• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 List of Illustrations
 The city in war-time
 A dark enigma
 Give us a victory
 The newsboys
 The confederate spy
 The meaning of the flag
 Dodging an army
 Reporting to General Lee
 The first gun of the battle
 The battle-field
 The torn ten-dollar bill
 The draft rising in New York
 The battle of New York
 The red flag
 Fort Redding
 The great day that came
 Advertising
 Back Cover
 Spine














Group Title: The battle of New York : a story for all young people
Title: The battle of New York
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00081646/00001
 Material Information
Title: The battle of New York a story for all young people
Physical Description: 248, 4 p., 12 leaves of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 20 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Stoddard, William Osborn, 1835-1925
D. Appleton and Company ( Publisher )
Appleton Press ( Printer )
Publisher: D. Appleton and Company
Place of Publication: New York
Manufacturer: Appleton Press
Publication Date: 1892
 Subjects
Subject: Youth -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Soldiers -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Spies -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Slavery -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Draft Riot, New York, N.Y., 1863 -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
History -- Juvenile fiction -- United States -- Civil War, 1861-1865   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1892   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1892
Genre: Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by William O. Stoddard.
General Note: Frontispiece printed in colors.
General Note: Publisher's advertisements follow text.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00081646
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002237885
notis - ALH8378
oclc - 04046299
lccn - 09003417

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Title Page 1
        Title Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Table of Contents
    List of Illustrations
        List of Illustrations
    The city in war-time
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 4a
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 12a
        Page 13
        Page 14
    A dark enigma
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 20a
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Give us a victory
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 36a
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
    The newsboys
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 52a
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
    The confederate spy
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
    The meaning of the flag
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 86a
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
    Dodging an army
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
    Reporting to General Lee
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 112a
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 116a
    The first gun of the battle
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
    The battle-field
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 146a
        Page 147
    The torn ten-dollar bill
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 160a
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
    The draft rising in New York
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
    The battle of New York
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
    The red flag
        Page 201
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
        Page 206
        Page 207
        Page 208
        Page 209
        Page 210
        Page 211
        Page 212
        Page 213
        Page 214
        Page 215
    Fort Redding
        Page 216
        Page 217
        Page 218
        Page 219
        Page 220
        Page 221
        Page 222
        Page 222a
        Page 223
        Page 224
        Page 225
        Page 226
        Page 227
        Page 228
        Page 229
        Page 230
        Page 231
    The great day that came
        Page 232
        Page 233
        Page 234
        Page 235
        Page 236
        Page 237
        Page 238
        Page 239
        Page 240
        Page 241
        Page 242
        Page 243
        Page 244
        Page 245
        Page 246
        Page 247
        Page 248
    Advertising
        Page 249
        Page 250
        Page 251
        Page 252
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text



-/ 17iC























































The Battle of New York.








THE



BATTLE OF NEW YORK



A STCORI FOR ALL 'OU\G PEOPLE





E'i
\VILLIAM 0. STODDARD
u..ITH.:-F *--- *.-- [1' I.-t .l' .:' L :l r Fl- ll II TiE SMOKE,
1- I b -NCi ~I i t L ;, ET*-


N E \V YO R
D. APIPLETON AND COMPANY





































COPYRIGHT, 1892,
BY D. APPLETON AND COMPANY.










PRINTED AT THE
APPLETON PRESS, U. S. A.





















CONTENTS.


CHAPTER
I.-THE CITY IN WAR-TIME

II.-A DARK ENIGMA

III.-GIvE US A VICTORY

IV.-THE NEWSBOYS .

V.-THE CONFEDERATE SPY

VI.-THE MEANING OF THE FLAG

VII.-DODGING AN ARMY .

VIII.-REPORTING TO GENERAL LEE

IX.-THE FIRST GUN OF THE BATTLE

X.-THE BATTLE-FIELD .

XI.-THE TORN TEN-DOLLAR BILL

XII.-THE DRAFT RISING IN NEW YORK

XIII.-THE BATTLE OF NEW YORK .

XIV.-THE RED FLAG .

XV.-FORT REDDING .

XVI.-THE GREAT DAY THAT CAME


PAGE
1

15

. 31

46

61

S75

S90

.103

.117

.133

S148

.165

183

201

216

232



















LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.


FACING
PAGE
The Battle of New York Frontispiece

Return of the regiment 4

"No you ain't, honey!" .13

The spy on Wall Street 21

Barry's first lesson at selling newspapers 36

Barry tells Mr. Hunker he can go 52

The wounded captain tells Barry of the flag .87

General Lee covers sleeping Dave with the Confederate flag 112

Kid Vogle hooting into the ear of Respectability 117

Dave starts for New York with General Lee's message 146

Dave delivers General Lee's message to Mr. Vernon. 160

"The inside door won't keep 'em back a minute!" 222
















THE BATTLE OF NEW YORK.




CHAPTER I.

THE CITY IN WAR-TIME.

HE bayonets gleamed brightly in the sun,
as their steady rows came up the avenue.
A strong squad of blue-coated policemen
marched in advance to clear the way, and
behind them marched the band.
"Ur-r-r-ur-rub-a-dub-dub-boom-bomb-ur-rr-whang-
clang!" for at that moment the shrilling of the fifes
and the roll of the drums were lost in a clash of
cymbals and in a storm of martial music.
That grand burst of sound lasted only for a minute
or so, and then a tune which Barry Redding knew
seemed to find wings and to spread them and fly up
above all other noises, so that it could make itself
heard. It was very sweet, but Barry clung to the






THE BATTLE OF NEW YORK.


lamp-post against which the crowd was jamming him
and said aloud:
"Yes, it's 'Home, Sweet Home.' I never heard it
sound that way before, though. Guess they're all
glad enough to-get home."
There was indeed something like a wail in that
music. Perhaps that was what he meant. Close
beside him stood a ragged woman who was crying.
"No! he won't come back," she said. "He went
out with them, as brave a man as ever marched, but
there isn't any coming home for him."
"That's war!" solemnly remarked a well-dressed
and rather large man who was bracing himself to
keep from being shoved off the sidewalk.
"Mighty little you know 'bout war!" savagely in-
sinuated a sharp-faced little fellow, with tremendous
black mustaches, who was trying to squeeze his
head through the jam and get a look at the band.
"Don't I?" replied the big man. "Well, if I don't,
you needn't pull that sleeve so. It's been empty ever
since Bull Run, but it hurts yet to jerk it."
"Beg pardon, comrade!" suddenly and very re-
spectfully responded the small man, looking up at
him. "I didn't see your sleeve. All K.! I was
out two years and didn't get hit once."
"You didn't have half the chance I did, though.
Not so much of a target."







THE CITY IN WAR-TIME. 3

"That's so-for bullets, but I got blowed up. Lit
on my feet in a swamp."
Barry looked at the empty sleeve and wondered
how the owner of it could be so jolly and self-satisfied
about it; but just then the woman who was crying
said:
"Hark! what's that?"
"'Hail, Columbia,' replied Barry, but she was not
speaking of the music.
The band had marched away on, before it changed
its tune. Several carriages had followed it, and then
mounted men and men on foot. Next there was led
along a well-fed, proud-lookipg horse, carrying an
empty saddle, with a sheathed sword hanging at its
pommel.
"That's the old colonel's horse. He was killed at
Chancellorsville."
"There comes the regiment!"
"All that's left of them. Not more'n a hun-
dred, and they went out pretty near a thousand
strong."
Barry heard it all. He heard a number of other
remarks about the army and about what the war was
costing, but his ears heard it for him on their own
account. He was himself busy only with his eyes, for
next after the riderless horse marched several ranks
of men in weather-beaten uniforms.






THE BATTLE OF NEW YORK.


"I'm glad they got back," said Barry. "Don't I
wish 'twas father's regiment!"
They marched well, and there was a kind of light
upon their bronzed and hardy faces. There was
something buoyant and swinging in the way they
stepped along, and one of them carried the raggedest
flag Barry had ever seen.
"I s'pose those are bullet-holes," he said. "It got
torn, too, in some o' the battles."
"Wow-oo-ow-wow! sounded mournfully just be-
hind him, and he looked around to see a setter dog
with his muzzled head lifted, sending out a long
howl, as if he too were thinking of the soldiers who
did not come back.
"What's the matter with you?" asked Barry.
"None o' your folks volunteered. My father's been
out ever since the war began."
"Bully for him!" exclaimed the one-armed man.
"But Cham always howls when he hears 'Hail,
Columbia.' "
"Well he might!" came to Barry's ears, in a kind
of snarl, from somebody at his left; and the small
black-mustached man seemed to bristle angrily as
he turned quickly to answer:
"What's that? What did that fellow say against
'Hail, Columbia?'"
"Hurrah!" shouted Barry. "The Seventh!"







a


VN,'


Return of the regiment.


,'~E
~


iii


MI







THE CITY IN WAR-TIME.


Everybody. turned to look, and there they came.
The full, close ranks were in splendid drill. Their
bayonets flashed in the sunshine. They seemed to
Barry a perfectly ideal regiment; and now their band,
which had been silent, except for a time-keeping drum-
beat, broke out into something stirring which quickly
changed into "Tramp, Tramp, Tramp, the Boys are
Marching."
Barry admired them exceedingly, but he was still
thinking of the man who carried the ragged flag.
"Only a few of that veteran regiment got home-
only a hundred out of a thousand," he said to himself,
as he let go of the lamp-post to march with the crowd.
"I wish father wasn't in the army. What's the use
o' war?"
Then he heard somebody saying:
"Will it be over soon? No, sir; it won't. The
South'll never give up. It's 1863 now, and there's
no telling how many more years it'll last."
"No, it won't," said the man who had spoken
against "Hail, Columbia." "'Lincoln can't get any
more volunteers, and they aren't actually draft
men."
"Daren't they? Can't they?" came excitedly from
some man near the curb-stone. "I'm going, for one.
I shan't wait to be drafted. It made me ashamed of
myself to look at those fellows. I've as good a right







6 THE BATTLE OF NEW YORK.

to go and get killed as any man in that regiment ever
had. I wish I had gone before."
Barry's ears did not seem to miss anything, nor his
eyes. He did not walk fast, for he was drifting with
a stream of people; and every pair of feet among
them was keeping time with the music. He could
march well enough, for he was a tall, slender fellow
-at least an inch longer than could fairly be expected
of a fourteen-year-old boy. He had grown upward,
however, without properly widening; and he gave the
impression of being too narrow for his length. His
arms were long and so were his legs. He wore a
narrow-brimmed straw hat, that came well down over
his closely-cropped brown head and was cocked a little
on one side. He was straight enough, however; and
there was nothing slouching or listless about him.
The next remark that he made was to himself,
and it referred directly to the matter of his own
looks.
"There's a great deal in a uniform," he said.
"That's a fact. But if I should join the army now
my uniform wouldn't fit me more'n a week. I won-
der what on earth makes me grow so fast. I look
like a guy !"
He must have grown very well since first putting
on the blue flannel suit he wore, for he was reaching
out beyond it in all directions. His neck seemed all






THE CITY IN WAR-TIME.


the longer because of his coat collar coming up no
higher than it did; and too much of him was wrists'
and ankles. The next thinghe did was to wheel
discontentedly out of that marching column on the
sidewalk and take his own course down a cross-
street, while the returned volunteers and their escort
and their music paraded on to show themselves in
other parts of the city.
Barry's face grew very questioning indeed as he
walked along. Something was troubling his mind,
and at last it broke right out.
"What is war?" he asked aloud. "What right
has government to do it, anyhow, and have so many
men killed?"
He had not expected any answer, but something
like one was given him.
A pair of rapid feet had been catching up with his
own, and he heard:
"If there was not any goffernment there would not
be any war. All ofer the world it is so." It was the
"Hail, Columbia" man again.
"Hullo, Palovski!" exclaimed Barry, turning to-
ward him. "Going back to the barber-shop?"
"I had to go downtown. The goffernment haf
enrolled me. They haf enrolled efery man. They
clean out the barber-shop. Down with the goffern-
ment!"






THE BATTLE OF NEW YORK.


