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 Front Cover
 Cinderella
 Back Cover






Group Title: Sunshine series
Title: Cinderella
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00081635/00001
 Material Information
Title: Cinderella
Series Title: Sunshine series
Alternate Title: Little glass slipper
Physical Description: 8 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: McLoughlin Bros., inc ( Publisher )
Publisher: McLoughlin Bro's.
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: c1893
 Subjects
Subject: Fairy tales -- 1893   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1893
Genre: Fairy tales   ( rbgenr )
fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Running title: Cinderella, or The little glass slipper.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00081635
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001869426
oclc - 29040104
notis - AJU3973

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Cinderella
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
Full Text















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CINDERELLA.


/ NCE upon a time, a poor nobleman
married a very rich but proud and
tbad-tempered lady. She was his
second wife, and had two grown-
Lr "up daughters, of exactly her own
Disposition. The nobleman, too,
",S had a daughter-the loveliest girl
/'', ever known. She had been brought
; up by her godmother, who, as
S sometimes happened in those days,
was a Fairy.
4 / The marriage was no sooner over
I, than the step-mother began to be
very harsh and unkind towards this
young girl, whose gentle and loving disposition caused the behavior
of her own daughters to appear even more detestable than before.
She made her do all the hard work of the house; scrub the floor,
polish the grates, answer the door, wait at table, and wash up the
plates and dishes.
But the poor child would not complain, even to her father, who
always showed the most anxious affection for her. She knew how
unhappy he, too, was in this second marriage, and how powerless
to help her. When her work was done, she would sit for warmth
in a corner of the chimney, among the cinders; and for this reason,
and to show how much they despised her, the unkind sisters gave
her the name of Cinderella.
One day the two sisters received an invitation to a ball that was
to be given at the palace of the King, in honor of his son, the Prince,
who had just come of age. An invitation to this ball being a great







Cinderella, or the Little Glass Sliper.

honor, the sisters were in high glee, and at once began making
preparations to appear there in grand style.
This meant a great deal more work for Cinderella. She had to
do all the sewing and ironing, to starch and plait the ruffles, to run
out three or four times a day to make purchases, and, when the day
of the ball came, to help her proud sisters dress, even to the arrang-
ing of their hair; for they knew she had excellent taste in all these
matters, although they would rot deign'to admit it openly.
At last the time came to start, and the sisters rode off to the ball,
being mean enough at the last moment to taunt Cinderella with not
having been invited. The poor girl retired to her dismal kitchen,
and could not help weeping as she sat there, thinking over her
sisters' cruelty.
SSuddenly, her Fairy
I l godmother stood by her
/. side, and asked what
Swas the matter. "I,-
_,lo I,--should so much have
ai --have liked "-sobbed
Sthe broken-hearted girl,
/A but could say no more.
70 -- Do you mean, you
S''' \ \ would like to go with
your sisters ?"
/ "Oh! yes, I should,"
S cried Cinderella.
S "Well, well!" said
AJ ria ., z her godmother, "be a
Good girl, and you shall

..P. Cinderella soon dried
her tears; and when
THE. SISTERS RECEIVING THE INVITATION TO THE BALL. her godmother said,














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THE FAIRY APPEARS TO CINDERELLA.


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CINDERELLA ARRIVES AT THE BALL.







Cinderella, or the Little Glass Slyper.








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^ CINDERELLA S CARRIAGE GOING TO THE BALL.
"Fetch me a pumpkin," she ran and got the largest she could find.
The Fairy scooped it hollow, touched it with her wand, and imme-
diately .changed it into a magnificent carriage.
Then, seeing a mouse-trap in which were six live mice, she told
Cinderella to open the door of it; and as each mouse ran out, she
touched it with her wand; and so got as handsome a team of
mouse-colored horses as were ever harnessed together.
Then she made a coachman out of a rat, and six tall footmen out
of six lizards from the garden. Another touch from the wand
changed Cinderella's dingy clothing into a beautiful ball-dress, that
sparkled with diamonds. Last of all, the Fairy gave her a pair of
slippers made of glass, the smallest and prettiest ever seen.
Cinderella was now quite ready. Just as she was stepping into
the carriage, the good Fairy said, Mind, whatever you do, don't
be later.than twelve; and warned her, that if she did not leave in
time, her carriage would turn back to a pumpkin, her horses to
mice, her coachman to a rat, her footmen to lizards, and her dress
to rags.
There was a great stir at the palace when the splendid carriage






Cinderella, or the Lztle Glass Slzper.

drove up, and great was the interest displayed when Cinderella
alighted. The Lord High Chamberlain himself escorted her to
the ball-room, and introduced her to the Prince, who immediately
claimed delight, the envy and admiration of all the ladies and gentlemen.
The hours flew all too fast. At supper Cinderella was seated next
her sisters, and even conversed with them, they little thinking who
she was.
When the hands of the clock pointed to a quarter of twelve,
Cinderella, mindful of her godmother's warning, arose and hastened
to her carriage. The Prince hurried after her, expressed his regret
that she must leave so soon, and begged her to visit the palace
the next evening, when the festivities were to be continued.
The following night the two sisters went again to the ball, and
Cinderella's godmother let her also go; but in a much handsomer
dress than before.
The Prince waited for her at the door, at least three-quarters of
an hour, and when she arrived, led her into the, ball-room. He


CINDERELLA'S CARRIAGE COMING FROM THE BALL.



















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CINDERELLA'S FLIGHT FROM THE BALL.


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CNDERELLA IS ESCORTE TO-THEPA


CINDERELLA IS ESCORTED ?'O THE PALACE.


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Cinderella, or the Little Glass Slzper.

danced with her every time, and kept by her side the whole
evening.
Cinlerella was so happy, she entirely forgot her godmother's
warning, and the time had passed so quickly she did not think it
was more than eleven when the first stroke of midnight sounded.
She jumped up from her seat by the side of the Prince, rushed across
the room, and flew down stairs.
The Prince ran after her; but was too late. The only trace of
her was a glass slipper, which had fallen off in her flight. The
Prince picked it up, and would not part with it.
Poor Cinderella got home frightened and out of breath, with no
carriage-no horses-no coachman-no footmen-and all her old
clothes back again. She had none of her finery now, except the
other glass slipper.
The King's son made the strictest inquiries, but could get no
information from the servants of the palace, or the soldiers on
guard. The only person
that had passed' them,
was a poorly clad girl,
S;.: who certainly could not
"^, ^ have been at the ball.
,\--- The-next day heralds
were sent through all
the Kingdom, proclaim-
"l 'ing that the Prince would
marry the lady who could
wear the slipper that he
had picked up.
The rivalry among the
Ladies was very great, but
S5." their feet were all much
too large. When the
Herald called on the two
THE PRINCE FINDS THE SLIPPER.






Cinderella, or the Little Glass Slipper.

sisters, Cinderella
opened the door,
and recognized the
slipper at once. As
soon as her sisters
were quite tired out
with trying, she
said, "May I see if
it will fit.me ?
They began to
laugh and sneer;.
but the herald, look- r
ing very attentively
at Cinderella, and
seeing what a love-
ly face' and figure THE SLIPPER FINDS ITS OWNER.
she had, said, Everybody has a right to try."
He handed her a chair; and no sooner was the slipper tried, than
it fitted like a glove. The two sisters bit their lips in envy and
vexation; and they nearly fainted when Cinderella quietly put her
hand into her pocket, and brought out the other slipper,
The moment both slippers were on, the good Fairy appeared,
and, touching Cinderella's clothes with her wand, made them more
costly and dazzling than ever. Then the two sisters recognized that
the despised Cinderella was the beautiful Princess whom they had
seen at the ball; and throwing themselves on their knees, asked
S her to forgive them the very many unkind things they had said
and done to her. She lifted them up, kissed them affectionately
and said she only wanted them to love her now. A royal escort
was sent to conduct Cinderella to the palace, where the King's son
met her; and in a very few days they were married.




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