• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 The tree cake
 "Father knows best"
 "Little mother's help"
 A day at the sea-side
 "Mother, had I minded you"
 Advertising
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: The tree cake : and other tales
Title: The tree cake
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00081244/00001
 Material Information
Title: The tree cake and other tales
Physical Description: 63, 8p., 1 leaf of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 16 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Rooper, Wilhelmina L
Blackie & Son ( Publisher )
Publisher: Blackie & Son, Limited
Place of Publication: London ;
Glasgow ;
Edinburgh ;
Dublin
Publication Date: [1892?]
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Parent and child -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1892   ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1892   ( rbgenr )
Prize books (Provenance) -- 1892   ( rbprov )
Bldn -- 1892
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues   ( rbgenr )
Prize books (Provenance)   ( rbprov )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
Scotland -- Glasgow
Scotland -- Edinburgh
Ireland -- Dublin
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by W.L. Rooper.
General Note: Date of publication from prize inscription.
General Note: Frontispiece printed in sepia.
General Note: Publisher's catalogue follows text.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00081244
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002236744
notis - ALH7222
oclc - 191867843

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Front Matter
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    The tree cake
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    "Father knows best"
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    "Little mother's help"
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
    A day at the sea-side
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
    "Mother, had I minded you"
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
    Advertising
        Advertising 1
        Advertising 2
        Advertising 3
        Advertising 4
        Advertising 5
        Advertising 6
        Advertising 7
        Advertising 8
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text



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Ak i II


ROLEY FRIGHTENED WHEN STEALING THE CAES.








THE TREE CAKE:


AND OTHER STORIES.


BY

W. L. ROOPER,
AUTHOR OF "CHATS WITH CHILDREN," ETC.


LONDON:
BLACKIE & SON, LIMITED, 49 OLD BAILEY, E.C.
GLASGOW, EDINBURGH, AND DUBLIN.












THE TREE CAKE.


CHAPTER L

NCE upon a time there was a little
Sboy called Roley. Roley was
Very fond of eating sweet things.
6s His mother was sorry for this.
SShe often told him that he must
take care not to be greedy. Roley," she
would say, "you must never eat more
than you want of anything, merely be-
cause it is nice." There was no harm in
Roley's liking sweet things, but there was
great harm in his eating too much of
them as he sometimes did.
One day Roley's uncle sent him a nice
cake. It was very large, and the top was






THE TREE CAKE.


covered with pink and white sugar. All
round the cake there was a pattern in
sugar like the branches of a tree. It was
for this reason called a tree cake. Roley
was very pleased with it. When he saw
it on the table he said: "Oh, what a nice
cake! May I have a large piece, mama?"
"Yes," said his mama, "you may have
a large piece, Roley, but you will like
Kitty to have a large piece too, will you
not, Roley ?" Kitty was Roley's little sister.
"Yes, mama," said Roley, "let Kitty
have a large piece, only it is my cake, so
I ought to have most."
Was not this a greedy speech? Roley's
mama thought so, and looked very grave.
Roley saw that she looked grave, and he
knew she was not pleased with him for
what he had said. His face got very red,
and he whispered:
"Mama, will you please give Kitty
that bit you have just cut, with plenty of
sugar on it. Kitty likes sugar." Then






THE TREE CAKE.


Roley's mama looked pleased at him,
because she saw that he was trying not
to be greedy. She knew that Roley liked
sugar too, and was very glad to see him
give it up to his little sister.
When Roley had had one piece of cake
he asked for another. His mama said:
"No, dear, you have had enough. I
will put the cake on the sideboard till to-
morrow.
Roley was very sorry to see the cake
put away; he kept thinking, "How I
should like some more cake!" This was
wrong of Roley. When his mama told
him he must not have any more cake
he ought to have tried not to wish for
any more.

CHAPTER II.

W HEN Roley was in bed that night
he said to Kitty, who slept in the
night nursery too:







THE TREE CAKE.


"Kitty, should not you like some cake
now?"
Kitty was half asleep, so she answered,
hardly knowing what she said:
"Yes, please."
"I will go and get some then," said
Roley. I know where mama put the cake,
and there's the moon shining, so it won't
be dark"
"But mama said we were not to have
any more cake to-night," cried Kitty, who
was wide awake by this time.
"Yes, I know she said so at tea-time,
but now I'm so hungry. Mama would
not like me to be hungry. Aren't you
hungry too, it is so long since tea-time?
Look here! we'll go together to the dining-
room and get some cake. Nurse is down-
stairs and mama is out to-night, and papa
is away, you know, so no one will know."
"But I don't like to do what mama
mustn't know," said Kitty; I like her to
know all I do."






THE TREE CAKE.


"Well, we will tell her some day, only
do come now, it will be such fun, and the
cake will taste so good! We will pretend
we are grown up, and going out to dine.
You can take my arm downstairs as if you
were a big lady and I a gentleman."
"No, Roley, I dare not go. Don't you
remember when Ann was here she told us
there was a black man on the stairs at
night who would catch us if we did not
stay in bed and go to sleep. He could not
come to us in this room, she said, if we
lay still and went to sleep, and did not
worry her."
"Stuff!" said Roley; "there is not a
black man on the stairs. If there was
papa would shoot him. I'm not afraid. I
shall go downstairs, and if I see the black
man I will knock him down."
"Oh, Roley, how brave you are! but I
wish you would not go," Kitty said.
Roley laughed. "Only girls are afraid.
Of course I'm brave, because I am a boy,"







THE TREE CAKE.


replied he. Then Roley got out of bed,
put on his little flannel gown, and crept
down to the dining-room.


CHAPTER III.

THE moon shone very brightly in the
room, so that Roley could see his
way to the sideboard; and he left the
door open so as to make as little noise as
possible, because he knew he was doing
wrong and did not want anybody to know
it. When Roley got to the sideboard he
got up on a chair and took hold of the
cake. A knife lay on the cake plate, and
Roley took it up to cut a bit of cake, when
a sudden noise made him start. Roley
looked round quickly and saw-what, oh,
what? Why, the black man standing
outside the door in the hall waving one
arm solemnly and angrily (as Roley thought)
at him.






THE TREE CAKE.


Down went the knife, crash went the
plate, bump went the cake on the floor,
over went Roley screaming with fright.
Roley's mama was just coming in when
she heard the noise he made. She ran
into the room and picked up Roley, saying
in a very surprised tone:
You here, Roley! what is the matter?"
"Oh, the black man, the black man!"
screamed Roley, clinging to his mother
and pointing to the place where he had
seen the figure.
"There is no one there," his mother
said; "I came by just now. But I see
what you thought was a black man, you
silly boy; come with me;" and she led
Roley, shaking with cold and fear, to the
door, opposite to which were some pegs.
On these pegs were hung hats and coats,
and among them Roley saw his father's
greatcoat hanging with the hat above it,
and one sleeve loose at the side. There
was a little wind that evening, which,







THE TREE CAKE.


blowing in gusts through the hall, made
some noise, and caused the coat sleeve to
move up and down as if an arm were
moving in it.
Roley was very much ashamed of his
foolish terrors, and of his mother having
found him where she did. Never before
had Roley felt so ashamed of being a
greedy boy as he did now, when he had
to tell his mother that he had come down-
stairs out of bed to eat cake. Roley's
mother said to him, "I am ashamed of
you, Roley. I am very sorry to think I
have such a greedy little boy. You know
it was naughty to leave your bed and
to come down and eat cake at this time
of night. You would never have been
afraid of a coat, and thought it was a black
man, if you had not been doing a naughty
thing. Naughtiness makes boys and girls
cowards. Then Roley began to cry, and
said: "I won't be greedy any more,
mama. But Kitty said, Ann told her







THE TREE CAKE.


once, that there was a black man in the
house, and I heard a noise when I was
going to cut the cake, and I looked round
and I thought I saw him. But, mama,
I told Kitty there was not a black man,
indeed I did."
"Ann was a wicked girl to tell Kitty
such a story. But as for you, Roley, I am
not sorry you had a fright if it is a lesson
to you not to be greedy again."
Oh, no, mama, I never will be greedy
any more," sobbed Roley; and I think
after that he tried hard not to be too fond
of good things.
As for the tree cake, Roley never saw
that any more. His mama took it, and
gave it away to some poor little children
she knew who had never tasted cake
before.













