• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Preface
 Table of Contents
 The pigs at home
 Tusko discovers the garden in the...
 The pursuit of Tusko
 The death of Tusko
 Grumphy goes to look for Tusko
 Snout becomes head of the...
 Fusky makes a friend
 Fusky loses her friend, but gains...
 Snout to the rescue
 Snout's terrible adventure
 The pigs at home again
 Back Cover






Group Title: The wild pigs : a story for little people
Title: The wild pigs
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00081652/00001
 Material Information
Title: The wild pigs a story for little people
Physical Description: 4, 131, 1 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Young, Gerald
Parkinson, W ( Illustrator )
Swan Sonnenschein & Co ( Publisher )
Macmillan & Co ( Publisher )
Gresham Press ( Printer )
Unwin Brothers (Firm) ( Printer )
Publisher: Swan Sonnenschein and Co.
Macmillan and Co.
Place of Publication: London
New York
Manufacturer: Gresham Press ; Unwin Brothers
Publication Date: 1892
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Swine -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Pride and vanity -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Gluttony -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Obedience -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Parent and child -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1892
Genre: novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Gerald Young ; with four full-page and numerous text illustrations by W. Parkinson.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00081652
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002240239
notis - ALJ0784
oclc - 00847283

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Half Title
        Half Title
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Title Page
    Preface
        Preface
    Table of Contents
        Table of Contents
    The pigs at home
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Tusko discovers the garden in the forest
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    The pursuit of Tusko
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
    The death of Tusko
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
    Grumphy goes to look for Tusko
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
    Snout becomes head of the family
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
    Fusky makes a friend
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
    Fusky loses her friend, but gains experience
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
    Snout to the rescue
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
    Snout's terrible adventure
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
    The pigs at home again
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text




















THE WILD PIGS.








THE WILD PIGS:


A STORE Y FOR LITTLE PEOPLE.





BY

GERALD YOUNG.


WITH FOUR FULL-PAGE AND NUMEROUS TEXT ILLUS-
TRATIONS BY W. PARKINSON.


gonboun:
SWAN SONNENSCHEIN AND CO.
NEW YORK: MACMILLAN AND CO.
1892.















PREFACE.



IT is some time ago since I told my children the
story of "The Wild Pigs," and I find that now
they crave for stronger food, and that I cannot set
such a simple dish before them. It is a comfort,
however, to think of the many homes with little
people who are not yet too old to take an interest
in the adventures of Chunk, Fusky, and Snout, and
who, even if they cannot read, can anyhow point with
their little pink fingers to the pictures Mr. Parkinson
has drawn with so much skill. To these little un-
known friends I commend the fortunes of The Wild
Pigs."
GERALD YOUNG.



















CONTENTS.



CHAP. PAGE
I. THE PIGS AT HOME I

II. TUSKO DISCOVERS THE GARDEN IN THE FOREST. II

III. THE PURSUIT OF TUSKO 2I

IV. THE DEATH OF TUSKO 33

V. GRUMPHY GOES TO LOOK FOR TUSKO 45

VI. SNOUT BECOMES HEAD OF THE FAMILY 55

VII. FUSKY MAKES A FRIEND 66

VIII. FUSKY LOSES HER FRIEND, BUT GAINS EXPERIENCE 83

IX. SNOUT TO THE RESCUE 96

X. SNOUT'S TERRIBLE ADVENTURE 114

XI. THE PIGS AT HOME AGAIN 122

















THE WILD PIGS.



ALONG time ago-it must have been when I
was quite a little boy, or possibly before I was
born-there lived in a large wood a family of wild
pigs. The family was composed of a father and
mother pig, one sister and two brother pigs. The
father's name was Tusko," the mother, Grumphy,"
the sister, Fusky," and the two brothers were
"Snout," the elder, and "Chunk," the younger. There
had been other little ones before these, but they had
all gone away, or died, or been killed; some had
gone off with other wild pigs, and had never been
seen again, -and some had died when they were
babies-anyhow, at the time I am telling you about,
only three pigs were left in the nursery. Now, as
the story goes on, you will find out that these three







THE WILD PIGS.


little pigs were very like children in many things
they did, and you will see that Snout was a good,
brave pig, and that Chunk was a greedy, thieving pig,
and that Fusky was a vain and cowardly pig. Their
home was one of the most beautiful places you can
imagine. It was close to a broad but shallow river,
that in the summer only took the little pigs up to
their knees, and in some parts was quite dry. The
bottom of the river-bed was white sand and little
shells, and the water was as bright and clear as a
dewdrop. On the side that they lived, the trees
hung over the river, and the tall ferns grew close to
the edge; and about twenty yards from the side the
pigs had made a most comfortable sort of den, in
which they slept. There was a pool that had been
made by the pigs rolling in .the water close by here,
where they used to take their bath. -And very merry
times they had; for their great delight was to coax
Grumphy to come and bathe with them. And .she
used to lie down in the pool, whilst the three little
pigs would try and climb up on to her slippery sides,
squeaking and squealing at each other, and trying to
balance themselves ; then one after another-and
sometimes all at once-they would slip off again
into the water, whilst old Grumphy used to lie







THE WILD PIGS.


chuckling to herself, and sending up fountains of
water by flapping her ears in the pool.
Old Tusko didn't often- condescend to come to


these nursery baths. He liked to go further down
the river to a deeper pool, and plunge in with the
water coming over his black, bristly back, then come







THE WILD PIGS.


out and roll in the fern, and tear it up with his teeth
as he turned over and over. And if anybody inter-
fered with him at such a time, he could be very cross
-in fact, I may tell you that although he was a very
good specimen of a wild pig, he was very touchy and
very easily offended, and if he was in one of his
tantrums, he could bite; and grunt, and be very
savage, and his little eyes would look quite red, and
the bristles on his back stand upright. And when
the little pigs saw him look like that, they would set
off into the thickest part of the wood squealing as
loud as they could-for these pigs were very fond of
calling out before they were hurt-and even Grumphy
herself would slink into the fern and get out of the
way, for I am sorry to say she had three or four
great marks on her side from Tusko's teeth.
"Keep out of his way, my dears," she said, and
the little ones took very good care to take her
advice.
At the time I am telling you about, the summer
was drawing near its end, and the nights had begun
to get cooler, and the little pigs, instead of lying with
their front paws out of bed, or even, sometimes, their
hind legs kicked out, were glad to snuggle up against
Grumphy as tight as lozenges in a box. Tusko had








THE WILD PIGS.


certainly a very nasty habit of waiting about in the
fern until the family had all settled themselves for
the night, and then he would come blundering along,
stepping upon them with his hard feet, and making
them scatter away squealing, when he would lie down
in the nice warm places they had left, and they were
obliged to be content with coming back and making
new places. This was a good plan, you see, for he
not only got his bed warmed, but he had their fat
little bodies to keep him warm too. But, after all,
you must remember that he was Tusko, the father of
them all, and it doesn't do to be too particular about
what the head of the house likes to do. As for
Grumphy, she always pretended to be fast asleep,
and not to know anything of what was going
on.
It was a beautiful sunny morning after one of these
chilly nights. The sun shone through the trees and
the fern, and on the clustered bodies of the family.
It shone upon the nose of little Snout, who, as usual,
was the first to wake up. Just raising his head a
little, he took a good sniff of the fresh morning air;
then, getting up on his little bandy legs, he took a
good stretch. First of all, he put his little hind legs
out as far as they would reach, and stretched; then







THE WILD PIGS.


his front ones out and his head between them, and
stretched ; then he put his nose high up in the air,
and stretched his throat and the back of his neck;
then he came out a little bit into the wood, and
looked about him. What was the best thing to
do? Just go down to the river and eat a few
watercresses, and have a scrabble in the wet sand ?
Yes, that was a good idea-such a good idea that
he found it necessary to give a little hogging his back, jump up into the air, then to
take three or four jumps round after his tail; such a
capital idea that he was obliged to lie down on his
back, and seize one of his legs in his mouth and
pretend to worry it, and grunt and snarl over it.
Yes, he felt better now, and with one more squeal
and one more jump he was off to the river. It was
not long before he was followed'by Fusky and
Chunk, who, when they woke up and missed Snout,
felt certain he had gone off to the river, and then a
really good game of play took place. They rolled
in the shallow places ; they ducked their heads in the
little pools, and came up spluttering and blowing;
they pretended to swim, with two hind legs on the
sand, and two in the water; they ran after each
other, dripping with water, along.the river bank, then








THE WILD PIGS.


into the river again, and splashed each other-in fact,
they did everything I have seen children do at the
seaside, I think, even to digging in the sand, only
they dug with their noses instead of with spades.
Presently they came out, and began to rout on the
side of the river. I'm afraid you children can't under-
stand the pleasure of routing-your noses are too soft
and flabby to be able to rout properly-and you
can't understand the pleasure of digging away under
squashy weeds and .roots, until you sniff something
that smells good, and you dig away more eagerly,
and out comes something soft and savoury-I don't
know what, but something that tastes delicious.
Sometimes it might look like a bit of dead bird or
rabbit--but oh, its taste! like the most delightful
toffy or'almond hardbake, or perhaps like a bit of
chicken smothered in bread sauce. Yes, I'm sure
routing must be ore of the most enjoyable things in
the .world ; only don't try it, or your father and
mother might not like it if, after you had had your
baths in the morning, they were to come down and
find four or five little people kneeling on the break-
fast table, routing amongst the kidneys, and toast,
and marmalade-anyhow, I forbid my children to
rout without my leave. Chunk soon wandered away







THE WILD PIGS.


from the other two, further and further, until he came
to a nice-looking little green glade; so he dawdled
up this, and soon came to a piece of mossy grass
under a large tree.' On this grass lay some prickly-
looking pods. Chunk turned them cautiously over
with his foot first, and as he trod upon one, a bright
little kernel popped out. This didn't look prickly, so
he ventured to smell it, then to taste it. Sweet, juicy,
and good They were sweet chestnuts, but it was
the first time he had tasted them. He looked guiltily
over his shoulder. Should he go and tell the others?
No, certainly not, he thought. He had found them,
so he would make haste and clear them up, and he
began to munch and to scrunch as fast as he could.
Now, he could not have eaten more than four or five
good mouthfuls, when he heard a rustling, pushing
noise behind him, and Tusko himself, followed by
Grumphy, came cantering up. Tusko knew the autumn
was drawing near, and that the chestnuts would be
falling, and the spot where Chunk was feasting had
been a favourite place for his father and mother for
years, and here was actually a son of theirs who had
discovered the place, and, instead of coming home at
once to tell the good news, was positively gorging all
by himself. Oof! oof !" said the old pig, and the