It was evident that whatever else Palovski might
be he was not an American-not a patriot-and that
he did not wish to be made a soldier of.
"Going to be drafted, are you?" said Barry.
"Somebody's got to go. If I were old enough I guess
I wouldn't wait to be drafted."
"You go some day," said Palovski. "The goffern-
ment grab you by and by."
"I wouldn't care," replied Barry, "if they'd let me
take father's place, so he could come home and take
care of mother."
"I tell you," exclaimed Palovski, loudly, "when
the people haf their rights-no more goffernment! no
more war!"
He seemed to have but one idea in his head, although
there was room for more. In fact, it was a head
almost too large for a man of his size; but he evi-
dently had all the strength needed to carry it. He
was short and dark and muscular, but he somehow
did not seem at all well shaped. He was not hand-
some, for his mouth was narrow and thin-lipped and
his sallow features looked as if they were withered,
although he was apparently quite young, and his
mustaches were only a thin pair of black lines. He
was plainly but not badly dressed, and he wore a
bright red ribbon in one of his coat button-holes.
"Well," said Barry, "I s'pose soldiers don't get as






THE CITY IN WAR-TIME.


good wages as you do. I wish I knew how to earn
something."
"There ought not to be any wages," snarled Pa-
lovski. "We ought to be all supported by the goff-
ernment. There must be no rich men."
"Well," responded Barry, who was very much
puzzled, "they couldn't be supported if there weren't
any government."
That seemed to set Palovski's tongue going. He
was no taller than Barry, but he seemed to consider
himself a hundred times as old-older than anybody
else and wiser. He spoke English freely and with
only a slight accent, and now, as they walked along,
he talked some of the queerest stuff Barry had ever
listened to. He understood some of it, or thought he
did, especially what Palovski said he himself and
others had suffered under the tyrant governments of
Europe. Then Palovski said the government of the
United States was just as bad, levying taxes and car-
rying on war. It was a tyranny, and should be wiped
away. Then there would be a brand-new concern,
invented and put together by such men as Palovski.
Under this there would be no war, no soldiers, no
police, no prisons, no judges, and, above all, no rich
men. All men would be expected to work a little,
but all would do so without wages, for they would be
supported by the government.
2






THE BATTLE OF NEW YORK.


It was evident that Barry had heard his queer ac-
quaintance talk before, but never so freely and fully,
nor so fiercely; for Palovski's bitterest wrath had
been stirred up by the fact that he was now in danger
of being drafted into the army. He explained to
Barry just how it was-how there were not men
enough volunteering to fill up the army; how all the
men in the land fit for soldiers were hunted out by
government officers, and lists of them made: how,
when men were wanted, their names were taken
from these lists by a kind of lottery, and each man
drawn in the lottery would have to go, unless he
could pay three hundred dollars or find another man
to go in his place. So, said Palovski, a man who
had plenty of cash could get out, while the men
who had none must go and be killed in a war they
hated and for a tyrant government they did not care
to sustain.
"That means you," said Barry, thoughtfully. "It
doesn't mean father or me. I hate the war, but I'm
going soon's I'm old enough."
"Oh!" said Palovski, "you wait and get into camp
and be drilled. I was there. You be flog once- "
"I'd kill any man that flogged me!" exclaimed
Barry. "They don't flog men in our army. You
were in Europe."
That was true, but he was willing to hear, as they







THE CITY IN WAR-TIME.


went on together uptown, all that Palovski had to
tell him of the terrors of military discipline.
While Barry was getting that part of an answer to
his question about war, the returned veterans and
their music and their splendid escort had marched on
up the avenue. All along their line of march there
were crowds of people to welcome them, and there
were flags hung out of the houses. It was a proud
day for all that was left of that brave band of vol-
unteers.
So it seemed to be, too, for a great many of the
people who watched them from the. sidewalk, as if
whatever glory had been won was being cut up like a
cake and passed around for all who wanted some to
take a piece.
At last they wheeled to cross through a narrow
street to reach another avenue. The escort had to
fold up its ranks to do so, but the veterans did not.
It was a street of pretty well-built houses, and it went
up a moderate hill. There were only a few flags vis-
ible, perhaps because nothing to bring them out was
expected; but at just about the middle of the block
there was a very unlooked-for sensation. There was
a high-stoop, brown-stone fronted house that carried
two flags. One was a large, bright-looking Stars and
Stripes, that was swung vigorously from a parlor
window by a very bright-eyed, middle-aged woman.







THE BATTLE OF NEW YORK.


"Hurrah!" she shouted. "My husband's in the
Forty-second!"
"Halt!" exclaimed the officer in command of the
veterans. "Now, boys, three cheers for her and for
him! Three cheers for the boys in line and the
women at home!"
The men stood still as one man, rifle on shoulder
and hat in hand, swinging to their enthusiastic cheers;
but at that moment a slight, bare-headed, girlish
form stepped lightly out upon the stoop of the house.
She, too, carried a flag, and she waved it with all her
might as she shouted, in a clear but tremulous voice:
"Hurrah for the Sunny South !"
The flag she swung was not large, but it was brill-
iant. It was a silken, tasselled Stars and Bars, the
banner of the Confederacy. Just behind her, firm as
a rock, and with a face full of defiance, stood another
middle-aged woman, darker and taller than the first;
and she said:
"My husband fell with Stonewall Jackson at Chan-
cellorsville!"
There was yet another form in the doorway, and
one of a pair of large and very black hands was pull-
ing at the woman's dress, while the other reached for
that of the girl.
"Lor' bress you, Missus Randolph! You an' Miss
Lily come into de house!"
































rrET


",No you ain't, honey
"No you ain't, honey!"


,,


i
.12
I







THE CITY IN WAR-TIME.


There were at once rude outcries among the rougher
part of the people on the sidewalk, but the veteran
officer sang out to his men:
"Boys! she's all right! We're all soldiers. Three
cheers for the plucky little reb that stood by her
father's flag! One, two-now!"
The brave fellows cheered with a will and a tiger-r
and the girl waved her flag; but her mother turned
to go into the house, crying and saying:
"God bless real soldiers, anyhow!"
"Come into de house, Miss Lily!"
"No, I won't, Diana. Not till they're all gone by."
"Yes, you will, Miss Lily. That there crowd isn't
all sojers. Dey's loafers in it. Dey might grab de
flag. Come in!"
"I swung it, anyhow!" she said, as she reluctantly
yielded to Diana's urgency and her pulling. .
Large and strongly-made was Diana Lee, and at
the next instant she stepped quickly out past Lilian
Randolph and asked of a fellow who was already half-
way up the steps:
"Wot you want heah?"
"I want that Confed flag! I'm a-going to have
it, too."
"No, you ain't, honey!" replied the mellow, mocking
voice of Diana. "You kin go right down de steps, or
I'll help ye. You ain't any kine of sojer. You's one







THE BATTLE OF NEW YORK.


of dem fellers 'at couldn't be hired to go. Hope de
draf' '1 git ye!"
"Bring me that flag!"
"No, ye don't, honey!" said Diana, as she squared
herself before him and held a dangerous-looking black
fist very near his nose. "You go an' foller de Stars
an' Stripes aw'ile, an' I'll talk wid ye. Go an' fight
something' more'n a little Virginny gal. Fight some
o' the Virginny men!"
"That's the talk!" came loudly up from the side-
walk. "Give it to him, aunty! Let him do his flag-
snatching in a blue uniform."
"Come in, Lilian!" It was Mrs. Randolph's voice,
still intensely excited and defiant, but it was Diana
who shoved them both before her and closed the door,
throwing back at the fellow on the steps a bitterly
sarcastic:
"Loafer, go an' be a sojer!"













CHAPTER II.


A DARK ENIGMA.

RS. REDDING did not close her window after
the soldiers and the crowd went by. She
only drew in her flag and stood it up in a
corner, where it seemed to rest and look at
her. She had not yet taken her eyes from it,
and there was a bright flush on her face. It
almost seemed as if she and the flag were talking,
while a heavy step came in at the outer door and
through the hall into the parlor.
"Mrs. Redding," rasped a harsh, menacing voice,
"I don't care to have any extreme political demon-
strations in any house that b'longs to me!"
"Mr. Hunker!" exclaimed Mrs. Redding, in aston-
ishment. "Why, what do you mean? This house is
mine so long as I pay for it. Mrs. Randolph is a
Southern woman, sir. She is a soldier's widow. She
can wave her flag if she wishes."
The flush on her face had grown deeper, and Lilian
was thinking:
"How handsome she is!"
15







THE BATTLE OF NEW YORK.


"That isn't what I mean," replied Mr. Hunker.
"I'm agin the Linkin government myself. Jest don't
you swing out no more cussed Union flags!"
"I'll do as I please, and I don't care to hear that
kind of talk."
"No, ye won't! not in any house of mine. I know
haow you're doin' in your boardin'-haouse business.
You can't pay your rent, and you've gdt to, or break
the lease. I won't let up on ye. It's only half what
I can git naow. I've another tenant ready."
"He won't get it, then," responded Mrs. Redding,
with energy; "and you can leave this house."
"I want to see that lady from the Saouth," said
Mr. Hunker. "I'm landlord here. The Saouth has
its friends in New Yoark."
Mrs. Randolph and Lilian had retreated into the
back parlor already, and now a voice came that
sounded as if two had begun to speak and one had
finished it:
"We don't want to see him, Mrs. Redding."
"Leave the house, Mr. Hunker," repeated Mrs.
Redding. "You'll get your rent when the time
comes."
"I don't knaow 'bout that, but don't ye swing no
more flags!"
Just then some man at the door shouted:
"Come along, Hunker! I can't wait."







-A DARK ENIGMA.


"I'm coming," replied the well-dressed but very
coarse-looking, unpleasant-voiced friend of the South,
turning to go; and he added to Mrs. Redding, "Mind,
naow, you'll pay or quit!"
Hardly was he out before there stood Mrs. Randolph
with tears in her eyes.
"You have been so good and kind, but I'm getting
desperate. I can't run in debt to you any more. My
money's all gone, and I don't know when any more
will come. They watch so closely. Nobody can get
through the lines. You can't keep boarders for noth-
ing. It's two months- "
"How I wish we were back in old Virginia!"
mourned Lilian.
"I've thought of all that," said Mrs. Redding, and
neither of them noticed that she had picked up the
flag and was smoothing it affectionately, with a far-
away look on her face.
"You and Lilian can go right along till your help
comes. We'll manage it somehow. I've part of the
rent ready."
"But how can we stay?" said Mrs. Randolph.
"You've nowhere else to go," replied her landlady.
"I have to be out of doors a good deal. You and she
can help me care for the house and see that I'm not
robbed."
There's a great deal of waste," said Mrs. Randolph,







THE BATTLE OF NEW YORK.


thoughtfully. "There always is in a boarding-house,
I suppose."
"That's my trouble," replied Mrs. Redding, "and
everything costs so in paper money. It takes twice
as much to live as it used to. Barry must find some-
thing to do, or I can't make both ends meet. A dol-
lar's less than half a dollar nowadays."
"It's worse than that down South," said Lilian.
"Oh, dear! when will this war be over?"
We won't worry. It's got to end some time. My
part of it's right here," said Mrs. Redding.
Mr. Palovski, walking with Barry, at that moment
flourished his hand and remarked, dramatically:
"The war and the goffernment are breaking down!
This draft is the end of both of them. It is a tax for
men! For so much blood! It is tyranny, my poy!
It will not be collected. You will see. We will not
be drafted."
His dark face grew fiercer and more scowling. His
eyes seemed to flash fire. He even looked like a
larger man.
Barry did not yet quite understand the draft and
how it was to be done, but he could understand that
a barber earning good wages, not much of an Ameri-
can anyhow, might be ready to run away if the
government were reaching out to make a soldier of
him.







A DARK ENIGMA.