"FATHER KNOWS BEST."


," NE, two, three, and away! There
Syou are, little woman," said
4 -j Peggy's father, as he lifted her
S into the back seat of the dog-
cart one morning. "Now,
where is the strap to fasten you safely
in ?"
Oh, please, father, do not strap me in
like a baby," cried Peggy. "A big girl
like me, of seven years old, to be strapped
in! I am sure I shall not fall out if you
will only let me sit here without the strap
across me."
"But I am not at all sure of any such
thing, Peggy," replied her father, "so you







FATHER KNOWS BEST. ,


must be content to be strapped in, my
little girl, and believe that father knows
best."
Peggy pouted in a very naughty ugly
way when the strap was fastened, but her
father took no notice of that, and as soon
as all was ready he got up in front of the
dog-cart, where Peggy's Aunt Mary was
seated, and drove off.
Peggy's father and aunt were very busy
talking, and did not attend to the little
girl, who was thus left to herself. Instead
of looking at the green fields and the
sheep and cows, and the wild flowers by
the roadside, as she usually did, Peggy
began to think some very naughty
thoughts. We cannot help naughty
thoughts coming into our minds any
more than we can help flies buzzing round
us in summer, but by God's help we
can drive them away, and not let them
stay in our minds. But Peggy let the
bad thoughts stay; she did not try to
(358)






FATHER KNOWS BEST.


drive them away, and these are some of
the wrong things that came into her
mind.
"How tiresome it is to be strapped in
the cart like a baby!" How cross of
father to do it when I asked him not.
He is unkind. I wish I could undo the
strap. I think I could. I will try."
And Peggy did try, and in a few min-
utes the strap was undone, and she was
sitting free, "like a grown-up lady," as
she said to herself.
"I will fasten it again, directly," thought
Peggy, "and father shall not know about
it to-day, but I will tell him sometime
how safely I sat without being held in by
that nasty strap, and he will not fasten
me in with it again."
Just as Peggy had made up her mind
to this the horse jerked the cart rather
suddenly in turning a corner, and Peggy
was thrown out on the road.
For a few minutes Peggy was- quite
(358) B







FATHER KNOWS BEST.


stunned, that is to say she did not know
where she was.
When she came to herself she found
that she was all alone on a dusty road
with a tall hedge on each side. The dog-
cart was out of sight, and Peggy did not
know where it had gone, nor did she know
her way home.
Besides, when she tried to get up from
the ground, on which she had been thrown,
she found that her foot had been hurt by
the fall, and that she could not walk. To
make matters worse, the sun now became
clouded, and the sky looked black and
gloomy.
Poor naughty Peggy! how sad and
lonely she felt.
She began to cry, and sobbed out loud:
"Oh, father, do come back! Oh, auntie!"
But no father was near, no auntie could
hear her voice; they had gone far away
by this time, so deep in conversation that
they had not as yet found out Peggy was






FATHER KNOWS BEST.


missing. All that Peggy could hear in
answer to her calls was the howling of the
wind, which was blowing the dust along
the road, and sighing in the branches of
the trees. Peggy grew very cold, and
her foot hurt her sadly. How she wished
she were safely strapped in the dog-cart
once more! "I wish I had not undone
the strap," thought Peggy. "Oh, what
shall I do? I cannot get home. I shall
die out here and be covered with leaves
by the robins, like the 'Babes in the
Wood;'" and then she cried more bitterly
than ever.
At last a lady came by. When the
lady saw Peggy she stopped and asked
her why she was crying.
Peggy said: "Oh, I undid the strap,
and I fell out of the dog-cart, and I've
hurt my foot, and it's so bad; and father
did not know I fell out, and he's gone
away, so is auntie, and I don't know
where he is "







FATHER KNOWS BEST.


"Don't cry so, my dear," said the lady.
What is your name?"
"Peggy; and I want to go home."
"Well, don't cry," said the lady. "I
live close by in that white house there.
You must come with me there. Father
is sure to come back for you. I will send
some one here to watch for him, and tell
him where you are, so don't cry. Look,
here is a pink sugar-cake for you. Can
you tell me where you live?"
"No, no," screamed Peggy, "I won't
tell you where I live. I won't go away
with you. I shall never see father any
more if I do. I don't want any sugar-
cake. Oh, father, do come!"
You will think Peggy very rude,.and
naughty, but her foot hurt her s6"much
that she hardly knew what she said, and
she had a great fear that this kind lady
wanted to steal her, and not let her go
home. Silly Peggy! But if she had been
wise she would never have got into this I







FATHER KNOWS BEST.


trouble. Just then the sound of wheels
was heard round the corner, and to Peggy's
great joy she saw the dog-cart come up,
with her father and aunt inside it.
"Oh, father, father!" cried Peggy, and
forgetting all about her bad foot she
jumped up from the ground where she
had been sitting. But this gave her
such dreadful pain that poor Peggy
fainted.
When she came to herself she was on
her Aunt Mary's lap in the kind lady's
house. Her father was standing close by,
and Peggy said to him:
"Oh, father, I was so naughty! I
undid the strap, and then I fell out of the
cart as it went round the corner. I am
so sorry, father; and oh, you did know
best!"
Peggy's father knew she would have
a great deal of pain to bear with her lame
foot, so he did not add to her troubles by
scolding her for the disobedience which
'-. ~ ^ ,







22 FATHER KXOWS BEST.

had brought its own punishment. All he
said to her was:
"Yes, Peggy, you have been a bad
foolish girl. I hope the pain and fright
will be a lesson to you never to be wilful
again. But it will be a long time before
I take you for another drive."













"LITTLE MOTHER'S HELP."
(TRUE.)

OTTIE BRIGHT was always called
"Little Mother's Help" by her
father because she was so active
and useful to her mother, saving
her all the trouble she could.
Lottie was proud of the name "Little
Mother's Help," and tried hard to deserve
it better every day.
She was a trim little maiden of about
seven years, with keen brown eyes, a brown
skin, and short dark hair.
Lottie always looked clean and tidy,
and, as a rule, so did the four little ones
younger than Lottie. The three eldest
children went regularly to school, and







LITTLE MOTHER'S HELP.


were noted for being always in time and
always looking neat and nice. Their
teacher one day said to Mrs. Bright: "I
cannot think how you manage, Mrs. Bright.
You keep all your little children so beau-
tifully clean. I know a young woman
with only one baby, who does not keep
it so nicely as you do your five-and
really they are not much more than
babies."
"Why, ma'am, it is Lottie's doing in
great part," answered Mrs. Bright. "She
is such a handy little thing. She has
more sense than some grown-up people, I
declare. I don't know how I should
manage if I had not got her to help me."
"What can she do, Mrs. Bright?" said
the teacher.
"Well, ma'am, she washes and dresses
all the little ones every day. Of course,
you know, I showed her how to do it at
first, and now she is as careful and par-
ticular as I am about them. Of course I







LITTLE MOTHER'S HELP.