THE WILD PIGS.


wretched little Chunk trembled from head to foot,
with his mouth still full of chestnuts, for he knew what


IW
I~VH~4i


was coming. Tusko didn't give him much time to
think over his misdeeds,, but rolled him over and over


I;

.?:~

r:rig~
- -r
'','








THE WILD PIGS.


like a ball, pushing him with his hard,' horny nose,
until he got him against the trunk of the chestnut-
tree, and then he held him 'against it, and squeezed
him most dreadfully-he squeezed him so hard that
Chunk had no breath to call out, but could only open
his little mouth and gasp. When Tusko had held
him for two or three minutes, he left him, but oh !
with such sore sides, and all his appetite gone, feeling
as if somebody had been dancing upon him with
thick boots. It was a terrible punishment, and one
the little pigs dreaded very much. They called it
" snouting." Whilst Tusko and Grumphy were busy
over the chestnuts, Chunk was glad enough to sneak
back to the river, and lie down in the cool water, first
on one side and then on the other, until he felt a
little less sore. Then he sat up and began to smack
his lips again, and think of the delicious taste of
the chestnuts. What a shame it was, he thought, of
his father to come and take possession of his find !
Well, he felt a little better now, so he thought he
would steal back and see what they were all doing.
And so he did. And when he got back things looked
a little better, for the whole family were beginning to
feel satisfied, and getting dainty, picking out only the
big chestnuts; and Tusko had evidently forgotten








THE WILD PIGS. II


Chunk's naughty behaviour, so the sore little pig was
grateful to quietly take his place, and pick up what
he could get, well out of reach of Tusko and his
terrible old nose.
















CHAPTER II.


HE coldness of the
nights warned Tusko
and Grumphy that
'$"-ii 'winter, in a few more
wvweeks, would be
P., i,, .coming on, and they
S' must think about
the store of provi-
"sions that they were
-. in the habit of lay-
S ing up; for on one
or two occasions
when they had not done this, snow had fallen, and
they had been miserably hungry, and unable to get
anything but the toughest and driest old roots.
Those chestnuts, now, they would have made a nice
beginning; and Tusko looked about him with a








THE WILD PIGS.


glittering eye, thinking if he could punish any one
in particular for their greedy forgetfulness, but all
had been equally to blame, so he contented himself
with some loud groofs," and said that he should go
for a good long range in the forest, to see if he could
find anything, or, if it would be better, to move to
some other place nearer food for the winter.
"Potatoes !" said Grumphy.
"Potatoes repeated Tusko, putting his head low
down, with his nose almost touching the ground, as
he always did when he was thinking. Dangerous,"
said the old pig, after a minute's thought.
"Don't go, then," replied Grumphy.; "but," she
added, with a sigh, they are so nice, and keep so
well."
How long ago is it since we had potatoes?"
asked Tusko.
S"Why, it was the year of Lobkin's accident"
(Grumphy always dated everything from the birth
of one of her children, or from some misfortune to
any one of them, and Lobkin had been an unfortu-
nate little pigling who had been born with the most
crooked legs you can imagine, but with an enormous
appetite; he had been choked from trying to swallow
a very big potato without even giving it one bite).







THE WILD PIGS.


"Poof, poof!" said Tusko; "who cares about
Lobkin Yes, I remember, it was two winters ago;
and a terrible fight I had with two dogs, who inter-
rupted me just as I was boring my way into a
splendid heap of them. Well, well, I think I'll go
and see if those things called men have planted any
more in our woods."
Take great care of yourself," called out Grumphy,
"and don't get too hot, and then sit down in
draughts."
Goo-rumph," was all the old pig said, as he turned
and made off into the thickest part of the forest.
Tusko had gone off very coolly, and as if what he
was undertaking was a very small matter; but, in
reality, he knew as well as any one it was a very
dangerous business, and as soon as he had got well
away from home, he laid quietly down under a bush
to think over his plans. You will understand that
of course it would have been a capital plan for the
family if they could all move to some safe place for
the winter, and near enough to some supply of food
(where they might go daily and feed, without the
trouble of hunting), such things, for instance, as
roots, stored up for cattle and sheep, or potatoes.
At the same time, it was sure to be a very dangerous








THE WILD PIGS.


plan, for people who store up potatoes, or turnips, or
beetroot, don't want wild pigs to come and eat them,
and they keep dogs and guns to keep such thieves
off. Tusko knew all this quite well; still, he thought
it possible he might find some lonely little farm or
garden where they might go with safety, if they were
cautious. So, after turning it well over in his head,
he got up again and began to push through the
bushes and fern at, a good long trot. He remembered
that after going some way he would come to a road,
and he knew this road was a dangerous place for him
to go on, so he made up his mind he would keep in
the long grass and bushes, where his footprints
would not be seen. It was a very hot day, and
Tusko found it hard work forcing his way along
through the wood, crossing the ditches, and ploughing
through the deep sand that he sometimes came to,
and he began to think he really would go back, and
start again on a cooler day. Just as he began to
loiter and go slower, a faint sound was heard in the
distance: it was so slight a noise that if you or I had
been with Tusko, we should not have heard anything
at all; but our ears are not so keen as a wild pig's,
and in a second Tusko stopped, and put his nose to
the ground and listened. Yes, he heard it again-a







THE WILD PIGS.


long way off, but quite clear enough for him to recog-
nize it AS A DOG'S BARK! Now, I daresay you think
that old Tusko turned round and went back again
as quick as he could. Not a bit of it, the sound quite
refreshed and cheered him, for he not only heard the
dog's voice, but he knew what he said, and he under-
stood that the dog was tied up, so he trotted on quite
coolly, only keeping a very sharp look-out, and
making as little noise as possible. "Yes," thought
Tusko to himself, "that dog's tied up somewhere in
the forest, very likely in a garden, and in that garden
there'll be something to eat, possibly potatoes, so my
journey hasn't been taken for nothing." Presently the
sound of the dog's bark grew louder and clearer, and
in about ten minutes after Tusko had first heard it,
he began to go very slowly; every now and then he
put up his long nose in the air and gave a long sniff,
then he curled up his tail on his back in a nice tight
little ring, for it had been hanging down quite limp.
Suddenly he stopped quite still: just in front of him
the bushes had got quite thin, he could- not hide
himself any more from the road, and on the other
side of the road there was a low wall, built of turf,
with some branches put at the top, and it was very
certain that the dog was barking from the other








THE WILD PIGS.


side of this wall. Then Tusko began slowly to come
.out on to the road, with his ears sticking up, and his
eyes staring, and almost holding his breath. The
dog kept on barking every now and then, but there
was no one to be seen, and no other sound. The old
pig crossed the road, trying to step on the stones and
hardest places, so as not to show his footmarks, until
he caine .to the little wall. He looked up at it, and
didn't fancy trying to climb over it, so he began to go
slowly along by the side, to look for an opening.
Soon he came to a little gate, and Tusko peeped
through the open bars, and his mouth watered, and
his heart beat with delight, for he saw that the
wall surrounded a garden planted with the most
beautiful-looking potatoes, as far as he could judge
from their green tops and flowers. There was no
house; but in one corner of the garden there was
fixed an old water barrel, and outside the barrel
there sat a large dog, with a soft curly black coat,
and very bright eyes. It was one of the places in the
forest that poor men used to plant with potatoes or
other vegetables, and come and dig them up and take
them to their own homes, leaving only a dog to
guard them, and to frighten off such intruders as
Tusko. The old pig understood all about it in a
3







THE WILD PIGS.


moment; no doubt there would be only this dog
here for a long time; and, with care and prudence,
his family could come and enjoy themselves finely
until. the potatoes were dug up, and even then
perhaps might find where they were stored. Yes,
he thought, Grumphy should come nearer, and they
would stop as long as they could. But now to try
if the potatoes were really good ones. Tusko
pushed the gate gently with his nose; but as he did
so the 'curly black dog caught sight of him, and
jumped up and began to bark most furiously, and
Tusko heard him say-
Go, go! Go away, go away! Go-go away,
go!"
To all this the old pig replied by giving a low
grunt, that might mean anything. He saw that the
dog's chain was safe, and all he cared for now was to
try and open the gate. He pushed it with his head,
he put his nose under it and tried to lift it; but it
was no use, the gate was safely fastened. Then
Tusko turned round and backed against it, giving
it some tremendous bumps; but it was a good stout
gate, and stood firm. You can fancy the state of the
poor dog whilst all this was going on: he jumped
about at the end of his chain from side to side, he








THE. WILD PIGS.


tried to drag the barrel along, but it was fastened to
the ground-in fact he did everything he could to
get at Tusko. At last the old pig gave the gate up
as a bad job, and he moved off to look for a weak
place in the wall; and sure enough he found one: two
or three of the large sods of turf of which the wall
was built had fallen down, and Tusko thought he
might climb up here, and so he struggled and scratched
and puffed until he got on to the top amongst the
brambles, and these pricked his face and the top of
his nose; but he hadn't much time to think about
that, for suddenly the top of the wall gave way, and
head over heels went Tusko into the garden, covered
with turf and briars and dust.
I wish you could have seen the dog now, for he
really did his utmost to frighten the pig away; he
called out-
"Master, master, come, come, come! Oh go, oh
go, oh go!"
He was quite hoarse with barking, and tried to pull
his head through his collar, but it was all of no use.
There was old Tusko now up to his middle in the
thickest part of the potatoes, digging them up, tramp-
ling them down, munching them, crunching them,
slobbering over them, leaving the little ones, picking







THE WILD PIGS.


out the best. Oh, it was a sad sight for the poor dog!
but for Tusko, it was just pure enjoyment: every
now and then, when he had got a specially juicy


mouthful, he would raise his head out of the potatoes
and look up quietly, as if he was wondering why
the dog made so much noise, then down again








THE WILD PIGS.


to rout up some more, or move to a place that
looked thicker. The old pig, however, knew that he
mustn't stay too long, so having eaten his fill, he
began slowly to make off to the broken part of the
wall, which was now quite easy for him to get over.
He slowly got up to the top, and then turned quietly
round and looked at the dog, whose barks had
turned into 'quite faint screams of rage-he was so
tired and miserable at seeing Tusko get off safe after
all the damage he had done.
"Good-bye," said Tusko, for he was a pig who was
fond of fun when he had had enough to eat. Good-
bye-take care of yourself-you sound very hoarse.
Capital potatoes! I'll come again to-morrow, and
bring my family." So saying, he bundled down on the
other side of the wall and was lost to sight.
