"Here's your shop," was all the reply he made,
however, and Palovski strutted into it, leaving him
upon the sidewalk.
"They'll have to go if they're wanted," Barry said
to himself. "But what's mother going to do for
money? She'll lose the house if she can't pay her
rent. I must do something. But I'm glad father's
in the war."
Just then a very loud, shrill voice shouted into his
right ear:
"A-axtry! 'Er'ld! Great battle on the P'to-
mick!"
Barry whirled around like a top, but no paper was
held out to him; neither was there much of anything
else, except a wonder that so much voice should
come from so small and slim a boy. He must have
been made up mainly of throat and lungs. Well, he
did have a very wide mouth. He was built, perhaps,
all over with reference to his mouth, and he was
therefore just the kind of fellow to sell newspapers.
"Is that you, Kid?" said Barry. "Where are all
your papers?"
"Sold 'em all," replied the newsboy, cheerfully.
"Made seventy-five cents since breakfast. Goin' home
to dinner."
"That's just what I'll do," exclaimed Barry; but
he was not thinking of dinner, for he added:







THE BATTLE OF NEW YORK.


"I've got to do something to help mother. I'll
pitch in and sell papers."
"Well," said Kid, a little doubtfully, "I dunno.
Mebbe you can do it. Get her to give you a dollar to
start on. Some fellers just can't, though."
"Why," said Barry, "I should think any fellow
could sell newspapers. It's easy enough."
"Now is it?" said Kid, with energy. "You try it
on and see 'f it is. No kind of whiner'll make a good
newsboy."
"I'm no kind of whiner," replied Barry, with some
indignation.
"I know you ain't," said Kid, looking up at him
in a fatherly way. "You might do. Tell you what,
though! if I can get at a man so I can hoot into his
ear I can sell him every time-startle him out o' five
cents. You can screech good. When you set out,
though, take a 'sortment."
"What's that?" asked Barry.
"Why," explained Kid, "it's the same thing,
morning' or evening Some fellers don't care what
they buy, if it's news; but mostly a Tribune feller
won't take a World or a Her'ld, and some on 'em'll
turn away from you if you haven't the Times or the
Sun. It's just so in the afternoon. A feller that
wants the Post or the Commershil 'Tiser'll give you
a lickin' if you try the Express on him. Anyhow,
















































The spy on Wall Street.


'ls"~ 5----, --r
L







A DARK ENIGMA.


soon's your first lot's out, don't you yell anything but
extrys, no matter what you've got. Everybody wants
battles, and so they all want extrys."
"That's so," nodded Barry.
"Tell you what," said Kid, "I can tell a feller's
politics soon's I see him, but 'twon't do to make a
mistake. You bet it won't! If his side's winning,
though, he may give you a quarter."
They had talked until they were in front of Mrs.
Redding's, and they separated there; but not until
Barry had agreed to go downtown with Kid .Vogel
right away after dinner.
All the while that Barry had been walking and
talking a very different kind of boy had been walking
in another part of the city. It was not a very wide
street. There was a stone church, with a tall spire
and a clock, at one end of it; and the other end ran
into the water, or rather it was covered over with a
ferry-house.
The buildings were of brick or stone, and some of
them were handsome. All along where the boy was
walking the signs on either side said Bank, "" Bank,"
"Banker," "Broker," or something of that sort; and
the boy seemed to be studying them.
It was not easy to guess what business so black and
so ragged a boy could have to do in Wall Street, or
with bankers or brokers; but nobody asked him any







THE BATTLE OF NEW YORK.


questions. He went along looking up at the signs,
and his face wore a wearied, anxious expression. It
brightened suddenly as he exclaimed:
"Washington Vernon & Co., Bankers. I'll go
right in."
Up the stone steps he went, and in another moment
he was inside of the door of an elegant business office,
asking:
"Please, sah, is Mars' Vernon in?"
Get out, you black imp!" replied a surprised growl
from behind a counter. "What do you want here?"
There was no question but that he looked remarka-
bly out of place, but he persisted:
"Yes, sah, if you please, I want to see Mars' Wash-
ington Vernon."
He spoke respectfully, but in so clear and loud a
voice that he was heard through an open door by
somebody in a room behind that office. It was a kind
of financial business parlor, apparently. A tall, old-
looking man arose quickly from his chair at a desk
and shouted:
"Simpson! show him in!"
"Humph!" exclaimed Simpson. "This isn't any
place for niggers. They ought to be all killed, any-
how. What does old Vernon want of a scarecrow
like that?" The growl he began in had been half-
suppressed, but it grew louder as he added: "Go right







A DARK ENIGMA.


in, Charcoal! Mr. Vernon is in there. Two more
like you'd make the room so dark I'd have to light
the gas."
He was a burly, middle-aged man, with a red neck-
tie and a diamond pin; and no doubt he was born
with a right to be brutal to poor black boys.
The boy he had now been brutal to did not reply to
him, but walked on into the other room. The tall
old man stood by his desk, with a look of sharp,
watchful interest upon his face.
"Is you Mars' Vernon?" asked the boy.
"My name is Washington Vernon. What is your
name?"
"Oh!" said the boy, speaking low, "I's no name at
all. I's on'y got lef."
"Right!" said Mr. Vernon. "Now let me see if
you have. Hand it to me!"
How he did watch that boy! He, too, looked in
the banker's face as he went to the desk and put down
his left hand, palm up, with its fingers spread out in
a peculiar way, and said, "Stone."
Mr. Vernon at once put down his own left hand,
across the small black hand, in the same fashion,
and said, "Wall."
The boy followed with his right hand, and said,
"Jack;" and the banker's right hand followed as
he added, "Son."







THE BATTLE OF NEW YORK.


"Shenandoah," said the boy.
"That'll do!" exclaimed Mr. Vernon; "but the
next word will be Susquehanna. It won't be long,
either."
"No, sah," said the boy quickly, while the banker
stepped to the door and shut and bolted it; "but it's
de Hudson, sah, an' de lakes. Dey's a-comin'!"
He was rapidly pulling off his coat as he spoke. It
was rusty and ragged, but it had a lining; and there
was a slit in this at the collar, and out of that slit the
boy drew a long, thin packet covered with india-rubber
cloth. He handed it to Mr. Vernon, saying:
"I tole de gin'ral I's gwine to give ye that. You's
jis one ob ouah folks. Now I's got anoder erran' to
do uptown. Reckon I'd bes' be gwine."
"Come here to-morrow, anyhow," said the banker,
commandingly. "I'll know what to do by that
time."
"All right, Mars' Vernon! Reckon ye will. I'll
come," said the boy.
"There's ten dollars," began the banker. "That's
for current expenses. I'll let you have more."
"No, you won't, Mars' Vernon," replied the boy,
not holding out any hand for the money. "I's got
enough. I's gwine to come an' see you agin to-
morrow. I's a gen'lman, I is."
Mr, Vernon was an astonished man, but only his







A DARK ENIGMA.


face said so. It was indeed a wonder-a black boy of
that size and rig absolutely refusing to take a ten-
dollar bill! But all he said was:
"Go ahead, then, but don't fail to come. I shall
be here all day."
"I's a-comin', suah," said the queer youngster;
and he seemed to be even in haste as he went out into
the street.
"I am glad that is done," he remarked to himself
on the sidewalk. "If I'm caught now, they can't
fairly shoot me. Not for anything they'd find on
me. They might shoot old Vernon, though, or hang
him."
However that might be, the banker was now sitting
at his desk, and was reading with seemingly intense
interest one of several written papers which he had
taken out of the black boy's packet. Mr. Simpson,
meantime, was busy with other men in the outer office.
Up at Mrs. Redding's the noonday meal, or "lunch,"
was not so important as that which was eaten at six
o'clock, when the masculine boarders came home from
business. This latter was apt to last a long time, for
some of them were sure to come late; and that was
one more reason why Mrs. Redding was glad to have
help from Mrs. Randolph. One woman, she said,
was not enough to run so large a household.
"Lilian," said her mother at noon, just before they







THE BATTLE OF NEW YORK.


went downstairs, "I don't care if Mrs. Redding is
a Yankee; she is a noble, generous-hearted woman."
"So she is, mother," said Lilian, with emphasis.
"She's in trouble, too. I'm glad I swung that flag,
anyhow! Soldiers are splendid!"
"So am I," said Mrs. Randolph. "Come! That
b6y Barry ought to be doing something. He's old
enough."
"I'm glad he isn't old enough to be a soldier," said
Lilian. "I'm glad the North can't get any more
men. There's more chance for the South."
There was evidently a great deal of war spirit in
that house, but they all thought better of Barry be-
fore luncheon was over. He talked about the veterans
and about the flag-swinging, and he even mentioned
Mr. Palovski and the draft; but he had ten times as
much to say concerning Kid Vogel and the fortunes
that were to be made by newsboys. His mother heard
him in a kind of thoughtful silence, until Lilian
remarked:
"Why, do newsboys really make money? I mean,
anything much? Such a lot of little, ragged- "
"Some of them do," interrupted Barry. "Smart
fellows, like Kid."
"Barry!" sharply exclaimed Mrs. Redding. "Go
ahead! It can't be helped. You can earn your own
clothes, anyhow."







A DARK ENIGMA.


"I believe I can," said Barry cheerfully; "and I
mean to get a suit that's three sizes too large and
just grow into it."
"Ha! ha!" laughed Lilian. "I would, if I were
you."
That was nearly the end of the talk. He ate the
rest of his lunch in a hurry, and then he darted out
of the house, with a dollar in his pocket, saying to
himself:
"Palovski- says there oughtn't to be any capital,
but if mother hadn't some how'd I get set up in the
news business?"
So far his new idea seemed to be getting along very
well; but it was not so with the ideas and purposes of
all other people.
If any boy, for instance, who has never before been
in a great city sets out all alone to find one particular
house in it, he may have his difficulties cut out for
him. It does not help him at all, moreover, if he is
poor and black and shabby-looking. The black boy
who had called at Vernon & Co.'s walked away from
the banking office briskly.
"Mr. Simpson called me Charcoal," he remarked.
"Well, one name's as good as another. I can find
that place. I know I can; but it's away uptown. I
guess I won't walk-I'll ride."
He was already going up Broadway, and nobody







THE BATTLE OF NEW YORK.


paid him any attention so long as he walked steadily
along with the kind of everlasting procession that
walks there during business hours. Opposite the City
Hall, however, he stood still, considering with himself:
"I wish I knew which street-car to take."
At that instant he was whirled around by a shock
that staggered him, and heard:
"Get out o' the way, Nig! I want to catch that
car."
Another shock seemed to catch him, and he was
propelled against a lamp-post with some vigor by a
big man who said:
"Mind whom you run against, Sooty! Take that."
The black boy glanced this way and that, in breath-
less indignation.
"I aren't say a word!" he exclaimed. "Ruffians!
Brutes! Dressed like gentlemen, too! Can't they
tell?-no, they can't! I'll just hurry and take any
uptown car."
He walked fast across the open space, and tried
hard to do as he; had said. He saw car after car
pause to take :1 passengers who motioned to the
drivers to stop, and he himself not only motioned but
shouted; and it was as if he had hurried them along.
* "Why won't they stop?" he exclaimed. "Now I'll
get into this one. 'Tisn't full."
It was not, and he succeeded in boarding it and in







A DARK ENIGMA.


being carried along for some distance. The conductor
was collecting fares forward, however; and just as
he reached the place where Charcoal-if that was to
be his name-held out a five-cent slip of paper cur-
rency, a man exclaimed loudly:
"Put him out, conductor !"
And another added:
"We don't want any cause-o'-the-war in this car.
Out with him! He's a blackbird."
"Get right out!" said the conductor, putting a
hand on Charcoal's collar.
"No, I won't! I've as good a right-I'm a gen-
tleman--"
There the black boy suddenly stopped, and seemed
in double haste to escape from that car and from the
storm of derisive utterances which replied to him.
The car did not entirely stop to let him off, and his
jump from it sent him too far. It sent him against
two neatly-dressed young fellows who were crossing
the street; and one of them sent him on into a heap
of dusty street-sweepings. He arose from it looking
worse than ever, just as a woman on the sidewalk
exclaimed:
"Do look at that contraband! Why, he's a scare-
crow! That fellow ought to have been ashamed of
himself to have kicked him, though."
Through all his blackness it could be seen that







30 THE BATTLE OF NEW YORK.

Charcoal was furiously angry. He seemed to swell
with wrath as he shook his fist after those two trim-
looking youths, but he was silent, except that he half-
whispered:
"I must bear it! Kicked! cuffed! blackguarded!
Well, I knew this trip would cost me something.
Hurrah for General Lee! He's coming!"













CHAPTER III.


GIVE US A VICTORY.

HE barber-shop in which Mr. Palovski was
employed was two squares away from Mrs.
Redding's. He was in it after dinner, but
S he was not shaving anybody. It was not
S the time of day for a rush of customers, and
he was busied only with a lot of razors, a hone,
and a strop.
If the razors needed sharpening, he did not; but
it seemed to do him inward good to bring each of
them in turn to the finest kind of edge. It was not
altogether because they would then do easier work
upon men's faces, for at last he said to another bar-
ber who was standing near him folding towels:
There! that would cut the throat of the goffern-
ment, if I had it in the right place. "
Barry had a private interview with his mother,
and went downtown .in a street-car. He hardly
saw or heard anything in the car, for all his thoughts
had gone away ahead of him, and he did not catch
up with them until he reached City Hall Square and







THE BATTLE OF NEW YORK.


looked up at the signs of the newspapers which dotted
the fronts of almost all the buildings of Park Row.
"That's why they call it Newspaper Row," he said.
"There's just lots of them. Glad they're not all
dailies, though."
He was out of the car when he said it, and there
was Kid waiting for him.
"Hullo, Barry!" said Kid, in a moderate tone of
voice-for him. "There won't be any papers to-day,
of any 'count, till three o'clock. Not unlesss there's a
two-o'clock extry."
"Will there be one?" asked Barry, fingering his
dollar bill. "I want to begin."
"Dunno," said Kid, thoughtfully. "But it's a good
day for us. There's a big battle gittin' ready for us,
but you can't say just when it'll git here. All the
millish are goin' out to fight in it. Seventh, Twelfth,
Ninth-oh, all of 'em! There won't be any sojers
left in the city. They're goin' all day to-day an' to-
night. Most of 'em are gone. Oh, but won't there
be extrys to sell while they're a-fightin'!"
"Loads!" exclaimed Barry, but Kid added:
"Besides, old Grant, he's gittin' himself awfully
licked at Vicksburg. He's got to let go of the reb
army there."
"No, he hasn't," interrupted Barry, sharply. "I've
read about that. He's going to fight them till they







GIVE US A VICTORY.


give in. There's a Southern girl, though, up at our
house-she and her mother say General Lee's coming
right on to take New York. He's going to take Bal-
timore and Philadelphia first, and then he's coming
right on here-unless he gets himself whipped so bad
he can't."
Kid seemed just then to be squirming a little over
an idea which had come to him.
"Well, I hope he won't," he said. "First thing
he'd do after he got here he'd shut up all the news-
papers. They're all against him nowadays, worse'n
they are against old Grant for gittin' used up at
Vicksburg. I guess he'd let some of 'em go on print-
in', though, so's he could git papers for himself, if
they'd on'y come out Confed instead of Union."
It was pretty plain that Kid had no narrow preju-
dices either way, and that he would be contented
with any result of the war which did not interfere
with the sale of newspapers. It was only a minute,
however, before he broke out with:
"Come on, Barry! You've got to get posted 'bout
things on Wall Street."
"I've been there," said Barry. "I know all about
it."
"Come on," said Kid. "I'll show you suthin'."
Off they went, and Barry shortly found that Kid
knew what he went for. The first thing he pointed







THE BATTLE OF NEW YORK.


out after they got there was the Stock Exchange, with
a crowd of men in front of it.
"See 'em!" said Kid. "When there's news, and
when gold is teetering up and down, and when stocks
are bobbing every which way, then's your time to sell
papers! Hoot 'axtry' at 'em, and they'd buy an old
sheet o' wrappin' paper. But lots o' fellers pitch
right down here soon's any paper's out. You've got
to race it to get here first. Now, come on!"
On they went, and Kid seemed to feel like lectur-
ing; but right in the middle of something he was
saying about "extrys" he halted.
"Look there!" he said. "But if Lee's army got
here they'd gobble it all."
The place they paused before was a money "ex-
change office," with a large show-window.
"See?" said Kid. "All sorts. It's where they
take in immigrants, too. Give 'em greenbacks and
fracksh'n'l currency for all their gold and silver.
See the gold piled up?"
"Yes," said Barry, staring at the gold. "But
our money's as good as theirs is. It passes here."
"'Course it does," replied Kid, "but it takes two 'n
a half of our dollars, and more too, to make a gold or
silver dollar. Look at them white bills. That's
regular English. Bank of England, I know. Them
others are German and all sorts."







GIVE US A VICTORY.


No doubt the paper was money, but the gold and
silver coins were what took Barry's eye; and it seemed
to him as if he could hardly remember ever having
touched one.
"Fives, tens, twenties," he said. "Tell you what,
Kid! all that gold is just beautiful. Look at the
silver, too. It can't come out till the war's over,
though."
"Come on !" suddenly exclaimed Kid. "There's
something' goin' on!"
They went back and looked for a moment. The
crowd of men on the sidewalk in front of the Stock
Exchange were shouting and gesticulating almost
frantically.
"There's news o' some kind," said Kid, "or they
wouldn't be cutting' up like that. Tell you what,
Shiner Murphy's goin' to buy the Express for him
and me. I'll go for the Post. You go for the C'mer-
shil'd Vertiser. We'll get the first lots and divide
'round, so we can spot any kind of feller. Shiner'll
get in 'mong the first. He's a kind of eel."
He might be, and Barry determined to be another;
but there were jams of boys in front of all the evening
newspaper offices. There were men waiting behind
the counters and there was a kind of system for get-
ting the papers distributed rapidly.
Almost at the same moment, down from the upper







THE BATTLE OF NEW YORK.


story of each of those tall buildings, came great
batches of freshly-printed papers. There were tussles,
twists, scrambles, and then the boys had the papers;
and every boy began to yell his loudest the moment
he squirmed out of the jam.
There were three who almost ran against each other
on a street-corner.
"Trade quick, boys," said Shiner Murphy, excitedly.
"I've sold five already. They'll go like hot cakes!"
"Wall Street!" exclaimed Kid, as he and Barry
arranged their assortments; and it did seem to Barry
as if he had never before in his life been so excited as
he was when he dashed away, shouting:
"Here's your Evening Post, Express, 'Vertiser!
Great battle on the Potomac! News from Vicksburg,
Grant, Lee's army, city o' Washington! Axtry!-
yes, sir, five cents-all right !"
Go it, Barry !" shouted Kid. "You'll do. Won't
you be hoarse to-morrer, though!"
"Oh, but can't you hoot!" said Barry.
The energy and foresight and enterprise of Kid
were indeed about to be rewarded. He and Barry
and the Shiner were the first detachment of news-
boys to reach Broad Street with the evening papers.
The crowd in front of the Stock Exchange and its
Gold Room was denser than ever and was more
furiously excited.























































Barry's first lesson at selling newspapers.







GIVE US A VICTORY.


"Now, Shiner," said Kid, "you pitch in on this side.
Barry can run around below, and I'll take 'em in the
middle. Whoop!"
There was a whole lot of mixed yelling from each
boy. It broke off into rapid sales of papers to excited
men of all kinds and all parties. Barry's first idea
was that his papers would all be gone in a wink. His
next was that there were now about as many news-
boys as there were stock-brokers and speculators, and
that some of the new-comers had throats equal to that
of Kid Vogel-almost.
"Boys!" he heard him shout, "cut for Broad-
way!"
They were just getting out of that crowd when Kid
added:
"Go in, Barry! You'll do first-rate; but you're
awful slow and careful 'bout making' change. I
saw--"
"No, I ain't. I know what you mean," said Barry.
"'Twasn't a cent he dropped. 'Twas a gold eagle.
He said he kept it so he shouldn't forget how it looked.
Gave me a quarter for finding it."
"Served you right!" said Kid. "Po-o-ost! "
"Can't he?" said Shiner, admiringly. "Why,
when his mouth's open his head's half off."
On they went, and Barry was ahead, for he was the
best runner of the three; but somehow or other Kid







THE BATTLE OF NEW YORK.


could sell more papers. They were all out quickly,
and had to go for a fresh supply.
"Twice as much money as I started with," said
Barry. "Part of it's that quarter, but I'll load up
and sell 'em all the way home. General Lee's doing
it!"
There could be no doubt but that the great Con-
federate general was stirring up the people of the
North tremendously. The papers sold so fast because
everybody was eager to know what he would do next.
All the soldiers President Lincoln could gather, more-
over, were on their way to meet the Southern army;
and all the world knew that about the hardest battle
of the war was very nearly at hand.
Some thought they knew more than others about
what was coming, but some of the most knowing on
both sides of the war were the most in doubt. Two
men of that kind sat in the back office of Washington
Vernon & Co., Bankers, with the door shut and bolted.
Before them, spread on the table, were the papers
brought to Mr. Vernon by the ragged boy his book-
keeper had called Charcoal.
"What do you think, Mr. Mapleson?" asked Mr.
Vernon. "How nearly are we ready'to make our
New York rising? They seem to expect a great deal
of us-none too much!"
"Not a bit too much!" said Mr. Mapleson. "We







GIVE US A VICTORY.


are ready now. If Lee will accomplish his part, I
can do mine. I can have a provisional government
in charge of New York, with all the forts and ships,
and the Treasury, and the banks, and so forth, in my
hands before he gets here. There's hardly enough
men to mount guard in the forts now. Just one
thing's in the way."
He was a dignified-looking, elderly man, with. a
stiff white mustache and cold, piercing blue eyes.
"What's that?" asked Mr. Vernon. "What can-
not General Lee do?"
"He hasn't men enough," said Mr. Mapleson. "A
hundred thousand isn't enough. He must win two
victories, you see. He must win one over the Army
of the Potomac before the day for the draft. Then
about that time he must win another over all that's
left of that army, with all the militia re-enforcements.
If he will do that, or if he will win only one genuine
sweeping victory, we can do the rest easily. Send
your black boy back and tell General Lee just what I
say. New York City will rise against the Lincoln
government on the day fixed for enforcing the draft,
if he will give us one victory. Can you trust your
messenger? Even a cipher dispatch would be full of
danger."
"He will be here again to-morrow," said Mr.
Vernon, "and I will decide. I could not let him







THE BATTLE OF NEW YORK.


stay in this office to-day, you know, for more than a
minute or so."
Of course not," replied Mr. Mapleson; and his voice
grew deep and stern as he added: "I can take full
possession of New York between twelve o'clock, mid-
night, and daylight of any day we agree upon after
Lee wins his victory."
He took his hat and went out, and Mr. Vernon
looked after him, remarking:
"There isn't a doubt of it! Ferdinand Mapleson
could make a tremendous name for himself. He is a
strong man. He could take the city; and then he
could govern it well. And some people would call
him a statesman and a patriot, and others, if they
were beyond his reach, would call him by quite another
name. They'd call him a traitor! They'd hang him,
too!"
There were all sorts of opinions, therefore, about
the war, and about the men who were carrying it on
and the deeds they were doing or planning. Up at
Mrs. Redding's boarding-house all things had gone on
very quietly for a little while after dinner. Then,
however, Diana Lee, in the kitchen, was startled by
a loud ringing of the basement door bell.
"Thar!" she exclaimed. "That ar' good-fer-nuffin
gal's somewhar' upstairs. Reckon I'll 'tend doah my-
self."







GIVE US A VICTORY.


To do so was evidently somewhat below her idea of
her own dignity and duty, but she went. Hardly had
she opened the door, before she exclaimed:
"Sho! w'ot you want heah, you brack vagabon'?
Jes' you git out, now!"
She saw before her a very, very black boy, of per-
haps about Barry's age, who wore a very dirty,
ragged suit of butternut-colored clothing. He also
seemed to wear an air of mystery and secrecy as he
replied:
"Hush up, aunty! Does you know anybody roun'
heah by de name of Randolph?"
"Dis is whar dey. board," she replied, eying him
from head to foot suspiciously. "Who's you, any-
how? I's Diana, Lee."
"I's glad you's Dinah Lee," he said. "I doesn't
b'long to de Lees. I's a Randolph. Jes' you tell 'em
Uncle John sent me. I wouldn't ha' foun' de house,
but I heard a feller tell 'bout Missy Lilian swung de
flag."
Diana stared hard at him. She noticed that his
hair was cut close to his head, so that his hat came
down and covered nearly all of it, and that he was a
decidedly handsome black boy, with a Roman nose
and a jaunty way of holding up his head.
"Bress your soul, honey!" she said, at the end of
her survey. "Reckon I know w'ot's w'ot. I'll tell







THE BATTLE OF NEW YORK.


'em, right off. Dey's all good folks in dis house,
now, I tell ye! Don't ye be 'feared ob Miss Redding."
"I will stay down here in the entry," he said in a
low, clear voice, as Diana hurried upstairs with her
errand.
She did not have to go further than the parlor before
she met Lilian and her mother and whispered eagerly:
"Hark to me, now! I's got something' to tell ye, I
has. You's got news from de Souf Thah's a young
feller heah from yer Uncle John. Jes' a kine o' col-
ored boy. He's down at de doah."
"0 mother!" whispered Lilian. "Let me go and
see him!"
"Be still, dear!" said Mrs. Randolph. "If he is
from your Uncle John the other side would call him
a spy."
"No, dey wouldn't," protested Diana. "Why, sho!
he's a heap bracker'n I be. Dey don't mind de col-
ored folks coming' through."
Perhaps not, but Lilian had gone past her like a
flash, and was already half-way down the stairs and
her mother was trying to catch up with her before
Diana was out of the parlor.
"Lilian!"
"Davis Randolph! You here?"
"Davis! 0 my son!"
"Mother !"







GIVE US A VICTORY.


Their arms were around him and they kissed him
frantically, but in a moment more he managed to say:
Mother, this was the only way I could get through
the Federal lines. They watch for spies, you know.
But I had to come and see you and Lilian. I've
brought loads of news, too-soon's we get where I
can tell it."
"0 my son, my son!" sobbed Mrs. Randolph.
"What a terrible risk for you to run!"
"Dave!" exclaimed Lilian, "I'm as proud of you
as I can be; but I'm glad Diana went to the door."
"Reckon she did!" came from a fiercely enthusias-
tic voice behind them. "You kin jes' trus' Dinah!
Do you s'pose I'd hurt 'im? I's one ob de ole sort, I
is! I's a Lee!"
She was proud enough of that family fact, but not
so much so of another, for she added:
"How he did fool me, dough! Tell ye w'ot, Mars'
Randolph! now you isn't a cullud pusson you's got to
lookout foh yourself. De army folks'd shet ye up,
suah."
"Mrs. Randolph!" was exclaimed excitedly at .that
moment, as Mrs. Redding herself came down- the
stairs.
"0 Mrs. Redding!" replied Mrs. Randolph. "My
only son! He made his way through the lines to
come and see his mother."







THE BATTLE OF NEW YORK.


"God bless him!" said Mrs. Redding fervently.
"We will do all we can. Take him upstairs right
away."
"And get the black off," said Lilian. "I'm just
wild to have a good look at him."
"And I'll go out and get him some clothes," said
his excited mother. "They mustn't find him in dis-
guise, and say he's a spy."
"Oh, nonsense!" said Mrs. Redding. "They won't
care how he came. He can't hurt the army. Don't
I know what my husband would say?"
"You're just as good as you can be," said Lilian,
"but I'm glad the black'll come off."
"I should say it would!" laughed Mrs. Redding.
"Some of it's on your face now; and look at your
mother's!" Diana was already chuckling over that
fact so vigorously that nobody could make out what
she was saying.
"Why, Lilian!" exclaimed Mrs. Randolph, "that's
so! Come, Davis-come right along with me!"
In a few seconds more Mrs. Redding was alone.
She held a paper in her hand, and she looked at it as
she said to herself, in an almost bewildered way:
"Her son! How strange it all is! But I don't see
what we are all going to do if Mr. Hunker takes the
house. I thought I could pay him any time before
the end of the quarter. I could have paid him up







GIVE US A VICTORY. 45

before this if all of them had paid me. Turn us all
into the street? The old villain! He can't and he
shan't! I'll manage it somehow. We'll see! Some-
thing will come. I'm sure it will."
She looked very courageous for a moment, and
then she turned and went upstairs with a slow, wea-
ried step and an air of despondency. She was in a
kind of war with circumstances, and in this particular
battle of it she was sadly in need of re-enforcements.













CHAPTER IV.

THE NEWSBOYS.

RS. RANDOLPH and Lilian took Davis up
to their own room, declaring somewhat
excitedly that they "would make him look
like a gentleman before anybody had a
chance to see him."
The moment the door of the room closed
behind them, however, they both stood still and
looked at him. There did not seem to be anything to
admire, for he had been shoved around and tumbled
and dusted, until all that could be seen was a very
dirty, ragged young black fellow. His face, indeed,
was shining with delight, through all its coloring;
while the faces of his mother and sister were putting
on expressions of almost hopeless despair.
"Why, we can't do anything for him!" burst from
the lips of Lilian. "We haven't a penny!"
"O Davis!" exclaimed his mother desperately.
"I've no money! I can't get you any clothes. I
can't even pay our board. If it hadn't been for Mrs.
Redding- What shall we do?"
She was answered by a loud laugh of boyish exul-
46







THE NEWSBOYS.


station that made her and Lilian open their eyes with
surprise, but Davis was fumbling among what might
be called the dark corners of his ragged coat, and was
tearing open the waistband of his trousers.
"Thousand dollars!" he shouted. "There! Part
of it is from Uncle John, and part of it is from some of
our tobacco that ran the Charleston blockade. Some
of Uncle John's Carolina cotton got through, too."
"Isn't that splendid?" said Lilian. "Dave, you're
a darling! It's too good to be true!"
"Oh, my dear boy!" said his mother. "Now I can
pay Mrs. Redding. We owe her for nearly three
months' board. But how do they get hold of green-
backs down South?"
"That's easy enough," said Dave, counting over
the money. "Some come by way of England. We
get some every time we win a victory. Besides,
there's a heap of trading done right through the
army lines. Anyhow, General Lee is going to be in
New York in a few weeks. He is on his way. He is
in the Shenandoah Valley, marching north."
"Hurrah!" exclaimed Lilian, all but dancing. "Oh,
if he will only come! Why, greenbacks? He'll get
all there are here, and the North will have to pay the
South back for what the war has cost. Isn't it grand?"
"I guess they couldn't do that," said Dave, "but
he is coming."







THE BATTLE OF NEW YORK.


"You are going to stay here- began Mrs. Ran-
dolph.
"Just a little," said Dave. "I can't tell. But
Uncle John says there are harder times coming for
both sides."
"You're not going back?" said Lilian.
"I've got to," said Dave, "but I must learn all I
can first. It's a kind of scouting duty."
All they wanted to say had to be cut off. The
black boy had to go to the bath-room to change his
complexion, while his mother and sister went out to
buy him a suit of clothes.
"I wonder what Barry will say," remarked Lilian,
as they went. "He won't hurt Davis. But oh, how
good it is! Think of General Lee coming up and
taking New York! How splendid it will be to see
our own flag everywhere, and our soldier-boys march-
ing through the streets!"
"Hush, Lilian!" said her mother. "Somebody
might hear you."
"Let's buy a paper," replied Lilian, "and see what
news they are printing."
They were not likely to have to wait long for a
newsboy. One, in particular, was about to set out
for his uptown business, and was getting some advice.
"Barry," said the Shiner wisely, "don't you ever
say exactlyy w'ot the news is. Keep them big-type







THE NEWSBOYS.


black letters out where folks can see 'em. They all
want to buy something' black."
That may have been his notion partly because he
was a boot-black whenever he was not a newsboy.
That was where his name came from.
"They're awful big and black to-day," said Barry;
"and here I've been selling papers all day, and haven't
read the news myself."
"Who cares what it is?" remarked Kid Vogel. "I
don't look at it half the time."
Barry was looking, however, and reading; and it
was a column almost altogether made up of big
black lines:

EXTRA!!!!

LEE'S ARMY MOVING!

Siege of Vicksburg-England and France-The Blockade-Run-
ners-General Grant-A Talk with President Lincoln-
Army of the Potomac-Proposed Capture of Rich-
mond-Fortifying Baltimore-Earthworks
at Harrisburg-Naval Operations-
Siege of Charleston-
Congress.

There has been no important change in the aspect
of national or military affairs since our last edition,
but all indications point to the immediate occurrence
of startling events.







THE BATTLE OF NEW YORK.


"There!" exclaimed Barry. "All the news is in
small type, at the bottom; and there isn't any, any-
how."
"Don't them editors know?" asked Kid. "How'd
we sell their extrys if they didn't give us a lift? We
wouldn't have anything to holler."
That was too plain for argument, and Barry set
off, leaving his two friends to carry on a downtown
business. It seemed to him that all the people he met
wore anxious faces; and so many of them had five
cents to spare that when he reached his own door he
said aloud:
"I declare! I haven't a paper left for another!
Well, there wasn't any news to speak of, and I've
got some money to show her. She'll be glad of that."
Not many minutes later be was looking into her
face with intense interest, while she was telling him
the very latest news; and when she paused for breath,
saying, "We must be careful and not hurt him," he
exclaimed:
"Hurt him! I hurt him? Now, mother, you tell
Lily and Mrs. Randolph I'll take the best kind of care
of him. I want to see him, though, and get him to
tell me all about it. How did he get through? But,
mother, I've made two dollars. Isn't it bully?"
"Why," she said, "if you can do half as well as
that, I'll be satisfied. If it wasn't for that rent Mr.







THE NEWSBOYS.


Hunker sent a man with a written demand. I'm
almost at my wits' end."
There had been a ring at the door-bell, to which
they had paid no attention, and the servant answering
it had let in a man who at once strode right on into
the parlor.
"Mr. Hunker!" exclaimed Mrs. Redding, indig-
nantly, "you here again?"
He had looked unpleasant enough the first time,
but he looked ugly now. He was dressed expensively,
to be sure, and he wore a diamond pin; but no clothes
or jewelry would have done much for him. He was
short and heavy and wheezy, with a very red face,
and he had kept his hat on.
"Afternoon, Mrs. Redding!" he said, with a tight-
ening of his hard, clean-shaved lips.
"Your notice came, sir," she said. "You needn't
have called."
There was a very defiant expression on her face,
and another, a trifle angrier, was on that of Barry,
as he looked at Mr. Hunker's threatening, frown-
ing visage and heard him say:
"Yes, ma'am, I did demand the rent. Now I find
you can't pay it, all I've got to say is you must go.
I've come to demand it, once for all, ma'am. Can
you pay, or will you quit?"
"Barry," whispered a voice behind him, "Mother







THE BATTLE OF NEW YORK.


says hand her that. Davis brought it. Tell her to
pay him."
Before Mrs. Redding could command her voice
sufficiently to reply, however, Barry himself stepped
right past her. Mr. Hunker had held out a receipt
ceremoniously when he demanded the rent, and it was
now suddenly taken out of his hand.
"There's your rent, Mr. Hunker," said Barry, rap-
idly counting out the money; "and don't you speak
to my mother in that way. Get out of the house!
Quick!"
Hunker's hand closed over the bills, but his mouth
opened with astonishment.
"I reckoned you couldn't pay, or I'd never have
offered that receipt. You kin give it right back."
"No, I won't," said Barry. "Take it, mother.
Lilian handed me the money. He's paid up square.
Now, Mr. Hunker, you can go."
"I'll explain," said Mrs. Randolph, from the back
parlor. "Turn out that ruffian!"
"Ruffian?" echoed Mr. Hunker. "Did she say I
was a ruffian?"
"I do," almost shouted Barry; "and you're an old
red Copperhead, too!"
Mr. Hunker's mouth was opening and shutting,
but he was beaten; for Mrs. Redding, with the receipt,
had instantly hurried away, exclaiming:




















0,



L.:


"7.a


- ago=---


Barry tells Mr. Hunker he can go.


'
)~i-;
L, .~I.
8".,







THE NEWSBOYS.


"Why, Mrs. Randolph! I'm so thankful."
"You can go," repeated Barry to Hunker.
"I'll get even with you, I will!" muttered the dis-
appointed landlord, as he slowly walked out. "How
could this 'ere thing have happened? She's losin'
money."
He was evidently studying hard upon his problem
when Barry slammed the front door behind him, for
his last words were: "And I hed an offer of nigh
twicet as much for the housee"
"You're Barry Redding?"
Barry turned from bolting the door, and out went
his right hand eagerly.
"You're Davis Randolph?" he said-" Lilian's
brother? Ain't I glad you got through! We'll all
take care of you."
"Hear those boys! They're acquainted already,"
said Mrs. Randolph in the back parlor. "O Mrs.
Redding, I am so glad to be able to pay that
board!"
"I'm so glad you could," began Mrs. Redding, but
Lilian interrupted her with:
"Barry's splendid! How he did turn out that old
fellow!"
"Barry's his father's son," said his mother proudly,
and Mrs. Randolph suddenly added:
"They're both soldier-boys. Why, how strange it







THE BATTLE OF NEW YORK.


seems! How can those two boys be upon opposite
sides? It's all wrong!"
"Think of Davis and Barry," exclaimed Lilian,
"being soldiers and having to shoot each other! I'm
glad they're neither of them old enough."
"I'm not glad," said Dave. "I wish I was a soldier
now!"
"So do I," said Barry; "but if I should take Dave
a prisoner I'd treat him right. Tell you what, Dave-
you're a kind of prisoner now. You're inside of our
lines."
"I guess he's safe enough," said Mrs. Redding.
"But he's got to tell me everything," said Barry.
" Come on, Dave. Mother says she's put up an extra
bed in my room for you. It's a load better than being
locked up in Fort Lafayette."
"You can't lock him up," said Lilian.
You ought to be, anyhow," said Barry, blushing
hard as he said it. "You're more Southern than
he is."
"I reckon not," said Davis; but off they went to-
gether, for it was time for Mrs. Redding and her
helpers to think of all the boarders who were soon to
come in hungry.
Outside of the house a man who had lingered in
front of it looked up, with a face as red as one of its
bricks, and muttered:







THE NEWSBOYS.


"Well, if I wasn't dead sure she couldn't pay that
rent! It can't be she's really a-makin' money, keeping'
boardin'-haouse in these times. I'll git her out,
somehow. I'd like to, I would-and that there lot
o' Virginny rebs with her! That is, I won't say I
would if Gineral Lee's really coming I'd want to be
right side up if he did. I've on'y hed jist one con-
tract from the Linkin gov'ment, and I somehow can't
git no more. I know I could git one through Maple-
son, if the Saouth was holding' New York."
That was a curious kind of evening at Mrs. Red-
ding's boarding-house. Somehow or other her board-
ers were hardly able to get a glimpse of her, even
when they tried to. The kitchen was deserted, too;
for Diana Lee did her last work like a steam-engine,
and disappeared upstairs, remarking:
"I jes' want to heah all he's got to say," for she
had begged hard not to be counted out of a little
family party that was to meet in Mrs. Randolph's
own room.
It was a sort of questiong-and-answers party, and
it kept one of its members very busy all the time. At
last Barry asked:
"Now, Dave, did you ever see a whole army when
it was all together?"
"No, sir-ree!" said Dave. "Nobody ever did. It's
too big. It's all over the country-on the roads, in







THE BATTLE OF NEW YORK.


its works, in the camps, behind hills and woods. You
can't ever see an army. Well, yes, I kind o' saw
Lee's army once-at night."
"Saw it at night?" exclaimed Barry.
"Nearest I ever came to it," said Dave. "I was
just about leaving to come here, and Uncle John sent
me up to the signal-station on the top of Black Cap
Mountain with a message. When I got there I could
look down and see the camp-fires as far as I could
look-thousands of them."
"It must have been grand!" said Lilian.
"Oh, but wasn't it!" said Dave; "and so was the
signal for all to move in the morning."
"What was that?" asked Barry.
"We set the woods at the top of the mountain on
fire," said Dave. "Then away across the valley they
answered by setting Pine Gap Mountain on fire. It
told everybody what to do. Anyhow, that's what
they told me. I don't know it all. They blazed like
two volcanoes."
"Don't I wish I'd been there!" said Barry.
"Some of your fellows were in the valley and saw
it," said Dave. "We took 'em prisoners only a few
days before."
Excitement, and scout duty in an enemy's country,
and telling all there is to tell will tire any boy out.
Therefore Davis Randolph was sound asleep the next







THE NEWSBOYS.


morning long after Barry Redding went downtown
with a feeling that he was somehow going into a
newspaper-extra battle.
Kid and the Shiner were on hand, and the three
associates made their first strokes of business at the
steamer landings. They did well with a great,
crowded river steamer that came down the Hudson;
and they sold liberal bundles of extras to the passen-
gers of a steamship that was just in from England.
There were lulls in the rush of trade, however; and
whenever there was a chance they were eager to listen
to Barry's thrilling'story of the Southern boy who had
squirmed his way clean through the Army of the
Potomac. He was a hero. He had actually seen
General Lee and Stonewall Jackson, and had heard
them command their men. He had almost seen a
battle, and he had heard the roar of cannon.
"Oh, but wasn't he gritty!" exclaimed the Shiner.
"The cops won't hurt him," remarked Kid.
"I'm going to sojer it, soon's I'm old enough,"
suddenly exclaimed the Shiner. "Tell you w'ot! I'll
raise a company, and go in as captain."
"I guess I won't," replied Kid. "I'd ruther sell
newspapers to the hull army. Oh, but wouldn't that
be fun! Make piles o' money, too! Then all the
army'd know 'bout the battles they're fighting. "
"I'm goin', soon's I can," said Barry. "Dave says
5







THE BATTLE OF NEW YORK.


he and -all the Southern fellows drill just like our mil-
litia, getting ready to pitch in. He can shoot with a
rifle. He can fence some, too."
The boy they were talking about was not thinking
of them, nor of anything that he had already done;
for he was trying to find out what he was to do
next.
Mr. Simpson, the head book-keeper of the banking-
house of Washington Vernon & Co., was standing
behind his desk, when a well-dressed young fellow
walked in, touched his hat with a graceful bow, and
asked with the utmost politeness:
"Is Mr. Vernon in, sir?"
"He is," said Mr. Simpson promptly. "Anything
I can do for you?"
"Yes, sir," said the young fellow. "Please tell
him I have a verbal message of importance from a
friend of his."
"Certainly," said the book-keeper; and it was only
a moment before the banker himself, in the inner
office, had also been politely bowed to and had smiled
inquiringly at his prepossessing young visitor.
Then he was startled by hearing:
"Is you Mars' Vernon, sah? Yes, sah, I tole you
I'd come down dis mawnin'. I's from ole Virginny,
sah, I is. I knows all de Vernons down dah, sah."
"You don't tell me!" exclaimed the banker, getting







THE NEWSBOYS.


up at once to go and bolt the door. "Well, if this
doesn't beat all! Tell me your name."
"I am Davis Mason Randolph," said the young fel-
low quietly. "I came up here to visit my mother and
sister, but I was told that it might be necessary for
me to get back at once to my relatives in West Vir-
ginia, just south of the Potomac."
"I'm glad you kept dark yesterday," said Mr. Ver-
non; and he did not mean any fun. "Have you seen
your mother and sister? Tell me everything."
Dave told him all that seemed to him worth telling,
and he was showered with compliments by the banker.
"Came through the lines with a drove of contra-
bands!" he exclaimed-" blacked boots, stole wagon-
rides, took a horse from a pasture and rode him all
night bare-backed; and went into New York at last
on a railway, like any other passenger! You'll do!
The Southern boys are beating the Yankees all hollow
for 'cuteness. Now, I've something more to say to
you."
He paused and seemed to ponder and hesitate.
Perhaps it was because Dave seemed so very young;
and that idea may have occurred to Dave himself, for
he said:
"If I came one way I can go back another, Mr.
Vernon. I know exactly what to do. If I were older
I couldn't do it."







THE BATTLE OF NEW YORK.


"Just so!" exclaimed the banker. "Well, you
had better go home now. See all you can of the city.
Have a good time to-day and to-morrow.. Come here
to-morrow afternoon, ready to set out at once. Tell
your mother to take a large sheet of paper and write
a letter to your Uncle John. Leave it open, so I can
add a postscript. Bring it when you come. I'll ask
you once more about money. No, I won't. Give
your mother every cent you have. Here's a hundred.
Spend all you want to spend. You deserve it. It's
pay and rations. We'll see that you have all that's
needed-and she, too." Mr. Vernon seemed to feel
altogether enthusiastic, and so did Dave. He took
the money readily, with thanks, while Mr. Vernon
remarked to him:
"You'll do. I'll tell 'em so. But to think of the
corners you must cut and the risks you must run be-
fore you can look General Lee in the face, and tell
him you have brought him a dispatch from his cousin
Vernon!"














CHAPTER V.


THE CONFEDERATE SPY.

SES, captain, it was a black woman shoved
me down the steps, but it was a white
girl waved the Confederate flag. What I
want to do is to go and get it. She's a
reb, right from Virginia!"
It was the very man upon whom Diana had shut the
door, after telling him to "Go and be a sojer!" He
was a lank, mean-looking fellow, but he was talking
to a bluff sort of man in a rusty blue uniform, who
was neither lank nor mean in his appearance, and who
replied:
"Nonsense! We don't care a cent for out-andout
Southern rebs here. All our trouble is with Northern
Copperheads. But what about that boy? What do
you know?"
"I found out all about it," said the informer
eagerly. "He came through the lines yesterday.
The upstairs girl told her cousin and he told me-
right from Lee's army. His mother lives in that
house. He's a spy-sneaked up here----"
61







THE BATTLE OF NEW YORK.


That'll do. No, you can't have any men to raise
a muss about any girl and her flag. Go and volun-
teer, if you feel like doing something for your country.
Guess there isn't much fight in you, but you might
stop a bullet."
There was an unconcealed contempt in the captain's
manner, and his informant went out of the office with
his head a little down. Instead of being welcomed as
an eager patriot he had been severely snubbed as a
fellow of no account.
Hardly had he gone, however, before the captain
said to himself:
"Anyhow, it's my duty to see about that boy. I'll
send for him. There's mischief brewing of some kind.
I can feel it in the air. We don't watch all the cor-
ners as they do down South."
He seemed to be gloomy and irritated, and he at
once sat down and wrote what seemed to be a mili-
tary order. Then he rang a little gong on his desk,
and a private soldier came into the office and carried
the order away.
"They can catch him best at about dinner-time,"
said the captain.
Over on Broadway, at no great distance from that
very office, a slim boy, in clothes too small for him,
was walking along with a solitary newspaper in his
hand, saying to himself:







THE CONFEDERATE SPY.


"'Cording to what Dave and Lilian say the war
isn't of any use. All the men have been killed for
nothing. I s'pose father and all the rest would have
to be killed before General Lee could march his army
here. Don't I wish I was old enough!"
He did not know how savagely in earnest he had
been talking. He had been looking down and walk-
ing right along; and he almost ran against a gray-
headed, middle-sized man, who suddenly said:
"Halt!"
"Yes, sir," said Barry, holding out his paper.
"Times, sir. Last paper I've got."
"I'll take it," said the man. "I heard what you
said, my boy. President Lincoln wants three hun-
dred thousand grown-up men that feel just as you
do."
"Hope he'll get 'em," said Barry. "My father's in
the Army of the Potomac." Just there he felt as if
he were waking up, for the man wore a uniform and
had star shoulder-straps.
"Mister!" exclaimed Barry, "ain't you a general?"
"Yes, my boy," said the man, smiling very kindly.
"I'm a general. I command the forts around the
harbor. My name is Brown."
"I want to ask a question," said Barry earnestly.
Could General Lee take New York?"
"No," said the general, "he could never take New







THE BATTLE OF NEW YORK.