look to them as well, because she is but a
little one herself."
I know she is a very active little girl,"
said Miss Stevens. "Her father told me
yesterday that he always calls Lottie
'Little Mother's Help."'
"Yes, ma'am, he does, and so do the
neighbours. It is quite Lottie's name in
the village. And she really is a help to
me. Besides washing and dressing the
younger ones every day, as I told you,
she dusts the room, sweeps up the hearth,
lays the table for meals, clears away after-
wards, and washes the things, cleans the
windows, helps to mend the clothes a
little, and minds the baby."
",Well, it is wonderful, I think, for such
a mite to be so useful. And she gets on
well with her school work too."
"Yes, ma'am, both father and I are
quite pleased with her reading and
writing, and she can sum, too, very well
for her age, and knows her little pieces







26 LITTLE MOTHER'S HELP.


well, she does, and says them so
pretty."
"Yes, Mrs. Bright, she does; she must
be a comfort to you."
"Indeed she is, ma'am; because, you
see, since I've been so badly I have not
been able to get about so much. But I
hope I shall soon get better and be able
to spare Lottie more often for a good
game of play. It makes her too old of
her age doing so much of the work she
does. Sometimes when I send her out
to play she will come back in ten minutes
or so and say, 'Now, mother, let me hold
baby, and you sit down and rest a bit.
I don't want to play any more to-day.'
She is always thinking of me, bless her
little heart."
This was a very nice way for Lottie's
mother to speak of her. But I should
not be telling of a real little girl if I were
to let it be supposed Lottie had no faults.
She had one great fault, the sad con-







LITTLE MOTHER'S HELP.


sequences of which once led to poor little
Lottie becoming her mother's hindrance,
instead of help, for many a day.
The fact was, that doing so much house-
hold work usually done by older girls
made Lottie rather forward and conceited,
till, instead of being content to help her
mother in the ways that were most useful,
Lottie, fancying there was nothing she
could not do, was eager to try work beyond
her power.
I can do that, mother," she would say
when she saw her mother ironing, or
mangling the clothes, or some such thing.
"No, Lottie, you are too young to 'do
this yet, it would not be safe, my dear,"
her mother would say; and Lottie would
feel cross, and mutter:
"I know I could do it if I might try."
This was naughty of Lottie. Naughty
thoughts allowed to stay in our hearts
make us do naughty things, for which we
are punished. So it was with Lottie.







LITTLE MOTHER'S HELP.


One day Mrs. Bright went to take
some clean clothes back to their owners,
leaving Lottie to take care of the little
ones. Lottie and her next sister, Meg,
were going out to tea that afternoon.
They were to go as soon as their mother
got home, so Lottie put out their best
frocks and pinafores that they might be
ready to put on when wanted.
Lottie unfolded her frock and pinafore
and laid them neatly on a chair, and then
did the same for Meg. As she spread out
Meg's pinafore she was much vexed to
see a great red stain upon it.
"Whatever is that stain, Meg?" asked
Lottie severely.
"Why, it's some currant juice that I
spilt on it last Sunday."
"How came you with currant juice on
Sunday?"
"Polly Smith gave me a bit of bread
and currant jam just before school. I
did not want teacher to see me eating







LITTLE MOTHER'S HELP.


it lest she should take it away, so I ate it
very fast, but the school bell rang before
I had done it, and I dropped the bread,
and the jam ran down over my pinafore."
Here Meg stopped to take breath, and
Lottie said with dignity:
"I can't take you out to tea with such
a dirty pinafore, so I shall wash it for
you." This Lottie did, and then said:
"It won't look nice unless I mangle it."
"Oh, Lottie," cried Meg, "you must
not touch the mangle! Mother said you
were too young to mangle. I heard her
tell you so yesterday."
"Yes; but she did not know I could
do it, and I know I can. Of course you
couldn't. But I'm not a little girl now,
I'm nearly eight! Mother forgets how
old I am sometimes."
"No, she does not, Lottie. She told
father yesterday you were nearly eight;
but she did say you weren't to touch the
mangle, and you're a bad girl if you do."







30 LITTLE MOTHER'S HELP.


"Be quiet, Meg. You be still, and do
as I tell you," said Lottie, quite determined
to have her own way. She knew she
was about to do wrong, but she made this
excuse to herself, "Mother wouldn't like
Meg to go out to tea in a dirty pinafore,
and when she comes in she will be so
tired she won't want to mangle and iron
it. I know how to do it, and I shall be
saving mother trouble if I do it for
her."
Thus Lottie silenced that warning voice
within, called conscience, which always
tells us what is right or wrong.
"Now, Meg, you stand on that chair
and hold the handle a minute while I put
your pinafore inside.
Mrs. Bright was coming up the garden
a few minutes later, when screams of
agony from within her cottage met her
ear.
Poor woman, she stood still for a few
seconds, unable to breathe for terror and






LITTLE MOTHER'S HELP.


dread of what she had to see,. and then
hurried into the house.
What a terrible sight met her eyes!
There lay Lottie screaming on the floor,
with the fingers of her right hand crushed
completely out of shape and bleeding fast.
Meg's and the baby's screams added to
the noise. The other two children were
out, or they would have been there too,
no doubt, also screaming.
The poor little girl was in torture, but
when she saw her mother she left off
screaming at once, and even tried to smile.
"Don't fret, mother, I shall soon be
better," she gasped.
Mrs. Bright did not stay to ask how
the accident happened. She told Meg to
be quiet at once, and to go and beg a
neighbour to send her boy for the doctor.
Then she soothed the baby, and did what
she could for poor Lottie.
The doctor came as soon as he could.
He looked very grave when he saw the







LITTLE MOTHER'S HELP.


poor little crushed fingers. He bound up
the hand, and said Lottie must be kept
very quiet. Lottie suffered dreadful pain,
but was very brave about it. She never
complained, and would often say, "Mother,
go and lie down now, I'm sure you're tired;
I shall be better soon." At first the
doctor thought he must cut Lottie's hand
off to save her life. Lottie overheard her
father tell her mother this, so the next
time the doctor came she said to him:
"Please, sir, don't cut my hand off
unless you can make a new one grow,
because I could not help mother much
with only one hand, and there's such a
lot of little ones to do for. Please, sir,
if you cut this hand off can you make a
new one grow, as I'm so little?"
"No, my little maid," the doctor said
smiling, "I cannot make you a new hand.
It is Almighty God who makes our bodies
and limbs, you know, and He only. But
your little hand looks better to-day. I






LITTLE MOTHER'S HELP.


don't think I need cut it off after all.
But it will be a long time before you can
help your mother with both hands again.
You must do the best you can for her
with one. What a pity it was you touched
the mangle!"
"Ay, sir," said Lottie's father, who came
in just in time to hear the doctor's words,
"you may well say that. It made Little
Mother's Help into Mother's Hindrance."
Lottie began to cry on hearing this, for
she knew her father was right. The
doctor said:
Nay, my little girl, you must not cry,
you have borne your pain bravely. One
day I hope you will have the use of your
hand again; and meanwhile, I must ask
father not to talk any more about what
is done and cannot be helped."
"Well, sir, I will not, for it can do no
good now. Good-day, sir;" and as the
doctor went out he heard Lottie's father
say:







34 LITTLE MOTHER'S HELP.


"Don't fret, my dear, about what I
said just now. Look, I've brought you
an orange."
The next afternoon, as Lottie was sit-
ting up in her little chair, she said to her
mother:
"Mother, are you going to take the
clothes home before the children come
from school?"
"Yes, I am," said her mother wearily.
"You don't mind being left a bit, do you?
Mrs. Grey has taken baby out, so you
need not trouble about him. When I
come in I must set to and clean the
windows and tidy up a bit. I've done
but little of that of late. It is sad having
you laid up."
"Yes, mother, it's dreadful bad. Father
say's I'm Mother's Hindrance now. I
wish I'd not touched the mangle. But I
did so want you to think me big enough
to help you in everything."
"I know you did, my dear; but it's