CHAPTER III.


FFAIRS at home
during Tusko's
absence had gone
on quietly enough.
Grumphy had
taken her three
children down to
the river in the
morning and
watched their
\ii games on the
banks, whilst she lay half on the sand and half in the
water. The three young ones had amused themselves
very well. Fusky had not been cross, and Chunk
had not yet forgotten his last lesson, and was inclined
to let the others get a fair share of any food there
was, and not stand upon some of it, whilst he would
try to eat the rest, as was his custom sometimes. In
22







THE WILD PIGS.


the afternoon they had wandered away into the wood
looking for more chestnuts, and all had been very
busy talking about their father's expedition, and
wondering if he would discover any place for them
to move to. So the day passed away, and evening
began to draw on, and Grumphy had just called the
children to her for going home, when she said, I
hear him." All the little pigs immediately stopped
in different attitudes of attention, and sure enough
in another minute Tusko was amongst them.
All the family saw at a glance that he was in high
good-humour; not only did his sides look quite tight
with food, but his eyes twinkled and his whole appear-
ance was that of a pig who had spent a happy day.
"Well?" said Grumphy.
"All right," replied Tusko; "I'll tell you all about
it when I've had some water, I'm terribly thirsty.
Go home," he said, turning towards the three children,
who were all standing with their ears pricked in atti-
tudes of great attention. And you, my dear, come
down with me to the river."
The three small pigs would dearly have liked to
have heard the news, 'but they knew better than to
disobey, so they turned rather sulkily into the scrub,
whilst Tusko and Grumphy went off to the river.







THE WILD PIGS.


"Well, my dear," said he, as soon as they were well
out of hearing, everything is capital: lots of potatoes,
nobody about, only one dog, and he's well tied up."
And Tusko chuckled to himself.
How far? asked Grumphy.


I' i


"Well, it's a long way, and I think the best plan
will be to move a little nearer to the place; but we'll
talk more about it to-morrow." As he said this, Tusko
took a plunge into the deepest pool, and snorted and
rolled and grunted, whilst Grumphy stood respectfully







THE WILD PIGS.


looking on, thinking what a wonderful pig he was,
and how lucky-she was to have such a husband.
When Tusko had finished his bath the two-old pigs
loitered home.' Tusko was thoroughly tired, and had
hardly made himself comfortable in the fern, and
certainly Grumphy had not quite finished tucking
him up, -before he was fast asleep.
The three young pigs had all kept wide awake, and
no sooner did they hear their father's snores, than
three little snouts came poking up, and Chunk said
in a most pleading voice-
"Do tell us the news, mugsy?"
Grumphy would have told them all about it with
pleasure if she could, but she really knew very little
herself, so she said in a pig's whisper-
"Hush! you mustn't talk now. I'll tell you to-
morrow, but your father says the potatoes are
delicious "
She said this last word in such an appetizing voice
-for poor old Grumphy had not had much to eat
herself that day-that it brought all the pigs out of
their beds. Snout himself could not resist the
thought, and he said-
I say, let's be off very early."
"Hush, hush !" was, all his mother answered, for the







THE WILD PIGS.


three pigs were getting so excited, and rustling about so
much, that she feared Tusko would wake; and nothing
made him more cross than being woke from his first
sleep; in fact, just at this moment he stopped snoring
and opened one eye; but all the pigs had laid down,
and before they ventured to move again Grumphy
had fallen asleep herself, and they made up their
minds the best thing to do was to follow her example.
Poor little pigs! they little thought of the terrible
trouble that was going to fall upon their home.
It had been, as I daresay you remember, a very
hot day, and soon after the pigs had fallen asleep
the moon rose, giving a clear soft light over the forest,
where all was now peace and quiet. You could only
hear the rippling noise of the river, or the dropping
of a leaf or little twig from one of the trees; but
about six miles off, in the potato garden, things were
very different-there all was bustle and confusion.
This potato garden was owned by two brothers, who
had a farm about fifteen miles off, where they lived.
And one day, wandering about in the forest, they had
found a nice green spot with no trees upon it, and
they had ploughed it up with a great deal of trouble
and planted it with potatoes, and were looking forward
with great pleasure to having a capital crop for their







THE WILD PIGS.


winter supply. You can guess how angry they were
when they went to feed their dog that evening,
to find the wall broken down, potatoes dug up,
chewed bits lying about, and the garden looking as
if a Board School had been turned loose into it.
Then they began to look carefully about to try and.
find out who could have done this, and very soon
they found the print of old Tusko's feet. The poor
dog would have told them all about it if he could;
indeed, he did tell them, but you see they could not
understand what he said, although he wagged his tail
and said in good dog-English"-
"Oh, master !-a big pig! Yes, master!-a great
black pig !" and then he put his nose up in the air
and gave a howl which said very plainly, How I
wish I hadn't been tied up!"
However, I think they guessed what he meant, for
one of the men patted him and said, "Well, old
Watch, you shall come and catch him."
Now it was a funny thing that Watch quite under-
stood what the men said to him, and he frolicked
about with delight as the two men talked to each
other. After a little chat Watch saw them take out
of the cart in which they had come an old gun,
and then he felt sure, to his great delight, that they







THE WILD PIGS.


would start that very night, and not wait until.the
morning. And he was quite right, for in another
minute one of the men, whose name was Amos, came
up to the barrel and took Watch's collar off. He gave
a bound in the air with pleasure, and would have
started off at once after Tusko had not Amos called
him back and made him come to heel. When, how-
ever, they had passed through the garden gate Amos
waved his hand and said, Seek him, Watch !" The
dog put his nose down to the ground, gave a little
excited cry, and dashed into the thick of the forest
on Tusko's track. He had not got very far, however,
before he heard his master's whistle; and coming
back, the man said-
"Not so fast, Watch; we shall never keep up with
you at that pace. Steady, old boy, steady!"
Watch understood, and went along very steadily,
stopping every now and then to look back and see
if his master was coming; and very hard work it
was for the two men, for although Tusko or Watch
could push-through the briers and thick underwood, it
was very different for Amos and his brother, whose
faces were flipped and scratched every minute, and
who had sometimes to stoop down and crawl along
to follow. Very glad they were that it was not the







THE WILD PIGS. 29


middle of the day, but on a cool, beautiful night,
they had this work to do. After going on for
three or- four hours they could hear the running
of water ; in fact they were now drawing near to
the poor piggies' bathing-place. Presently. Watch
,dashed forward and plunged into a clear stream,
shining in the moonlight, and began to lap and then
to roll; the two men also were glad enough to stoop
down and drink, and they could see by the moonlight
the print of many pigs' feet, and they .pointed out
'with delight to each other, that many of these were
quite little ones, and they winked and laughed as
they thought what a good thing roast pig was for
-dinner.
Now we must just take a look at the family we
left sleeping so peacefully, and see what they are
'doing. Snout had been the last to lie down, and his
sleep was very much disturbed. Thoughts of the
potatoes kept coming into his mind, and just as he
had really got into a good sound sleep, down came a
little twig off a tree and hit him on the top of his
nose, and quite woke him up. This time he felt it really
was no good going to sleep any more it was so light,
so he sat up and looked about. Tusko was snoring
dreadfully, so was Grumphy, and his brother and







THE WILD PIGS.


sister were giving little grunts and kicks, but they
were asleep too.
S"Well," thought poor little Snout, "this is very
dull! I wonder if I could steal off to the river and
have a bath. I've a good mind to go," and so he
stood up on his legs. "Yes, I will go," and in
another minute he was trotting along through the
fern.
Snout had not gone more than a few yards before
he stopped. A noise different to anything he ever
remembered to have heard caught his ear. He turned
his head on one side and listened, then he put his
nose to the ground in the same way he had seen his
father do when he was thinking. Yes, there was
something going on down at the river, somebody
bathing in their pools. Then Snout remembered that
once or twice some strange pigs had come down there,
and that Tusko had had some fights with them and
driven them off. He listened very carefully. No !
those noises certainly were not made by pigs. How-
ever, it was no good standing there, so he thought he
would go a little nearer and see for himself, very
quietly and not showing himself, for Snout was a
sensible as well as a brave little pig. So he pushed
his way into the thick fern, and got upon a higher bit








THE WILD PIGS.


of the river bank, where the fern grew quite thick and
close to the edge, and when he got quite close he put
his nose out, and then a little further, and took a peep.
Sure enough there was something very odd going on
down below him. There was a hairy black animal
without any tusks rolling in their pools and then
shaking himself, and then-why, what could those
two funny-looking things be ?-with only two legs, he
thought at first, but when he peeped again and took
a good look at them he saw they had four legs, but
their front legs seemed very short, and they looked as
if they were quite comfortable standing in this ridicu-
lous manner. They were such comical looking
creatures that Snout was on the point of breaking
into a hearty laugh, when the sudden thought struck
him that these must be men, of whom he had heard
his father talk, and then in a second Snout followed
the train of thought out. Yes, men !-the animals who
didn't like pigs taking their potatoes, and his father
had been out all day, and no doubt he had been eating
these creatures' potatoes, and they were coming to look
for him. Before you could count three, Snout had
swung his little body round and was cantering through
the fern quicker than he had ever gone before. Even
as he went he fancied he could hear the noises








THE WILD PIGS.


coming nearer and nearer, but there was no time to
stay and listen, his one idea was to, get back and tell
Tusko and his mother, Never had he dared to take
such a liberty before as he did now, for he charged
at his sleeping father, poking him in the side as hard
as he could, and squeaking out, Men, father Men
coming!"
STusko was upon his legs in a second, and as he put
his nose down to the ground and listened,Snout could
see his eyes turn quite redand shine :like little fire-
balls. Old Grumphy had not spoken a word, but,
almost as quick as Tusko, had scuttled up, and giving
Chunk and Fusky a push in their sides, was already
making off through the fern with them, for in a
moment she had understood that Tusko was being
pursued. Snout stood by his father, watching him
with the greatest attention, and so the father and son
stood for a minute or more as silent as stuffed pigs.
Presently the bark of a dog was heard in the
distance: Tusko's eyes rolled and shone, and his tail
twisted itself into the shape of a corkscrew. Then he
gave a sidelong look at Snout, who, carefully follow-
ing all his father's movements, was also rolling his
bright little eyes, and trying to corkscrew his tail-
he could only, however, get one feeble twist in it.








