur.veilla ce
( '*Wvf.i I.^ W- *.*^l-^>--..*PCT I*5w<:..AK ?*


'


..,.

..
.~ ~.


r


I ::, ,




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - Version 2.9.8 - mvs