York-not even if he could get here; and he can't do
that."
"I know a boy that says he's coming," said Barry.
"He's a Southern boy."
"Of course," said the general. "They all think so,
but he couldn't take the city without taking the forts
and all the gunboats in the harbor. I hope the war
will be over before we want you."
"But, general," persisted Barry, "I know another
man: he says all the drafted men won't be taken.
They're all going to rebel. They can take the forts,
too."
"No, they can't," said the general sharply; but a
swift change was coming over his face, and he rapidly
asked Barry several questions-not about Dave at all,
but about Palovski.
I don't want him," he said; I only want to know
what he told you."
Another officer had joined the general, and was lis-
tening, and it was he who at last said:
"Just as I told you, General Brown. There's
trouble ahead."
"Exactly, major," replied the general. "I know
there is-if Lee wins a victory; not if he is defeated.
We shall be ready. Go right along, my boy. If you
want to see war, you may have a chance to see it right
here on Broadway."







THE CONFEDERATE SPY.


.Just as Barry set off at a fast walk, his head all
a-fever over his talk with a real war-general, actually
in command of the city of New York, of the soldiers,
and of the forts, his quick ears caught the word
"Spy!" from the lips of the major. It was as if a
pin had pricked him hard, and he sprang away at
once upon a run, exclaiming:
"I didn't tell them Dave's name, nor where he lives.
If they don't catch me they can't find him. Oh, what
a fool I was!"
He ran well out of Broadway into and up another
street, square after square; and one man shouted,
"Stop thief!" but nobody stopped him or seemed to
be following him. He was a little out of breath then,
and while he walked to catch it again he found him-
self thinking furiously.
"I'm glad I told about Palovski. They ought to
know that. I ought to help them get more soldiers.
That wasn't wrong. Dave isn't any spy. No, they
didn't ask much about him. I didn't tell anything,
either. There, now! was it wrong to tell Kid and
the Shiner? No, wasn't'. They're not in the army.
Would they tell anybody else? Could it hurt him?"
He was growing intensely anxious, and he was get-
ting one entirely new idea to him. He had always
thought of the war as being carried on along the
Potomac and away down South. He had not at all







THE BATTLE OF NEW YORK.


understood that the city he lived in was like a fort,
and had a garrison, and was in the war as much
as was any Southern city.
"Ships of war in the harbor?" he said. "Why, I
thought they only came here to get mended and to
get coal and provisions. General Brown says they
are here to help the forts to keep out General Lee's
army. They can do it, too; and everybody'd help
'em fight."
Still, he did not run any more. He had thoughts
which made him walk pretty slowly all the way home.
His last remark to himself seemed to give him a vast
amount of relief.
"No, sir-ree!" he said. "General Brown forgot to
ask my name. He doesn't know me, and he doesn't
know where I live."
He had not asked because he did not care to know,
but after Barry left him he had said to the major:
"See the police commissioners before the day for
the draft-that is, unless Lee is beaten. They may
need our help. There is mischief brewing."
Just before Barry reached his own house three per,
sons were talking in low voices in one of its upper
rooms. One of them had been downtown, and had
returned with news which had set the other two
crying.
"Dave!" exclaimed Mrs. Randolph, "this is too







THE CONFEDERATE SPY.


bad! We've only just seen you. I can't let you go.
You can't get through to General Lee. It's sure
death."
"O Dave!" sobbed Lilian, "I can't bear it! You
have run risks enough. They ought to send somebody
else this time."
"Nobody else can go, Lil," said Davis. "They
can't trust everybody. It's something that General
Lee must know if he is to capture New York. I'm
glad of the chance. I'm going to do it for our flag-
do it or die!"
Barry had entered the house, and he had talked
very fast for a minute with his mother. "Barry!"
she had said, "we must go and see them at once."
That was the reason why the door of Mrs. Ran-
dolph's room was now suddenly opened.
"What is it?" exclaimed Mrs. Randolph.
"Hush!" replied Mrs. Redding hastily. "I'm afraid
Dave is in danger."
"Dave!" interrupted Barry, "I don't believe I did
any harm. They don't know where you live. I'll tell
you how it was."
"Barry!" exclaimed Lilian, as she stepped in front
of him, "have you told about Dave?"
"No, I haven't; I've come to warn him."
"Are they after him already?" asked Mrs. Ran-
dolph. "0 my son!"







THE BATTLE OF NEW YORK.


"I'd never have thought that of you, Barry," said
Lilian.
She looked very pretty indeed, but it was hard to
say whether her face contained more of grief or indig-
nation. Barry looked straight at her, while his mother
was saying:
"Tell them everything, Barry;" and then he began
with:
"There isn't anything to tell," and went on with all
his talk with General Brown and the major.
Davis listened carefully, but at the end of it he
said, in a firm, low voice:
"Mother, Barry is all right. I'd give a good deal
to be arrested. They'd let me go."
He looked so brave and manly and thoughtful that
his mother kissed him for very admiration, but Mrs.
Redding said:
"Come, Barry! we've all got to be very careful.
It's an awful state of things when you aren't say
what you want to."
She and Barry went out, but they had hardly done
so before Dave remarked:
"Mother, all that about the forts, and the gunboats,
and the draft, and the police is just what General Lee
wants to know. It's straight from the Federal com-
mander of the city of New York. If they would only
arrest me I might learn something more before I go."







THE CONFEDERATE SPY.


"It's just like you, Dave!" said Lilian. "Did I
say anything to Barry? He felt pretty bad."
There was no doubt of that, but he was to feel a
great deal worse. Of course nothing was said at the
dinner-table, for there were boarders there-men and
women. They had all come upstairs, and Lilian was
looking out of a parlor window, when she suddenly
turned very pale and exclaimed:
"Davis-Barry-mother-there they are! The sol-
diers have come!"
"I'll go right with them," said Davis. "I'llgo and
get my hat. Mother, don't you come-nor Lilian!"
"Yes, we will," said his mother.
There was a small tempest of whispered, excited
remarks, as a corporal came up the steps, leaving two
soldiers on the sidewalk. He rang the bell, and it
was answered by Mrs. Redding.
"A young man named Randolph- he began.
"Yes, sir, he is here," she said. "He boards here.
What about him?"
"He is wanted at headquarters."
"Here I am," said Davis, stepping out. "I'm
Randolph. Come on, Barry! let's go and see what
they want of me."
"All right!" remarked the corporal; and then he
added, "Humbug, boy! Some fellow's been fooling
the adjutant. Come along, boys! "







THE BATTLE OF NEW YORK.


"I'm going, too," said Lilian, "whether they want
me or not. Let's go, mother!"
"We'll all go," said Mrs. Redding; but she and the
others had to spend a minute or more in getting ready,
and meantime the boys, who were ready, had walked
off with the men in blue. They only walked as far
as a street-car; and it seemed to Barry only one long,
breathless minute before he and Davis were in a large
room before several severe, stern-looking men who
wore shoulder-straps.
Their first question came to him.
Who are you?" asked an officer.
"Barry Redding. Dave boards at our house- "
"Oh, well! you've nothing to do with this." Dave
nodded at Barry, but he was at once busy with his
own questions and answers.
A man at a table was busy with a pen, as they
asked his name and age and a number of other things;
and Barry heard a tall officer say twice, "All non-
sense!" just before the questioner said sharply:
"You came North to see your mother? How did
you get through our lines?"
"I walked through," said Dave-"crowd of refu-
gees and colored people."
"What account did you give to any of our army
officers?"
"Didn't have to give any," said Dave. "Nobody







THE CONFEDERATE SPY.


asked me. Then I went to Washington and came
here."
There was a rustle at the door at that moment, and
he added, "There are my mother and sister now. I
hadn't seen them for a year."
"He is my son," began Mrs. Randolph; and Lil-
ian's face was very white and fierce, while Barry and
his mother were evidently trying hard not to speak.
"Wait, madam," said the questioner, not unkindly.
"Wait a moment, colonel. Randolph, do you know
where General Lee's army is now?"
"Yes, sir; he is in the Shenandoah Valley, on his
way to New York."
He had made a sensation now, and even the colonel
himself asked question after question, until at last he
said:
"You are not a soldier, but do you not know that
you are hurting your own side by telling so much?"
"I think not," replied Davis. "General Lee is
marching right along. I've only told where our
forces were then. They are not in the same places
now. He isn't the kind to sit still. Our people say
there's enough of that done on your side."
There were red and even angry faces among the
officers, and Lilian looked triumphant; but the colonel
was calm.
"Are you not a kind of spy?" he asked.







THE BATTLE OF NEW YORK.


"Well, yes," said Davis, "if there was anything
here worth knowing; but General Lee isn't near
enough yet for me to tell him. New York is full of
people that would.like to tell him more than I know."
"Fact!" exclaimed the colonel. "My boy, do you
intend returning South?"
"Some day or other," said Davis; "when my visit
is over."
"Could you get back through our lines?"
"I wouldn't have to," said Davis. "I'd only go
and board in some place that General Lee was going
to take."
"I never saw such impudence since I was born!"
roared one of the officers. "Let him go, colonel!
How can we keep out their spies, when a mere saucy
boy can walk right through our careless, worthless
picket-lines?"
"Madam," said the colonel, bowing to Mrs. Ran-
dolph, "your son is at liberty. He is a plucky young
fellow, but he is too rash to be a good spy. He must
be more careful of his tongue. Good-afternoon,
ladies."
"Thank you, major!" said Mrs. Randolph, and they
hurried out.
"Did you learn anything?" whispered Lilian.
"Not much, Lil; but the colonel said to the one-
armed captain that there were not men enough in the







THE CONFEDERATE SPY.


forts to mount guard or man half the guns. If Gen-
eral Lee only knew!"
"Davis," said his mother, "I shall not hinder your
going. You must do your duty. Go and serve your
country!"
"Of course he must, mother," said Lilian; "I don't
believe any one else can do what he can."
She was proud of her brother; but at that very
moment Mrs. Redding was saying seriously to
Barry:
Yes, he is a brave boy; but I wish for all the world
he was in Virginia! So bright a fellow as he is might
do mischief."
' In the.office they had left in the Army Headquarters
Building the colonel was replying to the major:
"Spy? Why, so he is! That is, he would be if he
could. I've hardly any doubt that he came as a spy,
but we couldn't prove it. If we could, what's the
use? Lincoln wouldn't let him be shot. He can't do
any more harm. Let him go!"
Some hundreds of miles south of where they were
talking there was a very different scene. A rail-fenced
road came over the brow of a high-ridged hill that
seemed to belong to a long range of blue, smoky-topped
mountains reaching southerly into the distance. In
the middle of the road a group of dusty-uniformed
horsemen had halted, and for a moment they all







THE BATTLE OF NEW YORK.


seemed to be looking northward in silence. Then one
of them said:
"There is the Potomac, General Lee. I wish I
knew whether victory or defeat for us lay waiting
beyond it."
"There is but one victory possible. We are too
few for any other," answered the noble-looking man
he spoke to.
"Where is it to be won, general?"
"In the streets of New York," replied the Confed-
erate commander. "The war power of the Lincoln
government is upheld by the money power. The heart
of that is not in Washington. If we can stop the
beating of it in New York City for thirty days, we
shall win everywhere-for the Union armies will break
down of their own size and weight. Grant will let
go at Vicksburg. Their fleets cannot keep the seas.
France and England will join hands with us. We
need only one victory in the field. After that New
York is ours, the war is over, and the Confederate
triumph is secure. But there is an army beyond that
river, gentlemen; and the hardest battle of the war
is right before us."














CHAPTER VI.


THE MEANING OF THE FLAG.

ILIAN went home from the army head-
quarters in a triumphant state of mind.
Pm She had heard her brother tell the Federal
officers that General Lee was coming, and
she almost felt as if her army, or General Lee's,
were a number of miles nearer. She was twice
as ready for the proposed drive around the city, and
she and her mother waited half-impatiently while
Davis went after a carriage. If she could have adorned
that somewhat stylish turnout when it came with her
own flag, she would have been altogether satisfied.
Davis remarked that it was a part of his scout duty
to see all there was to be seen, but Mrs. Randolph
doubted his seeing anything of value to the Confeder-
ate leaders. They had not been in motion long, how-
ever, before he declared that he had seen at least one
thing.
"What's that?" said Mrs. Randolph.
"Why," said Davis, "so many men-crowds of







THE BATTLE OF NEW YORK.


them-enough to make armies! You don't see any-
thing like it in the South."
"I'm afraid that's so," said she thoughtfully; and
after that there was a silent time, until Davis sud-
denly asked:
"Was there ever any real fighting done right here,
where the city is?"
"Why, Davis!" said his mother; "don't you know?
There was no fighting when the English captured it
from the Dutch, but in the Revolutionary War--"
"No battles here?" said Lilian, when her mother
paused, as if trying to remember something.
"Well," said Mrs. Randolph, "the British beat
Washington's army in the battle of Long Island.
That was fought in Brooklyn. Right over yonder,
on the shore of Kip's Bay, there was another fight.
That was where General Washington lost his hat.
Over there, beyond Central Park, there was another;
and President Monroe was in it, and he was only two
years older than you are. Away up at Fort Wash-
ington was the hardest fight of all, and we were beaten
again."
"Too bad!" said Dave. "Well, there'll be some
Virginia troops here again pretty soon."
"I wish they were here now!" exclaimed Lilian.
"But oh, what a city it is! Dave, this is the first
time I've seen so much of it."