THE WILD PIGS.


Old Tusko gave a funny sort of chump with his
mouth, half amusement, half pleasure, and said-
Good boy, you stop to see the fight; but run away,
you can do no good. Run after your mother." Then
he said in a terrible voice, full of passion, I shall stop
them from coming after you."
As he said these words he put up the stiff bristly
mane on his neck and shoulders, and seemed to swell
himself into twice his natural size, and Snout looked
at him with admiration and delight.
"Go! said Tusko again ; and Snout turned slowly
into the fern after Grumphy, leaving his father alone
and undaunted to meet the strange visitors.
















CHAPTER IV.


a HE old pig remained
in the same attitude
for a minute or
two, then he took
a careful look all
round him. "Yes,"
he thought, "this
is as good a spot
for a fight as I
could wish." There
was only the little path along which the family went
to and fro the river for the men to come by, and
Tusko knew the dog would come first. It would be
time enough to think what he should do with the
men when he had settled the dog. Perhaps the wisest
plan would be to join Grumphy. Again there
comes from the fern a sharp, eager bark; it is
34








THE WILD PIGS.


very much nearer now. Watch is only about twenty
yards off. Still, nothing could be seen on account of
the thickness of the bushes. Then another bark, and
you can see the movement of the fern and hear the
men's voices, and they said, Good dog! pull him
out! good Watch! Tusko guessed they were urging
him on, but he stood :as still as if he was being
photographed. Suddenly the fern bent aside, and a
big, black curly dog-our old friend Watch-stood
in front of him, and they recognized each other. Watch
saw his enemy who had spoiled the garden, eaten the
potatoes, insulted him from the top of the wall, and
got off free. Now was his time, and without waiting
a second he rushed at Tusko, trying to seize him by
the ear. As he made his rush the old pig turned like
magic, and the dog missed him, and before he could
recover himself Tusko had given him a tremendous
blow with his nose, sending Watch rolling over and
over; but he was up again in a moment, and made a
second dash at Tusko. As he did so the pig raised
his snout quickly in the air, and one of his bright white
tusks went deep into Watch's side., The dog rolled
over, gave a little struggle, and lay still. Tusko looked
at him, wondering if he was coming at him again, but
Watch didn't move, the tusk had gone into his heart








THE WILD PIGS.


-he was dead All perhaps would now have gone
well with Tusko, and he might have joined Grumphy
if it had not been for little Snout. You remember
he had been told to join his mother, but he did not
do so. He couldn't resist watching his, father, so after
taking a few steps in the fern he had turned and
come quietly back, and when he saw that Watch was
dead he burst out of his hiding-place, and, rushing
up to his father, began first to rub his nose against
Tusko's sides, and then, his little hind-quarters giving
vent all the time to loud grunts of admiration and
congratulation, Tusko could not help forgiving him
at once, and, indeed, he felt rather pleased that Snout
should have seen how he killed the dog! Alas, alas !
for the delay; the two men, who had been wondering
what could have happened, all being so quiet, were
crawling on their hands and knees along the little
track which poor Watch had come by, and Amos,
who was in front, was now able to see the whole
scene-the victorious Tusko, Snout, and the body of
Watch. Hardly daring to draw his breath, he
motioned to his brother who was following behind
not to stir, and silently drawing the old gun up to
his shoulder, he took a long aim at Tusko and fired-
bang! Snout, who had never heard a gun fired








THE WILD PIGS.


before, fell down with fear himself, but jumped up
again directly as he saw his father staggering and
swaying to and fro. Tusko could only just get out
the words, Run away quick-go before he fell
upon the ground; but little Snout would not leave him.
"What! run away and leave his father, who had
just killed the dog! Certainly not."
And Snout stepped out in front of him, and putting
himself into the attitude he had so admired in his
father, tried to swell himself out in the same way.
Oh," thought he, "if only my tusks were grown "
Come along," cried Amos, I've killed the old
one, and here's such a fat little chap; I think we may
catch him alive."
As he spoke he made a dash at Snout, who stood,
like his father, quite still, until the man's hand almost
touched his back; then, flinging up his little nose in
the air, he rushed between Amos's legs. It was lucky
that his tusks had not grown yet. As it was, however,
he managed to throw the man down on his face, and
when he struggled up again, very red in the face and
very angry, Snout had vanished into the bushes.
The man looked round, and called to his brother,
who was still struggling along through the bushes.
Come along, Jack, I've shot the old pig ; but he's








THE WILD PIGS.


killed poor Watch, and the little ones have all got off,
.and I'm afraid there's no chance of catching them now
we've lost our dog, it's no use trying to follow them;
they'd go a mile in the time we should go a hundred
yards."
Jack, as the other man was called, now emerged
from the thick of the scrub with his face as red as a
brick, and hair and beard covered with grass seeds
and briers and thorns, and the two men sat down on
the ground opposite to the bodies of Tusko and
Watch, and looked first at them and then at each
other with a doleful air. It was clear to both of them
that it was quite, useless to think of pursuing the
young pigs any more; they had the satisfaction,
certainly, of having killed old Tusko, but unfortu-
nately he was good for nothing; you couldn't cut
rashers out of his leathery old sides, and his hams
were as tough as india-rubber. You might have
made sausages out of him, but then the men had no
sausage-machine to mince him up, so there lay
Tusko, no good to any one.
After the men had sat resting after their long chase
an idea seemed to strike Amos, for he looked eagerly
round, and then began to speak in a whisper to Jack.
They both seemed very pleased at what they were

































I,, /'.
/14


/14


kr,~ .


" THEY DID THEIR BEST TO MAKE HIM LCOK AS IF HE WERE ASLEEP."


1 TV


'r


x- vr


n'
,,








-THE WILD PIGS. 41

talking about, and got up and went to Tusko's body
and turned it over and doubled his paws under him,
and laid down his head upon them, and, in fact, did
their best to make him look as if he were asleep.
Then they went to Watch, and Amos took him up in
his arms and went into the fern and laid him down
out of sight. Then the two men pushed themselves
into the fern and pulled down some branches and green
leaves, and completely hid themselves, leaving, how-
ever, a little place so that they could see Tusko's body.
They loaded their gun again, and both sat patiently
down,as if waiting for something. Can you guess what?
The dawn was beginning to break, but all was
very quiet. The birds, as they perched on trees near
Tusko, looked at him with surprise, wondering what
he was doing, for they all knew him. Presently an
old blackbird, who remembered that where Tusko
was, there was generally something to be found good
to eat, flew down from a neighboring tree and
hopped upon the little open bit of grass. He
looked round, but saw nothing eatable, then he
hopped up a little nearer to Tusko and took a look
at him, then a little nearer and gave a friendly chirp,
but all was still. Then the blackbird cocked his
head first on one side, then on the other, and tried to







THE WILD PIGS.


understand what it meant, but he couldn't, so he took
one more hop, and this brought him close to Tusko's
nose, and the blackbird listened, and there was no
sound of breathing. Then in a second off went the
blackbird, bustling through the trees and bushes, and
screaming out as loud as he could, Chuck, cheeck.
Oh, dear! oh, dear! oh, dear. Cheeck, chucky,
chook, cheek, cheek! What a terrible thing! Oh,
cheEck until his voice died away in the distance.
The blackbird had made so much noise that he woke
up a squirrel who lived in a high fir-tree not far off,
and the squirrel sat up and brushed his face with his
fore-paws, and took up an empty nutshell from his
nest and turned it two or three times over in his
mouth, and then threw it away. Then he jumped
out of his nest and sat upon a bough, and wondered
why the blackbird should have woke him up so early;
but he was an active little fellow, and the fresh
morning air was so sweet that he was glad he had
got up, so he ran along a bough and took a good
look; and oh, dear, what did he see down below?
Why, that old pig he knew so well by sight, lying
fast asleep all by himself!
"That's very odd thought the squirrel. Why,
what's become of his wife and family ? "








THE WILD PIGS.


Oh, this was very interesting. He was quite
obliged to that noisy blackbird for waking him up, so
back along the bough he went and on to another tree,
and then another, until he came to an oak which
stood close to the little green spot; then he took up
a good position, sat up on his tail, and again looked
at Tusko.
No, he couldn't make it out; and although he
wasn't at all fond of coming down on the ground just
for curiosity, he felt he must go a little nearer, so
down the great trunk of the tree he went, but he kept
as near the trees as he could, and then when he was
sufficiently near he saw that Tusko's sides didn't
move at all, and he knew he was dead. And the
squirrel was sorry, for he had children of his own;
but there was no time to lose, he must be off and tell
all his relations and friends as quickly as he could,
and as he raced up the tree again he couldn't help
feeling what a pleasure it would be to wake up the
different families he knew with such a piece of news as
this. The sun was now risen, and as its bright rays
fell through the trees, one ray fell on the back of a
snake coiled up on a bank of moss, and the snake
blinked in. the sun, and then slowly uncoiled himself
and slid off his bed and rustled across the turf until he







THE WILD PIGS.


came to where Tusko lay, then he raised his flat head,
and he twinkled his beady little eyes, and he put' out
his tongue several times, and then he rustled off into
the bushes again to tell all the other snakes he knew
the good news, for Tusko and his family had often'
galloped over them and trodden on them, and they
didn't eat the same things, or enjoy the same plea-
sures, and these were the only inhabitants of the
forest, I think, who were glad that Tusko was dead.
But last of all came a ring-dove, and she sat on the
same tree from which the squirrel had come, and she
also saw what had happened, and sang a song over
the old pig, and it was so melancholy and so soft and
sweet, that I am sure you would have been angry
with any one who could have frightened or hurt her,
for she also knew what trouble was, and she sang,
"Oh woe! oh woe! oh woe!" and when she had
finished her song in the tree she flapped mournfully
along to a very deep, dark part of the forest, and there
she perched and again sang her song, Oh woe! oh
woe !" and it was so full of grief that the trees
themselves rustled and shivered as they heard it,
until the sun, blazing out, warmed their leafy tops,
and the dove flitted away, while the trees forgot all
about sorrow and trouble under the influence of a
new day.
