LITTLE MOTHER'S HELP.


best to be content with doing what we
know we can do and are wanted to do.
Then when the time comes to learn some-
thing fresh we can set about that, and
do our best to learn it quickly. But
don't fret, my dear. I heard you singing
baby to sleep to-day, so you're still
Mother's Help. Father only said you
were the other because he's so troubled
about you, and it makes him speak sharp
like."
Then Mrs. Bright kissed Lottie and
went out. Lottie had a picture-book and
some toys to amuse her, but she did not
occupy herself with them long. When
Mrs. Bright came back from her walk,
feeling hot and tired and unfit for her
work of dusting corners and cleaning the
windows, she found someone had done her
work for her. The room was dusted, the
hearth swept, the table laid for tea, her
chair was placed near the window, and
Lottie was kneeling on the broad sill very






LITTLE MOTHER'S HELP.


carefully cleaning the window with her
left hand.
"Lottie!" her mother cried, "what are
you doing, my dear?"
"Oh, mother," cried Lottie, "I have
been trying to do what I could with my
left hand, and I found I could do lots of
things. Doctor said I was to try. Please
let me go on doing what I can to help
you. Indeed I'll only do what I can
now, and I'll never try any more to do
what I can't."
And very hard did Lottie try to be as
useful as possible with her left hand, that
her mother might not miss her so much
as she had done while she was laid up.
Poor little girl, the fingers of her right
hand were for a long time crushed and
shapeless, and it was doubtful whether
they would ever grow to be quite like
ordinary fingers again. But she worked
away bravely with her left hand, and as
her mother fondly said," Lottie does more







LITTLE MOTHER S HELP. 37
with her left hand than many a girl does
with both hands; she was a bit too eager
to do things beyond her power, and a
terrible lesson she's had, poor little dear;
but now she's just willing to do what I
want her to, and she is still my most
precious 'Little Mother's Help.'"













A DAY AT THE SEA-SIDE.


SOM and Trix once went with their
mother to spend a day by the
sea-side. Neither Tom nor Trix
S had ever seen the sea before.
When they came in sight of the
great blue mass of waters sparkling in
the sun Tom cried out, "Oh! mother,
it dazzles me."
Trix stood looking at the sea with her
mouth and eyes wide open. At last she
said, "Oh! you lovely big sea. I do love
you."
"What is that black thing, mother?"
said Tom.
"That is the pier," mother replied. "It







40 A DAY AT THE SEA-SIDE.


is a long, broad, wooden road or walk
built out into the sea."
"Oh! do let us go there, mother," said
Trix. "I see a number of people at the
other end of it, and I hear such pretty
music being played there."
"Yes," replied mother, "we will go
there in a little while. But first let us
walk down to the beach and watch the
waves come on the shore for a little while.
Do you see, Tom and Trix, the waves
come nearly up to the foot of the cliffs
now?"
Yes, mother, and how they do splash
up into the air!" cried Trix.
"Well, by the afternoon the waves
will. be gone back, and where now you
can only see water, you will then only
see sand. There will be a great many
little boys and girls playing about and
digging in the sand then. I will buy
you each a spade and a pail, and you
shall dig in the sand, too, this after-







A DAY AT TI MEA-SIDV.


noon, and pick up some pretty shells to
take home."

By this time Mother, Tom, and Trix
had got down the steep cliff, and stood
close to the waves.
When Tom heard the hissing noise
made by the waves as they rolled in to
shore, he was afraid and said:
"Oh! mother, what a nasty noise!
don't let us stay here."
Trix laughed and shook her finger at
him.
"Oh! you fine boy, to be afraid of a
noise!" cried Trix.
Tom got red, and was angry because
Trix laughed at him, but mother said
gently:
"Little children are told to love one
another, Trix, not to laugh at one another.
You will soon get used to the noise, Tom,
and like it as much as I do. But we will
go on the pier now." So mother led the







42 A DAY AT THE SEA-SIDE.


way to the pier. Tom and Trix were
highly delighted when they found them-
selves walking above the sparkling blue
water. They peeped through the iron
rails which ran along the pier on either
side, and said:
"We really are almost walking on the
sea."
There were some pretty glass shops on
the pier with all sorts of toys, polished
stones, and pebbles in them, which much
amused Tom and Trix.
The end of the pier was very large, and
round. A band of music was playing
there, and a number of smart ladies and
children were sitting on chairs listening
to it. Tom and Trix did not want to
sit down yet, so they ran up and down
within sight of mother, who sat still and
looked at the bright blue sea all round
her, and the little boats with their white
sails, the red cliffs, and the town above
them. When Tom and Trix were tired







A DlAY AT THE SEA-SIbA.


of. running about they came and sat by
mother, and listened to the pretty music,
or counted the vessels they could see on
the sea.

By-and-by Trix .said, "Oh! mother, I
am so hungry!" Tom said, "So am I."
Mother said, "Come and we will have
dinner."
So she took them into one of the glass
shops to get some dinner. I will tell
you what they had to eat. Mother,
and Tom, and Trix all sat at a marble
table, and ate some chicken and apple-
tart, and drank some water out of red
glasses.
When they had finished dinner, mother
took Tom and Trix to a shop, and bought
them each a wooden spade and a pail.
Trix said, Mother, I've got sixpence, may
I buy father this pretty penholder?"
Mother said, "Yes, dear Trix, father
will be so pleased with it;" and Trix







44 A, bAY AT tAE 9EA-SIbR.


bought a smart red pebble penholder to
take to father.
Tom had only a penny in his purse, but,
as he said "Father will think Trix loves
him more than I do if I don't take him
anything," mother looked about till she
found a pretty blue polished shell for him
to take to father, which cost one penny
only.
After leaving this shop Mother, Tom,
and Trix went off the pier. Just outside
the gates were 'some gray and brown don-
keys standing ready saddled, and some
pretty little chaises drawn by goats.
"Oh! mother, may we have a ride on
donkeys, or a drive in a goat-chaise?" cried
Tom and Trix together.
"Yes," said mother, "you shall have a
drive in this goat-chaise. "Trix must
hold the reins and get in first because
she is a little girl, and Tom must take
them after her."
Tom and Trix liked their drive very







A DAY AT THE SEA-SIDE.


much. They drove along the cliffs as far
as some steps leading to the sands, where
mother told them to get out. Then
mother took hold of Tom's hand and of
Trix's hand and led them down the steps.
All of a sudden Trix broke away from
mother and ran up to a large white goat
that was feeding close to the steps.
"Pretty goat," said Trix, offering it a
bit of cake. But the pretty goat had an
ugly temper. It was angry with Trix for
coming up to it. It pushed at Trix with
its horns, and down she fell. Mother ran
up and drove the cross goat away, while
Tom went to help Trix to get up. Trix
was crying bitterly, because she was
frightened, but she was not hurt. Now,
you know, Tom might have laughed at
Trix for crying for fear, but he was too
kind.
He said, "Poor Trix, don't cry."
Mother said, "You are not hurt, Trix,
darling, so do not cry; but remember, you







46 A DAY AT THE SEA-SIDE.


must never again go up to any animal you
don't know, for fear you may be hurt by
it."
Trix dried her eyes and left off crying.
When she was once on the wonderful soft
yellow sand she forgot all her fright.
Tom and Trix spent a delightful time
on the sand. They took off their shoes
and stockings and paddled in the sea, and
laughed at the pretty little wavelets that
swept over their feet. Then Tom dug
a hole; and Trix took the pail and got
water to fill it. Tom and Trix each
picked up a number of pink, and purple,
and white shells to take home. Mother
let them take a large piece of sea-weed to
hang in the garden at home to tell them
what kind of weather would be. She told
them the sea-weed would be moist when
it was going to rain, and dry when it was
going to be fine.
At last mother said, Now we must say
good-bye to the sea, and go to the station."