THE MEANING OF THE FLAG.


It looks like a big thing to take," said Davis; "but
our boys can do it."
"Boys?" said his mother. "What our army needs
is men."
"Well," replied Davis, "Uncle John says all the
boys in the South over thirteen are of full age. It's
the war made 'em so."
If he was a fair sample, Uncle John was right; for
there was something very sober and manly about him,
even while he was out sight-seeing.
As for Barry, he was away downtown selling
newspapers; but it seemed to him as if he had never
before done so much thinking. Besides that, as he
told himself, he always heard everything. He had
just finished a brisk run of evening-paper business,
and was standing at the United States Sub-Treasury
corner, waiting for more customers, when he heard
somebody talking behind him.
"No, Hunker: Lee needn't care a cent for the forts
around the harbor. He is under no necessity for tak-
ing them. All he wants is the city itself. That will
cut off the Lincoln government from its cash-box."
"But the ships of war, Mr. Mapleson," replied
Hunker-" the gunboats? They can steam along the
water-front and shell out any troops holding the city.
General Lee can't hold New York against them."
"Nonsense, Hunker!" replied Mapleson, with a







THE BATTLE OF NEW YORK.


glitter in his cold blue eyes. If I had troops camped
in the public squares and up and down Broadway,
and quartered in the hotels and houses and churches,
they would have all the city for breastworks. They
could not be shelled out without destroying the town.
I could hold it until the Lincoln government at Wash-
ington gave up the fight."
"That's a fact!" exclaimed Hunker. "I never
thought of that."
Barry heard it all, and he thought about it so deeply
that he sold a man a World for a Tribune, and called
him General Brown when he corrected the mistake.
There was another man talking at that moment,
whom Barry could not hear, although it would have
done him good. Hundreds of miles southward and
hundreds of miles westward of the Sub-Treasury cor-
ner a short, thick-set man, in a dingy blue suit with
two dull-looking gold stars on each shoulder, stood
near the stump of a large tree. The roots of the
stump had been cut off, so that it could be tilted
toward one side. A deep hole had been gouged in
the face of the stump. Heavy iron bands had been
driven down and riveted around the massive wood.
Men with telescopes and other instruments were look-
ing, measuring, and directing, while some soldiers
with crowbars carefully tilted the stump to a precise
position.







THE MEANING OF THE FLAG.


In all directions, as far as the eye could see, there
were lines of earthworks. Some of them were
mounted with cannon, and all were teeming with
men in uniform. Here and there, over all these busy
fortifications, floated the banner of the Union, the
Stars and Stripes.
At some distance westerly, beyond a wide, bare
space, ran a long, low hill; and it was covered with
forts and lines of works. Beyond it ran a broad,
muddy river. Over the works that defended the hill
floated the banner of the Southern Confederacy, the
Stars and Bars.
All the air was gloomy with drifting powder-smoke,
and there was hardly any cessation in the roar of
heavy guns-nearer or farther-and the very sun
seemed to look down hotly and angrily.
"Fire!"
SA puff of smoke, a sheet of red flame, sprang from
the hollow in the stump. Then followed a thunderous
report, and something almost visible was hurled high
into the air, in a vast whirling curve. Up, up, up it
went, and away, away, until it ceased rising and
came down with a hissing plunge into the middle of
the Confederate works.
That will do," said the starred man, as he watched
the throwing of the bombshell and saw that it burst
on falling.







THE BATTLE OF NEW YORK.


"Well, General Grant!" said a deep voice close by
him, "who ever heard before of a mortar made of a
hickory stump? I'm afraid it won't last long."
"It won't have to last long, Logan," said Grant.
"It'll hold together till Vicksburg surrenders."
Barry did not hear that, or he would have received
another answer to his great question, "What is war,
anyhow?" He would have seen that war will some-
times discover what a man like Grant or an old hick-
ory stump is good for.
Just now he was pretty well waked up by the
remarks made to him by the man to whom he had
sold the wrong paper. He was trying to excuse him-
self, when another man came up, saying:
World ? That's what I want. Don't you try to
put off any Tribune on me."
Barry reached home tired out, but the first thing
he told his mother was:
"I can buy a new suit o' clothes in a week, at the
rate I'm getting ahead."
"Take two weeks," she said, "and get a real good
one. I want you to look as nice as Davis Randolph
does."
"Well," said Barry, "you mean on Sundays. I
guess it wouldn't do for a newsboy to rig up much.
How Kid would hoot if I did-the Shiner, too!"
Davis was indeed looking pretty well dressed, but






THE MEANING OF THE FLAG.


Barry was keen enough to see that that was by no
means all. He had such easy good manners, and he
was so cool and self-possessed. There was hardly
anything "green" about him, although it was his first
visit to the great city. Barry had lived there all his
life, and yet he had a strong feeling that Dave was
teaching him something new.
"You see," said Barry to Lilian, "he has been
a kind of soldier already. I'm going to be one, sure's
you live!"
"Dave'll be a general, or at least a colonel," said
Lilian proudly. "He is fit for anything. Mother
says it's because he thinks. I wish I knew how to
think."
"That's it," said Barry; "I've been thinking a good
deal to-day. All our militia regiments have gone to
fight Lee's army; but there's lots of discharged volun-
teers, tip-top soldiers, hundreds and hundreds of them,
all around the city."
"That's what Davis said," replied Lilian. "He
called them the rear-guard of your army, and he said
the worst of it was that they were all veterans. He
said General Lee probably knew all about them,
though."
"Well, he'd better not tell him," said Barry.
"That would be being a kind of spy."
"What?" exclaimed Lilian with a frightened look.







THE BATTLE OF NEW YORK.


"You couldn't stop him! You wouldn't! 0 Barry!
you wouldn't go and have Dave arrested again?"
"If I was playing spy against the Confederacy,"
said Barry, "wouldn't it be your duty and Dave's
to stop me?"
Of course it would," said Lilian. Oh, well, Barry
-of course; but we wouldn't let them hurt you."
"I wish Dave was safe down South again, anyhow,"
said Barry.
After supper there was a great deal of talk about
the war, and Barry was surprised at himself to find
how much he knew. He talked about the forts and
the gunboats and the police, and the disbanded volun-
teers, and how the city could be occupied, and how
not, until even his mother looked at him and said to
herself:
"How he is growing!"
Dave talked about the Southern army as freely as
Barry did about the city; but he was in one of his
thoughtful fits, and once or twice he actually whistled.
"How old Davis is!" exclaimed Lilian, after she
and her mother went to their room.
"It's the war," said Mrs. Randolph. "It's a hot-
house. It's a furnace. Oh, how I wish it were
ended!"
The entire question of war and peace had to be put
aside until the next morning. Even then it could not







THE MEANING OF THE FLAG.


be discussed; for the Randolphs were to go out riding
again, and Barry was out early at his newspaper busi-
ness. He actually read one of his papers-the news-
telegraph column-the first chance he had.
"They don't know where General Lee's army is,"
he said. "Well, if the whole Army of the Potomac
can't find him, I guess Dave couldn't. Is he really,
now, any kind of spy-dangerous to our side?"
However that might be, Davis and Lilian and their
mother had a double errand that morning. When
they came back from their drive Dave was all dressed
in army blue. He looked almost like a boy-soldier of
the Union army. He looked well in it, too; but Lil-
ian remarked:
Oh, how I wish it were butternut, with our gold
braid on the sleeves!"
Barry was not to come home at noon, and his mother
saw no cause of remark in Davis Randolph's new suit.
Mrs. Randolph, however, after her drive, spent a long
time over a letter to Uncle John in Virginia, or in the
army, just as if she expected him to get it. Toward
the middle of the afternoon Davis picked up his hat
and turned his head a little away from his mother, as
he said quietly:
"Nobody must know but what I'm coming right
back again-not even Barry nor Dinah Lee-until I'm
too far away for anybody to stop me."







THE BATTLE OF NEW YORK.


"Do your duty, my son," said Mrs. Randolph, try-
ing to look brave and firm.
"O Dave!" whispered Lilian, as she hung around
his neck, "be careful! Don't let them catch you!
Don't run any risks!"
All he seemed able to say was, "Good-by!" but
when he reached Wall Street, and walked into the
elegant office of Vernon & Co., he bowed to Mr. Simp-
son in the most polite and smiling manner.
He went on into the back room at once, and he was
shut up there for some time with Mr. Vernon. That
gentleman was not talking, however. He was writ-
ing something in the letter from Mrs. Randolph to
Uncle John. He wrote slowly, carefully, between the
lines she had made; and the curious part of it was
that his pen seemed not to leave any ink-marks
behind it.
There!" he said, when it was finished; "hand that
to General Lee and say 'flat-iron.' He will know
what to do with it."
"If he doesn't, I can tell him," said Davis. "But
if it's found on me I'll be shot."
"I think so," said Mr. Vernon. "I'm told that
they do not refer such cases to President Lincoln any
more. He is too kind-hearted. Bless him for that!
It's all over before he hears of it. There isn't really
much to be said against Lincoln by our folks."







THE MEANING OF THE FLAG.


"He's a tyrant!" exclaimed Dave. "If it wasn't
for him the North would give up."
"Of course it would," replied the banker, "but that
shows what a man he is. You are old enough to see
that if one man holds up a whole nation he's a pretty
strong man."
"We shall beat him!" said Davis.
"I believe so," said the banker gravely. "I am
doing all I can, at as much risk as if I were all the
while in battle and under fire."
"That's so!" said Dave; and in another minute he
had received his last instructions, more greenbacks,
a hearty hand-shake, and then he was out in the
street.
"Now for General Lee's headquarters!" he said to
himself, in a suppressed whisper.
"Hurrah for the Sunny South! How I would like
to march into New York with him! Wouldn't Lilian
swing her flag?"
All over the great city the Union flags were float-
ing. They were carried proudly by the tall masts of
ships in the harbor; they fluttered in the sea-breeze
that swept over the frowning stonework of the guard-
ian forts. One pair of busy eyes had been almost
counting them that day, and now that Barry had sold
the last of a heavy batch of papers, he stood with his
hands in his pockets looking seaward. His wander-







THE BATTLE OF NEW YORK.


ing trade had carried him to the Battery, at the har-
bor end of the city; and from that spot he could get
a better view of things, both afloat and ashore.
"Flags, flags, flags everywhere!" he said. "What's
the use of a flag? What made them stripe it and put
on so many stars? What's war, anyhow?"
"Don't you know what we soldiers call that flag,
my boy?" asked a weak but cheerful voice near him.
He turned around, and there stood a tall man, who
must once have been very broad-shouldered and strong,
but who was now thin, white-faced, emaciated, so
that his flowing black beard and brilliant black eyes
gave him a look that startled Barry. He wore the
uniform and straps of a captain.
"Guess you ought to be in hospital," exclaimed
Barry.
"I've just come out of one," said the captain. "I
wanted to take a last look at the bay and the flag."
"Going back again, then?" asked Barry.. "Been
wounded in battle? Getting well pretty fast?"
He felt that something about that man was making
him feel excited. It was almost as if the war itself
were talking to him.
"Yes," said the captain. I was wounded in battle.
Shot through the lungs. No, I'm not to get well.
The surgeon says I am to die to-morrow pretty cer-
tainly, but I can walk. The bay is beautiful, but it


























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The wounded captain tells Barry of the flag.




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