CHAPTER V.


n /E must now turn and
S follow Grumphy and
the two children,
Fusky and Chunk,
and see what 'they
have been dbing.
They had all, on the
alarm being given
by Snout, moved off
at a good round pace, their mother leading the way,
and Snout coming last. They had not gone far
before he had stopped and gone back without
saying a word to any of the party, and you know
with what results. The others had trotted along
until they came to a little brook, into which
Grumphy stepped, followed by the two small ones
who were both delighted to splash along in the
shallow water; in fact they both looked upon it as
45








THE WILD PIGS.


a great piece of fun. If only their mother would stop
and not go on so fast, it would be delightful, for they
could see bunches of wild celery, and other tempting-
looking food by the sides of the brook; but Grumphy
didn't seem at all inclined to stop. She went trotting
along, flapping her ears, and occasionally grunting
out when either of the pigs seemed inclined to stop.
"Come along! come along! Keep up! keep
up !"
At last, just as Fusky and Chunk began to say
to themselves that they must stop, and could not
go running on in this way, Grumphy turned aside
out of the brook, and pushing her way through some
high grass, the pigs found themselves in an old sand-
pit. Numbers of sand-martins' nests or holes were
seen all round the edge of the pit, but the birds
seemed all asleep. Out of breath with the long run,
the old mother laid down on the sand without
speaking, and the young ones were glad enough to
come and lie down by her, and rest their heads on
her side. When she had recovered a little, Grumphy
looked up and noticed for the first time that Snout
was not with them, and asked, Where is Snout ? "
But the two little pigs had never given him a thought;
both said they thought he was following. Grumphy







THE WILD PIGS.


put her head down again on the sand, and meditated.
Then one ear flapped, and her eyes twinkled with
pleasure, for she recognized in Snout the courage of
his father, and guessed that he must have gone back
to see if he could help. Yes, decidedly Snout was
a good son She felt pleased with him, and she took
a look at Chunk and Fusky, who, having rested, were
beginning to rout in the sand, and think it was high
time for breakfast; but the sand was very un-
promising, and they would soon have wandered out
of the pit again if Grumphy hadn't told them that if
they left the place she would ask Tusko to snout
them well when he came back. This threat quieted
the two pigs, who both sat down immediately,
Fusky, who was always ready to complain, begin-
ning to cry. It was very clear old Grumphy's
thoughts were with her husband: she wondered what
could have taken place, and when he would .come
back to them, when far off in the distance she
thought she heard some noise. She got up, and
putting her nose down to the ground, stood listening
intently. Presently a blackbird went whistling by,
and as it went it seemed to say something, but it
went so fast that Grumphy couldn't make out what it
was. So she still stood there listening. Then far







THE WILD PIGS.


away in the brook she heard Snout's little feet
plashing, and her poor heart sank, for it was only
the running of one pig, and that a little one, for well
she knew the tread of Tusko's feet. The splashing
drew nearer, and the two small pigs even heard it,
and ventured to give a grunt or two, for they both
thought what a good hand Snout was at finding
things to eat. Ah! they should get some breakfast
now; besides this, they knew Snout was a favourite
with their mother; he would make things pleasant
again. Now they hear him leaving the stream, and
into the pit he trots But what a trotter! Is this
Snout ? Why, he looks so fierce and so big he
seems to have grown since last they saw him, and
he didn't look at all as if he was thinking of
breakfast: he merely came close to Grumphy and
whispered in her ear. She nodded her head very
sadly, and then turned to Fusky and Chunk, and
said to them-
Don't you move out of this pit until I come back.
Your brother and I will be back presently, and then
you shall come out to breakfast."
Before the two young pigs could ask any questions,
Snout had again turned out of the pit, followed by his
mother, and their footsteps could be heard for some








THE WILD PIGS. 49


time splashing away in the brook. Brave little
Snout, sorely tired as he was with his long run,
would have been glad to snatch some of the nice
tufts off the green herbs, or take a good roll in the
brook, but he resisted all these temptations, and kept
trotting steadily along in front of his mother, who
followed him with her long ears flapping, and her
poor old face quite puckered with grief. Snout, as
he trotted on, although he felt very sorry for his
father's death, could not help feeling that he was now
a very important person himself, and could not.
resist a feeling of pleasure at the idea that he was the
head of the family. Then he knew Grumphy trusted
him. Then he thought of his brother and sister, and
he made up his mind at once that he would act the
part of a father to them-yes, even to snouting them
well when they deserved it; and so the pair drew
nearer and nearer to the fatal spot, until they had left
the brook, when Grumphy gently pushed Snout on
one side and now took the lead herself: the little pig
was going to follow, but his mother turned to him
and shook her head, and nodded for him to lie down.
Snout saw she could not speak, but he understood
her signs, and in truth he was not at all sorry to lie
down, for he was beginning to feel terribly tired ; his







50 THE WILD PIGS.


legs ached, and he felt very hungry. Grumphy
pushed on alone, until she came to where the bushes,
were not so thick, and she saw she was coming to the
spot where she had parted with Tusko. Hei-e'the
poor old thing stopped and tried to peer through the
bushes, but they were still too thick for her to see, so
she took a few more steps and then stood still. In
front of her was Tusko, his long nose resting on his
fore paws, his attitude as if quietly sleeping, his hind
legs comfortably tucked under him as she had often
seen him lie after a good meal. Why, it couldn't be
true what Snout had told her, and she walked up to
him, and gently rubbed his back with her nose.
Alas alas! as she did so she felt it was only too
true, his body was cold. Yes, it was indeed so.
Tusko the boldest fighter in the forest was dead;
his body, which had only been propped up by the
men, now fell over on one side, and then Grumphy
saw the wound made by the bullet; and as she did so
all her strength seemed to go from her, and she sank
down on the ground with her head on Tusko's face,
upon which her tears fell fast, and Snout could hear
her sighs and groans of distress. Everything had
thus happened as the two men had hoped when they
hid themselves. Old Grumphy had come back for







THE WILD PIGS.


her husband, and would be an easy prey, and now all
they waited for was an opportunity to get a good
shot. It was clear that Grumphy would not run
away, and they both began to push out of the bushes
without caring if they made a noise or not. As they
did so -she raised her head and looked at them, and
then got up upon her legs. As she did so it gave the
opportunity they wanted, and Amos, firing, Grumphy
fell without a sound by the side of her old Tusko.
The report startled Snout, who had almost fallen
asleep, but in a moment he was up and on the alert,
and making up his mind he would see what had
taken place, he cautiously looked through the bushes
and saw just in front of him those two horrid
creatures he had seen by the river side. They were
kneeling down and examining the body of his
mother, and a pang of sorrow and fear went
through him to see that she now was also killed.
Yes, they both seemed very pleased, and were
laughing; indeed they found Grumphy was so fat,
and wild pig fat is so nice, that they were recovering
their spirits again. Snout, crouching down, could not
take his eyes off their movements, and he saw them
dig a hole in the ground, and then one of the men
came out of the bush carrying Watch in his arms,







THE WILD PIGS.


and Snout felt a thrill of pleasure as he thought how
his father had killed one of the party, and the dog
was put in the hole, and they covered him up. Then
one of them took a rope out of his pocket and tied
it round Grumphy's legs, and, putting it over his
shoulder, he dragged her along until Snout could
not see him any more. Presently the other man
followed him, and Snout could hear them for a long
time talking and laughing; then they seemed to go
further away, and he could not hear them any
longer. Very gradually and fearfully he sneaked out
of his hiding-place, and ventured out upon the turf,
but they were really gone. There still lay his father,
but he looked so terrible with his tusks in the air, and
the hole in his side, that Snout could not bear to look
at him, and quickly turned again into the wood.
Snout now, indeed, felt that he was in a most re-
sponsible position: he was very sorry-yes, he was very
sorry indeed for his mother and his father, but in
reality his sorrow was lost in the thought of his own
independence. He could actually now do whatever
he liked, he was responsible to nobody, and he could
go where he liked, eat and drink just whatever he
could find, sleep where he liked-in fact he was a free
pig. It was a great thought, but then there came to







THE WILD PIGS.


him the remembrance of Chunk and Fusky, and this
recollection made him give a long sigh, for he felt sure
they would be a terrible trouble and worry to him;
but then he was the biggest and the strongest, and
they were young and foolish, and it was his duty to
look after them ; that's what he felt, and so the good
little pig made up his mind that he would go back
and take care of those two little ones until they were
old enough to provide for themselves. He was soon
back in the little brook, and very thankful to lie down
and let the cool water bubble over his back and
round his neck as he rested. He soon felt refreshed,
and when he came to a good bunch of celery, and
had eaten it, all up, roots as well as stalks and leaves,
he felt quite himself again, and able to undertake his
duties. So he plashed and he plodded, and he
splashed and he splodded, thinking that the first
thing he would do should be to take his brother
and sister out to rout for breakfast, and then if they
found anything particularly good, he would tell them
all about their father and mother. Then he thought
to himself that the sand-pit would be a capital place
to live in, shady in summer and warm in winter, and
close to the brook for bathing in; and so, as he turned
over his plans, he came to the place where was the








THE WILD PIGS.


turning to the sand-pit, and he stopped a moment
thinking he should very likely be able to hear what
Chunk-and Fusky were talking about, but all was quiet.
"They must have gone to sleep!" thought Snout;
and he entered the sand-pit very quietly and looked
round ; but one look was enough to show him that it
was.empty; there was no place to hide in, no hole into
which they could have crept, the banks were too
steep for them to climb up; they must have wilfully
gone out of the pit in which they had been told to
stay by Grumphy herself. Snout sat down on the
sand and felt exceedingly angry. Disobedience was
a thing he certainly was not going to stand; he had
come home like a good pig to do his duty, and take
care of these two children, and this was the beginning.
Well, it was no good sitting there, they must be
found, and once more Snout got up and left the pit,
saying to himself, These two pigs must be punished
-yes, severely punished!" and the thought that he
must be the person to punish the two truants made
up a little for his disappointment in finding the sand-
pit empty..

