A DAY AT THE SEA-SIDE. 47

Tom said, "Good-bye, sea, I hope I shall
soon see you again. I like to hear your
voice now I'm used to it."
Trix said, "Good-bye, dear, lovely,
beautiful blue sea. I do love you. I kiss
my hand to you so, and so, and so.
Mother, all that froth there is made of
my kisses to the sea. Good-bye, sea, dear
sea."













"MOTHER, HAD I MINDED YOU."


r H(IEBE PRATT and Maggie Miller
were walking home together from
S school one day. Phoebe was sing-
ing as she walked. The song
Phoebe was singing was called
"The Disobedient Little Trout." I dare-
say you all know it well

"Dear mother," said a little fish,
Pray, is not that a fly
I'm very hungry, and I wish
You'd let me go and try."

"My dearest child," the mother cried,
And started from her nook,
"That horrid fly is put to hide
The sharpness of the hook."







50 MOTHER, HAD I MINDED YOU.

Now, as I've heard, this little fish
Was young, and foolish too,
And so he thought he'd venture out
To see if it was true.
And all about the hook he played,
With many a longing look;
"And dear me I" to himself he cried,
"I'm sure that's not a hook.
"I can but give one little pluck.
Let's see,-and so I will"
So on he went, and lo it stuck
Right through his little gill.
And as he faint and fainter grew,
With hollow voice he cried,
"Dear mother, had I minded you,
I need not now have died."

Maggie Miller was not singing, but as
she walked she swung her bag of books in
time to the tune.
All of a sudden Phcebe stopped singing
when she had ended with the words "I
need not now have died," and said:
"I shall be glad of my tea to-day.
Singing has made me so hungry."







MOTHER, HAD I MINDED YOU.


"Has it?" asked Maggie. "Have a bit
of this then." As Maggie spoke she drew
out of her pocket a long piece of orange-
peel "Look!" cried she; "is not this good?
I picked it up in Hill Street yesterday."
Oh, how nice!" said Phoebe longingly;
"but I must not have any, thank you all
the same, Maggie."
"You must not have any of this nice
peel!! Why not?"
"Because you say you picked it up in
the street, and mother has often told me
never to eat anything, 'any rubbish,' she
said, 'from she did not know where.'"
But I picked up this, not you, Phoebe,
and it is not rubbish at all, it is nice
orange-peel. A woman threw it out of a
shop door as I passed. Tibbs was the
name over the shop, which is a baker's, so
you see I know all about where the peel
came from."
Yes," said Phoebe, but I do not think
I ought to have any."







52 MOTHER, HAD I MINDED YOU.
"Well, then, I think you're very unkind,
Phoebe Pratt, because I kept it till to-day
on purpose to share it with you, and now
you won't have any-'tis unkind."
"'Tisn't unkind, Maggie Miller," replied
Phoebe angrily; "but mother has so often
told me not to eat anything picked up in
the street; and where is Hill Street? I
never heard of it."
"Perhaps not, it's right t'other side the
town; little girls like you mayn't walk so
far alone, it's more than two miles from
where we live."
I'm not a little girl, Maggie, and I do
walk just as far as you do alone, and I'm
only a year younger than you, and-"
"Ah, well!" said Maggie good-tem-
peredly, "don't be cross, Phee-but come
do have half this peel, do."
"But, Maggie," Phoebe said, having got
back her good humour also, but, Maggie,
if I do I shall be disobeying mother, and
didn't you hear what our teacher said







MOTHER, HAD I MINDED YOU.


this afternoon, when she taught us the
song about the disobedient little fish?"
"No, I didn't hear," said Maggie; "I
wasn't listening. I never do listen to
preaches."
"Teacher does not preach," Phoebe said
hotly-for Phoebe was a good girl at school
and always got on with her teacher,
whereas Maggie was idle and often got
into trouble-" she only tells us how to
be good girls. All she said to-day was,
that the story of the fish had a lesson for
us in it, that if children disobey their
parents, harm is sure to come of it as it
did to the poor naughty fish."
"Well, I don't care," said Maggie, "and
I do think you're a stupid, Phoebe Pratt.
I do not believe your mother would mind
your having a bit of this peel. Now, you
know you always share all your sweets
with me, and I'm so pleased to have
something you like to give you for once."
I mustn't, Maggie, because you picked






54 MOTHER, HAD I MINDED YOU.
it up in the street; if you had known
Mrs. Tibbs, and-" began Phoebe.
"Oh, never mind that, I know her
name. Now, here goes, catch!" and Maggie
threw the piece of orange-peel she had
torn off for Phoebe into the latter's hands.
Phoebe looked at it a minute, and then,
I am sorry to say, she ate it instead of
saying, "No, Maggie, it would be wrong
to eat it, and I will not do it," as she
ought to have done.
I do not think she enjoyed it very much
either, because she knew she was doing a
naughty thing.
When Phoebe got home her mother told
her some news that pleased her very much.
The news was that Phoebe was to go and
stay with her granny in the country next
week. Granny had a snug cottage and
a pretty garden full of fruit and flowers.
Whenever Phoebe went to stay with her,
granny always made a plum-cake for her.
A visit to grandmother was a great treat.






MOTHER, HAD I MINDED YOU.


But, alas! a few days after this Phoebe
became poorly. The day before she was
to go to her grandmother's her mother said
to her, "Phoebe, my dear, don't you feel
well?"
Phoebe said, "Not very, mother, but I
shall be quite well to-morrow to go to
Granny's. I have only got a headache."
"I wonder what ails you," her mother
said; "have you been disobedient enough
to eat some rubbish that has disagreed
with you?"
"No, mother," said Phoebe, "I've eaten
nothing but what you've seen except," she
added truthfully, "a bit of orange-peel
that Maggie Miller. gave me the other day
as we came home from school."
"Ah! except," said mother, who was in
the meantime getting out a certain black
bottle of medicine, the sight of which
Phoebe dreaded; "there should be no
except about obeying me, Phoebe. How-
ever, now you must take a dose of this."







56 MOTHER, HAD I MINDED YOU.
Poor Phoebe made a great many wry
faces, but she had to drink up the nasty
medicine. When she had done so she
went to bed. But she felt very hot and
uncomfortable and could not sleep at first.
She kept repeating her school lessons over
and over-her tables, and the piece of
poetry about the disobedient little fish,
-until she fell into an uneasy sleep.
Then she had a dreadful dream. It
seemed to her that she was no longer
Phoebe Pratt, but the little fish. Phoebe
felt:as if she were swimming about in ice-
cold water trying to get warm. Then she
thought she saw a big bit of orange-peel
hanging in front of her. Just as she was
about to swallow it a black fish, with an
open mouth full of sharp teeth, swam up
and tried to. bite her. Phoebe thought
that she got away from the black fish, and
seized the orange-peeL The moment she
had swallowed it she felt a terrible pain
in her throat, and knew she had swallowed







MOTHER, HAD I MINDED YOU.


a hook, so at least she dreamed. Then
from ice-cold the water seemed to turn to
a burning heat. Phoebe thought she was
struggling hard to get off the hook, but
that it only stuck tighter in her throat
and pained her worse and worse. She
thought that she was being gradually
pulled up from the water by the hook,
and the anguish was so intense that she
awoke screaming:
"Oh! mother, oh! the hook is in my
throat. Mother, am I a fish? Is there a
hook in my throat, it does ache so?"
The fact was that Phoebe had scarlet
fever, and her poor throat was very sore.
Early the next morning her father fetched
the doctor, and by the time he came
Phoebe was quite unconscious. The
doctor told Mrs. Pratt what was the mat-
ter with Phoebe, and also added that he
had been sent for to see another little girl
called Maggie Miller who had scarlet fever
too.






58 MOTHER, HAD I MINDED YOU.


Both Maggie and Phcebe were very ill
with the fever. All through her illness
Phcebe was haunted with the idea that she
was the disobedient little fish caught on
the hook. It seemed to her as if she hung
on it for years vainly trying to get free.
Over and over again she sang the song
about it, always singing the last two lines-
"Dear mother, had I minded you
I need not now have died "-
most pitifully.
For some days she was quite insensible.
At last, however, she, as the doctor ex-
pressed it, "turned the corner," and began
to mend. Maggie also recovered by
degrees. I think she was not quite so bad
as Phoebe.
One day the doctor said to Mrs. Pratt,
"I am thankful to see Phoebe getting
on so well. I know of one poor woman
of the name of Tibbs, who keeps a baker's
shop the other side the town, in Hill Street,






MOTHER, HAD I MINDED YOU.


and who has lost two children with scarlet
fever lately. I did not attend them, but
a friend of mine did. These children
brought it with them from the country.
Excepting them, and your little girl, and
the other child, I know of no other cases
of scarlet fever, and I cannot think where
Phoebe and Maggie Miller caught it; can
you?"
"No, sir; I can't. What did you say
was the name of that poor woman who
has lost her children, sir?"
"Her name is Tibbs. Her husband
keeps a baker's shop in Hill Street; but
that is such a long way from here that,
I suppose, you know scarcely anything
about what goes on there."
"Oh, mother,' cried Phoebe, "I remem-
ber that it was a woman at Tibbs's shop
in Hill Street who threw out that orange-
peel which Maggie Miller picked up and
shared with me just before we were taken
ill."






60 MOTHER, HAD I MINDED YOU.
"Then that's where you and Maggie
caught the fever," said Phoebe's mother;
"or rather, that's how you caught it.
I could never trace it at all, sir, nor could
Mrs. Miller,' she added, turning to the
doctor, "for we knew there was no fever
anywhere about just here."
"Well, it's a curious thing," said the
doctor, "that my friend Dr. Grey told me
he had seen Mrs. Tibbs about to throw
some orange-peel from the sick-room into
the street, and had forbidden her to do it.
She promised him she would not again,
and said she had only done so once."
Well, sir," said Mrs. Pratt, if that was
the way Phoebe caught the fever, it will be
a lesson to her to mind me in future. If
she had remembered what I told her, for
I have times and times (aye, you know I
have, Phoebe) forbidden her to eat rubbish
like that. You'd never think what things
children will eat if they're let alone, sir!
She'd have spared herself a deal of suffer-







MOTHER, HAD I MINDED YOU.


ing, and me and father a deal of sorrow
and expense."
"Ah, so she would!" said the doctor.
"You'll be more obedient in future, Phoebe,
won't you?"
"Yes, sir. Please, sir, teacher was right.
She said if we disobeyed our parents harm
would come of it, sir. But I'll always
obey mother now."
"I hope you will," said the doctor;
"you have a good and loving mother,
Phoebe, and you should be a good and
loving child and try to repay her tender
care of you during your illness. God
will help you to be obedient to your
parents as our Saviour was to His if you
ask Him."
"I think she will be a good girl, sir,"
said Phoebe's mother, tenderly kissing her.
"She's been very patient during her ill-
ness, and please God, she will grow up
into a good woman by-and-by. Thanks
be to Him for sparing her to me and







62 MOTHER, HAD I MINDED YOU.

father. We think a deal of her, she being
our only child, sir."
"Yes, indeed," the doctor said, taking
up his hat to go. "Well, good-morning,
Mrs. Pratt. Good-bye, Phoebe. I don't
think I need come and see you again at
present."
"Thank you, sir, for making me well.
If you hadn't I might have died as the
fish did, because I didn't obey mother,
mightn't I?"
"Yes, you might have died. But you
must thank God, your Heavenly Father,
for showing me how to make you well.
And now, instead of thinking any more
about that miserable little fish you were
always singing about, you must change
your tune to
When pain and sickness made me cry,
Who gazed upon my heavy eye,
And wept for fear that I should dieI
My mother.








MOTHER, HAD I MINDED YOU.

'And can I ever cease to be
Affectionate and kind to thee,
Who was so very kind to me,
My mother.
'Ah, no! the thought I cannot bear,
And if God please my life to spare,
I hope I shall reward thy care,
My mother.'"









THE END.





A SELECTION OF
BLACKIE & SON'S

BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.
SUITABLE FOR GIFTS. FOR SCHOOL LIBRARIES.
FOR PRIZES.

BLACKIE'S HALF-CROWN SERIES.
Illustrated by eminent Artists. In crown 8vo, cloth elegant.
The Secret of the Old House: A Story for Children. By EVELYN
EvERETT-GREEN.
"A really pretty narrative."-Graphic.
Hal Hungerford: Or, The Strange Adventures of a Boy Emigrant.
By J. R. HUTCHINSON, B.A.
A distinct literary success."-Spectator.
The Golden Weathercock. By JuLrA GODDARD.
"Full of pretty and ingenious ideas."-Saturday Review.
The Hermit Hunter of the Wilds. By D. GORDON STABLES.
"A thorough boy's book."-Schoolmaster.
Miriam's Ambition: A Story for Children. By EVELYN EVERETn-
GREEN.
"Will delight the children who are happy enough to get it."-Freeman.
White Lilac: Or, The Queen of the May. By An WALTON.
"From first to last absorbing almost to the point of fascination."-Daily Mail.
Little Lady Clare. By EVELYN EVEFTT-GREE.
"Certainly one of the prettiest, reminding us in its quaintness and tender
pathos of Mrs. Ewing's delightful tales."-Literary World.
The Saucy May. By HENRY FRITH.
"A book both interesting and exciting."-Spectator.
The Brig "Audacious." By ALA COLE.
"Fresh and wholesome as a breath of sea-air in tone."-Court Journal.
Jasper's Conquest. By ELIZABETH J. LYSAGHT.
"One of the best boys' books of the season."-Schoolmaster.
Sturdy and Strong: Or, How George Andrews made his Way.
By G. A. HENTY.
"The history of a hero of everyday life, whose love of truth and innate pluck
carry him, naturally, from poverty to affluence."-The Empire.






2 BLACKIE AND SON'S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.


HALF-CROWN SERIES-Continued.

Gutta-Percha Willie: The Working Genius. By GEORGE MAO
DOxNAD.
"Get it for your boys and girls to read for themselves, and if they can't do that
read it to them."-Practical Teacher.
The War of the Axe: Or Adventures in South Africa. By
J. PEROY-GROVEs.
"The story is well and brilliantly told."-Literary World.
The Eversley Secrets. By EVELYN EVERETT-GREEN.
"Is one of the best children's stories of the year."-Academy.
The Lads of Little Clayton. By R. STEAD.
"A capital book for boys, and may be read to a class with great profit."-School-
master.
Ten Boys who lived on the Road from Long Ago to Now. By JANR
ANDREWs. With 20 Illustrations.
"Really attractive and brightly written."-Saturday Review.
Winnie's Secret: A Story of Faith and Patience. By KATE WOOD.
"The style is sure to win the hearts of young folks."-Pictorial World.
A Waif of the Sea: Or the Lost Found. By KATE WOOD.
"Written with tenderness and grace."-Morning Advertiser.
The Joyous Story of Toto. By LAURA E. RICHARDS. With 30
humorous and fanciful Illustrations by E. H. GARRETT.
"Should take its place beside Lewis Carroll's unique works."-Birmingham Gae.
Miss Willowburn's Offer. By SABAH DOUDNEY.
"It is a careful, well executed, and cheery study of English still life."-Academy.
A Garland for Girls. By LouISA M. ALooT.
"These little tales are the beau ideal of girls' stories."-Christian World.
Hetty Gray: Or Nobody's Bairn. By ROSA MULHOLLAND.
"A charming story for young folks. Hetty is a delightful creature."-World.
Brothers in Arms: A Story of the Crusades. By F. B. HABBIsoN.
"One of the best accounts of the Crusades we have read."-Schoolmistress.
The Ball of Fortune. By CHABLES PEAR E.
"A capital story for boys. There is plenty of incident."-Journal of Education.
Miss Fenwick's Failures. By Esam STUART.
"A girl true to real life, who will put no nonsense into young heads.' -Graphic.






BLACKIE AND SON'S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE. 3


HALF-CROWN SERIES-Continued

Gytha's Message: A Tale of Saxon England. By EMMA LESLIE.
"The sort of book that all girls and some boys like."-Journal of Education.
My Mistress the Queen: A Tale of the 17th Century. By IM A.
PAULL.
"The style is pure and graceful, and the story is full of interest."-Scotman.
Jack o' Lanthorn: A Tale of Adventure. By HENRY FRITH.
"The narrative is crushed full of stirring incident."-Christian Leader.
The Family Failing. By DARLEY DALE.
"It is a capital lesson on the value of contentedness."-Aberdeen Journal.
The Stories of Wasa and Menzikoff: The Deliverer of Sweden.
and the Favourite of Czar Peter.
Stories of the Sea in Former Days.
Tales of Captivity and Exile.
Famous Discoveries by Sea and Land.
Stirring Events of History.
Adventures in Field, Flood, and Forest.


BLACKIE'S TWO SHILLING SERIES.
In crown 8vo, with Illustrations, cloth elegant, 2s.
The Light Prineess, and other Fairy Stories. By GEORGE MAO
DONALD. New Edition.
Nutbrown Roger and I: A Romance of the Highway. By J. H.
YOXALL.
A Rash Promise: Or, Meg's Secret. By CEcILIA SELBY LOWNDES.
Sam Silvan's Sacrifice: The Story of Two Fatherless Boys. By
JESSE COLMAN.
A Warrior King: A Boy's Adventures in South Africa. By J.
EVELYN.
Susan. By AM WALTON.






4 BLACKIE AND SON'S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE

TWO SHILLING SERIES-Continued.

Linda and the Boys. By CECIIA SELBY LOWNDES.
Swiss Stories for Children and those who Love Children.
From the German of MADAM SPYr. By Luyo WHEELOOK.
Aboard the "Atalanta." By HENRY FaITH.
The Penang Pirate. By JOHN C. HUTOE~soN.
Teddy: The Story of a "Little Pickle." By JOHN C. HUTOHESON.
Warner's Chase: Or the Gentle Heart. By ANNIE S. SwAN.
New Light through Old Windows. A Series of Stories illus-
trating Fables of A sop. By GREGsoN Gow.
"A Pair of Clogs:" And other Stories. By AxY WALTON.
The Hawthorns. By Amr WALTON.
Dorothy's Dilemma: A Tale of the Time of Charles I. By CARo-
LI AusTIN.
Marie's Home: Or, A Glimpse of the Past. By CAROLINE AusTIv.
The Squire's Grandson: A Devonshire Story. By J. M. CALL-
WELL.
Insect Ways on Summer Days in Garden, Forest, Field, and
Stream. By JENNmTT HUMPHBEYs. With 70 Illustrations.
Magna Charta Stories: Or Struggles for Freedom in the Olden
Time. Edited by ARTHUR GILMAN, A.M.
,The Wings of Courage; ANn THE CLOUD-SPINNEB. Translated
from the French of GEOBGE SAND, by Mrs. CORKBAN.


FOR THE YOUNGER CHILDREN.
Adventures of Mrs. Wishing-to-be. By AUIo COBKBAN.
Our Dolly: Her Words and Ways. By Mrs. R. H. READ.
Fairy Fancy: What she Heard and Saw. By Mrs. R. H. READ.






BLACKIE AND SON'S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE. 5


TWO SHILLING SERIES-Continued.


Four Little Misehiefs. By ROSA MULHOLLAND.
Little Tottie, and Two Other Stories. By THOMAS ARCHEB.
Naughty Miss Bunny. By CLARA MULHOLLAND.
-Chirp and Chatter; Or, LESSONS FROM FIELD AND TREE. By
ALICE BANKS. With 54 Illustrations by GORDON BROWNE.



BLACKIE'S EIGHTEENPENNY SERIES.
In Crown 8vo, cloth extra, each with Tinted or Coloured Illustrations.


'The Seed She Sowed. By EMMA
LESLIE.
:Unlucky: A Fragment of a Girl's Life.
By CAROLINE AUSTIN.
Everybody's Business: or a Friend
in Need. By ISMAY THORN.
"Tales of Daring and Danger. By
G. A. HENTY.
'The Seven Golden Keys. By JAES
E. ARNOLD.
'The Story of a Queen. By MARY
C. ROWSELL.
.Joan's Adventures at the North
Pole. By ALICE CORKRAN.
Filled with Gold. By J. PERRETT.
Edwy: Or, Was he a Coward? By
ANNETTE LYSTER.
'The Battlefield Treasure. By F.
BAYFORD HARRISON.
Yarns on the Beach. By G. A.
HENTY.
A Terrible Coward. By G. M. FENN.
'The Late Miss Hollingford. By
ROSA MULHOLLAND.
*Our Frank, and other Stories. By
Amy WALTON.


The Pedlar and his Dog. By MARY
C. ROW8ELL.
Into the Haven. By ANNIE S. SWAN.
Tom Finch's Monkey. By J. C.
HUTCHESON.
Our General: A Story for Girls. By
ELIZABETH J. LYSAGHT.
Aunt Hesba's Charge. By ELIA-
BETH J. LYSAGHT.
By Order of Queen Maude. By
LOUISA CROW.
Miss Grantley's Girls, andtheStories
she told them. By THos. AROHER.
The Troubles of Little Tim. By
GREGSON Gow.
Down and Up Again. By GREGSON
Gow.
The Happy Lad. By B. BJ6ENSON.
The Patriot Martyr and other Nar-
ratives of Female Heroism.
Madge's Mistake. By ANNIE E.
ARMSTRONG.
Box of Stories. By H. HAPPYMAN.

When I was a Boy in China. By
YAN PHOU LEE.






6 BLACKIE AND SON'S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.


BLACKIE'S SHILLING SERIES.

Square 16mo, 128 pp., elegantly bound in cloth, with Frontispieces in
Colours.


Freda's Folly. By M. S. HAYORAFT.
Philip Danford. By JULIA GODDARD.
The Youngest Princess. ByJENNIE
CHAPPELL.
Arthur's Temptation. By EMMA
LESLIE.
A Change for the Worse. By M.
HARRIET M. CAPES.
Our Two Starlings. By CHRIsTIAN
REDFORD.
Mr. Lipseombe's Apples. By JULIA
GODDARD.
A Gypsy against Her Will. By
EMMA LESLIE.
An Emigrant Boy's Story. By
AscoTT R. HOPE.
The Castle on the Shore. By ISA-
BEL HORNIBROOK.
John a' Dale. By MARY C. ROWSELL.
Jock and his Friend. By CORA
LANGTON.
Gladys: Or, The Sister's Charge. By
E. O'BYRNE.
In the Summer Holidays. By JEN-
NETT HUMPHREYS.
How the Strike Began. By EMxA
LESLIE.
Tales from the Russian of Madame
Kubalensky. By G. JENNER.
Cinderella's Cousin. By PENELOPE.
Their New Home. By A. S. FENN.
Janie's Holiday. By C. REDFORD.
The Children of Haycombe. By
ANNIE S. FENN.
The Cruise oi the "Petrel."
The Wise Princess. ByM. HARRIET
M. CAPES.


A Boy Musician: or, The Young Days
of Mozart.
Hatto's Tower. By M. C. ROWSELL.
Fairy Lovebairn's Favourites.
Alf Jetsam. By Mrs. GEO. CUPPLES.
The Bedfords. By Mrs. G. CUPPLES.
Missy. By F. BAYFORD HARRISON.
Hidden Seed. By EMMA LESLIE.
Jack's Two Sovereigns. By ANNIE
S. FENN.
Ursula's Aunt. By ANNIE S. FENN.
A Little Adventurer. By GREGSON
Gow.
Olive Mount. By ANNIE S. FENN.
Three Little Ones. By C. LANGTON.
Tom Watkins' Mistake. By EMMA
LESLIE.
Two Little Brothers. By M. HAR-
RIET M. CAPES.
The New Boy at Merriton.
The Blind Boy of Dresden.
Jon of Iceland: A True Story.
Stories from Shakespeare.
Every Man in his Place.
Fireside Fairies and Flower
Fancies.
To the Sea in Ships.
Little Daniel: A Story of the Rhine.
Jack's Victory: Stories about Dogs.
Story of a King. By one of his Sol-
diers.
Prince Alexis: or, Old Russia
Sasha the Serf: Stories of Russian
Life.
True Stories of Foreign History.






BLACKIE AND SON'S BOOKS FOR CHILDREN.


THE NINEPENNY SERIES OF BOOKS FOR
CHILDREN.
Neatly bound in cloth extra. Each contains 96 pages and a Coloured
Illustration.


Cross Purposes, and The Sha-
dows. By GEORGE MAC DONALD.
Patty's Ideas. By L. E. TIDDEaAN.
Daphne: A Story of Self-conquest. By
E. O'BYRNE.
Lily and Rose in One. By CECILIA
S. LOWNDES.
Crowded Out. By M. B MANWELL
Tom in a Tangle. By T. SPARRow.
Things will Take a Turn. By
BEATRICE HARRADEN.
Max or Baby. By ISMAY THORN.
The Lost Thimble: and other Stories.
By Mrs. MUSGRAVE.
Jack-a-Dandy; or the Heir of Castle
Fergus. By. J. LYSAGHT.
A Day of Adventures. By CHAR-
LOTTE WYATT.
The Golden Plums: and other Stories.
By FRANCIS CLARE.
The Queen of Squats. By ISABEL
HORNIBROOK.
Shucks: A Story for Boys. By EMMA
LESLIE.
Sylvia Brooke. By M. HARRIET M.
CAPES.


The Little Cousin. By A. S. FENN.
In Cloudland. By Mrs. MUSGRAVE.
Jack and the Gypsies. By KATE
WOOD.
Hans the Painter. By MARY C.
ROWSELL.
Little Troublesome. By ISABEL
HORNIBROOK.
My Lady May. By HARRIET BOULT-
WOOD.
A Little Hero. By Mrs. Mus-
GRAVE.
Prince Jon's Pilgrimage. By
JESSIE FLEMING.
Harold's Ambition. By JENNIB
PERRETT.
Sepperl the Drummer Boy. By
MARY C. ROWSELL.
Aboard the Mersey. By Mrs.
GEORGE CUPPLES.
A Blind Pupil. By ANNIE S. FENN.
Lost and Found. By Mrs. CARL
OTHER.
Fisherman Grim. By MARY C.
ROWSELL.


SOMETHING FOR THE VERY LITTLE ONES.
Fully Illustrated. 64 pp., cloth. Sixpence each.

Tales Easy and Small fortheYoung- Maud's Doll and Her Walk. In
est of All. In no word will you see words of not more than four let-
more letters than three. By J. ters. ByJ. HUMPHREYS.
HUMpHREYS. In Holiday Time. In words of not
more than five letters. By J.
Old Dick Grey and Aunt Kate'sWay. HUMPHREYS.
Stories in words of not more than Whisk and Buzz. By Mrs. A. H.
four letters. By J. HUMPHREYS. GARLIC.






8 BLACKIE AND SON'S BOOKS FOR CHILDREN.

THE SIXPENNY SERIES FOR CHILDREN.
Neatly bound in cloth extra. Each contains 64 pages and a Coloured Cut,


From over the Sea By L E. TIDDE-
MAN.
The Kitchen Cat. By AaY WALTON.
The Royal Eagle. By LOUISA THOMP-
SON.
Two Little Mice. By Mrs. GAMLIOK.
A Little Man of War.
Lady Daisy. By CAROLINE STEWART.
Dew. By H. MARY WILSON.
Chris's Old Violin. By J. LOCKHART.
Mischievous Jack. By A. CORKRAN.
The Twins. By L. E. TIDDEMAN.
Pet's Project. By COlA LANGTON.
The Chosen Treat. By C. WYATT.
Little Neighbours. By A. S. FENN.
Jim. By CHRISTIAN BURKE.
Little Curiosity: or, A German Christ-
mas. By J. M. CALLWELL.
Sara the Wool-gatherer. By W. L
RooPER.
Fairy Stories: told by PENELOPE.
ANew Year's Tale. ByM.A. CuBRE.


Little Mop. By Mrs. CHARLES BRAY.
The Tree Cake. By W. L. RooPEn.
Nurse Peggy, and Little Dog Trip.
Fanny's King. By DABLEY DALE.
Wild Marsh Marigolds. ByD. DALE.
Kitty's Cousin.
Cleared at Last.
Little Dolly Forbes. By ANNs S.
FENN.
A Year with Nellie. By A. S. FENN.
The Little Brown Bird.
The Maid of Domremy.
Little Eric: a Story of Honesty.
Uncle Ben the Whaler.
The Palace of Luxury.
The Charcoal Burner
Willy Black: A Story of Doing Right.
The Horse and His Ways.
The Shoemaker's Present.
Lights to Walk by.
The Little Merchant.
Nicholina: A Story about an Iceberg.


A SERIES OF FOURPENNY REWARD BOOKS.
Each 64 pages, 18mo, Illustrated, in Picture Boards.


A Start in Life. By J. LOCKHART.
Happy Childhood.
Dorothy's Clock.
Toddy. By L. E. TIDDEMAN.
Stories about my Dolls.
Stories about my Cat Timothy.
Delia's Boots. By W. L. ROOPER.
Lost on the Rocks. By R. ScoTTER.
A Kitten's Adventures.
Holidays at Sunnyeroft. [By ANNIE
S. SwAN.
Climbing the Hill. By Do.
A Year at Coverley. By Do.


Phil Foster. By J. LOCKHART.
Papa's Birthday. By W. L. OOPER.
The Charm Fairy. By PENELOPE.
Little Tales for Little Children.
By M. A. CURIE.
Worthy of Trust.
Brave and True. By GREaSON Gow.
The Children and the Water-Lily.
Poor Tom Olliver.
Maudie and Bertie. GREGSON Gow.
Johnnie Tupper's Temptation. Do.
Fritz's Experiment.
Lucy's Christmas-Box.


*,* A Complete List of Books for the Young, prices from 4d. to 7s. 6d.,
with Synopsis of their Contents, will be supplied on Application.

BLACKIE & SON, LIMITED: LONDON, GLASGOW, AND EDINBURGH.







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