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Title: Short summary of the history of Haiti from 1492-1948
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00081396/00001
 Material Information
Title: Short summary of the history of Haiti from 1492-1948
Physical Description: 86 p. : illus. ; 14 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Heraux, Jules
Publisher: Tourist Dept. of Haiti
Place of Publication: Port-au-Prince
Publication Date: 1949?
Edition: 3d. ed.
 Subjects
Subject: National songs, Haitian   ( lcsh )
History -- Haiti   ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Haiti   ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Port-au-Prince (Haiti)   ( lcsh )
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Haiti
 Notes
General Note: Based on and translated from "Port-au-Prince et les autres villes de la République d'Haiti" published 1934.
General Note: Includes words and music of the national hymn, "La Dessalinienne."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00081396
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 16316979

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page i
    Front Matter
        Page ii
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Main
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    Back Matter
        Page 65
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Full Text
JULES ELRAUX
SHORT SUMMARY
OF

THE HISTORY
OF

HAITI


From 1492-1948
3nd. EDITION
TRANSLATED FROM PORT-AU-PRINCE
ET LES AUTRES VILLES DE LA
REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
1934 "
COURTESY OF THE TOURIST DEPARTMENT
OF HAITI





CHARMING

CHATELET DES FLEURS
HOTEL & RESTAURANT
in Cool Kenscoff, is 5000 feet
above sea-level and only 15 miles,
35 leisurely minutes from Port au Prince.
The cuisine is unexcelled :
AMERICAN, HAITIAN, EUROPEAN
Living accommodations are those of modern-day
Amnricans
The climate is that of
New England in September
Californie in November
and New Orleans in April
The most distinctive and pleasant living
in the Caribbean
You have not seen the Caribbean
until you have seen:
CHARMING CHATELET DES FLEURS















































~



B










VOLUMEE HAS BEEN
F AIMED
UNIVERSITY OF
.-JA LIBRARIES.
THIS VOLUME HAS.BEEN
MICROFILMED
BY THE UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA LIBRARIES.






HISTORY OP HAITI


GIRISTOPHR 60LUMBUS received from
the Spanish Sovereign three sailing ves-
sels; the Santa Maria, the Pinta and the
Nina with a orew of 152 Ren. and sailed
froq Palos for the discovery of the New
World on August 3, 1492.
On October 12th, after wuch trouble,
be sighted GUANAIIAI, (Arohipelago of
the BahaMas). On October 27 be disco-
vered Suba, and December 6,, be anobo-.
red in a bay whicb be called "Hole St.
Nicolas". Haiti was discovered.

THE ISLAND

The Island was called lispagsola.
It was divided in five kingdoms, gover-
ned by ohiefs carrying the title of
"G IQUI". There were about one million
inhabitants of brown bue, with smooth


-1-






hair, living frow hunting and fishing,
and to whom tke discoverer gave the name
of "Indians".
Goppelled to work hard and sorely mis-
treated by bije spaniards, tie Indians
with the exception of those who hid them-
selves in the mountains were rapidely
externiinated.
Tc supply their place they had to re-
sort to slave trade.
In 1629, English and French adventu-
rers founded establishments in the North
of the Island. Soipe applied themselves
to hunting and thcy were called "BOU6A-
NIERS", others, bolA pirates, living
from pillaging vessels, were called
"FRUBIOOTERS".
In 1697, by the "Treaty of RiswiOk",
Spain ceded tc Prance the whole par of:
the island whict were under the power ot
the French, and HISPA ,NOLA, from that
-2-





time, took the rnawe of Santo-Domingo.
In 1789, the population of Santo-Do-
rningo became divided into three distinct
classes: the white (forty thousand), tihe
slaves (six hundred thousand) aqd ilter-
pediate class, the freednen, (forty thou-
sand).
THE FRUNGH REVOLUTION

The French Revolution, proclaiming
liberty as the wost important of man's
rights, had its echo aL Santo-Domingo.
The freedmen of the North, under the
leadership of O~I and GlAVYINNE, clai-
Wed energitically for their class their
rights, which were granted to them by a
Decret of the National Assembly in Frarn-
ce.
conquered, they were extradited from
the spanish part where they were refu-
gees and beaten on the square of "Notre
Dame", at Gap.
-3-






The freedmen of the South took arms
under the leadership of RIIAUD and PIN-
(NINAT, and aroused the slaves of the
work-sbops.


Lencral Uge
This situation, speculated by the E~--
glish and the Spanish, became so criti-
cal for the French that the coissary
SONTIONAX, sent by the Metropolis, pro-
-4-







claimed on August 23, 1793, the general
liberty ol tle slaves, which decision
was ratified a few months later hvby rorr,t
of the National Assembly, ex. -Liij t .he
abolition of slavery to a11 tte iren'q
, olonies.













General Chav anes

Then arose a narn who had the vision
of liberating his country Ien?, and his
name was, TOUSSAINT LOUVERTURE.
-5-








TOU99AINT 1'JUVgRTIURE


' ..'V


At first in the service of the p-p.
niards, his valour had, for a long tie,
held the French in check. Later he tur-
red to the service of France, and having
--b-






retaken the French towns which were unl-
Aer the power of the IpaniarAs, he was
prouoted-due to bis military genious,


-to the rank of G~ier~l of tue Division
of the colonial arny.
At the investigation of HRDOUVILLE
who succeeded SONTHONAX, general RIgAUD
-7-


G ne t.t






who was conranding the provinces of the
South, refused to recognize the authori-
ty of the new General in ghief.
This was the signal of a civil war
wiich lasted 13 months and ended by the
defeat of RIgAUD who went to France with
his principal lieutenants.
Regaining the absolute master of San-
to-Domingo. TOUSSAINT convened, at Port-
au-Prince, a meeting of ten members who
appointed lhi governor for life, and vo-
ted a (onstitution for the colony.
The Metropolttis was.afraid of so
much authority.
BONAPARTE, then first consul, rushed
against Santo Domingo an expedition of
25,000 men under the leadership of his
brother-in-law LgLMERh, husband of PAU-
LINE BONAPARTE.
The expedition of approximately ten
-48-






vessels, arrived in Maiti in February
1802.
Sui"oned to surrender himself, ge-
neral Sristopher who was in command at
Sap, sent the answer that he would only
give up a town in ashes, and putting the
words to actions, he set fire to li.
sumptuous dwelling. The hostilities star-
ted immediately.
THE FREN&H

The French had the superiority in ar-
wuaent and organisation; they conquered
the natives at each engageivent, but this
was not without horribles sacrifices
which left them ore crippled than con-
quered. The 23rd of February, TOUSSAINT,
who was cantoned at "RAVINE i OULEUVRI"
received the shock of an entire division
of the French Army under the comqand of
general RODHAMBIEU, and the best batta-.


-9-






lion of LEgLERS guard. This was a fight
without Biercy which caused such a seve-
re loss to the French that they gairne
nothing by their. victory.













General Rochambeau

At "TROIU RIVIgREO" in the North-
Vest. general MAURIPAI also kept in
cheek during pore than a week another
French division.

-10-







Assailed by superior forces, he was
obliged to give up to the multitude, and
put down arms, after showing his great
valour which gained him the admiration
of the conqueror.

The most bloody episode of that une-
qual fight took place at the entrance
of the "6HAINB D9E GAHOS" where stood
the 'Fort of "LA GRgTE A PIERROT.
Leclerc had decided to take posses-
sion of it on 'he suspicion that TOUS-
SAINT had transported his treasures the-
re. To this effect h2 assembled an arny
of 18.000 aen provided with a strong ar-
tillery. The "GREMT A P1RROT"- armvd
with 12 canons, had but a garrisoil of
1.200 uen under the coiran.d of DEgA-
LINgS, helped by MASNY, LAMARTINIERE,
and MORISSgT.
On March 4th, the French attacked.


-11-






Repulsed by npirderous fire of tIe rtil
ve., they retreated in desor'der haviiE
had two generals wounded during Vte
action.
At the news of that bloody defeat,
1,gLgRu who was in Port-au-Prince w(nt
quickly on the spot with new force;i and
decided that another general attack
should be given the 11th of March.
DSSALINES
DES ALINge, who frog the fort was
following the Movenents cf the French
arny, assembled the garrison around him
self, and brandishing a lighted torch
said: "In a moment we shall be attac-
ked. I prefer, to have the fort blown
up than to see the French enter it. I
want to keep with me only those who
know the price of liberty. Let those
who wish to become slaves again fol-
low their destiny, and leave the pla-


-12-







ce. Let those who, to the contrary,
prefer to die free arrange themselves


$'''


I.:. .''
r1


Emperor Dessalines


around me and get ready to do their
duty Tte garrisson answered as one aanI
"We will all die for liberty!"


-13-





At the break of day, the "Marseillai-
se" resounded in the camp of the natives,
and the besieger, confused for an ins-
tant, began to sing the hywn which had
always carried thek to victory on the
battle fields, of Europe.
This was In epic day. Vainly the
French irultiplied their attacks; the na-
tives'fire stopped theq each time, cau-
sing thew dreafful losses:fiveegenerals
and more than one thousand we7.
Fearing that the shock would cause a
disaster, LG6LER( renounced all new at-
tack: .e0 .ad the Fort move narrowly sur-
rour ed to which he had for many days
submitted to an uninterrupted bombard-
tent.
Being ip short of water, provisions
and ar~unitions, the besieged held coun-


-14-







cil, and the evacuation was decided on
March 24 at eight p.n.; the remains of
the heroic garrison, 700 men in all,
left the fort and realized this unlikely
exploit of opening a way, with bayonnets,
through the French battalions.
In less than three aoonths, the French
had lost more than 5.000 Ren, but their
armies were victorious every-where. On
May, 5, 1802, TOUSSAINT, conquered, Made
his submission.
Lg9QLER soiled his victory in having,
less than a month-later, TOUSSAINT kid-
naped on his farn at Knnery.

He was embarked with his family on
"The Heros" which sailed for Frapce. The
first consul, incensed of the heroic re-
sistance of. the black general, had hii
Locked up in. "Fort de Joux" in "Jura"
and left him there to die from priva-






tions and cold, the 27th of April 1803,
after a captivity of ten months.
Sy the initiative of Mr. L. g. Lhe-
risson, a rqonuient, made by the Haitian
sculptor Noril gtarles, was, on July
9, 1922, raised on the place christened
since "TOUSAINT LOUYgRTURE", to vwbo
should be naQed The First of the
Blacks ".
THE MASTER OF THE COLONY
As Master of the colony, LEg6LRG, re-
established slavery there. DESIALIN i,
former lieutenant of TOUN8AINT, and P9-
TION, former lieutenant of RIgAUD pla-
ned to reorganize the resistance. PE-
TICN gave the signal of uprising in the
night of October 13 or 14, 1802, at
"Haut du Gap", and three days after,
DESALINES, in his turn, had the canon
fire the alarm at "Petite Riviere de
l'Artibonite.*" It was a war of sly enr-
-16-







buscade and nightly surprises, which,
together with the yellow fever 'epidemic,
sweeping the white troops, carried off
in less than four months 45.000 men and


General Leclerc
50 FrencGb qerjerali. 'Tie epiderGc did not
spare LMUGR J wio succontbed on November.


-17-







2. 1802, leaving the conanrd of the army
to ROG AMMBAU, who3e military seniority
valour and cruelty, designated him for
that post.
DESgLINg~, who was recognized by
all as the general in Shief, delegated
to the South FEROU and &EFFRARD with the
mission to conduct the war there. He
raised PETION to the rank of Brigadier-
Seneral, and assembled the officers of
the aryy to the Arcahaie congress where
he nade then swear, on the blue and red
flag that he had just created, to live
free or to die.

THE HOSTILITIES
The hostilities were from then pu-
shed with such a vigour, that on the
EIonth of. October, Port-au-Prince, which
DESALINES personally besieged, was conr-
pelled to surrender.


-18-







Durtag that same month of October,
the Trench garrissons at "Gayes" and
"Jeremie" submitted also, thus permit-
ting the troops of the louth and West
to join the army which was fighting the
French in the North.
This is where the battle of "Vertie-
res" took place, one of the Most beau-
tiful deeds of arms in t1he war of Inre-
pendance.
THE EXPLOIT OP DE9SALINES
On November 17, 1803, on the "Lenor-
Wand", farm near the Gap, DSSALINES had
the whole army March before him, and po-
inting his sword to the direction of the
gap, said: "Behold the term of our ef-
forts, swear all to conquer or die".
This was less an army than a ragged
horde, covered with ud and blood, enia-
ciated by privations and fatigues, but


-19-






who vere electrified by the breath of
approaching liberty: they were passing
boisterous clamour, ereot and sailing,
even thise who were weary, under the
weight of their haversac, stimulated by
the voice of. the general in khief strai-
ghtned themselves up to obeer hi.
To the vanguard, behold 6APOIS LA
MORT at the head of the ninth senibri-
gade. He was not only a hero, but tbh
battle being prepared, will bring hbl
tomorrow to the height.of a seqi-god.
Behold 61iBR at the head of the 3rd,
11th and 20th seli-brigades. JEAN PFI-
LIPPi DAU. at the head of a few batta-
lions of the 10th composed of the elite
of Port-au-Prince. Behold ARU IX, the
oldest general of the arOy, and 6ANSI
the conqueror of Jalcel.
rouni DISSALINI are arranged the fi-


-20-







erce Aragons of Artibonite urtdor the.
wooipaid of tke faithfull GIIRLOTIR UK-
6*DIIU, and tke izntrepiAs PAUL PROMPT.


URISTOPHR, backed by REMAIN at tle
bead of the Ist and 12th se~i-brigade,r


-21-






has already scaled the counts of "La Vi-
gie".
Here a few topological details are
necessary. To reach to the wards of the
gap to the "Barriere Bouteille", the na-
tive army had to cross the hillock of
"Gharrier" along side of which the bed
of a dried streak? formed a ravine from
which overhung a half ruineA bridge.
Nearly opposite "Sharrier", the Port
of "Vertieres" outside of the power full
barricade, diss iulated around his
flanks, was pointed toward the narrow
passage, the Ienace of twelve canons ed-
ged its enclosure. One thousand ien, in
addition, assured its defense.
Further off, the Forts of "ghampin",
"Pierre Michel", the Hospltal "Belair"
and "Breda", dissimulated all around
held under their fire the swampy plains
of "(happin", and the Gap Highway.


-22-







It was not without reason that RO-
SHAMBEAU judge the gap impregnable.
However it rmay be, the order of at-
tack arrived -fron? the Headquarters on
November 18, 1803, at the dawn of day,
and our battallions woved, drunk with
enthusiasm.
The vanguard, under the comWand of (A-
POIS, was instructed to go forward and
not to stop until they reach "Barriere
Bouteille". They rushed by charging, but
as soon as they reached to the top of
"Pont Sharrier" they were stopped by the
grapeshot of "Yertieres".

ROSHAMB~AU, by the noise of the ca-
nons, left the Gap, surrounded by his
guard of honor, and took position on an
eqiqnence near enough "Yertieres", frmnI
where he was permitted to assist to the
battle.


-23--






THE EXPLOIT OF GAPOIS
Under the battery fires of "Vertle-
res", the 9th, the 7th, and the 14tt se-
.i-brigades wavered, GAPOIgbreathinlg in


General Capois


thel his audacity led themn back to the
fight, but the enemy's fire whicht was
not even seen, laying low their ranks,


-24-







like ears of corn, obliged them to re-
treat again. DESALINES seeing the peril
then rushed the 3rd, the llth, and the
29th, seimi-brigades against the knoll
which were disseminated, even before
half-way reaching "Gharrier".
Raging mad, bounding like a deer, SA~
POIS rallied the remains of the army.
Mounted on a magnificent horse elabora-
tely caparisoned, which iade a target of
it he took command of the grenadiers and
carried theu off for a last attack.
A bullet felled his horse under him
but disengaging himself directly he getup
and brandfshing his sword, he cried:
"Forward, Forward!". It was in vain that
the grapeshot, scattering the dead on
all side, plucking the feathers froin his
"bicorn". "Forward, Forward!" roared the
fierce &APOIS.
At that moment applause burst from






ROSNAMBE~AU'i guard of honour. A beating
of the drums was heard, and the fire
having ceased, a French officer was seen
advancing towards our lines: "Captain
ROCHANBEAU, said he, sends his admira-
tion to the general officer who just
covered himself with so much glory".
Having thus spoken, he salutes with
his sword, returns to his caIp, and the
fire begins again.
lABART and PIILIFPP DAUT, by charging
steps, rushed forward, braving the gra-
peshots of the barricades, and canons
of "Vertieres".
The battle was restored. At that no~
went the Sharrier knoll presented no
more shelter, fortunate barricades had
to be made under the enemy's fire, and
trenches had to be dug. One then sees
that unheard thing; impossible under
the hall of projectiles that raise the


-26-






dust all around him, PHILIPPE DAY, sri-
ling as if in a parade, begins to draw,
with the point of his sword, the line
of intrencheients
Our colors finally float, on the
harrier knoll, as a defiance.
At about mid-day a caisson of powder
explodes, and "Yertieres" is but a quick
clear fire, that becomes impossible to
look upon.
The French leave the Fort, dragging
along with them their heavy cannons.
At this sight DgESALINES feels that
he takes the victory, Galling the chief
of squadron PAUL PROMPT, he said: "In
a few minutes there must not be a sin-
gle white man beyond the Port or that
I may learn of his death".
PAUL PROMPT salutes and disappears
with his squadron into a cloud of dust.
The French forti a square bristled
-27-






with bayonnets, that twenty charges of
cavalery are not powerful enough to
break through. Now and then the square,
by a chief order, opens and voqits the
grapeshot. At last the heroic obstina-
tion got the best of science, and the
French, in confusion, returned to the
fort, pursued and sabreed as far as the
ditch, where PAUL PROMPT, carried away
by his eagerness, fall with glory.
The battle begins again unmercifully,
but in the evening the rain, wetting
the cartridges and the powder, compels
the. combatants to inaction. In the heart
of the night DE8ALIN~E cane to Ghar-
rier, bringing his congratulations to
all and consolations to the wounded, and,
saluted by the hurrah of the ariy in
frenzy, he l.ft leaving at GLERVEAUX
the order to begin the attack afresh at
the break of day.
The order could not have been exe-
-28-






outed for that very night, the garris-
son evacuated the Fort after having
set fire to it.
Indeed our sacrifices had been hea-
vy, up to the end of the day we count
fifteen hundred dead bodies and twice
the amount wounded, but the result was
incalculable and from the following day
RO0NHAMBAU, fearing that the "sap" would
be stormed, sent Adjudant-4eneral DUVY~-
RIER to DEIgALINE$ for the purpose of
THE PROCLAMATION OF THE
INDEPENDANGE
negotiating a surrender of the city.
And January 1, 1804, on the place of
arms of gonaives, JEAN JAgQUEg DEg~AL-I
NES, general in Ghief of the Native Ar-
iy, proclaimed the independance of the
former French Golony of Santo Do~ingo
that look from them tbe name of HAITI.


-29-






D gAAL1INg received the title of go-
vernor for life and in September, 1804,
1e had a inMself proclaimed emperor, un-
der the title of JAGQUES 1 (Jares) 1.
At his death in October, 1806, GHRIt-
topher was elected President by the (Sons-
tituent Assembly called together at
Port-au-Prince. He refused that title
and withdrew to the North, -.ere he had
himself proclaimed King under the rna'
of HENRI 1st.
The Senate declared hie an out-
law and PETION was elected President.
Givil war was again let loose. After
bloody encounters, but none decisive
between the army of the Republic and the
troops of gHRISTOPHER, the latter set-
tled town at Milot and attended to the
administration of his Kingdon. He built
the "Gitadelle Laferriere" on the sunrit


-30-







of Bonet-a-Leveque, in prevision of an
offensive return of the French.
This fortress erected at an altitude
of 833 meters, and which a national' sub-
scription, due to the generous initiati-
ve of President VINRENT, has recently
permitted its restauration as well as
the Palace of gans-Souci and its chapel,
is a wonder that one never grows tired
of admiring and which draws thousands of
visitors each year. GHRISTOPHER esta-
blished schools, had the roads widened
and kept in repair, and developed agri-
culture and industry.
PETION, the founder of the Republic,
was equally and admirable administrator.
GHRISTOPH~R has had an iron discipline to
prevail in the North; PETION, on the
contrary, always proved himself of a
good-heartedness and an.indulgence that


-31-







had bin surnamed: "The Father-of the
People". He founded the Lyceuam PgTION of
Port-au-Prince, propagated public ins-
truction and distributed lands to the
officers of te ariy.


It is thanks to PETION and the gene-


-32-







rous co-operations in money, arms, amu-
nitions and men he granted twice to BO-
LIVAR conquered, that the Venezuelan He-
ro was able to begin the struggle afresh
and in 1819 to deliver his 3Duntry from
the Spanish domination.
General JEAN-PIERRg BOYER, at the
death of PETION, succeeded him to the
Presidency of the Republic and one year
and half after the unexpected death of
GHRISTOPHER, on August 19, 1820, opera-
ted the coalition of the North and West.
The eastern part spontaneously placed
itself under the HAITIAN FLAG.
It is under BOYgR'S government that,
by a powerful indemnity, ARLEA X, King
of France officially recognized our In-
dependance.
BOYER was succeeded by RIVIERE HE-
RARD: it is under his government that,
in 1841, the Dominicans broke off with







us and founded the DoRinican Republic
after a union of 22 years.













S ., ., -


GU~RRIER took the place of HRARD on
March, 8, 1845, and Marked iris passage
by the creation of Parish Boards and the
Post-Office.
At the death of GU~RRIER, PIERROT was






elected President of the Republic At
his fall, -I'!Hg was elected on March, 1,
1846. and diAd suddenly on Feb. 27, of
following year.
Two years later, SOULOUQU~ had bim-
self proclaimed Emperor of Haiti under
the name f FAUSTIN 1st. H- tried to res-
tore the uT.hority of the. Haitian evern-
pent ovei Lhe whole Is and, and after
two years of unfruitful campaign he hid
to renounce his intenti',n The Empire
was ovnrtbrowr on January, 15, 1859, and
the Republic orocnil,1~ed once more.
FABRE gEFFRARD, elected President of
the Republic, developed the Public Ins-
truction and dlscGplined the ary.
He signed vnth Rowne the Goncor iat re-
lative to the organisaton of the catho-
lic religion in Haiti. He resigned in
March 1867 and was replaced by SYLVAIN
SALNAVE. NIS{Ag SAgET succeeded SALNAVg
rn 'ar 1870.






Useful reforms were accomplished und-
er his administration. He respected the
laws, rendered the finances wholesome
and secured the country a prosperity un-
til then unknown.
At the expiration of his terin he was
replaced by DOMINQUE on June, 11, 1874.

BOISROND (ANAL, who succeeded DOMIN-
9UR, signalized himself by an honest and
enlightned administration. He abandoned
the power on July, 17, 1879, and three
months later the National Assembly elec-
ted General LOUIS SALOMON President of
the Republic. The Bank of Haiti was
founded under the Government of galoron
who liberated us entirely of the inden-
nity consented to France for the recog-
nition of our independence. He recrui-
ted, from France, instructors for the
army and teachers for the Lyceums.





At the fall of SALOMON, LE&ITIME
was elected President of the Republic.
general FLORYILLE HYPPOLITE, elected Pre-
sident of the Republic by the constitu-
ent Assembly of Gonaives, (October,
1889), succeeded LEgITIME. It is under
the government of HYPPOLITE that the Pu-
blic Works department was established.
At the departure of general SAM, on
May, 17, 1902, a provisional government,
having at its head general BOIROND GA-
NAL, was named, that decreed new legis-
lative elections. It is under the Pro-
visional government of 1902 that ADMIRAL
KILLISK had himself heroically blown up
with the war advice-boat "La Grete-a-
Pierrot" rather than to lower the flag
before the german gutn-boat, the "Panther"
On December, 21, 1902, the National
Assembly elected general NORD ALEXIS
President of the Republic.


-37-





The Government of NORD ALEXIS sole&ny
coGimemorated, at oonaives on January, 1 ,
1904, the hundredth anniversary of our
Independence and contributed with the Na-
tional Association of the Gentinarian to
have a statue of JEAN JA6QUE2 DESALINES,
founder of our Independance erected on
the (hap-de-Mars of Port~au~Prince.
General ANTOIN9 IMON was elected Pre-
sident of the Republic, by the National
Assembly, ori December, 17, 1908. The Go-
vernmnent of LE ONTE succeeded hii ir Au~
gust, 1911, LE6ONTE perished on August
8, 1912, in the mysteriouss explosion of
the National Palace.
The National Assembly elected, the
saqe day, TANGREDE AUUMUTf President of
the Republic. He died nine months after
and was replaced, on May, 4, 1913, by
senator MIGHEL ORESTE.
ORgETE ZAMOR, who succeeded MIGHEL


-38-






ORESTE, was replaced by DAVILMAR THEO-
DORE in November, 1914. In May 1915, VIL-
BRUN GUILLAUME SAM succeeded DAVILMAR
THEODORE.
Succeeding the unfortunate events of
July, 1915, which marked the fall and
death of VILBRUN VUILLAUME SAM, the Uni-
ted States of America landed military
troops, at Port-au-Prince, backed by Ad-
miral Gaperton's fleet.
On August 8, 1915, the National As-
sembly elected, to the Presidency of the
Republic, senator 9UDRE DARTIQUENAVE.
The convention of 1916, concluded between
the Republic of Haiti and the United Sta~
tes defining, without justifying same,
the purpose of the American intervention
care to settle the respective obligations
of the two contracting parties. This con-
vention, signed for a period of Ten
years, has been, even before its expi~


-39-





ration, renewed for a period that ended
in 1936.
SUDRE DARTIgUENAVE, elected for seven
years, descended from power on May, 15,
1922, and had for successor Mr. LOUIS
BORNO, elected to the presidency of the
Republic on April, 10, 1922.
Reelected in April 1926, Mr. LOUI1
BORNO descended from power on May, 15,
1930.
THE FORBES GOMMISION
Following the report of Forbes Sonm
mission appointed by the United States
government to inquire about the general
situation of Haiti, the citizen EUqENE
ROY, designated by the delegates of the
people, was elected temporarily President
of the Republic with imperative warrant
to see that the legislative elections be
made ic view of giving to the Nation a
definite President, freely elected by a
National Assembly born by popular suf-
frage. -40-







Mr. EUmmNE ROY, having fulfilled his
mandatee with the loyalty which was ex-
pected of hii, gave up the power to Mr.
STENIO VINGENT, elected President of the
Republic, by the National Assembly on No-
vember, 1930.
On April, 1941, Mr. ELI LESOOT was e-
lected President of the Republic, by the
National Assembly.

Mr. ELIE LESDOT who was an aristocra-
tic dictator lasted at the head of the
Nation only four years. On January 7th
1946 a generalmovement consisting into
a general strike throwed hii out of the
power, and a temporary military conmit-
tee handled the situation until another
president be elected. The names of the
executives members of the committee are
as follow: Solonel FRAN~K LAVAUD, General
in Ghief of the Arry, Major ANTOINE LE-
VELT and Major PAUL MAgLOIRE.
-41-






On August 16th 1946, Mr. DUMARSAIS E-~
TIM9l, active c.r, 'f thp Parliament as
deputy, was elected, by the National As~
senbly, President of Haiti Republic for














President Dumarsais Estime

6 years starting the date of his elec-
tion. Inpediately after this election,
the Parliament erected themselves 3ons-
tituent and elaborated a new Gonstitu~
tion.
-42-







The same day of. his accession to the
ha tian presidency, President ESTIME pro-
mised to haitian people the adoption of
i liberal and constructive policy. Wi~
thout any delay, he starts the applica-
tion of a large program for a social wel-
fare and economic development.
Indeed, in less than two years the
present government undertook and reali-
zed in the limits of the Gonstitution
and the laws, the indult of the freedom
of the speech; the amendAment of the Jus-
tice; the reinstatement of the reserve
on the salaries in proportion.of the
high cost of living; the increase of the
workers and day-workers; the construction
of the border town of "Belladere"; the
establishment of the workers syndicate
and trade nen; the irrigation ofourprin-
cipal agricultural parts and their elec-
trification including that of different







localities (Sayes, Jeremie, Groix-des-
Bouquets, Kenscoff, Leogane, Belladere,
gaint-Marc, Port-de-Paix etc); the pur-
chase of six naval units for the cost-gu-
ard service; the development of the net-
work stager and the creation of tourist
centers; the anendmnent of the rural edu~
cation with the construction of numerous
schools and colonies of application
and agricultural fields of cultiva-
tion and application; the improvement
and arrangement of our principal ci-
ties and various shipping ports; the
re-establishlent of the national pres-
tige in the selection of the diplo-
matic and consular representatives of
the Republic; the enlisting of a quali-
fied foreign staff composed of monks and
laymen for the primary and superior ins-
truction in various centers of the coun-
try; the creation and the arrangement of


-44-






professional schools and re-educational
centers; the creation and the arrange-
rent of the hydraulic net-work in va-
rious parts of the Republic; the sup-
pression of the black market and other
practices of supply of provisions for
the passes; the re-establishment of the
standard of living of the public securi-
ty agents; the accomplishment of the pro-
ject of 1949 International Exposition on
the occasion of the Bi~-entury of the
foundation of Port-au-Prince. The restau-
ration of the Borders twons: Belladere,
Mallepass, Ouanaminthe, Anse-a-Pite and
others.
The execution of such program in so
short a time allows to augur that with
the continuance in the administration and
the application of such efficient measu-
res, the Gountry will succeed to a real
progress -id a true civilisation.






PROCLAMATION OF THE INDEPENDANE AST
JANUARY 1st.- 1804
Native Ary:
To day, first of January 1804, the e-
neral in Ghief of the native army, accon-
panied with the general's of the arr~y,
called to the effect of taking measures
which Tqust reach to the happiness of the
country.
After announced to the Assembled Ge-
neral's their real intentions to assure
for ever to the natives of Haiti a last~
ing government, motive of its nost weave
anxiety, what he had done by a discours
which has for object to put at the know~
ledge of the foreign Power's the reso-
lution to rake the country independent
and to enjoy a liberty consacrated by the
blood of the People of this Island, af-
ter collected the advises, asked that
each-one of the assembled Generals pro-
nounced the 9WEARING to renounce for ever
to FRANGE, to die rather to live under
-46-





r;Rr .Aonmiratior and to fight ur.ti ih
last ',h for independence.
The *,n,_:erais pierced of thec :.s :..-
pr iL:ies, after giving by an unanimnous
v;:ice their compliance to the project
well marnifested of independence, had all
swear to the Posterity, to whole Univer-
se, to renounce fo: ever- t' FRANGE and
die rather to live under her domination.

(9). DESSALINES, General 'n chieff ; PE-
TI,-N, GSRITOPMEiJ JLERVEAUX, 1EFFRARD.
VERNET, GABART, Generils of Division;
P. ROMAN, E. (SRIN F'. GAPOIS, DAUT,
JEAN-~LOUI, FRAN6OIS FEROU, GANGE, L. BA-
ZELAIS, MAGLOIRE AMiROIE, J.J. HERNE,
TOUgAINT BRAVE YAYOU, Brigades Gene-
rals. BONNET, F. PAPALIER, MORELLY, GHE~
VALLIER, MARION. Adjudlint-enerals- MA~
(NY. ROUX, Ghiefs of Brigade: GHARERON,
B. LORET, QUENEZ-MAGAJOUX, DUPUY, GAMBRO--
NE, DIAQUOI Aine, RAPHAEL MALET, DERE-
NONGOURT, Officiers of the Arny and BOI--
ROND TONNERRE ,ecretary.


-47-






PHYSICAL MAP OF HAITI


The Island of Haiti, divided since
1844 in two Republics: The Donminican Re-
public at the East, and the Republic of
Haiti at the West is situated in! front
of Mexican gulf, between 17 and 29 de-
grees latitude North, 68-2 and 74-2 de-
grees longitude West front? the meridian
of Paris.
The Treaty signed January 21st. 1929,
between the Dominican Republic and the
Republic of Haiti ended the litigation
concerning the frontier between the two
Republics.

PLAINS

Although the Republic of Haiti is a
mountainous country, with sunmits reach-
ing nore than 3.000 nieters, it is favo-
rable to agriculture, since it has many


-48-






rivers, springs and a regular rainfall.
The pPincipal agricultural districts are:
The Plain in the North with a surface of
1.500 sq. kil. which produces sugar cane,
tobacco, coffee, sisal, corn and cotton.


THE REPUBLIQUE OF HAITI


The group of the Greater Antilles, si-
tuated in the Garribbean Sea consists of
four isles: "UBA. JAMAIGA, HAITI aud POR-
TO-RIGO. The island of Haiti extends o-
ver 29.000 squares inles. There are, on
this island, two countries: The Dominican
Republic, in the East, whtch cover 18.200
square piles and the Republic of Haiti, in
the West, with 10.800 sq.ri. The popula-
tion of Haiti is evaluated about at
3.500.000 inhabitants and its surface
is 28.000 sq. Kil.


-49-






GL LMAT9


Being situated in the tropics, Haiti
.has a very favorable climate. In spite of
its tropical latitude, Haiti is most favo-
rably situated as to climate conditions.
9he is exposed on three sides to regular
currents of air. The country is Mintai-
nous, but the mountains are not very high,
as to prevail the winds. The highest one
is aLout 8 500 feet.

The establishment of cross-currents
is the sole effect of the weather of Hai-
tian mountains.
The temperature decrease is proportio-
nal to the elevation at an approximat
te rate of 1" 6 (1,82 F) per each 150m.
or 492 ft. For the costal regions,the
average of 250 (779 F) is noted.







PORT AU PRINm E


The Gapital of Haiti is l'ort-au-Prince
which was also the Gapital of the late
colony of Saint~Domingue. Funded in 1749
its central situation permitted to conmu-
nicate rapidly with all the other parts
of the Island and its pos tion to the
bottom of "La Gonave" gulf iade it a su-
re roadstead.
Its area which extend each day is of
8 km 2. She is the seat of the Executive
Power, the Legislative Power, the Supreme
Gourt and the Archbishopric.
She possess also a Gourt of First En-
treaty, Four Peace Sourts, one National
School of Right, one National Medical
School, Pharmacist and Dental Art, one
Diligent of Sciences School for the edu-
cation of Engineers, one central Agricul-
tural School, one Art and Trade School,







one Normal School for young girls, one
Normal School for boys, two boys lyceum:
Petion and Toussaint-Louverture, one ly-
ceum for girls and many other primary and
secondary schools for boys aild girls.

The ground where is erected the Gity
has a strong declivity finding itself at
the beginning of a valley which strecth
of about 310 meters height: on the South
the chain of the Hospital mountains of
580 Meters of elevation and ended towards
the sharp end of "LaMentin" on the North,
a little hillock situated at 380 meters
front the sea, arise insensibily till to
weet those from the East.

The town take-off her name from the
vessel "Le Prince" which anchored in the
Port towards i680, and which marked out
the advantages to the authorities of the
colony.







Indeed, she is shelted against the
great wind from; high seas by the Moun-
tains'which obstruct it on the North,

gast and South. She is Moreover protected
on the West by "La gonave" Isle which the
position -as en inmense stone block her
entrance. By two channels of five leagues
wide, it can be approached to the North
and to the South. One hour after having
passed over one of these channels the
ship which coiMing to Port-au-Prinoe cut
towards the South in following the coast
lines of the sandbanks situated at the
foot of the mountains. The traveller can
remark separated by little distances -
the succession of cultivated fields, of
tbatched houses, of villas and manufactu-
res situated on the flank of the hills,
with 250.000 inhabitants. The official
language is French which is spoken by the







educated class. The peasants and the low-
er class speak "Greole" which is a pa-
tois. At Port~au~Prince, rarely the ten-
perature of the day exceeds 35 G (950)
The nigbts are cooler
T TRANSPORTATION

The Gapital can be reached by sea or
by air (Pan American Airways, K.L.M.
(Royal Dutch Airlines) frorn Miami, South
AMerioa and other Garibbean points, Port~
au-Prince is a regular port of call for
several American and European steamship
lines specially the Standard Fruit and
the Alcoa Steanship 9ornpanies.

THE GITIEN


The other principals towns are as fol~
lows: SAP-HAITIAN in the North ~ which


-54-






25.000 inhabitants and where good Hotels
can be found; AUX GAYg% in the South -
with 22.000 inhabitants. There also good
Hotels can be found; 9ONAIVES, with
20.000; 9T-MARG, with 12.000; PORT-DE-
PAIX, with 12.000; JERgMIg, with 10.000;
JAGMEL, with 10.000; PETIT-4PAVY, with
10.000; LEOGANE, with 10.000. These towns
can be rea hed by automobile as the .
roads are good and air-plane. At JERE-
MIE, gONAIV99 and T-~ MARS, Hotels are
available.


BANKS

There are two Banks: the "Banque Na-
tionale de la Republique d'Haiti", and
"The Royal Bank of (anada".






GURRENGY


The "Gourde" is the unit currency of
the Republic of Haiti. One "Sourde" e-
quals to 0.20 U.S. cents. The "gourde"
is exchangeable ~ op demand and without
preTiun at the fixed rate of 5 gourdes
for one U.S. Dollar.-


MAIN EXPORT PRODUCE

The main Export Produce of Haiti is
the Goffee. Others like: Gotton, Socoa,
Sisal, Bananas, log-wood, Runs, Honey,
Sisal shoes and Bags, Mahogany furniture,
-Trays and-Bowls etc., various kinds of
woods, essentials oils are exported.

FOREIGN TRADE

The Haitian Foreign Trade is esta-
blished with all countries of the world.







U.S.A. France, I.taly, great Britain, Ier-
ntany, The Netherlands, BelgiuI, Japan,
Shina, Ganada, Mexico, Argentine, etc.
etc.
RESTAURANTS
Also rQany restaurants can be found ip
Port-au-Prince but the select-ones are:
On the Shanp de Mars: KAL4AR' (GAPE, AN-
SONIA, 9AVOY-~AFG, RgX GAg and AUX 0O-
SAQU~E where a really international "cui-
sine" and the coolest drinks are served.

GLUB8

Many Glubs can be found in Port-au-
Prince but the select-ones are: BgLLE VU
GLUB, PORT AU PRINGIgN GLUB, AMBA99ADORS
GLUB, etc.
T ORLAND {LUB and PETIONVILLK 6LUB are
located out of the city. Taxis and other
kind of transportation are available at
any tiie requested.


-57-






NIWHT GLUBg


At Petionville: SABANE GROUSOUNg and
ZANZIBAR are both select dancing places
where on Saturdays and Sundays nights the
society qeet for a real baMboche. To get
there taxis and Buss are always for hire.


KENSGOFF


Kenscoff, the wonder of the tropics
is a small town situated at an altitude
of 1.500 m. (about 5.000 ft.) Its teepe-
rature is about ~ yearly 150 ( (590 F).
During suner time the temperature rarely
exceeds 21 G (700 F) but in winter season
the night is down to 100 (500 F). 9oWe (50.
times a night temperature of 80 G to 90
(49-480 F) is to be recorded.







At Kensooff, the following Hotels are
to be found: DRgMIX-HOYEL; FLORYVIL-BOIL;
(IATELET DES FLgURS, and 20 irnutes fur-
ther up "TRE REFLUE", The roonps are very
-comfortable; the cooking very good and
the price very moderate.

S0OT ELS
There are pany hotels which can be
ranged in three classes; but the best o~
rnes are: "Splendid Hotel", "Hotel La 8i-
tadelle"; "tans gouci Hotel", which are
situated ii the residential sections up-
town. The others are to be found in town
where the temperature is not so agreea-
ble.

SOMMlt'NATIONS
N N ~ R.,.A. All America Gables; Inter-
national TelepFhore Service.
QO '; TO HAITI1


-59-






































-60-


A- 4 41 AW 1 ;I- Ai.~L re-






























-6.1-








WORDS OF THE NATIONAL HYMN
1
Pour le Pays
Pour lee Anoetres
Marcbons Unis
Dans nos rangs point de tri trees!
Du sol soyons seuls maitrts
M archons unis
Pour le Pays, pour les Ancotres
Marchons unis
Pour le Pays pour les Anoctres.


2
Pour les Aieux
Pour la Patrie
Bichons joyeux
Quand le champ fructifie
L'aie se fortifie
Becbons joyeux
Pour les Aieux: Pour la Patrie
Bcchons joyeux
Pour le Pays, pour la Patrie.



3
Pour le Pays
Et pour nos Pbres
Formons des fils


-62-







Libres, forts et prosphres
Toujours nous serious frbres,
hInms des fils
Pear le Pays et pour nos Pares
Ibrmns des Pile
Pour le Pays et pour nos Pres.


4
Par les Aieux
folr la Patrie
0 Dieu des Preuxl
Sous ta garde infinie
rends nos droits, notre vie
0 Dieu des Preuxl
Pour lee Aieux
Pour lee Aieux
Pour la Patrie.


5
Pour le Drapeau
Pour la Patrie
Mourir est beau!
Notre pasee nous crie
"Ayes l'Ame aguerrie"
Mourir est beau
Pour le Drapeau
Pour la Patrie
Mourir est beau
Pour le Drapean
Pour la Patrie.
















-N N I








Tle RIVIERA OF THE WEST INDIES

SPLENDID HOTEL

PORT-AU-PRINCE
HAITI


Situated in a beautiful park in Port-au-Ptince's
most lovely residential section
Spacious rooms with private balconies and bath rooms
French and American cuisine of international distinction
Wood Panelled Splendid Bar, featuring Haitian rum potables in an
Old World atmosphere.
Cable dress : Splendid Mme. Maria Fraenekel, proprietor.
Telephone : 5591 Mr. P. Albertini, manager.









4la mul Oans #uvi
To"-atn-prim. Waftlt


EXCELLENT ACCOMMODATIONS

IN GRACIOUS SURROUNDINGS


OPEN ALL YEAR


AMERICAN PLAN


-b6-


Tephone 5~6








(9ranb otrl @lofnfaa
HOTEL-BAR-RESTAURANT
PORT.AU-PRINCE, HAITI


Overlooking the Bay situated in tropical setting
in the coolest section of the town.
Renowned for its excellent cuisine
Large and varied wine cellar-
Open air dining room Rooms with private bath
Swimming Pool.
Room and Board $ 1 -8 10 up. Special rates for week and month
MOLUSHM-RENCH -OERMAN-SPANISH


-67-







HOTEL DES CARAIBE8
Port-au-Prnoe, Haiti



B ... I,


Is the new place for tourism's.

Located on a 10 acrespark. Attractive... Atmosphere.

All comfort. Good Cooking. American Plan

Double S 14, 16, 18. Try Hotel des Caralbes and

you will be satisfied.

-68-









BOURDON HOTEL
FRENCH -AIERICAN-ITALIAN-AYTIAN KITCHEI


A friendly Welkome await you at "BOURDON HOTEL"
Situated among beautiful mountains in the Residential sections
up town where the coolness in inviting.
Enjoy also the delicious frncnh cooking carefully prepared by a
MASTER COOK
For your convenience we keep at your disposition
very comfortable rooms with bath.
For more informations please cal 2940 we will be glad
to give them to you.
THE DIRECTION


-69-







YOU SHOULD SEE

MHraux Tours & Travel Service


For all your sightseeing and shopping
tours and tor your Excursions to
OLE REFUGE", "SANS-SOUCI"t
THE CITADELLE-LAFERRIERE
THE PINE FOREST,
or for a visit to a
VOODOO DANCE
Inquire at the
KALMAR'S RESTAURANT
on the CHAMP-DE-MARS
Tel: 3494
or write to:
GEORGES HERAUX
P.O. BOX A--TI
PORT-AU-PRINCE
HAITI


-70-

















Every one should visit
"LE REFUGE"
an exquisite Lodge perched at 5.500 feet above
sea level and 1.000 feet above Kenscoff located
in the most glorious scenery of the Caribbeans
where you will enjoy the perfect climate,
The Best Food in the most pleasant atmosphere at
VERY REASONABLE RATES
Hot Water, Latex Air Foamed Mattress
Horseback Riding Tennis Hicking
The Ideal Place for Winter or Summer vacation
For all information call : 3494
or write to :
GEORGES HERAUX
P. 0. BOX A-177
PORT.AU-PRINCE, HAITI





KALMAR'S CAFE


Restaurant

The Leading Place for really good
Food and Drinks.

On the Champ de Mars facing the
National Palace

Gerty and Georges H6raux
Proprietors


invite you cordially
Phone :3494

























SOUVENIRS AND CURIOS SHOP
SISAL, HANDBAGS, COASTERS,
SLIPPERS MAHOGANY ARTICLES


Prop; Vve. P. DELAQUIS

A STREET, PORT-AU-PRINCE. HAIT








HAITIAN TOURIST BUREAU


PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI

Rue du Qual




Manager:SYLVIO CATOR

AGENT FOR THOMAS COOK & SON ETC


$kbhteing Shopplng ezurslon and Trdp







ANSONIA HOTEL and CAFe-RESTAURANT
Port--Prince, aiti--Phone: 2076

North Square of Champ-de-Mars
Rendez-vous of the Select People where
First Class of Cooking- Ice-cream and Cakes
All Kind of drinks are served.
Well come !..



THE SOUVENIR SHOP
Mme. PAUL PAQUIN
KARL (3ETJENS
Port-au-Prince. HaIti
T61. : 2795
A Permanent exhibit of all Haitian Handicraft
The largest assortment of FRENCH PERFUME"
and Liquors.
Visit us!..






MAGIC ISLAND SHOP
Rue du Quai. No. 57
Port-au-Prince, Haiti

Sisal shoes, handbags, luncheon sets,
Straw bags, glass holders,
turtle shell, silver, mahogany,
lignum vita articles.
All articles hand made, woven or carved by
best Haitian Handicraft.

HAITIAN INDUSTRIAL ART
GEORGES DESLANDES, (Prop.)
Manufacturer and Exporter
of Handicraft Mahogany Goods

Sales Room
Port-au-Prince, HaTti
Rue du Peuple No. 74.
P. O. Box A-7






AGENTS IN HAITI
PAUL E. AUXILA
Rue Traversibre Phone 2735
Port-auPrince Haiti

All best brands of French Perfumes Mens' & Ladies
up to date SHOES -Nylon Stockings & Hose
for all ages Oiit articles Belts Handk.rchiefs
Silk piece goods for all purposes.
At Competitive Price.

VISIT TIE :
HAITIAN CURIO SHOP
F. CARDOZO
Roe do Quai 0o. 49

Sisal Hand bags
Sterling silver bracelets
Hand carved mahogany Trays, bowls
Real tortoise shell hand bags, bracelets etc.
French perfume
Marie Brizard Liquors
Vve. licquot Champagne





PROM ONE 20 FIVE STARS !

If you want the best Rhum
in the world look for:


RHUM BARBANCOURT

The great mark...
The Rhum that one no discuss...
BARBANCOURT gold dchps...
The Rhum that one drink with... devotion...
and eyes... closed...

JEAN GARDM&RE
Suooessor
r1--112 Cesare Street
Ask your driver to take you there...








ABITBOL AND ABOUDI 8 Co.
PORT- 4-PtRINCE
IIHAITI

Code uase : AL U . .
TdeItphi address : ABIOL
Tepheam No. SI3
Rwe Courbe No. 105


is the biggest firm

Established since 1918

ACTIVITIES:

Dry Goods, Whole Sale

l~uporlt Limacm


ABITBOL AND ABOUDI & Co.







CONSTANT BUZ JOSEPH (Prop)


ELIE JOSEPH FILS


Cable Address :JHFI LS, Port-au-Prince
SnUley's and Private Codes
P. O. Box A-i9

Wole sale Merzchant
and
Manufacturers Agent
Phone :Bureau 2442
Stores 2601
Residence 7354


Port-au-Prince, Haiti





LIBRAIRIE


A LA CARAVELLE

BOOKSTORE
36 Rue Roux, Phone 3495
Port-au.Prince, H'AYt
American magazines and books

PAUL MEVS

Tourist Shop and Hardware
Corner streets du Quai and Fronts-Forti
Opposite Custom-House
Mahogany turtoise shell and souvenirs
Port-au-Ptince, HaTti









THlE ART a CURI

SIOP FISHER

Port-au-Prince

5S-55 be do Qai


$we Dlstbutovs
of


PARFUMS PRINM


MATCHAIELL

Paris- France


The Armanac Brandie

of Krsa--m

lordMa--ran
























La Citadelle Laferriere, stupendous fortress located
in the back of Cap-Haitian on the North coast of Haiti, is one
of the tourists marvels of that French speaking Republic. It is one
of the fabulous structures which have sirvivec from the reign of
Emperor HENRI CHRISTOPHE
In building that splendid fortress King Christophe did net
thought he produced one of the wo.aders of the Western Hemisphere.
Only absolute power could have put that strong hold atop
its mountain peak when it stands as a monument to the ire
will of this great warrior.
Visit can be made to the wonder during on day from Cp-
Haitian; in two days from Port-an-Prince by automobile; a few
minutes by plane...
Visit the Citadelle Laferribre fII







FOR YOUR TRIPS

SEE TIE

HAYTIAN TRAVEL SERVICE
blprtethtie of amrls expreu ud uk r/. Foster.
L L1 T. A. 11I1iE
SIGITSIIIUI TRIPS
TO EIVEY WNEIR
KENSCOFF-PINE FOREST
CITADELLE-LE REFUSE

If ye desire to have a pleasant ad profitable
Stay in alti, apply to the "IAITIAN TRAVEL SERVICE
A well-orgaized Travel Bureau served by an effkM
and trained personneL
CUS FOR RENT 01 A DAT IBSIS

PRONI tiL r w24.


HAYTIAN TRAVEL %Kjmvicg.









COIFIIIIE LITHOiPHIIOQE D'HAITI

All kind's of work in the Oraphic Art as :
LITHOGRAPHY
OFFSET
VARY-TYPINO
PRINTING
In colors or in black and white.

Our photoengraving Departement delivers
all kind's and shape's of plates in a minimum time.

English, Spanish and French Spoken.

The client is the Boss in our plant

Visiting cards, Business card's, Wedding
card's, Letter head's, Enveloppes, Bills, Menu ect. ect.





THIS VOLUME HAS BEEN
FLY MICROFILMED
BY THE UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA LIBRARIES.


K. L. M.


ROYAL DUTCH ill LoES



S. A. E. G.


MARTIN IMPORTand EXPORT CO.




THE ART & CURIO


SHOP FISHER

Port-au-Prince

53-55 Rue du Quai



Sole Distributors

of


.--1
~ij

- I


'1-

-,ATIN


PARFUMS PRINCE


MATCHABELLI

Paris France


The Armagnac Brandies


of Kressmann


Bordeaux-France







THE ART & C UIRIO SHOP FISHER
POIR''-ALT-PIINCE IIAITI
Ihon 14 .,Pst B. I u lu Quai
PLost IHox 63.


THE MOST IMPORTANT SHOP IN TOWN
HAYTIAN HANDICRAFTS
FRENCH PERFUMS, WINES, LIQUORS, BRANDIES etc.

IMPORT RETAIL EXPORT


'4._h

..




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