CHAPTER VI.



-NOUT, as he went
,: through the long
..-I .grass that grew
S, .' outsidee the pit,
looked on the right
:-- and left hand to
"- ee if he could dis-
--- -over any traces,
but it was evident
-~ _.-~- that the two wan-
derers had gone out
the same way he had come in, and that they must
have gone down stream, or he would have seen or
heard something of them as he came back. So he
slowly followed the course of the stream until it grew
much wider, with flat reaches of sand on each side,
and in a few seconds Snout saw their footmarks,
55







THE WILD PIGS.


leaving the stream and again going into the wood.
The tracks led him to a part of the forest that he felt
certain must be very dangerous for wild pigs, for he
soon had to cross a road with marks of carts, and the
hoof-marks and tracks of many animals showed him
that if they wished to keep quiet and not be worried
and hunted, they must go to a wilder part of the
wood. The last few hours had made Snout very
cautious, and every step he took he felt he was
running into danger, and he feared that he might
again hear the horrid noise which he had heard when
both his father and mother had been killed. The
two small pigs had crossed this road, and gone to
a part of the wood that had beautiful large trees
dotted about, but no nice thick underwood to hide a
,pig in, and several tracks ran in different directions.
Down one of these they had gone. In a few minutes
more Snout could see by the marks that his brother
and sister had not long gone before him, and then he
heard their voices. He very cautiously approached
them, and found them only a little way from the
path, routing under a very fine old oak tree. It was
a magnificent tree, and under it lay quantities of
*acorns, of'which Chunk and Fusky were eating most
heartily. Snout longed to trot up to them and join








THE WILD PIGS.


in their meal, but he felt that wouldn't do at present;
so he dodged about until he was hidden by the trunk
of the tree, and then he came quietly up and stood
just the other side of it, where he could hear every
word they said.


"Ain't they good ?" was the first thing he heard
Chunk say.
Quite delicious," answered Fusky, in an affected
but thick voice ; "but don't you think we'd better go
back now ? "







THE WILD PIGS.


"Go back!" snorted out Chunk, in disgust.
" Certainly not! Eat away, eat away!"
"What do you think could have been the matter
when Snout came and took away mother ?" asked
Fusky.
"I don't know," replied Chunk. "Eat away! And
what's more, I don't care. Eat away-I never saw
such fine acorns as these."
Delicious," said his sister ; but as she spoke she
was obliged to sit down-in fact, she had never had
an opportunity of so perfectly gorging herself,- and
she was now beginning to feel terribly tight in the
skin, and quite faint.
Chunk, however, had not had enough yet, and
Snout had just made up his mind he would come
out upon them, when his brother began again to talk
during intervals of eating.
I'm very glad Snout isn't here," said this greedy
pig; "he eats so quick, and he always takes the best
of everything-in fact, he's a great deal too cocky."
This was too much for Snout, who burst out upon
the astonished pair, and, knocking Chunk down,
rolled him up against the oak tree before the
wretched -little pig could say a word or empty his
mouth, which was full of half-chewed acorns.








THE WILD PIGS.


I'm too cocky, am I?" said Snout. "Ugh !"-
and with every sentence he gave Chunk as good a
push as he possibly could. "I take the best of
everything, do I-ugh! I eat so fast, do I-ugh!
You came out of the pit without leave, did you-ugh!
You don't care about your father or your mother,
don't you-ugh ugh! ugh! "
Snout finished up his questions with three tre-
mendous digs-indeed, he felt pleased with himself,
and that he had conducted this first snouting in a
way that was worthy of a son of Tusko. Fusky had
looked on with a most woebegone air while Snout
was giving this punishment, and as he now came up
to her he saw that the tears were running down her
face; but he was determined that he would begin his
duties properly; so he rolled her over to the tree,
saying-
"You know, Fusky, you must be punished for
disobedience, but I shall not give you as-much as I
did Chunk, for I have no doubt he led you into this
mischief."
As he spoke he gave his sister one good snout and
two little ones, and then quietly walked up to the
acorns and began to thoroughly enjoy himself. As
for the two little pigs, you cannot imagine a more







THE WILD PIGS.


foolish or miserable picture than they presented.
Chunk covered with dust, his mouth still full of
acorns, panting and grunting; Fusky sobbing, and,
whenever Snout's eye caught hers, giving quite an
hysterical scream. For two or three minutes Snout
enjoyed his meal, but he very soon remembered that
they were all running into great dangers, and that
at any moment they might be surprised by dogs or
other animals ; so, selecting a few more of the finest
acorns, he turned to the other two, and said, in a
cheerful voice-
Now, come along with me; you've both done
very wrongly, and you've been punished, and now I
forgive you; but I've got some sad news to tell you.
However, we mustn't stop here, for at any moment
we might all be killed or eaten by dogs; so follow me
at once."
Both the small pigs had got up on all four legs
when they heard of such dangers, and followed Snout,
who, as quickly as he could, retraced his steps, feeling
very glad when they had all once more stepped into
the brook; in a short time afterwards they had
all safely reached the old sand-pit. Snout settled
himself comfortably against the bank; the others
laid down; and after all had recovered their breath-







THE WILD PIGS. 61


for Snout had come along very fast-he said, sitting
up with his hind legs under him, but his fore feet
firmly stuck in the sand-
Listen to me."
Fusky sat up in a respectful attitude, but Chunk
remained lying down, now and then opening one
eye.
Listen to me," repeated Snout. "You have lost
your father and mother. We shall never see them
again."
At this unexpected news Fusky began to cry
again, but Chunk felt a thrill of pleasure: he was
sorry to lose Grumphy, but his sorrow was more than
repaid by the thought that Tusko was not coming
back again.
"That is enough for you to know," continued
Snout; "so for the present you must look to me
as your father and mother. I shall tell you what
to do, help you to look for food, take you to bathe
and to rout, play with you, and try to make you
happy, but," and Snout's voice got very stern, "I
must be obeyed."
As he said this Chunk gave a snort-it sounded
very like a snort of contempt-and Snout stood up
and looked at him. Chunk, finding his brother had








THE WILD PIGS.


assumed a threatening attitude, tried to turn, his
snort into a cough, and mumbled something about
an acorn sticking in his throat. There was an awk-
ward silence for a few moments, when Snout took
up his position again, and went on-
Yes, obeyed-that is to say, until the hot weather
comes back again, when no doubt you will both be
able to take care of yourselves; but, until then,
remember I will be obeyed."
Yes, Snout dear," said Fusky, in a tearful voice,
of course we shall do whatever you tell us; and I'm
sure we shall try and be obedient."
"Very good-very good indeed," replied Snout,
and he looked at Chunk to see if he had anything to
say; but that bad little pig had shut his eyes, put his
nose down on the sand, and was pretending not to
know that his brother was looking at him. Well,
Chunk, have you got nothing to say ?"
"Nothing at all, thank you," said Chunk.
"Did you hear what I said? "
Oh, yes, I heard it."
This was rather puzzling, and Snout didn't quite
see how to meet the difficulty, for he wanted Chunk
to say something like Fusky had, but it was very
clear that he had not the slightest intention of saying







THE WILD PIGS.


anything at all; so, after another pause, Snout could
only say, in a very angry voice-
"Then mind you attend "
Again did Chunk make that very disagreeable little
snort, and again mutter something about acorns."
Snout sat down; he felt his speech had not been
quite successful, and that he should evidently have
some trouble with Chunk. "Would it be well," he
thought, "to give him another snouting before they
went to bed, and tell him that he had only given him
half in the wood?" No; there were two or three
things against that. There was no tree near; it
would look spiteful; and, lastly, his own nose was
rather sore and tender; so he gave up that idea.
It certainly had been a wonderful day of excite-
ment and adventures. The sun was now setting, and
the evening air felt chilly. Snout roused himself
from his gloomy thoughts, and told his young charges
that none of them would leave the pit any more that
night, but that they must make themselves as com-
fortable as they could in the sand, and that on the
next day they would go out and get some bedding,
but that for the present a little scooping away of the
sand in the side of the pit would make them a good
shelter. So he set them the example, and in a very







THE WILD PIGS.


little time they had dug themselves out quite a nice
little bedroom. Now, as they dug, Snout thought to
himself of the way Tusko used to come trampling
over them and snug himself into their places, and
he said to himself, I will lie furthest in, Fusky shall
come next me, and we will make Chunk be on the
outside and keep us both warm; it will serve him
right."
Now it so happened that Chunk had been scratch-
ing away, and was working further and further into
the bank; and when Snout called out, That'll do;
you can both come out," Fusky obediently came out,
but no Chunk. Snout went to the mouth of the
little cave they had dug. and looked in. There was
Chunk already in the very place he had meant for
himself, lying most comfortably, and. apparently fast
asleep. Now, then," said Snout, in a firm but polite
voice, please to come out and let us arrange about
how we shall go to bed." But Chunk gave no sign,
neither did he move. "Chunk! called out Snout,
"Chunk i"
Snout saw it was no use calling to him; so he
crawled into the bedroom and tried to stir Chunk
up with his nose; but everything seemed against
him. The roof was so low that he knocked his head








'THE WILD PIGS.


and brought down sand in his eyes. His nose, too,
was. quite stiff and sore. It really was quite impos-
sible to get at Chunk in any way. Well, he couldn't
and wouldn't lie next to a pig who was behaving in
this manner; so he came out and told Fusky to go
in next; and after she had gone, poor Snout had,
after all, to take the place outside, and feel that
Chunk was in the place of honour. The worst of all
was that, after he settled himself comfortably, there
came from the back of the little cave that horrid
snort of Chunk's again-this time with no apology
about acorns, but quite loud and defiant, and repeated
two or three times, and it irritated Snout dreadfully,
but he knew he was powerless for that night anyhow.
"But things should be better arranged," he said to
himself the next day. This state of rebellion and
snorting should not go on." The sun had sunk now;
Chunk had really gone off to sleep; Fusky was
dreaming; and Snout himself, worn out with the
excitements of the day, at last tumbled off into a
sound snoozle.















CHAPTER VII.


-- DARESAY some of
you children have often
I gone to bed feeling
f. rather cross and dis-
1 l : appointed, and next
morning when you
woke up found all
-. those feelings had
li gone, and then you
i wondered at your-
selves for being so
1. foolish. That was
just the case with
Snout when he woke up next morning, for his mind
was full of plans for the day, and all spiteful feelings
about Chunk had quite gone. He had slept very
comfortably in spite of his being on the outside, and
felt much fresher than Chunk, who came out looking








THE WILD PIGS.


very hot and fusty. It certainly was a delightful
feeling that they could go out and do just what they
liked, and the spirits of the three pigs rose high.
Snout began to chase Fusky round and round the
sand-pit, and Chunk soon joined them. I wish you
could have seen the three pigs, and their funny antics
-curling their little tails, squeaking, dodging each
other, turning over in the sand, and falling all in a
heap together. It was just the sort of game that
children sometimes play when they wake early, and
run into each other's bedrooms; but, mind you, I
don't say that it's a good thing for children to do,
although a great deal depends where their rooms are
-if they are over their father and mother's, or near
enough to wake them up-why then I say it's a very
bad thing to do, and in such cases the only plan is,
for the father to pop on his dressing-gown, take an
old slipper in his hand, and steal upstairs quietly,
and-; but I'll leave you to guess what then.
The game of romps put all the pigs in a good
humour, and freshened up their appetites. Snout
proposed they should go down to the brook and
bathe, and rout along the banks for breakfast, keeping
well in the thick part of the forest, and not going
where there were tracks of any other animals.








THE WILD PIGS.


"Remember," said Snout, "that as long as you
keep in the forest you will be safe; but if you go
where there are roads, or where other animals are,
you will be in danger."
Neither of the two smaller .pigs felt inclined to
contradict Snout just then, although the minds of
both were full of the idea, that directly they could
get away from Snout they would be off to those
delicious acorns again; so they wallowed in the
water and hunted along the banks, while Snout
thought to himself that he would try and carry out
his father and mother's idea of laying up some stores
for the winter. In the afternoon they left the bank
and wandered about in the forest, and found under
the oak trees quantities of acorns, not nearly so large
or good as Chunk and Fusky had been found eating,
but still good enough for any pig. Snout proposed
they should dig some holes and fill them with some
of these acorns, and explained to his brother and
sister about the need of having something to eat
during the cold weather that would soon be coming
on ; and as neither of the small ones made any objec-
tion, they all went to work, and dug a good big hole;
into this they pushed the acorns with their noses, and
when they had quite filled it, covered it over with








THE WILD PIGS.


earth again, stamping it down quite tight. Snout
knew that this would only go a very little way, but
he did not want to make the young pigs work too
hard the first day, so he said all should rest now, and
then get home to the sand-pit before it was dark.
And so they all laid down in the fern, and Snout, as
he shut his eyes, thought it would really be impossible
for him to keep an eye continually upon his brother
and sister,.but that he must trust to their behaving
tolerably well; and so he shut one eye, and then both,
then opened them again, and looked round, and saw
both Chunk and Fusky apparently sleeping comfort-
ably side by side. And very soon after that, Snout's
snores could be heard for some way off.
Very soon after Snout had begun to show these
certain signs of being fast asleep Chunk raised his
head and looked at Fusky, then at Snout, and then he
quietly stood up upon his feet, and Fusky followed
his example. Alas! Snout slept as sound as a top,
and Chunk, leading the way, in a few seconds they
both found themselves in the brook ; the running water
quite deadened any sound of their footsteps or voices,
and Chunk, looking round, said to his sister-
I don't know what you mean to do; but I can
tell you I'm not going back again."






72 THE WILD PIGS.


Oh, Chunk was all Fusky ventured to say.
".No, indeed," continued Chunk. "I'll let Snout
have all his nasty little acorns to himself, poor little
dry things; you know the place, Fusky, where they
are just as big as three of these little things we have
been burying to-day. So come along with me."
Fusky, however, was too much alarmed at this
entire breaking away from Snout's control; she
would have liked to have gone for a little while and
then stolen back again; or very likely she would
have gone with Chunk if he had waited two or three
days. So she stood still, and shook her head; but
Chunk had quite made up his mind.
"All right," said he. You stay and bury acorns,
and get well snouted every day ; it'll serve you right."
So saying, he set off at a good round trot down the
stream, and was soon lost to sight, whilst Fusky stood
for some time staring after him, but afraid to follow
him. However, she thought she would have a little
walk now by herself, so she snuffed along by the side
of the bank, going very slowly, and looking for
Chunk's footsteps ; so she tracked him until they
showed her the place where he left the broad part of
the brook's bed and crossed into the more cultivated
part of the forest. Here she stopped, and drew a long







THE WILD PIGS.


sigh. Should she go any further and join him, just
for a few minutes ? Then she'took a long look at the
wood, and fancied she could see the big oak tree.
After all, it would be very easy to go to-morrow, and
this evening she thought she would go back to Snout;
and so she turned round, and in another moment


would have set off, when she heard the grunt of a pig
quite close to her. Oh, dear! She started and.
trembled with fear. Had Snout woke up and come
after, them, or was it Chunk hiding and trying to
startle her ? She crouched down close to the bank
and listened. Yes, there it was again, a comfortable,


ylP







THE WILD PIGS.


rich snort ; it was not an angry snort, but a pleasant
,sort of snort, and she ventured to put her head up and
look out, and then she saw that, coming straight
towards her was a very fat little pig, about as old as
Snout, but muchfatter, and, most wonderful of all,
quite white. She could see its pink skin under its
silky white hairs ; it had no bristles on its back, only
beautiful rolls of fat, and as it put its nose up in the
air and gave a sniff, she saw something glittering in
the sun. Never had Fusky seen such a beautiful pig
as this. It must be a prince !" she thought. Then this
stranger gave another snort, and Fusky thought what
a beautiful voice he had-there was nothing hard or
squeaky about its snort, but it was mild and soft; it
snorted like a pig who had been fed on batter-pudding
or oatmeal porridge; and all this time the beautiful
pig was coming direct to the place where Fusky lay;
and presently the white pig stood just over Fusky
and looked down, and Fusky looked up and met the
gaze of this noble animal, and remained fascinated:
The little white pig looked at her for a long time, as
if he wondered why a little rough black pig' should be
crouching down in the brook; and at last he said, in
the softest voice-
"Where do you come from ?"








THE WILD PIGS.


Fusky thought, as she answered him, how'rough
and ugly her voice sounded. "I live in the
woods."
This seemed to puzzle the white pig, for he said,
"Where's your sty?"
Now Fusky didn't know what a sty was, but she
didn't want to show her ignorance, so she put on a
very bashful air, and said, I mustn't tell you."
"Why? said the white pig.
Fusky thought for some time before she could get
a good answer to this; but at last she replied,
"Because my brother wouldn't like it."
This answer seemed to satisfy the pig, who, looking
over the bank, said, "Why don't you come out of
that and rout in the woods ?"
Will you take care of me if I do ?" said the timid
Fusky, quite forgetting Snout and Chunk.
"Yes, yes," said the pig. "But don't lose time, I
must be going home directly."
So Fusky scrambled out of the brook and stood by
the side of her new friend ; and the pig looked at her
from head to foot with great curiosity, and, well-
mannered pig as he was, he could not resist giving
one or two grunts of astonishment, and then he said-
Where's your ring?"







THE WILD PIGS.


This question again puzzled Fusky, who had no
idea what a ring meant; but as she had been so suc-
cessful before in answering the questions, she said,
I've not got one."
Oof! said the white pig. Look at mine." And
holding its head up in the air, she saw a beautiful
shining thing in his nose. Oh, oh, so this was a ring,
was it! Well, she was learning by degrees. So Fusky
put on her most fascinating look, and she said, Oh,
it's very beautiful!" Then she tried to smile at the
pig, and evidently succeeded, for he said-
"What a beautiful smile you've got!"
No one can tell Fusky's delight at these words;
tears almost fell from her eyes with gratitude, and she
felt so delighted that there should be something the
white pig could admire in her. So she ventured to
gently rub her nose against his soft, plump sides, and
he wasn't a bit offended; on the contrary, he said-
"Scratch my back."
And Fusky would have rubbed his back all night
if he had wished, so she set to work with a good will,
while the pig stretched his legs out and stood still,
enjoying himself, with his eyes half shut. When she
stopped to take breath he opened his eyes, and
said-








THE WILD PIGS.


You scratch very well."
Another compliment was almost too much for
Fusky, and she was going to redouble her efforts,
when a low, booming noise came sounding through
the woods, and the white pig, directly he heard it,
said, in a very matter-of-fact way-
"Oh, there's the horn, I must be off now." And





"- r.,"









he began to walk away from Fusky towards the more
open part of the forest, to which Chunk and Fusky
had been together. But Fusky could not bear to be
thus left, without a word of good-bye ; and she trotted
after the pig, and said, in an imploring voice-
Shall I never see you again ? "
"Oh, yes," answered the white one; "I always








THE WILD PIGS.


come with the others every day as long as it's fine;
but of course we go back to our sties at night."
Fusky was too anxious and excited now to ask for
any explanation about sties," but she ventured to
say, in as tender a voice as she could-
Won't you tell me your name? Mine is Fusky."
"Fusky!" said the white pig. "Fusky [" And he
gave a little snort of astonishment. Dear me, what
an odd name! Mine is'Small White the Third.
Now good-bye, I mustn't stop."
And he started at quite a good pace, whilst Fusky
stood looking after him and wondering if he would
look back at her. To her great delight, just before he
entered the wood, he did turn and give her a nod,
which she acknowledged with a rapturous flourish of
her snout in the air ; and then this beautiful vision
was lost sight of. Oh, what a wonderful day it had
been This was something like life. Snout and Chunk,
indeed, poor creatures that they were, she felt
ashamed to have such brothers when she thought of
Small White the Third. It was very clear to her that
she must disown her family as soon as possible,
and wear a ring in her nose, and go home at
sunset to a sty, whatever that might be, and, she
thought, change her name, for it was evident Small








THE WILD PIGS.


White the Third didn't like the name of Fusky. Yes,
she would ask him to-morrow what he thought was a
pretty name for a young pigling of good birth like
herself. Full of thoughts like this she slowly went
back to the sand-pit, and just as she was leaving the


brook, the sun shone upon a bright little pool, and
Fusky could see herself reflected in it as she stood
upon the bank. Oh, it was very sad, she thought,
how ugly she was-her back was so arched and sharp,
not smooth and broad like the white pigs; her legs


0,








THE WILD PIGS.


were so long, and her snout such an immense thing-
when she thought of Small White's thick-set little
nose, which was quite sunk down in the middle of
two fat cheeks. Yes, it was all true; but then there
was this comfort-he had said she had a beautiful
smile; and as she thought of that she curled up one
side of her mouth, and looked in the water, then the
other side, then' wrinkled up her nose, and showed her
teeth. No, it was the smile upon the left side he had
praised; and she stood for some time practising this
smile, and looking at her reflection in the water.
She was so much taken up with herself that she did
not hear or see Snout, who had not long woke up,
and .was also going back to the pit, when he had
caught sight of Fusky from the other side of the
brook, and had "stood wondering what she could be
doing. Presently he called out in his firm, sharp
voice-
What are you making those hideous faces for,
Fusky?"
Hideous faces, indeed !" thought Fusky. "This
just shows what a low pig he is." Snout could not have
said anything more likely to irritate Fusky than this,
so she turned sulkily from the water, and trying to
imitate Small White the Third's sedate walk, she led







THE WILD PIGS.


the way through the grass to the pit, followed by
Snout, who stared at her with his little twinkling
eyes, and wondered what had come to his sister.
Now then," said he, when they got into their new
home, "where's Chunk ?"
"I don't know," answered Fusky, in an injured
voice. "I know nothing about him; he went away
and left me."
"All right," said Snout, very coolly, "then he may
stop away; I'm not going, to look after you pigs all my
life; I've tried to do my best for you, so I now give
it up; only you tell him, if you see him, that he
mustn't think he's going to get any of the winter
store I'm laying up, and that if I catch him routing
about I'll give him the most awful snouting! Yes,
my tusks will soon be growing, I can feel them now;
I'll show him."
This language struck Fusky as dreadful. Snout-
ing," indeed! what vulgarity! Fancy Small White
the Third using such a word; and Fusky felt that
really this must be the last night she would put up
with such rudeness.
Snout, as soon as he had finished speaking,
had gone into the little cave and laid down. Fusky
made herself as comfortable as' she could, and shut-
7








82 THE WILD PIGS.


ting her eyes, began to think of a ring in her nose;
a sty, what could that be ? the horn she had heard,
and all the things Small White the Third had said
to her, and then of what she would say to him next
time she met him : and very soon the two pigs were
comfortably asleep.















CHAPTER VIII.


WHEN Fusky woke up in the morning her
first thoughts were naturally of yesterday's
adventures, and she wondered what could have
become of Chunk. She fancied that after all he
might have stolen back to them late at night, but
there were no signs of him. Then she felt very glad
that she had slept outside, for Snout was still fast
asleep; and quietly getting up upon her legs, she
saw it would be very easy to steal away at once
without Snout's knowing anything about it. Fusky
since yesterday had certainly grown very much
bolder. She could hardly believe herself that she
was the same pig, as she coolly trotted out of the
pit and took her way down the stream. It was a
lovely morning; the sun sparkled on the water; the
trees bent backwards and forwards, and rustled with
the morning breeze; a water-rat popped out of his
hole and looked at her as she ran along the brook-
83








THE WILD PIGS.


side, sometimes in the water when it was shallow,
and then out on the bank when the water got
deeper. She felt as if something would certainly
happen of great importance to her to-day, and she
hurried along as if there was not a moment to
spare, until she came to the level place where the
stream was so broad, and she could see the very
tracks that Small White the Third had left. It
was no use waiting or thinking now. She had made
up her mind, and come what might she would follow
him. So she followed his footmarks, and very soon
found herself under the very tree against which
Chunk had had such a snouting; but all was very
quiet-there was not a sound to be heard. Fusky
felt puzzled. What should she do next? Should she
go further on and try and track out the footsteps of
Small White, or should she stop where she was and
trust to his coming back? Yes, she thought this
last plan was the best, so she looked round for a
comfortable spot to rest in, and then she noticed
that the ground was trampled in all directions with
the marks of very many pigs' feet. There must have
been quantities of them. Fusky felt rather frightened
at this : she picked up a few acorns, but her heart
beat so fast that she had not much appetite. It wa's








THE WILD PIGS.


certain that she had made a very bold stroke, and
she thought for a moment that after all life with
Snout would not be so very bad-should she go
back again? No; she must stop and see Small
White once more. Fusky soon found a hiding-place.
Close to her was an old oak tree with only two or
three branches left alive; all the rest of the tree
seemed dead; and on one side of the tree there
hung a mass of ivy and creepers. Pushing her snout
through these, Fusky saw they had grown over a
great crack in the side of the tree, and that the
inside was quite hollow. Squeezing herself carefully
behind the ivy so as not to pull it down, Fusky
stepped into a delicious little hiding-place. You
could see daylight high up, and the bottom of the
tree was quite deep in soft powdery old wood. The
little pig raked up some of this in a nice pillow, laid
herself down, and determined to take forty winks.
She could not have been very long asleep when she
woke up with a start. What was all this trampling
and snorting and grunting all round her ? She stole
to the crack in the tree and peeped through the ivy.
Why, the wood seemed quite alive with pigs-black,
white, pink, brown, and red pigs, large pigs, little
pigs, moderate sized pigs what a collection!








THE WILD PIGS.


Eagerly did she look amongst them for the shapely
form of Small White the Third, and very soon
discovered him at some little distance off, ac-
companied by two older and larger pigs, but all
with a strong family likeness, for all had the same
short legs, wide backs, square quarters, and snouts
more like penny pieces than anything else, sunk
between noble puffed-out cheeks. Fusky looked at
them with reverence. No doubt they were the father
and mother of Small White. She wondered if they
would be kind to her if she ventured out. The other
pigs all seemed so intent upon grubbing and routing
that Fusky thought that if she could steal quietly
out she might, with a little hiding and dodging, get
up close to the Small White family without the rest
of the herd observing her. So she pushed herself
quietly out of the tree, and stood for a moment or
two concealed by the hanging ivy. Poor Fusky she
little knew of the conversation that had taken place
that very morning between Small White the Third.
and his father and mother. He had told them of
his meeting with Fusky, and that though very
ugly, she was a splendid scratcher; but old Small
White had been very angry, and had told his son
that if he ever spoke to Fusky again he should be







THE WILD PIGS.


most severely punished, and made to sleep without
any straw for a week, besides being kept from
the trough all one meal, and other punishments;
and Small White the Third, who was dreadfully
greedy, had promised that nothing should make
him take any more notice of Fusky. She, poor
little pig, knew nothing of all this, and she had
now managed, by creeping along and getting behind
trees and bushes, to get close up to the spot where
the Small Whites were feeding, and when she got
quite near she put on the smile that had been so
much admired, and, popping out from behind a little
bush, she called in a squeaky but bashful voice-
Small White the Third "
The three Small Whites all raised their stumpy
noses and stared at her, and I am ashamed to say
that Small White the Third looked at her as if he
had never seen her before. Poor Fusky, fixing her
eyes upon him, redoubled her smile, and said, in the
most trembling voice-
Oh, don't you remember me?"
On this Small White the Third put his nose down
to the ground and began to look about on the ground,
for he felt he aren't speak, but waited for his father
or mother to help him out of his difficulties. And







THE WILD PIGS.


old Small White looked at his wife, as he always
did when he was bothered, and she looked .at Fusky
from the very tip of her snout unto the last hair on
her tail, and then she said, in a voice that was most
wheezy and gasping-
"Go away, you bold thing! How dare you come
and speak like this to Small White the Third!
Don't you know we're prize pigs? What im-
pudence, to be sure. Go back to the woods, you-
you--,"
Mrs. Small White stopped and took another good
look at the wretched Fusky, and then went on, with
a little sort of sneeze between each word-
You long-legged hunch-backed hairy! disgust-
ing wild pig "
SNo sooner had she finished than Mr. Small White
went on-
"Yes, go back; and let me tell you that the
sooner you go the better. Perhaps you don't know
that a pig very like you-I should think it must be
a brother of yours-was caught yesterday when he
was eating our acorns, and taken home with us to
a sty; and I expect, from the noise I heard this
morning" and Mr. Small White stopped and
laughed in a most spiteful manner to himself-" he's







THE WILD PIGS.


had a fine big ring put in his nose, so you'd better be
off at once."
As Mr, Small White spoke Fusky thought for the
first time that day of Chunk, and she felt sorry for
him, as she said in a subdued voice-
Oh, please don't be angry with me; but do tell
me, was his name Chunk?"
At the mention of this name, which sounded very
strange in the ears of these pigs, they all began to
laugh, and repeated, "Chunk! Chunk! Chunk !" in
accents of great contempt, and as Fusky looked from
one to the other of them, Mrs. Small White
answered-
"I really don't know what the animal's name was.
I should think it was very likely Chunk ; he looked
like a Chunk." At this joke all the family laughed
again. But," she went on, "whatever his name
was, there can be no doubt he is a relation of yours;
he has all the family beauty ; in fact, except yourself
I never saw such an ugly, long-snouted beast before."
Poor Fusky felt as if she should certainly burst
into tears in another minute, but she had courage
enough to bear these cruel insults and say-
"Will you tell me where he is?"
Mrs. Small White gave a most expressive grunt




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs