Title: Hometown news (Port Orange, FL)
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00081231/00116
 Material Information
Title: Hometown news (Port Orange, FL)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Hometown news
Publication Date: April 3, 2009
Copyright Date: 2009
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Volusia -- Port Orange
Coordinates: 29.118889 x -81.002778 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00081231
Volume ID: VID00116
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text





PORT ORANGE
SOUTH DAYTONA


PONC 'E INLETY
,4 DAYTONA BEACHi SH .OR!I

... V *.4


Vol. 4, No. 10 Your Local News and Information Source www.HometownNewsOL.com Friday, April 3, 2009


District's proposed school


CLAIRE METZ
WESH-TV NEWS
BUREAU CHIEF


Hi Hometown News
readers,


Police looking
for suspect
South Daytona police
continue to hunt for a man
who terrified two store clerks
at a Dollar General store on
Big Tree and U.S. Highway 1.
The women were getting
ready to close when the
suspect came in, pulled out
a gun and directed the clerk
to fill a bag with cash. The
women actually recognized
See BRIEF, A1 1


, PLUS



RFf IDAY
MOSTLY
CLOUDY ..:o
RAIN CHANCE: 20%
82HIGH 68LOW I
High Tide: 03:21 PM
Low Tide: 09:18 AM


SA U DAY
PARTLY
CLOUDY
RAIN CHANCE- 20%
81 HIGH 66LOW
High Tide: 04:32 PM




PARTLY
CLOUDY '"
Rain Chance: 20%
83HIGH 63LOW
High Tide. 05:36 PM
Low Tide: 11:18 AM


VIOLIN DIVA


boundaries
By Jeanne Willard
Willard@hometownnewsol.com
SOUTH DAYTONA It takes a lot
to rile Anna Lee Webb, but when she
heard Volusia County School District
officials' latest plan, she had to speak
out.
To balance student enrollment,
officials want to move some South
Daytona students to Port Orange and
bring children into South Daytona
Elementary from another city.


anger pare
"(They are saying) take your kids
out of school," Ms. Webb said, "send
them somewhere else and bring kids
from another town into our school."
Ms. Webb, whose granddaughter
attends South Daytona Elementary,
said the board's proposal makes no
sense to her.
District officials counter this per-
ception, saying school boundary
determination is more complicated
than just looking at city limits.
Ms. Webb was one of more than a


City approves big

banners for condos


By Jeanne Willard
Willard@hometownnewsol.com
SOUTH DAYTONA -
Where's the bottom?
A local condominium
developer said he's seen a
recent uptick in sales, but
it's requiring price reduc-
tions and creative adver-
tising to lure buyers.
Jonathan Gillman, sen-
ior vice president of the
New Boston Fund, devel-
opers of Halifax Landing,
appeared before the city
council last week to ask for
a sign waiver to boost sales
at the 15-story, 186-unit
riverfront complex.
Halifax Landing officials
recently launched an
ambitious effort to market
the units with cable TV,
newspaper and magazine
ads, Mr. Gillman said.
What's missing is drive-
by traffic stopping in for a
look, he said.
"Less than 15 percent of
prospective customers ...
are coming from signage,"
Mr. Gillman said. "What
we are hoping to do is
enhance that effort."
After attracting buyers
recently with the use of 30-
day special event "sales


banners" posted on the
sides of the building, Mr.
Gillman was back in front
of council members
requesting a sign waiver to
accommodate two giant
banners.
Special event permits
are limited to one per cal-
endar year, so the original,
smaller banners must be
removed when the permit
expires.
The vertical banners,
approximately 5 feet wide
by 60 feet long announcing
"condos for sale," would be
attached on two front fac-
ings of the condominium
building.
Although city code
allows for commercial
sales signs, they are limit-
ed to a maximum of 24 feet
and must be fixed as
opposed to banners,
which are only temporarily
attached.
Signs outside of those
parameters require a waiv-
er as to type and size.
The banners would be
made of breathable mate-
rial to allow the wind to go
through them, Mr. Gillman
said.
See BANNERS, A3


ants
dozen concerned FA j
parents who attend-
ed last week's city 80E
council meeting to .
protest the pro- 0
posed school n
boundary changes.
Resident Tina '
Olko said the local
school serves as
the hub of the small bedroom com-
munity.
"I do believe that South Daytona


See BOUNDARIES, A10


Let it rain
1 -- !-" --- ^ V '-


Randy Barber/staff photographer
Jowna Ramseur, 5, of Port Orange, didn't let a rain storm get her down as she gets a
tongue-full while visiting Riverside Park in New Smyrna Beach last Saturday.


Man sentenced to 35 years for strangulation


By Jeanne Willard
Willard@hometownnewsol.com
SOUTH DAYTONA -
When Samantha Lewis was
murdered nearly two years
ago, her mother said her
own life effectively ended
that day.
"When he took her, he
killed me too," said Trish
Shackelford. "I don't know
how I am going to survive
the rest of my life without
her."
Despite the satisfaction
of seeing Clayton Williams


Jr., 29, of South Daytona
sentenced to 35 years in
prison for the death of Ms.
Lewis, 18, her family said
they will have to deal with
the pain and horror of los-
ing their loved one for the
rest of their lives.
Ms. Lewis, who was
strangled and stuffed in a
trash bin, was last seen
alive at Mr. Willliam's South
Daytona apartment in the
early morning hours on
April 30, 2007.
Speaking before Judge R.
Michael Hutcheson at Mr.


William's recent sentencing
hearing, Ms. Shackleford
bared her pain with a quiet
intensity.
She spoke of a young
woman who loved to make
people laugh and hated to
see anyone unhappy.
"I love my daughter and
miss her very, very much,"
she said. "I don't want to
see this man walk the
streets ... ever again.
No one deserves to die
the way she did," she said.
"To discard her like she was
trash."


Connie Landini sobbed
openly as she spoke of her
granddaughter.
Instead of the pleasure of
helping Ms. Lewis pick out
her first car, she said she
had to select a coffin.
"Instead of a wedding
gown," Ms. Landini said,
"we had to pick out an out-
fit for her to be buried in."
Ms. Landini spoke of the
overwhelming silence that
has replaced her grand-
daughter's happy voice.
"She should have out-
lived me by years. I should


have seen her grow up and
become a young lady," Ms.
Landini said. "I was robbed
of all of that, I will never
see that happen."
Maintaining his inno-
cence, Mr. Williams plead-
ed to second-degree mur-
der to avoid the possibility
of the death penalty and
faced 20 years to life.
His court appointed
attorney, Michael Nielsen,
asked the judge to impose
the lower end of the sen-
See SENTENCED, All


Renowned violinist
Mayuko Kamio will
perform with the
Russian Philharmonic


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Fitness festival fights obesity


Randy Barber/staff photographer
Todd Arias, 11, of Silver Sands Middle School, runs the
mile race against other students from all over the coun-
ty during the Volusia County Fitness Festival at the mid-
dle school in Port Orange.


By Jeanne Willard
Willard@hometownnewsol.com
VOLUSIA COUNTY Jes-
sica Strauss lifted her own
body weight six times in rapid
succession before her arms
started quivering.
With music blaring and
friends cheering her on, the
freckle-faced eighth-grader
grunted out four more pull-
ups before she dropped to the
sand below.
"It was hard," she said with
a grimace.
The Port Orange Silver
Sands Middle School student
was one of hundreds of stu-
dents from nine middle
schools who attended the
annual Volusia County Fit-
ness Festival hosted by her
school on Monday.
Sponsored by the Volusia


County School Board and the
Volusia County Physical Edu-
cation Association, the event
promotes physical fitness
and helps battle rising child-
hood obesity rates, said Lau-
rie Gawriluk, coordinator.
Elementary students com-
peted on the same day at
Seabreeze High School.
As a physical education
instructor at Silver Sands
Middle School, Ms. Gawriluk
is aware of the challenges of
promoting sports and physi-
cal activity in the face of
school budget cuts.
The fitness festival, held for
more than 25 years, fills a
need, she said.
"It's one of the only athletic
endeavors (other than physi-
cal education classes) for
middle school students," she
said.


Events include sit-ups, the
sit and reach, standing long
jump, pull ups, shuttle run,
50-yard dash, mile run and
mile relay.
School teams compete
each year for a traveling tro-
phy and individual winners
are recognized.
"It gives the students
another outlet and a chance
to pull together as a team."
she said. "It's an opportunity
to shine."
With nearly 700 students
and parents in attendance,
Ms. Gawriluk said she was
pleased to see the large num-
ber of parents supporting the
event. It's important that fam-
ilies promote and support
physical activity for their chil-
dren, she said.
See FITNESS, A9


V


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By Jamye Durrance
Durrance@hometownnewsol.com
NEW SMYRNA BEACH -
The New Smyrna Beach
Water Taxi is making some
cost-saving changes as it
celebrates its three-year


anniversary.
The taxi,
which is
owned by the
city and oper-
ated by the
Marine Dis-
covery Cen-
ter, will


said Fielding Cooley,
Marine Discovery Center
director. "We're thinking
about operating more as a
business rather than a
demonstration grant."
The taxi was established
under a $750,000 federal
grant in 2006.


'We're pretty proud of the operation
water taxi ... we're promoting that g
image and through echo tourism we
to-do that."


increase its Fielding Cooley
fare from $12 Marine Discovery Center director
to $15, effec-


tive April 1.
To help local residents,
there will be a frequent
rider card, which will make
every fifth ride free.
Additionally, two sched-
uled evening runs, at 7
p.m. and 9 p.m., will be
eliminated.
"We're presenting a pro-
gram that has an opportu-
nity to be self-sufficient,"


The city used a majority
of the grant money to pur-
chase two boats and to
contract operation servic-
es to the Marine Discovery
Center.
There is $184,000 left
from the grant, Mr. Field-
ing said.
The city last increased
the water taxi fare in early
2008. Mr. Cooley expects


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The New Smyrna Beach
Water Taxi will increase its
fare from $12 to $15,
effective April 1. To help
keep costs down for locals,
there will be a frequent
rider card, which will make
every fifth ride free.






Randy Barber
staff photographer

crease
this increase to bring in
$33,000 for the rest of the
current fiscal year.
Eliminating the two
evening rides will save the
city $9,000 for the rest of
the fiscal year.
The taxi runs daily
between New Smyrna
Beach and
s of the Ponce Inlet,
green ma ki ng
stops at the
Share able Down the
Hatch and
Inlet Harbor
restaurants
in Ponce
Inlet before
coming back
to the The Grille at
Riverview and Riverside
Park. The taxi runs five
times a day (one extra on
weekends), seven days a
week.
The taxi had 697 trips
and 8,109 passengers since
October 2008.
"It's very important that
we continue to promote
this kind of business in the
community," Mr. Cooley
said. "We're pretty proud
of the operations of the
water taxi ... we're promot-
ing that green image and
through echo tourism we
are able to do that."
Mayor Sally Mackay was
happy to hear of the water
taxi's successes.
"I'm delighted that it is
.pulling its own weight and
getting closer and closer to
that line of self sufficien-
cy," she said.
Mr. Cooley said the next
step will be to expand pro-
motions, create business
partnerships and explore
the possibility of selling
soft drinks and snacks
onboard.
"We think those kind of
partnerships and business
opportunities could great-
ly improve the service and
increase the amount of
revenues we could gener-
ate," he said.
For more information on
the water taxi, contact the
Marine Discovery Center at
386-428-4828 or online at
watertaxi-nsb.com.


| Do you have

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Hometown News Friday, April 3, 2009


A2 Port Orange/Ponce Inlet
ft2Z/. R. __/^ C-_ rt-__L c-1-


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Friday, April 3, 2009


www.HometownNewsOL.com


Port Orange/Ponce Inlet
So. Daytona/Daytona Beach Shores


Seabird Island plans


may come back


By Jeanne Willard
Willard@hometownnewsol.com
PORT ORANGE -
Although a proposal to build a
luxury hotel on Seabird Island
was recently rejected by coun-
cil members, Mayor Allen
Green kept the door open for
another look at the controver-
sial project.
Opponents won a victory
when city council members
recently rejected a plan for a
14-story, 145-foot luxury
hotel, called 90 Dunlawton, in
a 4-to-1 vote with Council-
woman Mary Martin support-
ing the project.
However, Mayor Green
made it clear that he voted
"no" to be able to ask for
reconsideration.
After the meeting, Mayor
Green said that while he never
expected a 14-story building
to be approved, he'd like
council members to reconsid-
er a scaled-down project that
would benefit the city in the
long run.
"I'm looking at the opportu-
nity for what could be at
Seabird Island," he said.
According to Robert's Rules
of Order, which governs par-
liamentary procedure, a
motion to reconsider may be
brought by someone who
voted on the prevailing side.
Two motions regarding 90
Dunlawton were considered
at last week's city council
meeting.
The first was a request to
change the land use from resi-
dential to commercial.
The second motion
addressed rezoning to a


Banners
From page Al
"It doesn't become a sail,"
he said. "It doesn't drift."
Developers also agreed to
install a 6-foot-high privacy
fence between the building's
south driveway and a home
on adjacent Saindusky Drive.
A ground level "new mod-


Planned Commercial Devel-
opment and consideration of
a conceptual plan for a 14-
story, 264-unit resort hotel
with a marina, restaurant and
retail space.
Because some council
members opposed the height
of the project, Mayor Green
polled members to determine
an acceptable height.
A mid-rise seven-story proj-
ect got the nod from council
members Mary Martin, Den-
nis Kennedy and Mayor Allen
Green, passing the first
motion to change the land use
to commercial.
However, Mr. Kennedy
changed his vote to "no" on
the second motion, effectively
killing the plan because land-
use approval was contingent
upon passage of the zoning
motion.
Councilman Bob
Pohlmann said he doesn't
support commercial develop-
ment on Seabird Island, espe-
cially any project exceeding
45 feet in height.
"I just don't see that in the
middle of the river," Mr.
Pohlmann said.
Councilman George Stein-
doerfer, who voted for a 17-
story condominium in the
Riverwalk project, said he
promised residents never to
vote for a high-rise building
again.
However, he noted that resi-
dents protesting the project at
the meeting represented only
a small part of the city's popu-
lation.
"We represent 55,000 peo-
ple and when we vote up here
we have to consider the other


els" sign would be posted on
that fence.
Recent advertising by Hali-
fax Landing lists condos
starting at $216,000, with
prices down between
$100,000 to more than
$200,000 from pre-construc-
tion sales.
With councilwoman
Nancy Long dissenting,
council members approved


Rendering courtesy of Gus Spreng
Shown is a rendering of conceptual plans submitted to the
city by owners of Seabird Island for a proposed 260-room


resort hotel and marina.

people," Mr. Steindoerfer. "We
are not hearing from the other
people."
Public comments focused
on the height of the project
and potential environmental
impact.
David Hartgrove, president
of the Halifax River Audubon
Society, said he believes the
project would have a negative
impact on a nearby bird rook-
ery.
"I don't think there is any-
way to do that (project)," Mr.
Hartgrove said, "without seri-
ous damage to Rookery
Island."
Other residents such as
James Hunt said the 14-story
project is just too large.
"It just doesn't fit in the
middle of the river," Mr. Hunt
said. "It will affect the whole
quality of life."
Steve Messinger, president
of the Port Orange South Day-
tona Chamber of Commerce


the sign request, but limited
the duration time the signs
could be up to six months
from the date of the permit.
Mayor Blaine O'Neal, who
was attending a Volusia
League of Cities Board of
Director's meeting in Talla-
hassee, was not present at
the meeting.
Councilwoman Nancy
Long questioned what


said the chamber has not
taken a position on the actual
planned development, but
supports rezoning from resi-
dential to commercial.
"This change will allow
quality upscale commercial
development that will com-
plement our waterfront as
well as benefit the economic
health of our community by
diversifying our tax base and
our economy," he said.
After the meeting, develop-
er Gus Spreng, who brought
the proposal to the city, said
he was disappointed that city
leaders turned down an
investment opportunity that
would create 200 jobs, more
than $1.5 million in annual
property taxes and additional
money for cash-strapped
schools.
He said he's hopeful that a
compromise can be reached.
"It's far from being over,"
Mr. Spreng said.


efforts were being made to
entice snowbirds.
Mr. Gillman said they are
marketing through a partner
in Indianapolis.
"We are reaching out," he
said. "It's a combined effort."
Speaking after the meet-
ing, Mr. Gillman said approx-
imately 50 percent of the
l4kts have been spokenn for"-
but not all have closed.


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Riies, c~ountylseamrch for ways to 'g'greSadsae'gen


By Bethany Chambers
bchambers@hometownnewsol.com
VOLUSIA COUNTY As
individuals and companies
have professed their love of
"going green," area munici-
palities have followed suit.
"I do believe this is an
emerging trend and, in my
mind, it's a very important
one for our future," Holly Hill
city manager Tim Harbuck
said.
Some cities have installed
low-flow toilets and native




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landscaping to save water
and begun using hybrid vehi-
cles to save gas. Flurries of
paperwork hopping out of
the printer and off of the fax
machine are also a thing of
the past in many of the cities;
to save trees, officials are
turning to e-mails and recy-
cled scraps.
Governments everywhere
are doing more to save the
planet and a few dollars.
Here's a list of what some area
municipalities are doing:







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Daytona Beach Shores
Going green is about envi-
ronmental responsibility in
the city, said grants adminis-
trator Lili Morgese, who is
spearheading the movement
in the city. Last year the city
started by forming a "Green
Team" composed of staff and
residents. To date, the Green
Team has hosted several
workshops, including a pro-
gram on recycling called
"Trash Talk" and a program
on water efficiency, and made
progress, she said.
The city is also expanding
the Earth Day event into a
week-long series this April.
Aside from providing infor-
mation to the public, city offi-
cials will be hands-on, bag-
ging groceries in reusable
bags at local stores. The city
will also host a beach clean-
up, a walk to promote earth-
friendly animal care, a tour of
the landfill and a series of
green workshops on topics
including waterwise land-
scaping and LEED certifica-
tion.
For more information go to
www.dbshores.org.

New Smyrna Beach
The new skate park, Third
Avenue fire station and
Industrial Park Avenue fire
station will all have native,
drought-tolerant, cold-hearty


In- om
Supports

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landscaping.
In January, the city held a
series of workshops to garner
community support for
changes to the city's land
development code that
would make landscaping
requirements more "water-
wise." The changes have not
passed, but the workshops
offered significant progress,
said city planner Marissa
Moore.
The city is encouraging
the use of e-mail as opposed
to paper-printed documents.
Printers in city hall are also
loaded with recycled print-
outs, so both sides of the
paper are used.
For more information go to
www.cityofnsb.com.

Ponce Inlet
Town employees "know
how important recycling is to
our community and our
world," officials said. To sup-
port recycling, the town
placed recycling containers in
all parks and facilities. Resi-
dents also have the opportu-
nity to recycle electronics and
fluorescent light bulbs
through the town's trash serv-
ice, Waste Management.
The town installed low-
flow toilets and fluorescent
lighting in all facilities
The public works facility
was landscaped with
drought-tolerant Zoysia sod.


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Native vegetation can be
found on all town properties.
The town also offers a
"Waterwise Landscape
Award" as an incentive to
property owners to conserve
water.
In the future, residents
may see a "Building Green"
ordinance. Already, the town
has a flood plain ordinance
that protects and restores
natural habitat, maximizes
open space, provides
stormwater design and quali-
ty control and controls
beachside lighting.
For more information go to
www.ponce-inlet.org.

Port Orange


LEED standards for retail
developments
The proposed developer's
agreement for the redevelop-
ment of 90 Dunlawton, also
known as the Seabird Island
project, includes require-
ments for the use of green
technologies in the site and
building design, including
rainwater harvesting, bio-
retention, drought-tolerant
plants, reduced high-water
demand sod, reduced
stormwater runoff, reduced
irrigation areas, solar energy
and natural seawalls.
When old vehicles in the
city's fleet are scrapped,
they're being replaced with
hybrids whenever possible.
For the first time in city
history, the city is ordering
two new fire pumpers that


Solar power is the wave of will include compressed
the future in this city. It is used foam air, a green system that
to heat water at Fire Stations mixes water with biodegrad-
No. 72 and No. 75 and at the able foam reducing the
police department. The city amount of water needed by
also intends to incorporate about 20 percent.
solar power into the existing In the future, the city may
police station and in Fire Sta- also have a green building
tion No. 73 when it's renovat- ordinance.
ed, city manager Ken Parker
said. The city also recently For more information go to
authorized the design of solar www.port-orange.org.
power collectors that may be
placed at central wellfield
locations. South Daytona
Energy efficient light fix-
tures can be found at Coraci T p dp
Park, the gym and city hall. m The city's police depart-
The city is offering rebate meant has two hybrid vehi-
incentives for residents who cles, a Toyota Prius used by
exchange their high-volume the Citizens' Patrol, and a
toilets for low-volume toilets, Chevy Malibu hybrid used
and participated in the Water in traffic enforcement. The
Authority of Volusia program Department also ordered a
offering rebate incentives for Ford Escape hybrid to use
residents who purchased rain as a community relations
barrels or energy-efficient vehicle. The city is still
washing machines. evaluating the vehicles,
Architects have been said Chief of Police Bill
working on U.S. Green Build- Hall.
ing Council LEED certifica- The city is also imple-
tions for the new police and meeting a pilot program to
fire stations, which would allow golf carts on roads
officially make them green with speed limits of 25 mph
buildings. or less. Some city leaders
At another new project at have said the golf carts pro-
Town Center, the city intends vide environmentally
to incorporate native vegeta- friendly, affordable trans-
tion, reuse water, stonnwater,portation to residents.
wind and solar energy.
The Pavilion at Port
Orange Shopping Center is For more information go
being developed to meet to www.southdaytona.org.

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Hometown News Friday, April 3, 2009


.A


@on








Friday, April 3, 2009


www.HometownNewsOL.com


Port Orange/Ponce Inlet
So. Daytona/Daytona Beach Shores


Slip sliding away


.f ;J-^ _^- "


Mike Casemer of
Daytona Beach Shores
holds on tight to his
daughters Hana, 3, and
Rhianna, 2, as they ride
the slide during Kidz .
Dayz in Port Orange last
weekend.







Randy Barber
staff photographer


Aububon Society
trip planned
The Halifax River Audubon
Society will hold a Gamble
Place boat trip in Port Orange.
Participants should meet at
8 a.m., Saturday, April 4, at the
Lowe's auxiliary lot on Dun-
lawton Avenue east of Inter-
state 95 to form carpools.
Participants should bring a
lunch and drink. Easy or no
walking required. Cost is $6.
For more information, call
(352) 302-3510.
DAR and SAR
meeting planned
The Daytona Beach-
Ormond Chapter of the Sons
of the American Revolution
and the Abigail Bartholomew
Chapter of the Daughters of
the American Revolution will
hold a joint meeting at 11
a.m., Saturday, April 4, at the
Colony in the Wood, 4000 S.
Clyde Morris Blvd, .Port
Orange, FL.
Dr. Louis McNally, assis-
tant professor of meteorolo-
gy, department of applied
aviation sciences at Embry-
Riddle Aeronautical Univer-
sity, will speak on the battles
of Lexington and Concord.
Art exhibit planned
The Port Orange Parks and
Recreation .Department and


the painting classes of the
city of Port Orange Adult
Center will hold a free open
house from 1 to 3:30 p.m.,
Monday, April 6 at 4790 S.
RidgewoodAve.
Water colors, oils, acrylics
and other forms of painting
will be on exhibit. There will
be a special exhibit of flower
painting.
Light refreshments will be
served.
For more information, call
(386) 756-5391.
Book sale planned
The Friends of the
Port Orange Regional
Library will hold its annual
April Showers Book Sale from
9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Friday, April
3 and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Satur-
day, April 4, at the Port
Orange library auditorium,
1005 City Center Circle, Port
Orange, FL
Shop early for the best
selection of children's books,
adult fiction and non-fiction,
puzzles, and other surprises.
For more information call
(386) 322-5152.
Workshop scheduled

The Central Florida Com-
.munity Development Cor-
poration will be having its
free first-time homebuyers
workshops from 6 to 9 p.m.,.
Monday, April 6, and Mon-
,day, April. -13, at Votran Bus


Service Center, 950 Big Tree
Rd, South Daytona.
Classes are free.
At this workshop, poten-
tial homeowners learn
about credit and debt man-
agement, home and prop-
erty selection, home
financing and repairs and
money management.
This information is pro-
vided as a pre-requisite to
obtaining or qualifying for
down payment assistance.
Space, is limited. For more
information, call at (386)
253-3232.
Catalog training,
class planned
Port Orange Regional
Library will present a cata-
log training class at 2 p.m.,
Tuesday, April 7, at the Port
Orange Regional Library
auditorium, 1005 City Cen-
ter Circle.
Learn how to use the new
SurfCat to look up the latest
movies, books and other
materials, to place reserves,
check an account and
renew matehals online.
For more information,
call (386) 322-5152 ext. 2.
Driver safety class
scheduled
The Association for the
Advancement of Retired Per-
sons is bojijng a driver safety,
program--for seniors- from


8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.rm, Tues-
day, April 7, at the Piggotte
Community Center, 504 Big
Tree Rd., South Daytona.
The cost is $12 for AARP
members and $14 and non-
AARP-members. Reserva-
tions with instructors are
required.
For more information, call
(386) 383-2756.
Governor appoints
members to board
Ann Williams of Port
Orange has been appointed
by Gov. Charlie Crist to fill a
vacancy on the Early Learn-
ing Coalition of Flagler and
Volusia Board of Directors.
Ms. Williams is vice presi-
dent of BW Gaskets, Inc., a
commercial refrigeration
gasket replacement compa-
ny. Her term runs from Feb.
17,2009 to April 30,2011.
The coalition is the sole
provider of quality state
funded school readiness and
voluntary pre-kindergarten
early learning services to
children ages birth to five
who are at risk of abuse or
neglect, at risk due to socio-
economic factors, or are from
working poor low-income
families earning at or below
150 percent of the federal
poverty level.
For more information, visit
www.elcfv.org or call (386)
323-2400 or toll free (877)
' 3._5-u06"5.


Editor's note: This is a list
of arrests, not convictions,
and all arrestees are pre-
sumed innocent unless or
until proven guilty in a court
of law.
Port Orange
Police Department

*Daniel Willard
Dougherty, Jr., 20, 464
Champagne Circle, Port
Orange was arrested
March 20 on charges of
grand theft. Bail was set at
$1,000.
*Dominique Marquise
Bolding, 20, of 1183 Sable
Key circle, Port Orange,
was arrested March 21 on
charges of possession of
cocaine (all forms crack).
Bail was set at $2,000.
*Alexis N. Harbelis, 22,
of 1183 Sable Key Circle,
Port Orange, was arrested
March 22 on charges of
possession of cocaine. Bail
was set at $2,000.
*Tara Jean Burley, 29, of
1140 Meditation Loop,
Port Orange was arrested
March 22 on charges of
possession of marijuana
more than 20 grams, pos-
session of Lortab and pos-
session of Xanax. Bail was
set at $3,500.
*Nicholas Kevin Fank,
47, of 5090 Orange Blvd.,
Port Orange, was arrested


Cubs home opener
planned

The Daytona Cubs have
announced that Wendy's
will be the sponsor of open-
ing day at Jackie Robinson
ballpark.
This will be the first
chance for Cubs fans to see
the team as they begin the
defense of their 2008 Flori-,
da State' League Champi-
onship on Fridav April 10,


March 23 on charges of
burglary of a structure. No
bail was set.
*Darron Mitchel Wren,
20, of 5317 Christiancy
Ave., Port Orange was
arrested March 24 on
charges of possession of
burglary tools and burgla-
ry to a conveyance. Bail
was set at $3,000.
*Michael D. Lawler, 52,
of 1863 Halifax drive, Port
Orange, was arrested
March 26 on charges of
possession of a scheduled
IV narcotic. Bail was set at
$2,250.

Daytona Beach
Shores Police
Department
*John T. Corning, 44, of
3501 S. Atlantic Ave., Day-
tona Beach Shores, was
arrested March 20 on
charges of burglary to an
occupied structure and
aggravated battery. Bail was
set at $25,500.

Volusia County
Sheriff's Department
*Billy Joel Lemasters, 20,
of 1089 Green Acres Cricle
South Daytona, was arrest-
ed March 23 on charges of
possession of cocaine. Bail
was set at $2,000.


versus the Brevard County
Manatees.
The gates will open at 5
p.m. The Cubs will have
inflatables for children,
appearances by the
Wendy's girls, numerous
prizes and post game fire-
works.

For tickets or more infor-
mation. call (386) 257-3172
or 'visit the Web site at
www.daytonacubs.com.


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LIVE LIFE OUTSIIDET


Live Life Outside...


As defined by the dictionary, a vacation
is "a respite or a time of respite from
something".. Most often that has come to
mean an escape from the daily grind but not
necessarily a trip to a far off land. Today,
many are seeking that solace in a place much
closer to home...just outside their back door.
And, best of all, they're finding it. ,

Traditional vacations are often
expensive, short lived, and end way too soon.
Today there is no need to settle for that
temporary reprieve. Outdoor living products
have made it possible to create your own
personal utopia in your own backyard.


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Patios,' summer kitchens, a fireplace or
swimming pool, all properly landscaped and
protected with a screen enclosure, can
become that blissful retreat you so long for
and deserve. And best of all, you can enjoy
this secret vacation spot anytime you like.

n ad ition, instead of your hard earned
money buying just e'feWv short days in 'a: place
you're not familiar with, you'll be adding true
value to the one place that means the most to
you, your home. "Home improvement
projects tend to be driven by an underlying
emotional need," explains Martha Baker,
well-known outdoor living expert as well as
the best-selling author of The Outdoor
Living Room: Stylish Ideas for Porches,
Patios, and Pools. "Building or
renovating outdoor rooms illustrates
our need to relax and reconnect with
family and friends. Outdoor rooms
S increase our quality of life while also
increasing a home's value." Research
has shown that outdoor living
improvements can yield an average
return on your investment of 150 to 200
percent. There is no trip anywhere
that can boast that.

In terms of monetary value,
industry professionals indicate that the
design and feature of a home's outdoor
| living space can add as much as 30
percent to the total value of your
property (Designing Out: The Home
: bLifestyle Report). It just makes perfect
sands sense to create the space you need
While achieving true benefits for now
and the future.

." This year, turn your vacation into a
"staycation" you'll treasure for years to
come. Make your home a tranquil
paradise that will bring you joy and
peace everyday...live life outside.


V '


Friday, April 3, 2009


APort Orange/Ponce Inlet


Hometown News


, 1 -,







Friday, April 3, 2009


www.HometownNewsOL.com


Port Orange/Ponce Inlet
So. Daytona/Daytona Beach Shores


( LIVE LIFE
' >, erit:ta .*K -'stfS :ei~a .''^a .,**^**.^'""'.."-...-- .-';; ;;.t'^;-:!.,i-


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VIEWPOINT

FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009 HOMETOWN NEWS WWW.HOMETOWNNEWSOL.COM


Got something to say?

Call the Hometown Rants & Raves line at

(386) 322-5900
or e-mail volnews@hometownnewsol.com.
Callers are asked to refrain from making slanderous
statements. Statements of fact will be checked for
accuracy.



Golf carts a positive step

We think golf carts are a great idea. Battery powered (or
solar powered) golf carts can move citizens to areas of the
city quietly and gas-free.
Bike paths and golf carts contribute to the small town
atmosphere of South Daytona.
Besides saving money, golf carts save the environment.
Those neighborhood streets are 25 mph or less, so golf carts
will not hinder the traffic flow except for people trying to
speed. A golf cart community concept can be positive for
South Daytona. It is a step into the future.

Why are schools not on the bailout lists?

Citibank, AIG, auto manufacturers, etc. all got
stimulus/bailout money.
The first, two mentioned have misused money, past or
present, due to the bailout money supplied recently.
However, schools continue to have to layoff teachers. Pro-
grams that enhance students for the future are in jeopardy.
Cuts are being made here, there and everywhere.
Please, someone tell me and everyone else why are the
schools not on the list for bailouts?
Why are they not the first, if not the only ones getting the
mnioney? I was under the impression that today's children
are our future. Can we not invest in them first and foremost?
I just don't get it, and I know I'm not alone.

In response to
'why should everyone pay for smokers'
healthcare'

Forget obesity and the problems it causes. At least it isn't
killing other people, like inhaling your smoke is.

Tuned out

I too am disgusted with what commercial television has
degraded itself to in this last decade.
"Reality" shows have spread across, the networks like a
cancer. Decent programming has gotten harder and harder
to find. On top of that, the amount of commercials has
increased to insane levels. In some cases more than 40 per-
cent of the show you are watching is commercials.
Many of these commercials present their product in a
way that is obnoxious and even offensive. (And quite loudly
I might say.) Some of these advertisers have the nerve to air
commercials for "adult products" at times when children
are watching such as weekend afternoon sporting events or
early evening game shows.
I've even seen ads for these "adult products" aired during
children's shows themselves. Complaining to the networks,
stations or providers is an act of futility. I became so fed up
with what is shown on TV that a little more than two years
ago I finally did something about it. I stopped watching net-
work and cable TV I set aside the amount of money need to
subscribe to cable TV and began using it to purchase DVD
box sets of many of my favorite programs, along with some
other shows I never got around to watching the first time
around.
I no longer spend my evenings in front of the TV set with
one finger on my remote's mute button, ready at a
moment's notice to snuff out an offensive ad. I once again
enjoy my evenings in front of the TV, watching the program
and only the program.

Is the rain safe?

Is our rain clear water or are there some toxins in it? Is
acid rain falling from all this air traffic over our heads? If so,
this is a large health problem for us. Whom do we hold
responsible: flight schools, New Smyrna Beach, or FFA?
I would hope New Smyrna Beach would be concerned
and call in Environmental Protection Agency to check into
this environmental problem. For a safe and healthy envi-
ronment, New Smyrna Beach should ask EPA to check sam-
ples of ground wells, rivers and soils around our airport to
see if we are at risk of any toxins filtering in from any source.
Since we do not have a small town airport anymore we
need better supervision with problems that may arise from
a large city airport.




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Published weekly by Hometown News, L.C.,
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Celtic Crossroads will perform on April 17 at the Peabody Auditorium, and on April 18 and 19 at the News-
Journal Center. For more information or to purchase tickets go to www.dbif.com or call 386-257-7790


Festival makes it through setbacks,


bigger and better for 2009


By Sandra Frederick
For Hometown News

DAYTONA BEACH Traditionally
spring brings showers, then flowers,
and is the prelude to a long, sizzling
summer.
This year, however, it brings the
London Symphony Orchestra and the
Daytona Beach International Festival
- with 30 venues, 100 events and 250
artists. For 43 years, the LSO has been
coming to Daytona Beach in the sum-
mer, but this time around DBIF organ-
izers decided to make it a spring event.
"The decision was made at the end
of the 2007 festival to make it in the
spring so we could be the first on the
festival circuit across the
nation," explained Manny "My,,
Bornia, vice president of the ,M
Daytona Beach International would
Festival. "By doing this, we will
kick off the festival circuit Beach
instead& a.of,-icompetingnvWith to brain
others." :
And it seems to, be working. This is
Bornia said ticket sales are up as the
by 11 percent over previous
years, with sales from as far
away as Hawaii, California, Julia Tr
Texas and the northeast. Festival
Through the sales, Mr. Bornia
said 1,200 people are making
travel plans, contributing about $24
million to the local economy.
While the LSO's events include per-
formances by four different conduc-
tors, there's plenty more for the com-
munity to take part in. The 17-day
festival is the longest music festival of
its kind in Florida and the largest
international and orchestral music
festival in the state, offering a variety
of musical offerings.
Festival performances range from
classical music, jazz, bluegrass and
guitar concerts to a Latin ballet.
The roots of the festival started
back in 1965, when Florida Interna-
tional Festival, Inc. was formed. The
late Tippen Davidson, of the founding
family of The Daytona Beach-News
Journal, met with community leaders
to find a way to improve the image of
the area, said Julia Truilo, Mr. David-
son's daughter. Mr. Davidson suggest-
ed a musical event and found himself


taking on the project.
"He sent letters to every orchestra he
could find and only one letter came
back the London Symphony
Orchestra." Mrs. Truilo said. "They told
him when he found the money to
come back to them, so he went out
and got the money and called them
back."
The LSO was the centerpiece
between 1966 and 1969, but a budget
shortfall ended the relationship.
In 1982, the LSO returned to Day-
tona Beach for an event managed by
Central Florida Cultural Endeavors, a
corporation formed in 1974 with the
guidance of Mr. Davidson. Within five
years, it had three staffers and a
$350,000 budget. By 1991, the staff
ad was a big dreamer and he knew
be big. When he came back to Day
from Chicago in the 1950s, he wan
g more culture to the-iarea land he d
good for the tourist industry as well
residents.

uilo
II founder Tippen Davidson's daughter

increased to six and the budget to $1.7
million. Between 1985 and 2007, the
LSO returned every other year as the
Florida International Festival's head-
liner.
Growth of the biennial event contin-
ued and today, DBIF has nearly 28
employees 16 are seasonal and a
budget of $6 million to put on the
shows. DBIF hopes to make enough
money to pay the expenses and if pos-
sible, put some aside for the next Festi-
val in 2011.
"My dad was a big dreamer and he
knew this would be big," Mrs. Truilo
said. "When he came back to Daytona
Beach from Chicago in the 1950s, he
wanted to bring more culture to the
area and he did. This is good for the
tourist industry as well as the resi-
dents."
Built around the LSO's residency at
Daytona Beach, the festival delivers a
musical experience unlike any other,


Mr. Bornia said.
Set along 23 miles of picturesque
Atlantic coastline, Daytona Beach
offers a variety of indoor and outdoor
settings and venues. Factor in pleasing
temperatures, sandy shores, historical
sites and cultural experiences, along
with a host of places to stay, and it is a
perfect scenario for the Festival visitor.
"The spring is new for us," said
Kathryn McDowell, managing director
of the LSO. "We are all interested to see
how it turns out."
And it has been a 40-year love affair
with Daytona Beach, Ms. McDowell
added.
"Some of the members have been
coming here year after year, a few for
at least 20 or more years," she said.
"This is a very young
this orchestra, so many are
tona planning on bringing their
families also." I
ited For more than a year, the
id. DBIF has worked tirehe'..1y
to develop a dynamic and
cultural program and the
most diverse collection of
concerts ever presented by
the group, Mr. Bornia said.
The LSO will return to
headline the inaugural
Daytona Beach Interna-
tional Festival on April 16
through May 2. Ms. McDowell said the
LSO has added a new Latin program
centering around film music this sea-
son "with a slightly different feel, very
vibrant and energetic."
Revered as one of the world's leading
orchestras, the 96-member LSO will
perform seven concerts, several
chamber concerts and recitals.
Ih addition to the LSO, the 2009 fes-
tival will feature a diverse lineup of
artists from around the world, per-
forming everything from bluegrass to
classical music to Latin jazz, at venues
throughout Daytona Beach and Cen-
tral East Florida.
Also new for the 2009 Festival is
DBIF's focus on increased accessibility
to the community through a variety of
innovative new programs, including
DBIF 365 Live, a new storefront bou-
tique; an expanded and redesigned
Web presence at www.dbif.com; and a
new Friends of the Festival program.


2009: Not your grandmother's festival


With a new name change also comes new events such
as a free DBIF Family Days on April 25 and 26 with a "Battle
of the Bands" and a sunset LSO concert free to the public.
In an effort to get the community involved, DBIF has
added a lineup of"Informances" and pre-concert talks. Not
only will the Ballet Hispanico give two performances,
members will open up the stage for a complimentary salsa
dance lesson.
"We are excited about having the community on stage
with us for a salsa lesson," Waldemar Quinones-Villanueva
said from his NewYork office.
Daytona Beach International Festival is kicking off a new
initiative designed to increase the organization's visibility
and accessibility to the community-- DBIF365.
DBIF365 will not only make the concerts more accessible
to the public, it now offers a new storefront boutique and
box office that allows visitors to purchase tickets and browse
for merchandise. There is also a redesigned, user-friendly
Web site with picture galleries, blog sections and in the
future, the ability for streaming radio and video options.
"We have worked hard to bring the festival to the people,"
Manny Bornia, vice president of DBIF, said. "We want as
many people as we can get to participate in the festival."
On the programming end, there's also several new pro-
grams at new venues, such as the festival Late Night Series,
designed to appeal to a younger audience in smaller more
intimate places with exciting new artists, accessible ticket
pricing and later start times.
"We tried to keep the price reasonable, at $20, so the
young professionals can come and and see it," Mr. Bornia
said. "They are going to be the ones to keep the festival
going in the future."


The new series will kick off on the festival's opening
weekend, Aprill7-18, with a sultry performance by Russ-
ian-born singer Sophie Millman at the Bank & Blues Club.
The series also includes a salsa dance night, jazz trio
and a YouTube internet sensation that fuses classical
music with hip-hop and contemporary styles.
Held at venues throughout Daytona Beach, West Volu-
sia and the surrounding areas, the 2009 DBIF "INfor-
mances" will feature some of the festival's most popular
artists, including Celtic Crossroads, Cherryholmes and
PROJECT.
In addition to these free performances, DBIF is offering
free educational components through the Volusia County
School system, further increasing accessibility to the Day-
tona Beach community.
The 2009 Festival is also featuring a number of first-ever
events, such as the Conductor-in-Residence program,
with Maestro Daniel Harding.
It is also bringing back several popular outreach activi-
ties as well, including the LSO On-Call program for home-
bound residents; the AT&TYouth Institute at Daytona
State College, offering 23 high school
students from across the state a once-in-a-lifetime
experience; and the
Stetson University Elderhostel program, featuring cus-
tomized lectures and behind-the-scenes experiences for
seniors.
"We want to serve as a catalyst for rediscovery of Daytona
Beach as a travel destination," he said. "We hope to re-
brand Daytona Beach with the festival."
Sandra Frederick


V 4








oidy pl 3
Friday, April 3, 2009


www.HometownNewsOL.com


Port Orange/Ponce Inlet
So. Daytona/Daytona Beach Shores


Local city budgets


see some relief


with lower fuel cost


By Jamye Durrance
Durrance@hometownnewsol.com
VOLUSIA COUNTY-
Every little bit helps.
That's what city and coun-
ty officials are saying about
the extra money they have
in the bank due to the drop
in fuel prices.
"We're certainly using
those funds to balance the
budget," said Ormond
Beach city manager Joyce
Shanahan. "The state shared
revenues and property rev-
enues are decreasing. We
can use (the fuel budget) to
offset those declines."
During the summer
months when most cities
were preparing their 2009
fiscal year budgets which
begin in October, the
national average price for
gas was hovering near $4.00.
Today, the current nation-
al average is nearly half
that- $2.048 for regular
unleaded -according to
AAA. Diesel comes in at
$2.259.
Because of the high
prices, Port Orange original-
ly budgeted more than
$800,000 for fuel and
through the end of February
had spent $139,000.
George Baker, Volusia


Fitness
From page Al
New Smyrna Beach resi-
dent Felicia Darrisaw con-
curred.
Attending the event to sup-
port her two daughters Con-
stance, 11, and Samaria, 14,
who attend New Smyrna
Beach Middle School, Ms.
Darrisaw said she actively
promotes physical activates
for her girls.
"We know there is a prob-
lem with children and obesity
in America." Ms. Darrisaw
said. "So we are really trying


County Fleet Management
director, said the county is
nearly $1 million under
budget for fuel costs, which
will be moved to reserves.
The city of Edgewater
budgeted more than
$600,000 and has only spent
just over $100,000. After
budgeting the $4.00 per gal-
lon for unleaded gas, they
recently paid $1.85, finance
director John McKinney
said.
While other budget
expenses might be increas-
ing and revenues decreas-
ing, city officials are happy
to see some good news.
"We've been able to offset
the revenue losses," said
Port Orange City Manager
Ken Parker.
But, it isn't just a lower
price in fuel that has helped
reduce fuel budgets, officials
said.
Most cities and the county
have switched to fuel effi-
cient vehicles and encour-
aged employees to be more
fuel conscious with their
driving.
Mr. Baker said the county
has about a dozen hybrid
vehicles with plans to pur-
chase more soon.
They have also switched
to other fuel-efficient vehi-


to keep them on the right
track."
But fitness and good health
are only part of the benefits,
she said.
"Sports help not only with
fitness," she said, "but with
self esteem, understanding
competition, how to work
with others, how to follow
directions and just reaching
your personal best."
Hinson Middle School stu-
dent Dallas Simson, 14, was
disappointed in completing
only 19 pull-ups.
"That's bad for me," he said.
But the'Holly Hill resident
has a good reason for his


Randy Barber/staff photographer
Volusia County Sheriff's deputy Tim Willis fuels up his
patrol car at the county fueling station in Daytona Beach.


cles, added GPS for route
optimization, and eliminat-
ed unnecessary vehicles.
"We look at return on
investment," Mr. Baker said.
"We know every mile per
gallon and life history of
every vehicle. We are right-
sizing our fleets."
Port Orange has also pur-
chased fuel efficient vehi-
cles and is researching the
possibility of buying electric
vehicles for departments
that don't have to travel long
distances.
"We do want to get the
right vehicle," Mr. Parker
said. "We look at the most
fuel efficient."
Mr. Parker said the city
implemented a goal two
years ago to reduce fuel con-
sumption by 10 percent. So


arms being a little tired.
On Saturday, he rode a bull
and caught hogs at the Flagler
County Cracker Day.
Ben Noyes, 14, who attends
Ormond Beach Middle
School, said he thinks chang-
ing the rising obesity rates
among children will require
dedication and hard work.
"We can change it if we
want to," he said.
Fellow student Andrew
McEwen, 13, agreed.
A member of the Naval
ROTC Sea Cadets, he said too
many kids sit around playing
video games orwatchTV
"It's sad," he said.


far, they have gotten to eight
percent, he said.
When it comes to predict-
ing the remainder of the fis-
cal year fuel expenses, offi-
cials are hesitant to plan too
far ahead.
In Ormond Beach, Ms.
Shanahan said she is not
making any decisions on
fuel prices for a few more
months.
Mr. Baker said he expects
fuel prices to jump back up
during the summer months.
The city of Port Orange
will be paying close atten-
tion to the reports from
Organization of Petroleum
Exporting Countries, or
OPEC.
"There is some data," Mr.
Parker said. "But, it's hard to
predict where fuel will be."


"Technology rules their
life."
At the end of the day, Silver
Sands won the overall team
competition for the second
year in a row with David C.
Hinson and Creekside in sec-
ond and third place respec-
tively.
"We get to keep the travel-
ing trophy one more year,"
Ms. Gawriluk said. "We are
real tickled about that."
Participating middle
schools included Taylor,
Ormond Beach, River
Springs, David C. Hinson,
Creekside, Heritage, New
Smyrna Beach and DeLand.


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A10Port Orange/Ponce Inlet
So Da tona/Da tonh Beach Shores


Hometown News Friday, April 3, 2009


Boundaries
From page Al
mentary is the heart of South
Daytona," she said.
Residents should have
first choice in sending their
children to a local school,
before children from out-
side the city are transferred
in, she said.
In January and February,
district officials held infor-
mal meetings at area


South Daytona Elemen-.
tary School's representa-
tive on the Volusia County
School Board is Dr. Al
Williams.
To contact Mr Williams
by phone call (386) 322-
7311 or email:
acwillia@volusia.kl2.fl.us.
Port Orange Elementary
School's representative on
the Volusia County School
Board is Mr. Stan Schmidt.
To contact Mr Schmidt
by phone call (386) 761-
1742 or e-mail:
sschmidt@volusia.kl2.fl.us
Saralee Morrissey, site
acquisition and intergov-
ernmental coordination
director can be contacted
at 386-947-8786 Ext. 50772
or e-mail: smorriss@volu-
sia.kl2.fl.us.


schools, including South
Daytona Elementary, to get
public feedback on pro-
posed boundary changes
for next year.
At the time of the meet-
ings, district officials said
they were proposing
changes with an eye on
future enrollment.
The resulting staff-rec-
ommended plan is sched-
uled for public hearing on
April 14 before the Volusia
County School Board.


The April 14 school
board meeting will be held
at 4 p.m. at the DeLand
Administrative Complex,
200 North Clara Ave.,
DeLand.

Meetings open to
public comment
A public participation
portion of the agenda near
the beginning of the meet-
ing allows a member of the
public up to four minutes
to speak on agenda items.
In order to address the
board, attendees must fill
out a public participation
card and turn it in to com-
munity information per-
sonnel that day, prior to
the start of the public par-
ticipation period.


Parent dissatisfaction
with the plan wasn't limited
to South Daytona.
Port Orange residents
slated for transfer to South
Daytona Elementary School
protested transfers at those
early meetings for the same
reason many South Day-
tona parents cited.
They say they want their
children to attend school in
their own city.
The proposed plan means
South Daytona's Harborside
subdivision joins Orchards
and Bryan Cave, two subdi-
visions that were previously
zoned to a Port Orange
school and will remain that
way.
"We now have three sub-
divisions inside the city,
that are being zoned out-
side the city," said City Man-
ager Joe Yarbrough.
An area south of Beville
Road and north of Nova
Road, currently zoned for
Turie T. Small Elementary
School in Daytona Beach, is
rezoned allowing 50 stu-
dents to attend South Day-
tona Elementary School.
Changes would bring the
school's capacity from 77
percent to 102 percent, offi-
cials said.
Another group of stu-
dents residing closer to
Turie T. Small remain zoned
to South Daytona.
City officials said they
asked district officials to
zone all city subdivisions
into the local school, before


bringing in students from
other cities.
Although school officials
have been accommodating
in providing statistical
information, Mr. Yarbrough
said they have been "nonre-
sponsive" to concerns
raised.
"We want the children
who live in South Daytona
to go to South Daytona Ele-
mentary," Mr. Yarbrough
said. "We want that because
it gives continuity to the
community and gives the
community identity."
Saralee Morrissey, site
acquisition and intergov-
ernmental coordination
director for the Volusia
County School District said
Harborside subdivision was
considered for rezoning
because of the 14 students
who live there, nine cur-
rently have variances to
attend Sugar Mill, she said.
She also said those stu-
dents would avoid crossing
Reed Canal Road if they
were transferred.
School officials were not
swayed by the city's offer to
providing a crossing guard,
Mr. Yarbrough said.
While Ms. Morrissey
acknowledged a parent's
desire to have their child to
attend a local school, she
said district officials need to
look at things on a county-
wide basis.
"I can't look at a city limit
as a basis for drawing a
boundary," she said. "That
would be an expensive way


,.,.,,:.. ,


Randy Barber/staff photographer
Volusia County School District officials' latest plan to bal-
ance student enrollment includes moving some South
Daytona students to Port Orange and bringing children
into South Daytona Elementary from another city.


to provide education for
children."
Councilwoman Nancy
Long, who previously
taught at South Daytona
Elementary, said experience
has convinced her that
transferring children to
schools away from their
neighborhood is not always
in their best interest.
"It was very difficult for
the children," she said. "The
parents couldn't come easi-
ly and the students couldn't
stay after if they need tutor-
ing. I just don't think it's fair
for the students."


Meanwhile, Ms. Olko
asked council members
what they could do.
The city council has no
control over the matter, Mr.
Yarbrough said, as school
attendance zoning changes
are controlled by the School
Board.
He urged concerned resi-
dents to contact their
school board representative
before the April 14 meeting
and to attend the meeting.
See accompanying col-
umn for information on
contacting school board
representatives.


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Friday. April 3. 2009


www.HometownNewsOL.com


Port Orange/Ponce Inlet Al
So. Daytona/Daytona Beach Shores


Sentenced
From page A1
tencing guidelines
because of a battery of
psychological tests that
indicated Mr. Williams
suffers from cognitive
deficits and has an IQ of
69.
"He's got major prob-
lems as far as his thinking
and reasoning ability," Mr.
Nielsen said.
While other family
members were present at
the hearing, only Danny
Williams spoke on behalf
of his younger brother.
He told the court that he
believes the system has
failed his brother.
"Clayton has never
raised his hand to any-
one," he said, "so these
charges are pretty hard to
accept. This young man is
wrongly accused."
Mr. Williams spoke
briefly on his own behalf.
"I didn't do the crime,"
Mr. Williams said. "Where
is the justice here? This is


my freedom."
Assistant State Attorney
Matt Foxman argued that
evidence, including DNA,
fingerprints, eye-witness
testimony and a confes-
sion from the defendant,
point to a cruel and
heinous crime that
deserved a sentence of life
in prison.
"He didn't just murder
her, he strangled her," Mr.
Foxman said. "He put her
in a trash can and threw
her away with yesterday's
garbage. That's cruel."
Although Ms. Lewis'
family said they were dis-
appointed that Mr.
Williams did not get life in
prison, they praised Mr.
Foxman's handling of the
case.
Ms. Lewis' grandfather,
Tony Landini, said he has
no doubt about Mr.
Williams's guilt.
"I'm confident in my
mind that they put away a
bad person," he said.
Mr. William's family
declined to comment after
the sentencing hearing.


Brief
From page Al

the suspect because he had
been in earlier in the day
buying bandages. At the
time, the suspect told the
women to be safe, and left.
Six hours later, he returned,
hanging around outside and
coming in with the gun just
before they closed. The
suspect told the women
they would not be hurt if
they cpoperated, so after
giving him the money they
expected him to leave. You
can imagine how frightened
the women were when
instead, the suspect forced
the women to the back of
the store and tied them
together. Police said the
women thought the suspect
was going to kill them.
Much of the armed robbery
was caught on surveillance
tape, but so far no one has
recognized the suspect. The
women managed to free
themselves after the suspect
left the store, and called
police.


State of county
address delivered
County Council Chairman
Frank Bruno recently gave
the state of the county
address at the Ocean Center
and focused on accomplish-
ments as well as challenges
with budget constraints.
Bruno called the newly
expanded Ocean Center a
huge benefit to the local
economy, allowing for more
significant convention
business in the area. He also
said the new lifeguard
headquarters on Atlantic
Avenue, with a meeting room
overlooking the oceanfront,
is a showplace forVolusia
County, and serves as a
beacon for business with its
panoramic views. Bruno
admits it is a difficult time to
be in government with more
demand on county services
and fewer dollars to respond
to the demand. Bruno
continues to throw support
behind commuter rail as a
way to connectVolusia
County to the rest of Central
Florida, but says locally, the
area may have to consider
consolidating services to save


money and prevent overlap.
County officials are also
concerned about the loss of
dollars coming into the
school system. A growing
numbers of families are


leaving the area because of
job losses while others are
worried that the school
system, struggling for money,
can't adequately respond to
existing student needs.


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Al, Port Orange/Ponce Inlet Hometown News Friday, April 3, 2009
So. Daytona/Daytona Beach Shores


Michael Faller's mysterious lack of energy brought him to Halifax Health, where a quick diagnosis in the area's only
modern electrophysiology lab may have saved his life.
CO
I-
At first, Michael ignored his lack of energy. But when he mentioned it to his personal physician, he was sent to Dr. Vance
Wilson, an interventional cardiologist at Halifax Health. After studying Michael's heartbeat in the high tech dec tluoph ,i,,logy
lab, Dr. Wilson noticed an abnormality that was causing a weakening of Michael's heart. With the blessing of Michael and his
wife, the Halifax Health team acted quickly led by Dr. Hanscy Seide, the only fellowship-trained electrophysiologist in the
area and implanted a biventricular pacemaker and defibrillator into Michael's chest. He says he can't believe such a short
procedure saved his life. "The day after my surgery, I was running around with my kids. The improvement in my quality of life
is just unbelievable." He also can't believe how much in life comes down to proximity. "I don't even like to think about how this
would have turned out if Halifax Health wasn't so close by."


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GREEN LIVING '09


Friday, April 3, 2009


Indian River County
HOMETOWN NEWS


S, : ,-.. ,


, 4. ,
& "- ",," *_ .-.-'"


f. -4''


i ,


A decorative idea for reusing
all those plastic grocery bags

Newsletter publisher: We all
have to help the planet-

Indian River County offers
recycling help

Church, gets in
on greeA.mnovenent


IRMC saving money
by becoming eco-friendly


Page 2


Page 4


Page 4


Page 5


.Page 6
- *. ..


~qJU~Y


An aavel


ing supplement to Hometown News


Custom Jewelry 'l,/ff,' //( / eawtff/W
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2 Indin River County
HOMETOWN NEWS


GREEN LIVING '09 Friday, April 3,2009


Making an


eco-friendly


fashion


statement

Recycling plastic
grocery bags into
purses, wallets, more
By Jessica Tuggle
ituggle@hometownnewsol.com
INDIAN RIVER COUNTY- Crochet stitches and plastic
grocery bags; it's not a combination you hear about every
day, but it's one of Jean Grider's favorite ways to recycle.
Mrs. Grider has been turning plastic shopping bags into
laptop cases, yoga mat carriers, wallets, purses, water bot-
tle holders and more for almost five years.
"Just think of all that we save from going to the landfill by
doing this," said Mrs. Grider.
By cutting the plastic bags into strips, then attaching
them end to end with small knots, the plastic becomes a


r


Cliff Partlow/staff photographer
Bags to Riches teacher Jean B. Grider shows how to tie the strips of plastic bags together to make plastic yarn
used in her recycle bags.


continuous thread of material, and is wound into a ball,
similar to yam.
Three basic crochet stitches are used in assembling the
recycled items, and it's very easy to do, Mrs. Grider said.
"Anybody can do it, it's a really good pastime," said
Mrs. Grider, who is affectionately called "The Bag
Lady."


"It doesn't cost you anything extra and it's a good
social gathering activity," she said.
She led a class, open to the public, on how to make
the bags at the Main County Library in Vero Beach in
December and the response was so positive, it has
See STATEMENT, 3


As of October 1, 2008
Who receives curbside recycling?
The County provides residential curbside recycling collection for all residents.

How is it paid for?
Recycling services are included and paid through your Solid Waste Assessment; therefore,
with or without garbage service, recycling is picked up curbside dt no additional. cost to
you. Indian River County encourages our Residents to Recycle.
Do you have to have garbage collection in order to
receive recyclable collection?
I h-'. E .,r, i ...:.,j = _.,c :j '' e rio t t:.. ,j t,:.. : r et to: r r. -' .: sri ,t'lia l :ao rl ,:,i .: rlel C, c.'r, -,j r. :i p.i l c ,t
,_:,: ,,*:l1,I:,I_'. c rLiJ,,,h f.)r ,c l-' : I,.:r, ri ,: o ;_, r, :i t:,iill l.:.r i- r. ,,-ic.-


Bin 1
* Plastic Containers t1-7
* Glass Containers
(Brown, Clear & Green)
* Aluminum Cans, Aluminum
Foil, Pie Plates & Trays
* Steel Cans
* Aerosol Cans
(No Household '
Hazardous Waste)
* Aseptic Packaging
(luice & Milk Cortrnl I


Bin 2
* Newspaper & Inrserts
* Phone Books ..
* Envelopes/Junk Mail
* Office Paper
* Shredded Paper
(Place in Clear Plastic Bag)
* Catalogs / Magazines
* Brown Paper Bags
* Other Paper Products
(Cereal/Food Boxes, Pizza
Boxes, Soda, & Beer Boxes)
* Corrugated Cardboard
(Flat- No larger than 2'x3)


Fiil t:'n i . i .f.iir- ,-, I .:.r f r ll.= -1 j



T ik; V j ,.:iri., ',.. ii.

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GREEN LIVING '09


Indian River County -
HOMETOWN NEWS -


Statement
From page 2
become an ongoing program called Bags to Riches.
"This is the first example of the library going and promoting green
recycling projects," said Maria Goodman, library program director.
"This is just the beginning of us working to save .the planet and
finding ways to recycle," said Ms. Goodman.
Knowing how to crochet is not a requirement for attending the
class, said Mrs. Grider.
"Most people who come to the class have never crocheted before,
but it's not a big deal because we just teach them," said Mrs. Grider.
Mrs. Grider's husband, Bill, makes crochet needles for the class
out of small dowel rods.
Because the crochet stitches are..tight and secure, Mrs. Grider
believes that some of her larger beach bags can easily carry more
than 20 pounds of weight without breaking.
"The weave on that that bag can probably hold about 25 bricks,"
said Mrs. Grider.
Just because the items are made of grocery bags doesn't mean
they can't be creative, said the women in the class.
"To dress it up, you can thread ribbon in the stitches," said Sonia
Dinger.
Her spacious handbag, made of white plastic bags, was detailed
with festive blue and silver ribbon.
"I'm making my purse to take to fairs and places like that, because
it's lightweight, but has enough space to carry big things and won't
be too heavy," said Ms. Dinger.
"This is a great thing for recycling and reusing.-It's amazing how
many bags you pick up when you go to the grocery store or to Wal-
greens. It's so nice to be able to reuse things and make something
pretty," she said.
For more information about the Bags to Riches program, call Marla
Goodman at (772) 770-5060, or visit www.irclibrary.org.


Cliff Partlow/staff photographer
To add color to her creations, Jean Grider will crochet colored ribbon and plastic yarn together.


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Indian River County
HOMETOWN NEWS


GREEN LIVING '09 Friday, April 3,2009


Healthy lifestyle


is a family affair

By John MacDonald
Macdonald@hometownnewsol.com
While Gen Short-Hamiwka has only been publishing the
Treasure Coast edition of "Natural Awakenings" for just
about four years, her knowledge of healthy living, learned
over a lifetime, could fill volumes.
"People need to be educated," Mrs. Short-Hamiwka said.
"If you teach people preventive care, then they will rarely
get sick. It's such a simple concept.
"I'm 53 years old and I feel better than when I was 23. I'm
healthier and more vibrant."
Armed with a desire to help others, Mrs. Short-Hamiwka
took over the monthly publication when a lot of people
were still skeptical over the benefits of the holistic
approach to healing and nutrition.
"People were a lot less open," Mrs.Short-Hamiwka said.
"Now it's becoming more mainstream. The buzz word is
'green.' To some people it's just trendy, but it's a step in the
right direction."
The change in attitude and the overall acceptance of the
"alternative" lifestyle is reflected in the spike in circulation
of the magazine.
"When I took over, there were just 32 publishers," she
said. "Now there are 66 publishers over the United States.


See LIFESTYLE, 5


Photo courtesy of Gen Short-Hamiwka
Gen Short-Hamiwka and her daughter Katy are the driving
force behind 'Natural Awakenings,' a healthy living publica-
tion.


County

offers

recycling


choices

For Hometown News
News@hometownnewsol.com
INDIAN RIVER COUNTY-
Recycling in Indian River County is
available to residential units for both
unincorporated areas and municipali-
ties and is coordinated through the
Indian River Solid Waste Disposal
District.
Residential curbside garbage
collection is not mandatory in Indian
River County, although it is within the
Vero Beach city limits. As an alterna-
tive to curbside residential collection,
residents may use any of the five
convenience centers without charge,
to drop off trash, yard waste, recy-
clables and needles.
See RECYCLING, 7






Friday, April 3,2009 GREEN LIVING '09


Indian River County
HOMETOWN NEWS


Local church


goes green

For Hometown News
News@hometownnewsol.com
INDIAN RIVER COUNTY When it comes to curb-
side recycling, churches are classified as businesses
and unlike residences, are charged a fee for recycling.
Two years ago, the administration committee of the
Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Vero Beach decid-
ed it was important to recycle office paper and con-
tracted for a large blue bin at the cost of $30 per month.
The church's preschool also uses the bin, as did
members of the congregation before Indian River
County expanded its curbside recycling program to
include office paper and junk mail.
The church office also uses 30 percent recycled con-
tent copy paper for all of its copying needs. Church
bathrooms are stocked with 100 percent Ecosoft brand
toilet paper and paper toweling.
All of these environmentally responsible actions help
render this church a green sanctuary, a designation of
the Unitarian Universalist denomination to those con-
gregations who strive to build awareness of societal
environmental issues, generate commitment for per-
sonal lifestyle changes, and build a connection
between spiritual practice and environmental con-
sciousness.


Lifestyle
From page 4
In Miami we have an English and Spanish edition.
"We have over 2 million readers. We've really
spreading the word."
Perusing through the most recent edition -
available for free at retailers like Publix and Sam's
Club there are articles on a variety of topics,
including holistic pet care, green foods and
hypnotherapy.
"To have a healthy lifestyle, there are no short-
cuts," Mrs. Short-Hamiwka said. "Some people
think a poor lifestyle is genetics or bad luck. We're
meant to be healthy."
While the responsibilities of running the month-
ly publication mostly fall on Mrs.Short-Hamiwka's
shoulders, her family helps her carry the load. Her
husband, Nyk, helps with the layout and some of
the distribution, as does her son. The biggest
contributor is her daughter, Katy.
"She does the ad design and she's pretty good at
it, too,"Mrs.Short-Hamiwka said. "She's excellent
at proofreading."
For most 14-year-olds, that, along with the
.rigors of school would be enough. For Katy, it
wasn't.
"I've always been involved in the environment,
like recycling," Katy said. "Once I got more into it,
I started reading different facts about pollution
and global warming. I thought it was time to do
something.
"I knew I couldn't make an impact with money


"To have a healthy lifestyle, there are
no shortcuts. Some people think a poor
lifestyle is genetics or bad luck.. We're
meant to be healthy."

Gen Short-Hamiwka
publisher

like most kids my age, so I came up with a Web
site to help and try to educate people."
Katy started Enviroteens. homestead.com last
summer and the feedback was overwhelmingly
positive.
"I did the research on how to begin aWeb Site
and it kind of flowed real easy," Katy said. "The
first month I got the most responses."
The site offers tips on recycling and volunteer-
ing, as well as how to go green at school.
"She's very passionate about it,"Mrs. Short-
Hamiwka said. "She even surprises me how she's
taken it on.
"She lives it and walks her talk."
Mrs. Short-Hamiwka said inspiring her daugh-
ter to carry on what she has spent a lifetime to
achieve is just one example of what everyone
needs to be doing.
"To make really good decisions, it has to start at
a young age," Mrs. Short-Hamiwka said. "People
have to be committed. We all have to be dedicated
to making the planet a better place."


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29th Annual Florida Native
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May 21-24 West Palm Beach Marriott
Hosted by the Palm Beach and
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April 2 Thur Zora Neale Hurston Sunrise Theater 7 PM
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Zora N. Hurston.and Marjorie Kinnan
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April 5 Sun 5P Annual Zora Fest Authors Champagne Brunch
__ Pelican Yacht Club Sunday 11:30 AM to 2:30 PM $35




6 IndIan River County
HOMETOWN NEWS


GREEN LIVING 09 Friday, April 32009


Indian River.

Medical Center

goes green to

save some green

Environmentally-friendly
initiatives at hospital save
money, environment
By Jessica Tuggle
jtuggle@hometownnewsol.com
INDIAN RIVER COUNTY Indian River Medical
Center has joined the ranks of large businesses becom-
ing environmentally conscious, and already, it's seeing
positive results.
"Our big target is energy conservation," said Cliff
Schroeder, facilities services director.
"Two years ago, when we opened the heart center,
we noticed a quick, high rise in energy consumption
per square foot. Since then, we've started to reduce our
energy consumption," he said.
Since September 2007, IRMC has reduced energy use
by 11.5 percent, which also reduced carbon emissions
required for energy consumption and operating costs.


Cliff Partlow/staff photographer
Indian River Medical Center environmental service manager Ann Rieben, of Sebastian, is proud to use the
'single stream recycling' program offered by Freedom Waste.
One way the hospital has cut energy costs is by left the light on, it will turn off," said Mr. Schroeder.
installing occupancy sensors in rooms. Changing to more energy- efficient lighting has also
"When people are in here and moving around, the
lights will stay on, but if they are not and someone has See GREEN, 7


T' "N


' Hometown News

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Indian River County -
HOMETOWN NEWS '-


Friday, April 3, 2009 GREEN LIVING '09


Recycling
From page 4
Items that maybe brought to the convenience
centers -and the Indian River County landfill for
recycling include: plastic containers, glass contain-
ers (brown, clear and green), aluminum cans,
aluminum foil, pie plates and trays, steel cans,
aerosol cans (ro household hazardous waste),
aseptic packaging (juice and milk cartons),
newspaper and inserts, phone books,
envelopes/junk mail, office paper, shredded paper
(place in clear plastic bag), catalogs/magazines,
brown paper bags, other paper products
(cereal/food boxes, pizza boxes, soda and beer
boxes), corrugated cardboard (flattened), Styro-
foam from large appliances, fluorescent light
bulbs, motor oil (less than 2 gallons), batteries,
other hazardous waste materials, such as pesti-
cides, oil-based paint and other items containing
mercury, sharps (needles), scrap metal and white
goods (refrigerator, stoves, washing machines,
dryers and dishwashers).
Electronics need to be taken to the landfill
directly for recycling.
'The convenience centers are for residential use
only No businesses please. Those who live south of
theVero Beach City Limits or in Indian River Shores
can subscribe to residential collection service by
calling Treasure Coast Refuse at (772) 562-6620.
Those who live elsewhere in the county can call
Waste Management at (772) 569-1776 to subscribe.
Those who do not receive residential garbage
collection may put out recyclables curbside for
collection, free of charge.


Cliff Partlow/staff photographer
Indian River Medical Center maintenance
worker Don Lowe uses the new and
sophisticated Clarke 'Boost' Super Scrub-
ber to clean, and shine thousands of
square feet, of hospital flooring without
using any chemicals.


Green
From page 6
made an impact, he said.
"The compact florescent light
bulbs use 75 percent less energy
than the incandescent bulbs and
they last longer," said Mr.
Schroeder.
A hospital-wide recycling
program was started last June,
said Mr. Schroeder. A single-
stream recycling format, or sin-
gle bin collector, holds plastic,
glass and aluminum, and works
well in the hospital because it
doesn't take up as much space
in the corridors and offices, he
said.
Freedom Waste picks up the
recyclable materials and sepa-
rates them, he said. Paper is
kept in a separate container.
Kim Leach-Wright, hospital
spokeswoman, has worked at
IRMC for the past five years.
"I knew when I came that I
was going to generate a lot of
paper waste, between junk mail,
newspapers, releases etc., and
we didn't have a recycling pro-
gram. I felt guilty sometimes
having to throw all of that paper
away," said Ms. Leach-Wright.
"Now 95 percent of my trash


goes into the recycling bin in my
office arid my garbage can is
usually empty. I really feel good
about doing it, recycling, I
guess," she said.
"Since June, we have collected
more than 20 tons of paper,
plastic and cans," said Chad
Lane, plant operations manager.
"Basically that's the weight of
10, 2-ton vehicles, plus another
five vehicles of recycled elec-
tronics," he said.
"In 2007, Waste Management
said that we contributed 918
tons to the landfill and we're
working hard to get that
reduced by 30 percent," said Mr.
Schroeder.
"We're not there yet, but we've
come a long way since then," he
said.
In the future, Mr. Schroeder
said he would like to see the
hospital look into green roofs, or
roofs with plants and other veg-
etation that help insulate in the
winter and cool in the summer,
in addition to being attractive.
"What's good for our environ-
ment and our county is ulti-
mately good for our patients,"
said Mr. Schroeder.
"It's a win-win all the way
around and worth the effort we
put into it," he said.


When you donate your unwanted house
hold items or clothing to the Humane Society
Thrift Shops you are Thrift-Cycling.

The Humane Society raises funds to run their shelter and the
many programs they offer the community.
Our Customers obtain.quality merchandise at a great value
The Planet benefits through the reduction of waste and
natural resource conservation. o
Its as easy as 1-2-3 -
1.Donate and conserve;the planets natural resources.
2.Save money buying used and recycled items.
3.Support.the Humane Society of Vero Beach and Indian River County
Dropit Off
-Monday thru Saturday 9:00- 2:30
We accept Clothing Shoes, handbags, jewelry, books, kitchenware, sporting goods,
small appliances, W's, furniture. We provide pick up service for Furniture.


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GREEN LIVING '09


Indian River County
8 HOMETOWN NEWS


Friday, April 3, 2009


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Port Orange/Ponce Inlet
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S I'.-' PortOile


Entertainment
SECTION B WWW.HOMETOWNNEWSOL.COM FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2009


Classified
BggfcMI


Out &


FRIDAY, APRIL 3
*Spring Dance: This event
will be held from 2-4 p.m., Fri-
day, at the City Island Recre-
ation Center, 108 E. Orange
Ave., Daytona Beach. Talk of
the Town and Dream will per-
form. The $3 admission
includes refreshments and a
dance lesson that begins at 1
p.m.
*Bethune Cookman Uni-
versity Performing Arts Cen-
ter: The play "I Leave You
Love; The Legacy of Mary
McLeod Bethune" will be per-
formed at 7:30 p.m., Friday,
April 3. The drama presents Dr.
Bethune's reflections on her
past which come alive as she
composes her last will and tes-
tament. "I Leave You Love"
was written by Lois Fennelly
who has been professor of
English at the university for 40
years. The play was first pre-
sented in 1983 as a student
production. Tickets are $3 at
the door.
*Play: The Riddle Players
Theater Company presents
"You're a Good Man, Charlie
Brown," at 7 p.m., Friday, and
Saturday, in the Instructional
Center Auditorium at Embry
Riddle Aeronautical University,
Daytona Beach. Admission is
$5 for adults, $3 for students.
For more information, call
(386) 226-6000.
SATURDAY, APRIL 4
*Church carnival: Mount
Bethel Baptist Institutional
Church will hold its first church
carnival from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.,
Saturday, ,at 700 S. Martin L.
King Blvd., Daytina Beach. For
more information, call (386)
255-6922.
*Antique car show: The
sixth annual East Central Flori-
da Antiques on the Avenue
Festival will be held from 10
a.m.-5 p.m., Saturday and Sun-
day, at the Holly Hill Recre-
ation Center, 1046 Daytona
Ave. Festival features antiques
and collectible items from
dealers; fee-based, individual
evaluation of personal antique
and collectible items by
accredited appraisers on Sat-
urday at Sica Hall, 1065 Day-
tona Ave. Free admission and
parking. For more information,
call (386) 248-9460 or go
online www.antiquesontheav-
enue.net.
*Historical Bus Tour: The
Ormond Beach Historical Soci-
ety will host this tour at 9:45
a.m. Each two-hour tour intro-
duces more than 30 historical
buildings and sites. The cli-
mate-controlled trolley makes
stops at the Fairchild Oak and
the Three Chimneys Sugar Mill
Ruins (ruins not otherwise
See OUT, B2


She's got the beat


Oceana Ortiz, 7, of
Wilbur by the Sea,
plays an African drum
with the Heritage
Dancers and Drum-
mers, during the Spring
Equinox Celebration at
the Daytona Beach
Lions Club recently.








Randy Barber
staff photographer


Philharmonic of Russia closes


symphony society season


For Hometown News
Volnews@hometownnewsol.com
The National Philharmonic of Rus-
sia will provide the conclusion to the
Daytona Beach Symphony Society's
57th season at 3 p.m. Sunday, April 5,
at the Peabody Auditorium.
Under the baton of the conductor
Vladimir Spivakov, the orchestra has
become a musical symbol of the new
Russia.
Mr. Spivakov is a musician with a
multi-facted career. He's a promi-
nent violinist; a respected guest con-
ductor; founder, conductor and vio-
lin soloist of the Moscow Virtuosi,
one of the world's leading chamber
ensemble; and has been music



The


*Axe-n-Shield Pub: The
Big Bopper Band will per-
form from 7-11 p.m., Sat-
urday. Drink and food spe-
cials will be available all
night. The band will per-
form 50s, 60s and 70s
music. For more informa-
tion, call (386) 492-2916.
*Bank & Blues Club:
Daytona Blues Society
"True Blues" Live Jam
open jam session is held
from 8 p.m.-1 a.m. each
Wednesday at 701 Main
St., Daytona Beach. This
nonprofit group is dedicat-
ed to preserving and
spreading the love of blues
music. For more informa-
tion and a full events
schedule, visit the Web site
at www.DaytonaBluesSo-
ciety.org.
*Cuvee Oceanside Wine
& Tapas: "Wine Down
Wednesday" is held each
week, featuring live music.


director and principal conductor of
the Russian National Orchestra.
Joining them on the Peabody
Auditorium stage for Tchaikovsky's
Violin Concerto in D, Op. 35 will be
Japanese violinist Mayuko Kamio,
the 2007 gold medal winner of the
13th International Tchaikovsky
Competition in Moscow. In 2001, the
violinist was the youngest artist ever
to be presented in the Young Concert
Artists Series at the Kennedy Center.
She started playing the violin at
age four and made her concerto
debut at age 10 under the baton of
Charles Dutoit. She has appeared
with many of the world's leading
orchestras, and conductors includ-
ing Keith Lockhart, Mstislav Ros-


tropovich and
Zubin Mehta.
The April 5
concert will fea-
ture works by
Tchaikovsky
and Stravinsky.
Tickets range
from $34 to $59.
There are
three options
for purchasing
tickets: Visit the Mayuko Kamio
Peabody Box
Office, 600 Auditorium Blvd., Day-
tona Beach; call Ticket master at
(407) 839-3900; or order on-line at
www.dbss.org. For more informa-
tion, call (386) 253-2901.


Scene


Bermuda High performs
from 7-10 p.m. each
Thursday. John Macker'
takes requests from 10
p.m. to midnight, Friday,
with a late-night happy
hour. Breaking Bread per-
forms from 7-10 p.m., Sat-
urday. Cuvee Oceanside is
located at 188 E. Granada
Blvd., Ormond Beach. For
more information, call
(386) 615-4727 or visit the
Web site at www.cuveeo-
ceanside.com.
*Daily Grind Coffee
House & Cafe': The Embry
Riddle Jazz Duo will per-
form at 7 p.m., Friday, at
1500 Beville Road, Day-
tona Beach. Open Mic
with Graham Woodard will
be held Friday, April 10. All
poets, musicians and
comedians are welcome.
Participants will receive a
free recording of their
open mic with Graham


Woodard session. For more
information, call (386)
238-1044.
*Five O'Clock Charley:
This band will perform
rock 'n' roll, blues and
country hits from 6:30-
10:30 p.m. p.m., Friday, at
the Ormond Elks. They will
be performing from 4-8
p.m., Sunday at the Halifax
Yacht Club, 331 S. Beach
St., Daytona Beach. They
hit the stage from 7-10
p.m., Wednesday at Julian's
Landmark, 88 S. Atlantic
Ave., Ormond Beach. They
will be performing each
Thursday from 5:30-8:30
p.m. at Pirana Grille, 241
N. U.S. Highway 1,
Ormond Beach.
*Frappes North: Wine
tasting are held at 6 p.m.
the first Tuesday of each
month. Reservations are
required. Live Music Fri-
day Nights are held from 7-


11 p.m. Frappes is located
at 123 W. Granada Blvd. in
Ormond Beach. To make
reservations, call (386) 615-
4888 or visit the Web site at
www.frappesnorth.com.
*The Fresh: Saxophonist
Jaime Hollis will perform
fro 6-9 p.m., Friday. Gui-
tarist and vocalist Lauren
Ellis will perform from 6-9
p.m., Saturday. The Fresh
is located at 1130 S. Ridge-
wood Ave., Daytona
Beach. For more informa-
tion, call (386) 947-9736.
*The Garlic: Blues and
Jazz musicians perform
seven nights a week. Mark
"Muddy Harp" Hodgson
plays the blues 7-11 p.m.
Friday. He will be joined by
Ray Guiser from 9-11 p.m.
Jazz with guitarist Rich
Walker and saxophonist
Ray Guiser will be per-
See SCENE, B3


STAR SCOPES
James Tucker
Week of 4-3-2009


Aries-March 21-April 19
You are well known for dar-
ing to dream big dreams and
then being bold enough to
act on and create them.
Why? Not only is it your time
of the year, but you climb up
the higher slopes of life
because of your lofty think-
ing, strength and courage.
You are able to survey all
things around you and then
pick and choose the ones
you love the best.

Taurus-April 20-May 20
Venus in Taurus gives you an
edge in the heart depart-
ment this week. Your motiva-
tion is fueled by the desires
living in your heart for a bet-
ter life. No one is more hard
working and determined
than Taurus. When you set
your plans into motion you
are capable of performing
miracles. Why? Because you
never quit or give up until
you victory is assured.

Gemini-May 21-June 21
Working the divine plan liv-
ing in your soul continues to
bring you mastery over life.
You know how to communi-
cate and manifest in that
order. The funny thing is that
physical rewards don't bring
you as much satisfaction
nowadays as much as the
spiritual. These are respect,
love, honor and human dig-
nity. Living a quality life is
more important to you now
than quantity.

Cancer-June 22-July 22
Don't fret over life's recent
struggles. This is just life's
ebb and flow. The secret to
balance is to work harder
when things are flowing and
increasing. Then hold back
when they are ebbing. Being
in the flow of monthly cycles
of energy is just as important
as finding daily balance. Fol-
low your heart, trust your
instincts and use the natural
rhythms of life to enhance
and bring you your well-
earned and deserved good.

Leo-July 23-Aug. 22
Measure the quality of your
life by the joy you feel in your
heart. You were born to rule
by being of service to others.
You are at your best when
you are able to help some-
one else find the answer to
their life challenge. Everyone
gains strength from your

See SCOPES, B8


Fsh Brunch l am 3pm Reservations Available

* Egs Benedict Roast Beef and Ham Carving Station
* Sc~rmbled Egs Marinated Grilled Vegetables
* Bacon and Sausage Mashed Potatoes
* Bagels and Cream Cheese Assorted Fresh cakes and pastries

Pa ONLY $19.95
Sole Picotta
Marsa .Kids Under 6 9.95

FREE MIMOSA $2.oo Bloody Ma0ys







1130 S.Ridgewood Ave. Daytona Beach.S
1/2 Mile North of Beville Road
www.freshatasteofitaly.com

386.947.9736


.7r


B1


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B2Port Orange/Ponce Inlet
B~cD ta.tona-flana B ach Shwas


Out
From page B 1
open to the public). The cost is
$20 for adults, $18 for seniors
(65 and older) and $7 for chil-
dren (5-12). Tours begin at The
Casements parking lot, 25


Riverside Drive, Ormond
Beach. Reservations are
required; seating is limited. To
reserve seats, call (386) 677-
7005.
*American Legion Post 17:
A half barbeque chicken dinner
with all the fixings will be
served at 11:30 a.m., Saturday


Pc.j YouE

Our Lunch Variety Goes Way Beyond Ham.
We offer a wide variety of delicious sandwiches
and salads. Try them all!
345 Bill France Blvd. (Behind Volusia Mall)
Daytona Beach, FL 32114
(386) 238-0026


386.788.6772 | Open from 7am 3pm 17 days a week
3280-D S. Atlantic Ave., Daytona Beach Shores
Approximately 1/2 Mile North of Port Orange Bridge (In Metz Plaza)
I.og on to Hometow'nnewsol.com for 1/2 priced gift certificates


at 619 Canal St., New Smyrna
Beach. Meals will be served
until they run out. Price is $6
per meal. There is free delivery
for five or more dinners avail-
able. For more information, call
(386) 451-8667
*Dancing fundraiser: The
Bert Fish Medical Center Foun-
dation has a night of desserts
and dancing planned for Satur-
day at Venetian Bay's Towne
Center. "Dancing Under the
Stars" will feature the sounds
of a 17-piece orchestra called
"bb Swing." Tickets are $50 per
person, which includes
desserts and Champagne. A
cash bar will be available and
the parking is free. There will
also be a silent auction of
items donated by business
sponsors. To purchase tickets
call (386) 424-5015 or go
online at www.bertfish.com.
*Boat show: The Atlantic
Coast Boat Show will be held
from 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Saturday
and 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sunday at
the Ocean Center. At this free
show, exhibitors will display
hundreds of new fishing, off-
shore, performance, cruiser,
pontoon, ski and deck boats.
Parking is available in the
.Ocean Center's parking lots
and parking garage for $5 a
day. For more information, call
(386) 943-8383.
*Science day: The Chi
Epsilon Pi Eagle Chapter will
host Science Day from 9 a.m.-
noon and 1:30-4:30 p.m., Sat-
urday at Embry-Riddle Aero-
nautical University College of
Aviation for children ages 6
to 12. Science day allows chil-
dren to come out to ERAU and
learn about science by visiting
six activity stations that include
media weather, a Cessna air-
plane, and the air traffic control
simulators.

SUNDAY, APRIL 5
*Concert: Bethune Cookman
University is having its annual
free Spring Concert featuring
the concert chorale and sym-
phonic band at 4 p.m. Sunday,
at the Mary McLeod Bethune
Performing Arts Center at 698
W. International Speedway
Blvd. in Daytona Beach.


WEDNESDAY, APRIL 8

*Environmental Film Festi-
val: "Crude Awakening," a
documentary will be shown at
6:30 p.m., Wednesday at
Southeast Museum of Photog-
raphy, located on the Daytona
Beach campus of Daytona
State College at 1200 Interna-
tional Speedway Blvd. The
museum is located in the Mori
Hosseini Center. Visitor parking
is available. Admission and
events are free. For detailed
exhibition and program infor-
mation, visit
www.smponline.org or call the
museum information hotline at
(386) 506-4475.
*Fun walk: The Happy Wan-
derers free 5K Fun Walk, will be
held at 6 p.m., Wednesday at
Airport Road Park, Port Orange.
For more information, call
(386) 788-4026 or (386) 676-
9863 or visit the Web site
www.happywanderersfl.org

THURSDAY, APRIL 9

*United Church of Christ:
Maundy Thursday's "Tenebrae"
service will be held at 7 p.m.,
Thursday. It is a Holy Week tra-
dition at the Church of Christ. It
recognizes Christ's unique
place in human history, and
features a telling of Jesus' final
days in Jerusalem, his arrest,
trial and crucifixion. Diversity
will be celebrated in a commu-
nity Good Friday service. The
Good Friday service, scheduled
for noon on Friday, April 10 at
the United Church of Christ,
203 Washington, is being
sponsored by the city's minis-
terial association and for will
bring together diverse church
families from all sections of
New Smyrna Beach. For more
information, call (386) 428-
2352.
*Our Lady of Hope Catholic
Church: Mass of the Lord's
Supper will be held at 7 p.m.,
Holy Thursday. The Adoration
of the Blessed Sacrament will
be held from 8 p.m.-midnight,
Thursday. There will also be a
celebration of the Lord's pas-
sion at 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. on
Good Friday, April 10.
*Hippity Hop: This event
from 5 to 7 p.m., Thursday, at
McDonald's at 100 S. Nova
Road, allows children a chance
to' ride either of- "io large
inflatables. They can hop over
and have their faces painted,
enjoy balloon artistry, help cre-
ate a giant mural and before
their visit is over, nibble on
cupcakes, cookies and candy.
There is no admission charge
to enter the site and enjoy the
games and rides. Cameras are
welcome. For those who do


work up an appetite, a Happy
Meal special will be available
for 99 cents when purchased
with an adult value meal. For
more information (386) 676-
3241.
*Cheer and dance champi-
onship: The National Cheer-
leaders Association/National
Dance Alliance Collegiate
Cheer and Dance Champi-
onship will return to the Ocean
Center and other venues in
Daytona Beach. Tickets for the
competitions at the Ocean
Center will be on sale begin-
ning Thursday, April 9. Tickets
are $20 for Thursday's events,
$10 for Friday's events, or $25
for a two-day pass. Tickets can
be purchased at the door. On
Thursday, April 9, doors open at
7 a.m. and competition will be
from 8 a.m.-10 p.m. On Friday,
April 10, doors open at 7 a.m.
and competition will be from 8
a.m.-2:30 p.m. Saturday's com-
petition will be at the Daytona
Beach Bandshell.

ONGOING EVENTS

*A Taste of Wines: Port
Royal Caribbean Restaurant
will host this event at 6:30 p.m.
the second Wednesday of each
month inside Pirates Cove
Resort, 3501 S. Atlantic Ave.,
Daytona Beach Shores. During
this semi-formal gathering,
four-course meals will be
served with wines that comple-
ment each course. A wine
expert will teach facts about
each wine. Reservations are
required, and guests must be
21 years old. The cost is $30
per person. Proceeds will ben-
efit the Children's Home Soci-
ety. To make reservations, call
(386) 788-3922.
*American Legion Post 270:
A fish fry and music entertain-
ment is held from 5-7 p.m.
each Friday. Taco night is held
each Monday from 5-7 p.m.
Wing night is held each
Wednesday from 5-7 p.m. The
public may attend. American
Legion Post 270 is located at
119 Howes St., Port Orange.
*Art Walk: This event is held
from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. the fourth
Saturday of each month along
Flagler Avenue in New Smyrna
Beach. A wide variety of art-
work, free children's activity,
entertainment and a special
prize drawing are presented by
the Gallery Group of Flagler
Avenue. For more information
or to request an artist's appli-
cation, call (386) 428-1770 or
visit the Web site at www.fla-
glergallerygroup.com
*Bunko, Bridge and Poker:
New groups are starting at the
Port Orange Adults Center,
4790 Ridgewood Ave. Resi-


dents meet at 4 p.m. each Fri-
day to play games. For more
information, call (386) 761-
7633.
*The Casements Cultural
Center of Ormond Beach:
Free tours are provided at the
home of John D. Rockefeller
from 10 a.m.-2:30 p.m., Mon-
day-Friday, and from 10-11:30
a.m., Saturday, at 25 Riverside
Drive, Ormond Beach. Large
groups should call for reserva-
tions at (386) 676-3216.
*Cracker Creek's Pirate
Cruise: Featuring the Pirates of
Spruce Creek, cruises are held
at 1 p.m. each Saturday and
Sunday at 1795 Taylor Road,
Port Orange. Costumed pirates
create a live, interactive experi-
ence as young buccaneers
learn navigation, pirate
weaponry, knotting or rope
tying and pirate lingo, all the
while searching for the lost
treasure at Spruce Creek.
Pre-registration is required by
calling (386) 304-0778. Also,
the Snow White Cottage, a
near-replica as seen in the
1937 Walt Disney animated
classic "Snow White and the
Seven Dwarfs," is located on
the Gamble property. Canoe
and kayak launch and rentals,
guided eco-history Pontoon
boat tours and golf cart tours of
the conservation nature trails
also are available. For more
information, visit the Web site
at www.OldFloridaPioneer.com
or send an e-mail to cracker-
creek@OldFloridaPioneer.com.
*Daytona Metropolitan
Bridge Club: Duplicate Bridge
is played Monday through Sat-
urday at 600 Driftwood Ave.,
Daytona Beach. For the sched-
ule, call (386) 255-7744 or visit
the Web site at www.Day-
tonaBridge.org.
*Sica Hall Senior Center:
Nickel and dime poker is
played at noon each Thursday.
Donations are all that is asked
to play. Several different games
are played, and rules are post-
ed. Line dancing takes place at
2 p.m. each Thursday and costs
$4 for members. Also, from 2-4
p.m. each Tuesday, a live band
plays music from the 1940s
and up to dance to. Refresh-
ments are served. Singles or
couples may attend. The cost is
$4.50 for nonmembers and
$3.50 for members. Bingo is
-.held at 1 p.m. each Monday
"and Wednesday. Drawings,
prizes and free refreshments
are available. The cost is $1 for
members and $2 for nonmem-
bers. The Sica Hall Senior Cen-
ter is located at 1065 Daytona
Ave., Holly Hill. For more infor-
mation, call (386) 236-2997..


SUNDAY
FREE TEXAS HOLD'EM BYVEI POKER
TEXAS MOTOR SPEEDWAY RACE 1:30PM
HAPPY HOUR DURING SPRINT CUP 7
WI-FI Hot Spot Original Owners for 24 Years ,


Hours: Sun-Thurs 11am Midnight Fri. & Sat. 11am-lam


jIiqA


Easter Egg : E TI I
So iO i- April 6th-11th
Art Exhibits Prizes for the young and the young at heart
,, f.-l A i l i r. .. .r. ..


71


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So. Da
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Friday, April 3, 2009


Hometown News








www.HometownNewsOL.com


Port Orange/Ponce Inlet
So. Daytona/Daytona Beach Shores


Traditional art


Scene
From page B1
formed from 7-11 p.m., Sat-
urday. Saxophonist Jaime
Hollis hits the stage from 6-
10 p.m., Monday. Mr. Hodg-
son will perform from 6-10
p.m., Sunday, Tuesday and
Wednesday. Saxman Thomrn
Chambers hits the stage
from 6-10 p.m., Thursday.
The Garlic is located at 556
E. Third Ave., New Smyrna
Beach. For more informa-
tion, call (386) 424-6660.
eInlet Harbor: Nancy
Hartline will perform from
1-5 p.m., Friday. Intrigue
hits the stage at 7 p.m.
Intrigue comes to the area
from Detroit. For more
information on Intrigue,
visit www.intrigue-
online.com. Les B. Fine will
perform from 1-5 p.m., Sat-
urday. Open Bar hits the
stage at 6 p.m. Gailforce
will perform from 12:30-
5:30 p.m., Monday. Eddie


Uzzle and Steve Hageman
will perform at 6 p.m.
Eddie Uzzle performs from
1-5 p.m, Monday. Rob Gra-
ham will perform at 5:30
p.m. Kenny Sphire will per-
form from 1-5 p.m., Tues-
day. Mike Caso will perform
at 5:30 p.m. Mike Caso will
perform from 1-5 p.m.,
Wednesday. Mr. Sphire will
perform at 5:30 p.m. Rob
Graham will perform from
1-5 p.m., Thursday. Steve
Hageman will perform at
5:30 p.m.
-Java Jungle: Open Mic
Night is at 7 p.m. each
Thursday. Wes Malone will
play music from 7-10 p.m.
Friday. Java Jungle is locat-
ed at 4606 Clyde Morris
Blvd., Unit 2P, Port Orange.
For more information, call
(386) 760-2551.
*Norwood's Restaurant
and Wine Shop: Free wine
tasting are held from 5-7
p.m. each Friday on the
deck and Saturday in the
shop with complimentary


cheeses. Norwood's is
located at 400 Second Ave.,
New Smyrna Beach. For
more information, call (386)
428-4621.
*Wine Warehouse New


Matt Knopf of Port Orange
stands in front of his oil
paintings entitled 'Tradi-
tions' during his opening
reception at the Art Haus
in Port Orange. His work
will be on display in the
gallery through April 17.
Mr. Knopf graduated from
Spruce Creek High School
in 2004 and attended
Ringling College of Art and
Design. Upon graduating
in 2008, Mr. Knopf opened
up his own studio in Port
Orange called the Florida
Museum of Contemporary
Art.



Randy Barber
staff photographer


Smyrna Beach: Free wine
tasting are held from 4-7
p.m. each Friday at 636
Third Ave., New Smyrna
Beach. For more informa-
tion, call (386) 426-6133.


Student art portfolio
winners announced
The Daytona Beach Inter-
national Festival recently
announced the winners of the
2009 Student Art Portfolio
competition. The winners
were honored at an award
reception at the University of
Central Florida Daytona
Beach Campus.
The annual contest drew
submissions from more than
180 Volusia County public
and private school students in
kindergarten through grade
12, who created original art-
work based on a musical
theme. One winner from
each grade level was selected.
and will have their winning
artwork displayed at various
festival venues during the 17-
day festival, beginning April
16. The artwork will also
make up the 2009 Student Art
Portfolio, which will be pre-
sented as a keepsake.
The 2009 Student Art Port-
folio winners include:
*Claire Bellas, Cypress,
Creek Elementary, kinder-
garten
-Ivy Grace Wyman, Cypress
Creek Elementary, first


Jantzen Heberle, Cypress
Creek Elementary, second
*Iris McGrath, Osceola Ele-
mentary, third
*Conner Sawchuk, Osceola
Elementary, fourth
*Ariana Keonitzer, Ormond
Beach Elementary, fifth
*Alex Bass, Creekside Mid-
dle School, sixth
*Michelle Henning, Creek-
side Middle School, seventh
*Elizabeth Shepherd, Holly
Hill Middle School, eighth
*Ashley Winstead, Atlantic
High School, ninth
*Audrey Friend, New Smyr-
na Beach High School, tenth
*Maggie Klepper, New
Smyrna Beach High
School, eleventh
*Hannah Woleslagle,
Seabreeze High School,
twelfth
Student artist Hannah
Woleslage will have her work
featured on the cover of the
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Traditional Italian Easter pies from sweet to super spicy


Hello smart shoppers,
hope you had a good
week.
Please note, some of this
week's recipes contain
Crisco. It has been around
since 1911. Before that time,
lard (pork fat) was used.
Today's Crisco has no trans-
fat, whether you purchase
the blue or green label.
Easter is coming! Today's
column will give you recipes
for very old, traditional
Italian Easter pies. If it
weren't for the requests I
have received, I would never
have thought to print them.
They're time consuming but
with some, tradition is
tradition.
Pizza Rustica is a spicy
meat pie. I will give you a
family recipe and another
from a friend.
Ricotta pie is a sweet,
cheesecake-like dessert
that's not too hard to make
with a sweet cookie crust. It
requires the optional
addition of candied diced


ROMANCING
THE STOVE ..
with the
Grammy Guru "
ARLENE BORG

orange and citron. I always
thought citron meant all
kinds of candied citrus,
didn't you?
I went to my World Book
encyclopedia. The citron
tree, native to Asia, bears a
grapefruit-size lemon-like
fruit with a thick rind. The
fruit is considered inedible,
but the aromatic rind is
candied and used in baking.
While reading this
information, I remembered
a huge tree my parents had
in Boynton Beach. It was
there when they bought the
house and we could never
understand why anyone
would plant such a strange
tree with inedible fruit.
Noticing the tree, an Asian
family knocked on mom's


door and asked if they could
buy the fruit. Mom told
them to help themselves,
but they insisted on paying.
Twenty-five cents apiece
seemed fair and they picked
several.
A few days later, many
more friends appeared and
as the tree was getting bare,
the price went up to 75
cents each. When I finally
learned what citron was I
put two and two together;
mom and dad had a citron
tree.
See you next week.

PIZZA RUSTICA
NO. 1 (NIB)

4 ounces each of Genoa
salami, Prosciutto (Italian
ham), boiled ham and hot
dried salami or pepperoni
12 eggs
1 cup grated parmesan or
Romano cheese
1/4-cup coarse ground.
black pepper
One 15-ounce container
ricotta cheese

You can cut the heat by
using sweet, dried salami
and reducing the pepper.
Do not add salt, the meat is
salty.


Cut meat in small pieces
or thin slices, set aside. Beat
together remaining ingredi-
ents. Add meat, blend well.
Fit pie crust into a 9-inch
by 13-inch by 2-inch deep
glass baking dish, fluting the
edges. Pour in filling and if
you have enough leftover
pastry, basket weave strips
across the top.
Bake at 375-degree oven
for 1 hour or until eggs are
set. Serve warm.

PIE CRUST

You can use my pie crust
recipe or store bought
pastry sheets, instead.

1 cup flour, sifted
Pinch of salt
1/2-cup solid shortening,
such as Crisco
Ice water

Sift together flour and
salt, cut in shortening. Add
water, 1 tablespoon at a
time, until dough sticks to
your fingers. Roll out on
pastry board and fit into
baking dish.

PIZZA RUSTICA
NO. 2 (NIB)


1 stick pepperoni
1/2-pound each of ham
and Italian sausage
4 raw eggs
1 cup ricotta cheese
1/4-cup grated Romano
cheese
1/4-teaspoon black
pepper
8 ounces mozzarella,
cubed
8 hard-boiled eggs, cut up

Cut meats into small
pieces or slices. Remove
sausage from casing; brown
it lightly, drain; set aside.
Beat raw eggs with ricotta,
Romano cheese and pepper.
Add meats, mozzarella
and hard boiled eggs. Refer
to recipe No. 1 to finish pie.

RICOTTA PIE
(TORTA DI RICOTTA)
Pastry:

1 cup flour
1/2-cup sugar
Pinch of salt
1/4-teaspoon grated
lemon rind
1 stick butter, room
temperature
1 egg yolk, beaten


Water, as needed


Sift together dry ingredi-
ents, add rind. With a pastry
blender, work butter into
flour until it resembles
coarse crumbs. Blend in the
egg and add water by
droplets until pastry can be
worked into a ball. Cover
with plastic and refrigerate
for one hour.
Roll out pastry and fit into
a 9-inch pie pan. Flute
edges.

Filling:

One 15-ounce container
of ricotta cheese
1 cup sugar
1 egg
1/2-teaspoon grated
lemon rind
2 egg yolks
2 tablespoons golden
raisins
2 tablespoons pine nuts
Diced orange and citron
peel (optional)
Confectioner's sugar

Beat ricotta with half of
the sugar and the whole egg
until smooth. Add lemon
rind. Add remaining sugar
and egg yolks, beating until
well blended. Add the
raisins, nuts and candied
fruit. Pour into prepared pie
shell and bake at 350 for
approximately 30 minutes.
Serve cold, dusted with
confectioner's sugar.

Iam available for talks
from south Vero to Hobe
Sound, call (772) 465-5656.
When a recipe is not in my
cookbook it will have (NIB)
next to the title.
HOLIDAYSPECIAL: For an
autographed cookbook,
"Romancing the Stove with
the Grammy Guru, "send
$17.50 instead of $19.50. For
multiple books sent to one
address, add $2 postage for
each additional book ($15
plus $2.00). Send to:Arlene
M. Borg, 265 SWPort St.
Lucie Blvd, No. 149, Port St.
Lucie, FL 34984. Check;
money order, Visa, Master
Card or Paypal accepted, or
visit Bprders in the Treasure
Coast Square Mall in ]ensen
Beach, Books a Million in
Boynton Beach or the Vero
Book Center in Vero Beach.
Visit my Web site at
www.romancingthestove.ne
t or send me an e-mail at
arlene@romancingthestove.
net.


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Friday, April 3, 2009


B4PortOrange/Ponce Inlet


Hometown News


or %4







Friday, April 3, 2009


www.HometownNewsOL.com


Port Orange/Ponce Inlet
So. Daytona/Daytona Beach Shores


Lingering thoughts of hush puppies, cole slaw and such


On a gray morning I
found myself
fishing between the
raindrops up near High
Bridge.
I was looking for redfish
in a place I had found
them only days before.
On that day, I had
landed a 20-inch fish, but
had spooked up several
really large reds and the
20-incher had just not
satisfied me.
Throwing a Mirro lure
twitch bait and using it as
a top water lure, I soon
had hits from two small
sea trout and then two
larger ones. No hook-ups
resulted from those four.
More than a bit frustrated,
I switched rods to the one


baited with a chartreuse
jig.
It was a quarter-ounce
white lead head with a
four-inch soft plastic
shrimp tail. Within
minutes, I had landed a fat
19-inch trout. That started
me to thinking of hush
puppies, cole slaw and
such. Casting about a
hundred feet out into
water that was about four
feet deep, I was hooked up
before the jig had made it
to the bottom. The line
darted away at a right
angle to my cast, and I
knew that I had a good one
on.
After five minutes or so,
I had gained precious little
line, and it was becoming


very clear that this big
gator trout would not meet
his cornmeal destiny with
any ease.
The water was clear and
green and when I was
finally able to get the fish
coming toward me, I could
see that it was between 24
and 26 inches. As often
happens, just as I saw it; it
saw me. The trout did a
hard about face and the
dull snap told me that it
had broken off. I sat down
and took a deep breath.
Sure I was disappointed,
but it had been a good
fight. It had just taken me
too long to play it down.
The line had rubbed on
that rough mouth just a bit
too long. As I re-tied, I


W~ :. FISHING
S. WITH
DAN
SDAr SMITH
':1

hoped that the big fish
would be able to shake the
hook for I would not want
it to die for nothing. I
fished another two hours
until the rain grew steady
and I was able to add three
more keeper trout for a
four-fish limit. I also
released five more that
were just a shade small. I
was out looking for
redfish, but had an all-
trout morning. I will never
complain about such a
thing.


One other notable on
that trip: Our water has
come back. For the past
few months, I have been
unable to tell high tide
from low tide. This time, I
had caught a flood tide.
All morning, the tide had
been coming in and had
covered areas that I had
not seen submerged since
last fall. I was able to pole
my boat into places I had
not been in some time. If
the water stays high, we
will have some good red
fishing on the mud flats
and between the man-
groves down at Mosquito
Lagoon.
Folks, it was no accident
that the fish were biting
on this overcast and rainy
morning.
Nothing rings the fish


dinner bell like a falling
barometer. If you are able
to get out on the leading
edge of a front, your
fishing is bound to
improve. With the light
rain falling, I did not
encounter another boat all
morning. The faint of
heart had left the water all
to me. The next time you
believe your fishing has
been rained out, put a bow
in your back and go for it.

Dan Smith has fished the
waters of Volusia County
for 40 years. When he's not
fishing, the retired contrac-
tor is heavily involved with
the Ormond Beach Histori-
cal Trust. For questions or
comments send an e-mail
to
apes123@mybluelight.com





. ,AOL.com


Tips for stroke prevention, part 3


In the last few weeks,
I've given you all the
bad news about the
dangers of heart disease
and stroke. Now, I have
some good news. There
are things you can do to
lower your risk.
Eat a healthy diet. You
know you've been mean-
ing to get with the pro-
gram. The American Heart
Association offers some
tips:
Use at least as many
calories as you take in.
Know what you eat and
don't eat more than you
can burn up in a day.
Eat a variety of foods
from all food groups. To
get the nutrients you need,
choose vegetables, fruits,
whole-grain products and
fat-free or low-fat dairy
products most often.
Vegetables are high in
vitamins, minerals and
fiber and lower in calories.
Whole grains can help
lower your cholesterol and
help you feel full.
East fish at least twice a
week. Recent research
suggests that the benefits
from omega-3 fatty acids
found in salmon and other
fish may lower the risk of
coronary artery disease.
If you are pregnant, talk
to your doctor about limits


S ALIVE
0^ &WELL
SHELLEY KOPPEL



on fish intake because of
mercury. For others, that is
not a problem.
Don't consume empty
calories. Limit foods that
are high in calories but not
nutrients, such as soft
drinks. Limit saturated
fats, trans fats and sodi-
um, as well. Read the
labels.
Choose lean meats and
poultry without the skin.
Cook with herbs and
without saturated fats.
Choose fat-free, 1
percent fat and low-fat
dairy products.
Cut back on foods with
partially hydrogenated
vegetable oils to reduce
trans fats. Choose a spread
such as Smart Balance.
Try to eat less than 300
milligrams of cholesterol a
day Trvo ano.
2.3 ''mi li a o
sodiurm'per day. Check
canned food labels; they
have a lot of sodium.
Only drink in modera-
tion. That means one
drink a day for a woman
and two for a man, but you
don't have to have it.


Watch portion size.
Exercise every day. Walk or
do physical activity for at
least 30 minutes most
days. Check with your
doctor before beginning.
Know your blood
pressure. If you need
medication, take it even if
you have no symptoms.
Stop smoking.
A lot of this sounds
overwhelming. I'm going
to suggest that you start
with one thing at a time.
For example, buy a salt
substitute or use herbs
instead of added salt this
week.
Next week, buy low or
non-fat milk and other
dairy products. Then add a
fruit each day.
Take a walk in the
morning or after dinner.
Before you know it, your
diet and your health will
both improve!

For more information
about heart health,. visit
the Wteb sire of the .ineri -
can Healritsociation
.wwn.m.i ban hear t.orpe. 9

Shelley Koppel is the
former editor of "Today's
HealthCare" magazine and
a member of the National
Association of Science
Writers. E-mail questions
to skoppel@bellsouth.net.


Visit us at:


www. 1iomet


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hometown ews $UPER BUY$of the wee



How to win the grocery store price cycle game


Have you ever gone to
the grocery store and
wondered why prices
on the same items change
so much each week?
A box of pasta may cost 79
cents one week and $2.39
the next. A bottle of juice
that costs $2 today may cost
$4.29 just a few days from
now.
Most people accept these
price fluctuations as
normal. Many don't even
notice them at all.
Why do prices at the
grocery store change so
much in a short period of


time?
Grocery stores sales run
in 12-week cycles. Most
everything in the store is at
its lowest price point just
once every 12 weeks.
Throughout the rest of the
cycle the price may fluctu-
ate a bit, but it won't go to
its rock-bottom low again
until the 12-week cycle is
complete.
You might be thinking
what I thought when I
initially learned this valu-
able piece of information:
what if I had just bought
more pasta last week when


COUPON
QUEEN
JILL CATALDO



it was 79 cents?
Better yet: what would
have happened if I bought
enough boxes of pasta to
last my household 12
weeks? I'd save $1.60 on
each box. If we ate pasta
once a week for the next 12
weeks, I would save $19.20
by buying all 12 boxes in


one trip when the price was
low.
Granted, this approach
goes against everything we
typically do as shoppers.
When it's time to go to the
store, most of us look
around the house, see what
we're out of and then go to
the store to buy it. But the
problem with this is that it's
impossible for every item on
our list to be at its lowest
price point, since different
categories of grocery items
operate on different pricing
cycles.
That's part of the grocery
store's marketing plan.
Stores know that if shoppers
come in for a sale item, it's
likely they will buy many
other full-priced items.
As, shoppers, changing the
way we shop is the key to
saving money.
Obviously, it's not easy to
stock up on perishable
produce and dairy items.
But many other products
are easy to store for long
periods. If you start saving


money on slow-to-outdate
items, cereal, canned and
frozen foods and personal-
care items such as tooth-
paste and shampoo, your
entire grocery bill will start
to come down.
Here's the challenge: We
are just not in the habit of
buying 12 boxes of pasta at a
time. But why not? Pasta has
a long shelf life. It doesn't
spoil'It's easy to store. Yet,
when we see it on sale, we
usually don't think, "That's a
great price. I'm going to buy
a dozen.".
When I became a super
couponer I started seeing
shopping in a new light. I
started buying larger
quantities of my household
staples when they were at
their lowest prices.
Die-hard couponers refer
to buying in quantity as
"stockpiling."
When you buy more than
you need because the price
is low, you can "shop from
home" the next time you
need that item, because you


have stockpiled it in your
kitchen cupboard.
And you've avoided
paying the higher price for
the identical item in the
grocery store this week,
because you purchased
enough to last your house-
hold almost three months
when the price was lowest.
And we haven't even
discussed coupons yet!
Imagine that during the
pasta sale, I had coupons for
75 cents off each box of
pasta. I would now be
buying my pasta for just 4
cents a box. We'll discuss
how to use coupons in
conjunction with the 12-
week sales cycle next week.

Jill Cataldo, a coupon
workshop instructor, writer
and mother of three, never
passes up a good deal. Learn
more about couponing at
her Web site, www.super-
couponing.com. E-mail
your own couponing
victories and questions to
jill@ctwfeatures.com.


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I Choose from more than 24 specially-selected wines Phone 386.677.9800
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"He Works Wonders. He's My God!" i
Baleigh Hyatt, Freshman, Embry Riddle Cross Country Team
Chiropractic "works wonders" for Baleigh Hyatt, Freshman, Embry Riddle. Baleigh
experienced an IT band injury that her Orthopedic Doctor said would cause her to miss
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--!o. ura n/Ponel t HometownNews -rd Ai3,0


*Alzheimer caregiver sup-
port group: This group
meets from 7-8:30 p.m. the
first Thursday of each
month at Lighthouse Point
Clubhouse, 155 Spring
Drive, Port Orange. All care-
giver support groups are free
to the public. For more
information, call (386) 677-
2921.
*Americans for Fair Taxa-
tion: This group meets at 6
p.m. the second Wednesday
of each month at 5100
Orange Ave., Port Orange.
Members discuss current
events and brainstorm new
ideas. Learn more about
HR25 and Congress. This is a
nonpartisan group. For more
information, call (386) 788-
8083.
*Anti-war Demonstra-
tion: This group meets each
Tuesday at 5 p.m. at the cor-
ner of Dunlawton Avenue
and U.S. 1 at the Port
Orange fountain. For more
information, call (386) 760-
2050.
*Beta Sigma Phi: The Pre-
ceptor Eta Delta chapter
holds meetings the first and
third Tuesday of each
month. BSP promotes
development programs,
networking, and is a sup-
porter of many local and
national charitable organi-
zations. For more informa-
tion, call (386) 615-0261.
*Chess Club: The Port
Orange Regional Library
Children's Department
hosts this club from 5:30-
6:30 p.m. each Tuesday and


from 3:30-4:30 p.m. each
Friday at 1005 City Center
Circle. For more informa-
tion, call (386) 322-5152, Ext.
4.
*Citizen Observer Pro-
gram: This group of volun-
teers assists the Sheriff's
Office to fight crime and
patrol neighborhoods in
Volusia County. For an
application and more infor-
mation, call (386) 672-0285.
*Embroiderers Guild of
America: The Sand Dollar
Chapter meets from 10 a.m.-
2 p.m. the first Thursday of
each month at Westminster
by the Sea Presbyterian
Church, 3221 S. Peninsula
Drive, Daytona Beach
Shores. This organization is
involved in various outreach
programs. The public may
attend. For more informa-
tion, call (386) 304-0814.
*Fair Tax: This group
meets at 6 p.m. the second
Wednesday of each month
at the Tanglewood Mobile
Estates Clubhouse, 5100
Orange Ave., Port Orange.
For more information, call
(386) 788-8083. Volunteers
are needed.
*Five Cities Democratic
Club: Members meet the
second Tuesday of each
month at the CWA Hall, 4638
Clyde Morris Blvd., Port
Orange. Political speakers
and candidates for officers
attend monthly meetings.
The club covers registered
Democratic voters in Port
Orange, South Daytona,
Daytona Beach Shores,


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Wilbur-by-the-Sea and
Ponce Inlet. For more infor-
mation, call (386) 451-4758
or send an e-mail to presi-
dent@fivecitiesdems.org.
*Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion 335: This club has din-
ner and a meeting at 6 p.m.
on the third Thursday of
each month at the Port
Orange Veterans of Foreign
Wars Post on South
Williamson Boulevard. This
is a group of former sea
service people Navy,
Marines and Coast Guard. A
breakfast get-together is
held at 8 a.m. the third Sun-
day of each month. For more
information and directions,
call (386) 788-5382 or (386)
852-7773.
*Food Addicts in Recov-
ery Anonymous: This club
will help those who suffer
from food obsession,
overeating, under-eating
and bulimia. FA is based
upon the 12 steps of Alco-
holics Anonymous. There
are no dues, fees or weigh-
ins at meetings. This club
meets at 7 p.m. each Mon-
day and Tuesday at United
Presbyterian Church, 730
Beville Road, South Day-
tona, and at 8 p.m. each Fri-
day at Port Orange Presby-
terian Church, 4662 S. Clyde
Morris Blvd. For more infor-
mation, call (386) 258-0610
or visit the Web site at
www.foodaddicts.org.
*Gold Wing Road Riders
Association: Chapter FL1-H
Daytona Beach meets the
third Thursday of each
month at the Country Har-
vest Buffet on U.S. 1 in the
Sunshine Park Mall in South
Daytona. Every make and
model of motorcycle can be
found in the ranks promot-
ing "Friends for Fun, Safety,
'Knowledge." Dinner will be
served at 6 p.m., followed by
the meeting at 7 p.m. Visi-
tors may attend. For more
information, call (386) 427-
5169.
*Irish American Club:
This club meets at noon the
third Wednesday of each
month at the Elks Lodge,
5207 S. Ridgewood Ave., Port
Qran.ge.11ri-i1 Intisic, lunch
and Geili dancing will be
available. Nlembership dues
are $10 per year per person.
Those interested in partici-
patitng should call 1 386i 761 -
6790.


*Knit Wits: This group is
offered to those who enjoy
knitting, crocheting and
socializing. Members meet
from 1-3 p.m. each Wednes-
day at the Port Orange Adult
Recreation Center, 4790 S.
Ridgewood Ave. For more
information, call (386) 846-
0514 or (386) 761-1071.
*Lions Club of Ponce
Inlet: This club meets at 6:30
p.m. the first Wednesday of
each month and at noon the
third Wednesday of each
month at the Community
Center, 4670 S. Peninsula
Drive, Ponce Inlet. Lions is a
nonprofit club that supports
sight, hearing and commu-
nity civic projects through
various activities. Members
support the Conklin Center,
the Children's Camp, eye
exams and Seeing Eye dogs.
For more information, call
(386) 760-4964.
*Living Legends of Auto
Racing: This nonprofit
group of volunteers dedicated
to preserving the history of
Daytona-Ormond auto rac-
ing. The organization meets at
7 p.m. the third Tuesday of
each month at the Daytona
Beach Community Center,
3048 S. Atlantic Ave., Daytona
Beach Shores. The organiza-
tion also operates the Living
Legends ofAuto Racing muse-
um in South Daytona, which
is run by an all-volunteer staff.
The museum is open Mon-
day-Saturday from 10 a.m.-5
p.m. and is free to the public.
For more information, call
(386) 763-4483, or visit the Web
site at www.livinglegendso-
fautoracing.com.
*Lupus Link Support
Group: This group meets from
11 a.m.-1 p.m. the second Sat-
urday of each month at the
Community Room of the Hos-
pice ofVolusia/Flagler behind
Halifax Hospital Port Orange.
For more information, call
(386) 299-6912.
*Maryland Club: This club
for former and present Mary-
land residents meets at 11:30
a.m. the third Wednesday of
each month at the Country
Harvest Buffet located in the
Sunshine Park Mall in South
DaTvona. For more informa-
don, call 13861 788-9003.
*NMomingstar Quilt Guild:
Members meet at 10 a.m. the
first Wednesday of each
month at United PresbN-enan
Church. 730 Beville Road.


South Daytona. A project class
is held at 10 a.m. the third
Wednesday of each month.
New members are welcome.
For more information, call
(386) 788-2143.
*National Association of
Retired and Veteran Railroad
Employees: This organization
was formed to observe and
inform members of changes
in the railroad retirement sys-
tem that could affect benefit
or pension funds. Members
meet at 11:30 a.m. the second
Wednesday of each month at
Whistle Junction Buffet and
Grill, 1854 S. Ridgewood Ave.,
South Daytona. For more
information, call (386) 428-
9848 or (386) 767-9086.
*Opera Video Club: This
club presents opera videos
each Thursday at noon at the
Daytona Beach Shores Coun-
cil Chamber's Activity Room,
3048 S. Atlantic Ave. Admis-
sion is free. For more informa-
tion, call (386) 767-6967.
*Sons of Italy: Members
(men and women) of the Sons
of Italy No. 2524 are reaching
out to families and friends of
any heritage who are interest-
ed in joining this group.
Monthly activities are held,
and monthly meetings take
place at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday of each month
iat the Port Orange Adult
Center, 4079 Ridgewood
Ave. For more information,
call (386) 562-7370 or (386)
405-1010.
*Overeaters Anonymous:
This club helps compulsive
eaters and those who are
ruled by food. There are no
weigh-ins, dues or fees. Call
(386) 426-1558 or (386) 233-
9399 for the nearest meeting
location.
*Palmetto Club: Members
meet at 11:30 a.m. the first
Friday of each month for a
social with lunch, a business
meeting, and speakers at the
Palmetto Club, 1000 S.
Beach St., Daytona Beach.
This is a charitable organi-
zation that plans projects for
various charities.
*Port Orange Friends of
Carving Club: This club
meets from 6-8 p.m. each
Tuesday at the Port Orange
Recreation building on U.S.
1, south of Dunlawton
Avenue. For more informa-
tion, call (386) 852-5830.
*Port Orange Lions Club:
This club is a service organi-
zation and is open to the
public and potential mem-
bers at all meetings. Those
interested in serving the
community may join. For
more information, call (386)
756-1274 or send an e-mail







usto W Indoi
a Mfffw/


to rayspubs@msn.com.
*Port Orange Recreation-
al Travelers: This nonprofit,
senior service organization
is for anyone 55 and older.
The club is intended to
enhance the quality of life
through programs, trips and
tours, as well as promote
good fellowship among
members. Those 55 and
older may join the club for
$5 per year. For more infor-
mation, call (386) 761-3274.
*Port Orange Ship Model
Club: This club meets at 10
a.m. the last Saturday of
each month in the Port
Orange Library. This society
for the ship model hobbyist
ranges from beginners to
experts. Members attend
meetings in Volusia and Fla-
gler counties. For more
information, visit the Web
site at http://home.bell-
south.net/p/PWP-shipmod-
el.
*Sons of Norway: This
club holds meetings the sec-
ond Friday of each month.
For more information, call
(386) 427-6618 or (386) 788-
7409.
*Sunset Civitan Club:
This club meets at 7 p.m. the
second and fourth Monday
of each month at 1038 Reed
Canal Road, South Daytona.
The club is dedicated to
helping the community with
an emphasis on physically
and mentally challenged
individuals. For more infor-
mation, (386) 253-0604 or
visit the Web site at
www.civitan.org.
*Take off Pounds Sensi-
bly: This club weighs in at
8:30 a.m. and 9:30 a.m. each
Monday at the Port Orange
All Saints Lutheran Church,
751 Dunlawton Ave. Meet-
ings start at 1Q. a.m. TOPS is
a national weight support
group. For more information
on cost and membership, call
(386) 322-9746.
*Take off Pounds Sensibly
No. 266: This club weighs in
at 6 p.m. and meetings start
at 7 p.m. Monday at the
South Daytona Christian
Church, 2121 Kennilworth
Ave. South Daytona. TOPS is
a national weight support
group. For more information
on cost and membership, call
(386) 788-4459.
*Tomoka Poets: This club
meets from 7-9 p.m. the
fourth Monday of each
month at Piggotte Commu-
nity Center, 504 Big Tree
Road. A spotlight poet will
appear the first hour, and
then an open mic session
will take place for all attend-
ing poets. For more infor-
mation, call (386) 304-7440.


Dr. Terry Kahn
Chiropractor


CENTER
4606 Clyde Morris Blvd., #1M, Port Orange
756-9303 j


Event Name:
American Cancer Society


Orange
American Cancer Society Contact:
Jamie Anderson (386) 274-3274 ext. 5855
Date of Event:
May 1-2, 2009
After dark, the Relay for Life of Port Orange
celebration will include a special Luminaria
Ceremony. Encircling the track with lights, the
Luminaria Ceremony reaches for tomorrow with
each candle of life and touches the stars for only a
moment to remember those of yesterday. Your
donation for each bag will place a luminaria along
the pathway to memorialize or honor someone you
love. The bags will stay lit throughout the evening,
reminding us that HOPE LIVES among us.
Luminaria Ceremony:
Friday, May 1st, at 8:00pm
Location:
Port Orange City Center Circle

Please contact Jamie Anderson at (386) 274-3274
ext. 5855 for more information regarding the Port
Orange Relay For Life Luminaria Ceremony.


OUR 0CA LNy m &IF iO nu10n mqCm


i


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Hometown News Friday, April 3, 2009


B6Port Orange/Ponce Inlet
BDrcn nartnq/na^na RBeach Shores


Relay for Life of Port


Sunday Closeu -:@< ,rt :-i
. . . -, .-







Friday, April-3, 2009


www.HometownNewsOL.com


Port Orange/Ponce Inlet
So. Daytona/Daytona Beach Shores


Pretty bird


GOLF DEMO DAY

*TOMORROW* Saturday, April 4th
Featuring Wilson and Nancy Lopez Golf


Randy Barber/staff photographer
Grace Peacock, 3, of South Daytona winks for the camera as she rides a merry-go-round
with her mother Carol Custodio during Kidz Days in Port Orange.


All you need to


know about Adobe


Reader program


This week I thought I
would touch on an
issue that seems to
have been popping up
more of late.
I keep getting requests
for help from people who
either have a file that was
e-mailed to them that is
supposed to be "universal
portable document
format," but they can't
open it, or they click on a
link in a Web site and then
get a message they need
something called "Adobe
Reader" in order to read
that file. Has this ever
happened to you?
The confusion seems to
come from the idea that
when you get a computer
it's fully loaded and ought
to be able to open any-
thing, especially so-called
"universal" files such as
Adobe files.
To further confuse
things, some computers
do come with Adobe
Reader already installed in
its "core build" (that is, the
standard package of
programs installed for that
model) but many do not.
Since the ability to read
Adobe files is not some-
thing that Windows can do
on its own, you can run
into some confusion the
first time you encounter
one of these Adobe files.
You can recognize an
Adobe file by its extension:
.pdf. The extension (the
last three characters of a
file name after the dot)
tells Windows what kind of
file it is and what program
to use to open it.
In this case ".pdf"
stands for "portable
document format" and it
is supposed to be univer-
sal. That is, it's supposed
to look the same no matter
what kind of computer
you try to view it with.
The problem comes
from the fact that,
although this is a univer-
sal format, you must have
a special reader installed
in order to see the file
exactly the way it was
created, hence the need
for the Adobe reader
"plug-in" or "helper app."
(a plug-in or helper app. is
a small program that takes
over when Windows can't
do the job).
I can hear all these
questions going through
your heads and I have an
answer for all of them.
If the icon isn't present
in your programs list, or it
is there but you still have
trouble opening .pdf files,
then you should consider
downloading the latest
copy.
If you don't have it, it's a
sure bet you'll need it,
someday and if you have


COMPUTE
S THIS
-. SEAN MCCARTHY



it, but it won't open files,
then it may be an older
version trying to open a
file that was created with a
newer version. That can
happen from time to time
too.
Do you really need it?
Well, it's gobd to have on
your machine. Eventually,
you will encounter a .pdf
file and having the latest
version installed will
ensure you are, able to':
open it when you
encounter one.
The reader is available for
free by downloading it
from Adobe's Web site; just
visit www.Adobe.com and
click the "get Adobe
Reader" button.
Follow the directions
and soon your system will
be opening .pdf files with
no problems at all.
As for the spyware
question, the answer is
that there's no spyware.
Adobe Reader is com-
pletely safe.
But it is good to be alert
when downloading
"freebies" from the
Internet. Sometimes free
comes with a cost but in
this case, it's OK. Installing
Adobe Reader won't load
your machine with a
bunch of spyware garbage,
and it won't cause you to
get a ton of spam so you
can relax. This is a safe
one.
So, in a nutshell, some-
times Windows needs help
opening even "universal"
files and the way that is
accomplished is by
downloading and
installing the appropriate
"helper app."
When you encounter a
message that Windows
can't open a file, don't
panic. Make a note of the
file's extension to tell you
how to open it. If it's .pdf,
then you know you need
to have Adobe Reader
installed.
If it's some other exten-
sion, remember you can
always Google it to find
out what kind of program
you to open it. The nice
thing is that once you
download and install the
helper app., you never
have to do it again. From
that point on, Windows
will know how to open
files with that extension.

Sean McCarthy fixes
computers. He can be
reached at (772) 408-0680
or help@ComputeThisOn-
line.com (no hyphens).


',,' .



, Advadd A6 r 7607-1654
SAppwth coupon Exp. 4-609.
, i Part's labor additional
U -


CHEAT PUMP SPECIALISTS

1 < HEAT
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Inae 386.767.165


Heating & Air Conditioning

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(CAC)#57588)
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BPort Orange/Ponce Inlet
B8So. Daytona/Daytona Beach Shores


Hometown News


Friday, April 3, 2009


Scopes
From page B1
light and presence. It keeps
your family bonds strong. It
gives you much personal
power in the workplace. You
are a well- loved and trusted
friend.

Virgo-Aug. 23-Sept. 22
The moon in Virgo this week


-


L IoO

.f...


gives you an edge in- emo-
tional power. Keep your heart
open and listen to your inner
guidance. The wisdom that
comes up is the greatest truth
you can have on earth. Have
faith in it, learn to trust it, sur-
render and wait. Before long,
the right ideas begin to pop
into the mind from this deep
well within. When you act on
these divine impulses before
the head gets in the way, you
will see great, unexpected


gain materializing right in
front of your eyes.

Libra-Sept. 23-Oct. 22
Find joy and good cheer in
the little things. Laugh a lot.
Hang around with positive-
minded people who let you
be yourself. Tell someone a
joke and make her laugh.
Poke a little good-natured fun
at yourself. Others love to
laugh at our foibles. It's a


good part of being healthy
and human. It keeps our self-
righteousness and ego in
check when we poke a little
fun at ourselves. Make some-
one else laugh and it cheers
you up.

Scorpio-Oct. 23-Nov. 21
When you arise each day,
take stock of your many
blessings and express grati-
tude. Then know that more


SCHMOS


*. -,DP ^ ti !p .* :*


positive good is on the way to
add to this. This attitude of
positive expectancy then rubs
off on others and causes
them to want to help you get
what you want. Then be gen-
erous and share your new
blessings.

Sagittarius-Nov. 22-Dec. 21
You function best when you
feel inspired. Here is one to
affirm every day. "The uni-
verse is my source of life.
Each day begins anew. My
job is to share and honor it to
many or to few. I ask for wis-
dom, love and courage with
each new passing day. Let me
help someone with a greater
burden somewhere along the
way. In the giving I receive
back multiplied. With this
possibility my life is justified.
Mine is a great life and I am
thankful."

Capricorn-Dec. 22-Jan. 19
Ask the universe for new
direction and be open to new
ideas when they come. Feel
yourself in perfect health, sur-
rounded by happy people,
with all your needs being met
right now. Allow yourself to
receive back for all the good
you have given to others. The
safety, peace and joy of this,
fills you with a youthful inner
glow and gives a sense that


all is well.

Aquarius-Jan. 20-Feb. 18
Mars in Aquarius gives you
the courage to stand up for
what you truly believe. Your
sense of justice is legion. No
matter what is going on
around you, you always know
how to do the right thing.
Continue to expect the unex-
pected. Create new causes.
Push forward. It's springtime.
Plant new seeds and expect
positive results. Your dynamic
leadership continually goes
out to others like a light, and
gives hope to those in need.

Pisces-Feb. 19-March 20
Mighty forces are at work
right now. Mercury in Pisces
speeds -up your decision-
making powers and gives
clarity to your thoughts.
Uranus in Pisces continues
to hone your spirit and the
visions that flow up from the
soul. Now is the time to
rejuvenate yourself. New
energy, enthusiasm and
hope are abundant.
Regroup often and stay
focused on the edge of your
own possibilities and pas-
sions. A psyched up and
happy Pisces is a mighty
force to be reckoned with in
this old world.


Holy Week Services


Church oftfie Epiphany


201 Lafayette St.
Port Orange, Fl. 32127
386-767-6111


Private Confessions Monday, April 06, 2009
9:00a.m., 12:00p.m. and 6:00p.m.


HOLY THURSDAY
April 09,2009
Solemn Morning Prayer 9:30a.m.
Mass of the Lord's Supper 7:00p.m.
Prayer before the Blessed Sacrament 8:00p.m.
Night Prayer to close Adoration 10:00p.m.


GOOD FRIDAY
April 10, 2009
Solemn Morning Prayer 8:30a.m.
Stations of the Cross 12:00p.m.(noon)
Celebration of the Lord's Passion 3:00p.m.
Celebration of the Lord's Passion 7:00p.m.


HOLY SATURDAY April.I 1, 2009
Solemn Morning Prayer 8:30a:.n
Blessing of Food 10:30a.m.
EASTER VIGIL at 8:00p.m. (There are no Masses il l- t, il',
r n -_a'V.


rEASTER SUN DAY'u April 12, 2009
: L SS 1.:." lJc r,'.: .urr>,:;l .r.]
6:C,.-) m r un'. ; Mi: i ..1
I Br.ng .:,ur : r. ch. a


A'.


/:uua.m l l.ir j T .' I ' m .- -- .


Website: http://home.catholicweb.com/EpiphanyCatholicChurch
Email: epiphanychurch@cfl.rr.com


SHoly Week Vorshi
Palm/Passion Sunday, April 4 & 5
Procession of Palm and Holy Communion
Saturday at 6pm/Sunday at 11am at Dunlawton Avenue
9:30am at Cypress Creek Elementary School
Maundy Thursday, April 9
7pm at Dunlawton Avenue
Foot washing, Holy communion, Stripping of the Altar
Good Friday, April 10
7pm at Dunlawton Avenue.
The Passion according to St. John; The Triumph of the Cross
Easter Vigil, Saturday, April 11
6pm at Dunlawton Avenue
SAk- e of'ight, Readiflgs.'Aftirmation ot Bapbtsm, nd '"
Communion
Easter Day, Sunday, April 12
8am at Dunlawton Avenue
9:30am at Cypress Creek Elementary School
11am at Dunlawton Avenue

All Saints Lutheran Church
751 Dunlawton Ave., Port Orange
386-761-9129
www.allsaintslutheranchurch.org N
Between Nova Road & Ridgeibood Ave. 0
1/4 mile west of Port Orange Office 0
Ln


4t* Eggstra-Ordinary "
anM A ~L Hunt

all children pre-school to 5th grade Apr il 11th

* Over 18,000 candy-filled eggsl
* Tons of give-aways from Stone Edge Skate Park, CiCI's Pizza,
Daytona Lagoon Water Park, Chick-Fit-A and mor!
* Held at the Port Orange City Center.
100 Cdy Center Ccle Port Orange FL. 32129
S0 Meet at the amphitheater


Games, Give-away s & pre-hunt fun starts 'tf '
;A 4 MMP Me start af; the amphi,
SFirst Baptist Church
118 North Palmentlo Ave.
E \Daytona Beach. FL 32114
(386) 253-5691 ext. 201
a w-- az-wrrean


am


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1-' .. .


'*1'~'
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Port Orange Presbyterian Church
Rev. Dr. Calvin H. Gittner
4662 S. Clyde Morris Blvd. Port Orange 386-788-1 111 www.webpopc.com
'. Palm Sunday April 5th 8:30 and 1 1:00 Worship
i All are welcome to participate in our Procession of the Palms
Confirmation Class prepares and Serves Communion
Holy Week Spirituality Center April 6th-I 0th
Monday-Wednesday 7 am-2:30 pm Maundy Thursday 7 am-7 pm
Journey to the Cross as we explore the final days of Jesus' life:
The Center will be a place where you can come to shut out the
noise and distractions of everyday life, long enough to quiet your soul
and really listen for the Spirit of God. Visit the Sanctuary anytime,
Maundy Thursday Service April 9th 7:00 pm
Easter Celebration April 12 8:30 and 11:00 Worship S
9:45- Resurrection Workshops and M
Egg-strat aganza for the kids meet in the Sanctuary!
Bring your Easter Basket with an offering for our New Hope
Orphanage-Motorbike Ministry and then fill it up with Easter Eggs that .ou find!


in~n. ~ -
a a -~


'E. At Church:
S..... Mm R 8 -.O.m: 9.30 11OOm
Our bLdy ct LourdU CnAholic. Church ,OI.' N IiIa A 'r [*'ot -.r b n.:h [t- .211

,_.13So2c*'5-4T..h-. T o' ijrlady.:.l, [.Ie.'.'ivl'onQ.c..ri
(C orner ,f ..:.- ,,I-v N r.l,, i I ic, ,. t .-
.
4, 6- 4, ,


7'T '1 4r vl
"AMERICA'S CUTE KID" SEARCH

Miss/Mr.Volusia County
April 19th
Sunshine Park Mall
Registration Begins 1pm Pageant starts 2pm
Savings Bonds Awarded
FOR BROCHURE/INFO CALL 321-631-8484 W
Or email cuteklds@bellsouth.net (EVERYONE RECEIVES A TROPHY)
www.americascutekids.com i-
61 1 .. _u -L x. :


Trinity Lutheran School
Kindergarten Roundup
April 16- 6:00 p.m.
April 17 11:OO a.m.
Quality Christ Centered Education
^ ~Caring Environment
SBefore & After School Programs
Qualified Professional Staff m
VPK Provider / Children First
Summer Camp -June 10 to August 14
Preschool Ages 2 to 4 Kindergarten thru Grade 5
1205 Ridgewood Avenue Holly Hill, Florida 386-255-0182


Join Us

For Easter

Worship

Palm Sunday
Services April 5th
Featuring palm procession
and Holy Communion
Full Choir both services
8:45 am & 11:00 am
Quality Nursery provided
Traditional Worship
Maundy Thursday Service April 9th
Intinction Communion and Tenebrae
7:30 p.m.
Quality Nursery provided
Westminster By-The-Sea Presbyterian Church
3221 S. Peninsula Dr., Daytona Beach Shores, FL 32118
(1/2 mi. N. or Port Orange Bridge) o
386-767-8342 g
www.wbts.org iL


C.



y
;> r.




5 '


29th Annual






April 12, 2009 at 7:00am
Winterhaven Park
on South Atlantic Ave. in Ponce Inlet
,(3.5 miles south of Dunlawton Bridge)
co

Nondenominational Free Will Offering
Open Communion Plenty of FREE Parking
* Bring a Lawn Chair Offering this Service for 29 Years


Sponsored By:
Port Orange United Church of Christ
.651 Taylor Road, Port Orange, (386) 788-0920
... ";.. ,.- Rev. Jim.Willis, Senior Pasm -'


--~--I~ I


rl^o -0 I0-BE, ,


rA4ZT








Friday. Aoril 3. 2009


www.HometownNewsOL.com


Port Orange/Ponce Inlet
So. Daytona/Daytona Beach Shores


Caution: Poisonous plants


flourish in Florida


Editor's note: This column
originally ran on April 6,
2007.
J am getting a lot of e-mail
requests to write about
some of the most
common poisonous plants
in Florida.
I have compiled a list of
some of the most common
plants that we all have in
our yards and gardens.
Some of these will shock
you.
What you don't know
about some of these
common plants can be
deadly. Some parts of the
ornamental plants or
flowers in your yard may
contain a deadly poison.
The most susceptible to
being harmed are children
and pets.
Oleander: One of the
most toxic and common
poisonous plants is the
oleander. This plant con-
tains a deadly heart stimu-
lant that resembles the
prescription drug digitalis.
If a child eats a single leaf
or two from this plant it
could be deadly. There have
been several instances of
people dying after eating
meats that were roasted on
a wood fire that contained
oleander twigs or branches.
Dieffenbachia: Dieffen-
bachia, which is a common
tropical plant that many of
us have in our homes, is
also highly toxic.
All parts of this plant are
poisonous.
If eaten, the plant can
cause intense burning and
irritation of your mouth.
The plant can be deadly if
enough swelling occurs to
block your airway.
You should always wash
your hands after handling
this or any of the listed


GARDEN
NOOK 'J I'
JOE ZELENAK


poisonous plants.
Azalea: All parts of the
azalea plant can be toxic if
ingested. The symptoms
include nausea and vomit-
ing along with difficulty in
breathing and possibly
coma. The end result can be
fatal.
Jasmine berries: These
berries can cause digestive
problems along with
nervous system disorders.
Oak leaves: The foliage
from oak trees can be toxic,
but the effects are gradual. If
foliage is ingested, it can
slowly affect your kidneys.
However, you need to
ingest a substantial amount
for severe poisoning to
occur.
Lantana: This plant,
which is commonly used by
many as a colorful ground
cover, is another specimen
that is toxic if ingested.
Acute poisoning can
cause hemorrhagic diarrhea
and rapid heart rate.
Other varieties:
Although this list includes
some of the most common
plant varieties, there are
many more: milkweed,
narcissus, daffodil, poison
oak, puslane and snow on
the mountain.
Bear in mind that just
because some of your
favorite plants can be toxic
if ingested, common sense
and keeping these plants
out of the reach of small
children and pets can avoid
tragedy.
Philodendrons, et al:
Finally, there are several
common houseplants that


can be toxic to animals and
children.
Probably the most
common is the philoden-
dron. The toxic part is the
leaves. If ingested, it can
cause burning of the lips
and mouth and also cause
contact dermatitis if the
plant juice contacts the
skin.
Similar symptoms can
occur with pothos, golden
pothos and devil's ivy.
Poinsettias not poison-
ous: We have talked a lot
about common and seem-
ingly innocent plants that
can be toxic but here is one
plant that many people
think is deadly poisonous
but in reality, is harmless.
The plant I am referring
to is the poinsettia.
This plant is one of the
most widely produced in
the country.
During the holidays,
almost every household has
at least one adorning their
decor.
Fear not, as today's
commercially distributed
varieties are not poisonous.
There are some people,
however, that may get a
mild allergic reaction to the
milky sap if it comes in
contact with their skin. The
affected areas can be
washedwith soap and water
to remove the sap if irrita-
tion develops.
Poinsettia plants are not a
serious risk for animals,
although it is always best to
keep any plant out of the
reach of pets if they like to
chew plants.
Joe Zelenak has 28 years
experience in gardening and
landscape. Send e-mails to
hometowngarden@gmail.co
m or visit his Web site
www.hometowngarden.co
m.


Lynn Kaiser-Conrad of
United Cerebral Palsy of
Central Florida dances with
Scott Masters of Port
Orange during the fifth
annual Developmental
Disabilities Awareness Day
in Daytona Beach.








Randy Barber
staff photographer


.- s







b^ 3


The Spine is an engineering
miracle that plays a major role
in your health and well-being.

Are you doing enough to
ensure its proper function?
Add chiropractic care to your


health team!


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Saturday 9 -10am
HEALTH CLASS: Saturday 10:30am


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Dr. Mindy Weingarten
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I


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National Board Certified H.I.S.
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B10Port Orange/Ponce Inlet
B1 Or n ,.,tnn/Davtona Beach Shores


Hometown News


Friday, April 3, 2009


* Hometown News Ml Volusia County 386-322-5949
f 1B 1-866-897-5949 Fax 386-322-5944
Email: classified@HometownNewsOL.com

I Logon to www.HometownNewsOL.com


Serving the following communities:
Barefoot Bay Micco Sebastian Orchid Island Vero Beach Ft. Pierce Hutchinson Island Port St. Lucie Jensen Beach Stuart Palm City '. -
Hobe Sound Sewall's Point Palm Bay Nlelbourne The Beaches Rockledge Cocoa .Merritt Island Cocoa Beach Suntree Viera Titusville -
Port St. John Port Orange South Daytona New Smyrna Beach Edgewater Oak Hill Da).ona Beach Holly I Hill Ormond Beach
Pleas check your ciassifid ad in Irme Irst inertion rimeaan i-ew a is noA respoinsble for errors a fiar t e e rs an, Ts i pulisner.a r na-e.e-, e" ri r, srEo, edi .ar. la -* reac1 or raasius., dver enerre witolt rinor rnC, e Tr.e put.hnSer aa iurr,& no r.r'rs,,,a rs5..-, a ibair rr eirrrs 5.m o rri L cr. i coal oeo..-4 ltr, crum c t-, aa


DAYTONA MEMORIAL
PARK Crypt companion
avail. Building 8 sec 26
level D Crypt 1 & 2.
Asking $3500 Call
678-358-3072

VALUE
ORMOND BEACH
Volusia Memorial park.
550 North Nova Road, 1
beautiful space with vault
Below the market value.
$1100 386-931-0903
VOLUSIA MEMORIAL
PARK 2 burial spaces 2
custom built vaults com-
panion bronze marker,
Section E3 Lot 86 sites 1 &
2 Value $10,800 will sell for
$6,000 386-437-3155





AANA ESCORT
SERVICE
386-453-3757
CHRISTIAN DATING &
Friendship Service, Our
20th year with over
100,000 Members &
countless relationships!
Singles over 40 receive a
package, 1-800-437-
1926



ALONE? Senior dating
bureau. Safest since
1977. Ages 45-90
800-922-4477 24hr or
RespectedDating.com
CALL CLASSIFIED
and sell that car!
386-322-5949


NEW CHURCH family
invites you to uplifting
gay/ straight affirming
Christian worship Sun.
10am & 6 pm at 815-B
Beville Road, Daytona
Beach 386-761-5565
www.newchurchfamily-
.org



ADOPTION 866-633-
0397 Unplanned Preg-
nancy? Provide your
baby with a loving, fi-
nancially secure family.
Living/ Medical/Coun-
seling expenses paid.
Social worker on staff.
Call compassionate At-
torney Lauren Feingold
(FL Bar # 0958107) 24/7
ADOPTION 888-812-
3678 Living Expenses
paid. Choose a Loving,
Financially Secure fami-
ly for your child. Caring
& Confidential. (24
hours/7 days), Attorney
Amy Hickman, (Lic#
832340)



$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
A BUYING COLLECTOR
Wrist/pocket watches,
working or not. Knives,
trains, lighters, guitars,
fishing, coins, gold and
scrap jewelry. We come
to you, INSTANT CASH!
386-299-6443
WANTED JUNK CARS
Running or not $200 &
up. We pay cash! 24-hrs.
Call 321-631-0111
WANTED- storm door or
windows 36x80, car buf-
fer, Formica 2ft x 6ft
386-322-6928


EMPIRE BED and chest
circa 1830 Good
condition. Asking $2500
386-214-6608



AIR MATTRESS- queen
size, with bag, has pad-
ded top, $15,
386-756-0753 VOL
ALUMINUM PATIO roof,
8' x 16', good condition,
disassembled, $150,
386-67.1-0173 VOL
AQUARIUM 10 gal all
glass, w/light lid, filter and
more $50, 386-235-4390
AREA RUGS- Orange
5x7, $60, Burgundy 5x7,
$30, Cream 5x8, $20,
386-423-5978 VOL
BABY GIFTS, crocket
cub blankets, pastel col-
ors, $25, 386-304-2537
VOL
BAR STOOLS- 4, black
rod iron, with backs, $85,
386-615-9092 VOL
BATH VANITIES- 30",
with marble top, $75, 60"
with 2 sink marble top,
$125, 386-341-7639 VOL
BED, ELECTRIC, Home
style, local delivery, less
mattress, $99,
231-384-5713 VOL
BEDROOM SET- Head-
board, armoire, 2 night
stands, $150,
386-882-8069 VOL
BICYCLES racing bike,
$35, ladies bike, $15, 100
golf balls for $20,
386-672-6518 VOL


-I
BIRD CAGES- 4, medi-
um to large, $50 takes
all, knick knacks, $50
takes all, 386-254-4814
BOAT, 10' fiber glass,
$200, 386-427-0555 VOL
BRACELET, EXQUI-
SITE, made in Zuni, 26
stoneson, sterling silver,
$195 firm, 386-441-8967
BRUNSWICK Mens
BOWLING BALL 16lbs
with black bag, & size 10
black bowling shoes $30.
386-345-3010
CAMCORDER, VHS,
RCA, new with Weston
flash adaptor/ charger,
$100, 386-441-0166 VOL
CEILING FAN Still up,
like new, 52" Huntington
3 Hampton Bay, black+
silver, $60. 386-334-0793
CLOTHES Maternity,
over 40 pieces, size me-
dium to large, $40,
386-898-4874 VOL
COCKATIELS 2, yel-
low, 2 years old, with
large floor cage, wheels,
$65, 386-756-2488 VOL
DAYBED, WHITE, metal,
porcelain finals, good
condition, $125,
386-756-3191 VOL
DESK 5 drawer, wood
grain, $35, TV stand, 1
drawer, shelf, $45,
386-756-0587 VOL
DINETTE SET- walnut
formica, 40" round with
one leaf, 4 chais includ-
ed, $200, 386-756-6445
DINING SET- good cond,
glass top, brass base, 6
high back chairs w/ cush-
ions, $100, 386-427-6226


DISHES like festaware,
$20, Bed-In-a- Bag, full,
$20, 386-761-4483 VOL
DOG KENNEL- chain
link gate with latch, $100,
386-426-6252 VOL
DRESS, BEADED se-
quin, top chiffon, bottom,
champagne, $75,
386-615-1744 VOL
DRESSER- TRIPLE with
mirror & night stand $95
Mens 10 speed bike
$90 906-202-2901
DRYER, FRIGIDAIRE
Crown, 4 temp setting, 3
load setting, white, $199,
407-492-1209 VOL
ELLIPTICAL TRAINER-
fitness gear model 8zlE,
console control, $199,
386-677-5396 VOL
FILE CABINET- metal,
sturdy, good condition,
and desk, $50 both,
386-760-5127 VOL
FOUNTAIN 4 tier 5'.5"
white. Good condition.
$175 386-492-3491
GARAGE DOOR, 16' x7',
brown, all hardware in-
cluded, very good condi-
tion, $200, 386-677-7287
GENERATOR, TROY
built, 5200 watt, used 24
hours, $200 firm,
386-423-4152 VOL
GLASS DOORS, for pa-
tio, good condition, $100,
386-427-1077 VOL
GOLF CLUBS- men, full
set, King Cobras, w/ 4
metal wedges & bag,
$200, 386-423-7599 VOL
GUITAR MAGAZINES,
350 copies of Guitar
Player, 1970's, 80's, $20
all, 386-677-8328 VOL


HAMSTER CAGES,
large, w/accessories,
Hammocks, 2, $35 ea,
386-767-0201 VOL
HEAD BOARD- Queen
or double size, new con-
dition, all wood, $100,
386-882-8748 VOL
IMAC and photoshop
books, $12, bar carrier
for cars, ok for Kayaks,
$13, 386-676-1363 VOL
IMAC BOOKS for Photo-
shop, $10, Canon Printer,
black/ white/color, new,
$25, 386-676-1363 VOL
KAYAK, 13' Touring,one
man sit down, $165, sta-
tionary bike, like new,
$25, 386-673-8214 VOL
KEYBOARD, CASIO,
CT-670, hardly used,
rhythm, $175,
386-788-6544 VOL
KEYBOARD, Casio, w/
stand, like new, $75,
Kenmore sewing ma-
chine, $40, 386-761-8454

LAWN MOWER self pro-
pelled, $165, 16' alumi-
num ladder $35,
386-492-4984 VOL
LEGOS- mega blocks
with wagons and trucks,
$75, legos w/table, $50,
386-322-5887 VOL
LIGHT FIXTURE- for
kitchen, in dark metal, 3
glass shades, $100,
386-788-2621 VOL
LOVE SEATS, 2, light
green, textured material,
excellent cond, $150
both, 386-299-9740 VOL
MAGAZINES Life,
170+, $100, Chilton pa-
per back manuals, $4
each, 609-240-2703 VOL


TO PLACE YOUR AD: EMAIL classified@HometownNewsOL.com
or log onto www.HometownNewsOL.com or Mail or Fax No Phone Calls
Thanks to all of our readers for submitting your Free ads for For private party use only Commerci/l advertising is not elig.
merchandise priced under$200. Reminder: We allow 4 lines 4 Lines (20 Characters per line)
including your phone number. Only 2 ads per month per
household. Ads are scheduled for 2 Friday publications.
All FREE ads must be submitted by mail, fax or email.
And finally, please remember to include your name and
address when submitting your ads. by Monday at 5 pm.


HOME OFFICE SOUTH DAYTONA OFFICE
1102 S. U.S. 1 2400 S. Ridgewood Ave. #22
Fort Pierce, FL 34950 South Daytona, FL 32119
Fa 77-65596 Fx38-2254


Mvr
. _- . . . .. .. .


--------------------------
ible 2 ads per month


Your Name
Address
City State Zip -
Home Phone_______Daytime Phone
Mail or Fax Coupon to the Hometown News Office Nearest You! Deadline for Free Ads is Monday at 5.00 pm


MATTRESS Queen
Newer, firm, asking $130,
300+ newer golf balls,
$35, 386-795-4459 VOL

MATTRESS Queen,
spring; $65, 6' white fold-
ing table, $20,
386-788-0397 VOL
MUFFLER for 2004
CHEVY Colorado Factory.
muffler & tailpipe. $50 386-
847-6243
PALLET JACK- E-Z lift,
4500 Ibs. $150 obo,
386-345-4519 VOL

PATIO SET- w/ glass ta-
ble, umbrella, 4 chairs, 2
are rockers, w/ cushions,
$75 obo, 386-304-0099

PICK UP bed cover, like
new, brown vinyl, clamps
off Ford, $100 obo,
386-322-4475 VOL

PLAY YARD- bought
new, use 2 weeks, $20,
386-427-6598 VOL

PORCELAIN FIGURINE-
Gone with the Wind,
Scarlett and Rhett, musi-
cal, $50, 386-428-3481

PORTABLE CRUISER-
carry on A/C for boats,
$200 obo, 386-690-1804
VOL
PRINT ORIGINAL- 1890
by Charles Green, in
frame, $200 obo,
386-677-3038 VOL

PRINTER Canon, also
copies, scans & faxes,
hardly used $55, 8' lad-'
der, $25, 386-304-9080

PYREX MIXING BOWLS
- Set of four, 65yrs old.
Exc condition. $65
386-672-8741

QUILT handmade, King
size, star pattern, perfect
cond, $200 obo,
386-423-4504 VOL
RING 1Ukt gold, $bU,
old hand carved ivory cig-
arette holder, $50,
386-423-9669 VOL
SAFETY HARNESS and
Lanyard, $40, Typewriter,
$10, 386-492-6202 VOL
SCHWINN EXERCISE
bike, large seat, $35,
386-427-8040 VOL
SHOWER CHAIR- like
new, w/ tag, adjustable,
w/ arms and back, Walk-
er, $20, 386-246-8200


STOVE 36" Hot point,
Electric Range, clean,
good cond, white, $50
obo, 386-426-0715 VOL
STOVE: General Electric,
Electric, Almond, Like
New, Only $125 OBO
407-399-7277 No Volusia
TABLE Kitchen, white,
butcherblock top, with 6
chairs, like new, $100,
386-663-4815 VOL
TABLE oval, glass top,
41" x 71" 4 upholstered
chairs, $199,
386-677-3572 VOL
TABLE, 42" round glass
top rattan. $50, BBQ grill,
gas, brand new $75
386-441-7478
TABLES 1 table, 2 end
tables, cherry wood,
great shape, $200,
386-439-6202 VOL
TRANSFER CHAIR, $75,
Oscillating electric table
fan, $8, 386-677-8079
VOL
TROLLING MOTOR,
electric, MINN-KOTA,
40lbs, $80, Cooler, $50,
386-615-4812 VOL
URN beautiful, new,
$200 obo, 386-252-0520
VOL






POODLES, STANDARD,
AKC, White, 12 wks
shots, wormed, girls/boys
Beautiful,Parents on site,
$550-$650 321-917-6417


HORSE BOARDING -
Shelter, light, water, $90/
month. Off of Volco Rd in
Edgewater 386-690-1804






Photos say it allI
Photos with your ad,
High Definition Slide
Shows and more
VISIT OUR
ONLINE SITE
www.HometownNewsOL.com
386-322-5949


VCR good working con-
dition, with remote and
manual, need RF cable,
$25, 386-424-9312 VOL
WASHER, Used, works
fine, you pick up, $20,
386-679-3930 VOL
WASHER- Maytag,
white, deluxe model, like
new, can deliver, $100,
386-677-5231 VOL
WATCH Mans new 18ct
clad Jules Jurgensen
1/20 sec chrono. $189.
386-761-8809, 316-0126
WEDDING DRESS- very
elegant, petite size, no
trail, not very old, $35,
386-316-4492 VOL


VISIT OUR
ONLINE SITE
www.HometownNewsOL.com
Photos with your ad,
High Definition Slide
Shows and more
386-322-5949









,I; I -






Pet Nanny Plus
Pet Sitting in your home.
Domestic and exotic pets.
Many years of experience.
Daily visits or 24 hr. service.
Licensed Bonded
and Dependable.
~ Plus ~
House Sitting'
Errands o
Driver .o
386-252-40 I
Referencese Avail.
PET CARE IN YOUR
HOME I will feed, walk,
check on your pet. Dogs,
cats or turtles, we even
pick up the poo! Exper-
ienced mature person.
$12-$16 or 2/$20. Please
call 386-295-7466 email
iaussie8@cfl.rr.com


'~'c: 'c~~i- -. is,~~i rvj'.'


So. a
y
ona a
y
ona


-










Friday. April 3, 2009


www.HometownNewsOL.com


Port Orange/Ponce Inlet B 1
So. Daytona/Daytona Beach Shores


LUMBER LIQUIDA-
TORS Hardwood Floor-
ing, from $.99/Sq.Ft.
Exotics, Oak, Bamboo,
Prefinished & Unfinish-
ed. Bellawood with 50
year prefinish, Plus A
Lot Morel We Deliver
Anywhere, 5 Florida
Locations 800-356-6746
1-800-FLOORING
STEEL BUILDINGS: 5
only. 25x34, 30x46,
40x64, 45x76, 80x150.
Must move now! Will sell
for balance owed. Free
delivery. 1-800-211-9594
x65



BRAND NEW Dell Com-
puters! 100% Financing!
Everyone's Approved!
Free Printer/ Copier!
Seen on TV! No Layaway
Required! From $24/
Week! MyBrandNew
PC.com, 800-799-6331
NAME BRAND Laptops
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Laptop You Deserve,
New! Super Thin, Super
Fast Includes Free Ship-
ping Log In Now! www.
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GARAGE SALE?
Place your ad in
Hometown News
386-322-5949


DIRECT FREE 4 Room
System! 265+ Channels
Starts $29.99! Free HBO,
Showtime, Starz! 130 HD
Channels! Free DVR/HD!
No start up costs! Local
Installers! 800-973-9044
TV- HDTV 32" Panasonic
2005, Great picture. $499
or best offer.
386-663-4622



MATTRESS, QUEEN Pil-
low Top $150. Brand
new in plastic. Can deliv-
er! Mike 386-451-9660
MATTRESSES, CALI-
FORNIA King (2), paid
$1600 ea. Brand New!
Asking Only $700 ea.
386-677-5460
MEMORY FOAM All Vis-
co New Thera-Peutic
Mattresses, Member BBB
- 60 night trial, As seen
on TV, High Density 25
year warranty, T/F- $348;
Q-$398; K-$498; Free FL
delivery. Thera- Pedic,
Dormia, # beds, Craft-
matic adjustable. Best
price guaranteed!!
Wholesale showrooms
www.mattressdr.com
1-800-ATSLEEP or 1-
800-287-5337
Please Tell Them...
I Saw It In
HOMETOWN NEWS
CLASSIFIEDSI
386-322-5949


THANKS HOMETOWN
NEWS
SOLD!!!!!!
ARMOIRE:' Solid Oak
/Haverty's, ,holds 32" T/,
6"h x 24'd x 44"w. Ex-
cellent condition. $400.
ES Palm Bay
VACUUM, KIRBY brand
with all attachments,
Works Great! $500.
386-345-3010



DIET PILLS Viagra &
Soma Visit: PriceBuster
RX.com or call 888-773-
6230 or 800-889-7909.
FDA approved. Phenter-
mine, Cialis, Carisopro-
dol, Fioricet, Tramadol
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urday Delivery.
ONLINE PHARMACY,
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Includes Prescription!
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coupon Mention Offer: #
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tor CONSULTATION in-
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QUICK WEIGHT LOSS!!
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ety/ Pain? Headache?
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FDA approved meds.
www.BestForLessRx.com
866-788-4530


VISIT OUR
ONLINE SITE
www.HometownNewsOL.com
Photos' with your ad,
High Definition Slide
Shows and more
386-322-5949


**ALL SATELLITE Sys-
tems are not the same.
Programming starting
under $20 per month,
HDTV programming un-
der $10 per month &
Free HD & DVR systems
for new callers. Call Now!
1-800-799-4935

A NEW Computer Now!
Brand name laptops &
desktops, Bad or No
Credit- No problem small-
est weekly payments
available. It's yours Now!
1-800-804-5010

ADOPTION Living/Med-
ical expenses paid. Lov-
ing, financially secure
family dreams of giving
your baby the best in life.
Please call Gina & Mike
via our Atty Jodi Rutstein
Confidential, #133050;
1-800-852-0041

AIRLINES ARE Hiring-
Train for high paying Avi-
ation Maintenance Ca-
reer. FAA approved pro-
gram. Financial aid if
qualified Housing avail-
able. Call Aviation Insti-
tute of Maintenance
1-888-349-5387

DIRECT FREE 4 Room
System! 265+ Channels
Starts $29.991 Free HBO,
Showtime, Starz! 130 HD
Channels! Free DVR/HD!
No start up costs! Local
Installers! 800-973-9044


.1 _________________ .4


DIRECT FREE 4 Room
System!. 265+ Channels
Starts $29.99! Free HBO,
Showtime, Starz! 130 HD
Channels! Free DVR/HD!
No start up costs! Local
Installers! 800-973-9044
DUM P cable: 150 chan-
nels for $9.99/ month.
Free HBO, Cinemax
$.01. Free Install. Debit
or Credit card required,
OAC. Call for details: 800
dumpcable, 800-386-
7222, www.EgaleSatTV
.com
FREE DIRECT 4 Room
System! 265+ Channels
Start $29.99! Free HBO,
Showtime, Starz! 130 HD
Channels! Free DVR/HD!
No start up costs! Local
installers! 800-620-0058
FREE DIRECT 4 Room
System! 265+ channels
Starts $29.99! Free HBO,
Showtime, Starz! 130 HD
Channels! Free DVR/HD!
No start up costs! Local
installers! 800-203-7560
FREE DIRECT 4 Room
System! 265+ Channels!
Starts $29.99! Free HBO,
Showtime, Starz! 130 HD
Channels! Free DVR/HD!
No start up coss! Local
Installers 1-800-216-7149
GET A NEW Computer
Brand name laptops &
Desktops. Bad or NO
credit- No problem.
Smallest weekly pay-
ments avail. It's Yours
NOW 800-640-0656


PROFESSIONAL SERVICE GUIDE


DON'T WANT TO GO
TO A NURSING HOME?
Get excellent care at our
small licensed adult living
facility. Private Room
Available. 386-677-1080.




WANTED JUNK CARS
Running or not $200 &
up. We oa casrI' 24-nrs
Call 321-63 -0111 :




BOB MILLAN
CARPENTRY LLC
Specializing in DOOR
Installations, Storm
doors, Crown & other
moldings, garage storage
solutions, attic stairs,
custom work & other car-
pentry. 30+ yrs. Lic & Ins
386-304-1228.


.I4.


CHIMNEY & Dryer Vent
Cleaning Since 1965. All
Repairs Fireplace Serv-
ices Inc. 386-767-9392




Professional Cleaning
w/a personal touch. Lic &
Insured. Comm'l/Resdn'l
'iCall Kristin for a FPEE.
estimate. 386-566-2311
ROB'S CLEANING
SERVICE.
25% off new customers.
Weekly*Bi-Wkly*Monthly
Free est. 386-615-8221




COMPUTER ROOTER,
Virus removal, up-keep,
tutoring, networking, re-
covery etc. 386-299-9672


QUALITY PC SERVICE!
Performance Computer
Services, Since 1996
Onsite service, Repair,
Virus & Adware Cleanup,
Training, Refurbished
Systems, Parts & Up-
grades. 386-423-7271
www.PCS3.com

COMPUTER


15+ YEARS
EXPERIENCE 8
N-
Call the I
REFURB DOCTOR


386-314-0316

www.RdfurbDoc.com

Friendly, Local, Onsite Service
Twilite Computer Service, LLC


ONLINE PHARMACY
Buy Soma, Ultram, Fiori-
cet; Prozac, Buspar,
$71.99 for 90 Qty and
$107 for 180 Qty. Price
Includes Prescription!
We will match any com-
petitor's prices 866-601
-6463 or www.tri-rx.com






McKENZIE'S HOME
IMPROVEMENTS, LLC.
Save $$$ on Door, Win-
dow, & Shutter Installa-
tion. Lic# CRC1327744/
Insured. 386-322-1220
Mike Davidson Const.
Remodel/Addition/Repair,
Replace Doors/ windows,
Kitchen/Bath, 25 Yrs Exp.
St Lic#CBC1255638, Ins.
386-756-3397, 299-2132


GREENLEAF LAWN
SERVICES 8+yrs exp.
Reliable. Lrg/small props.
Full svc: Weeding, trim-
ming of shrubs/bushes,
decorative stone, brick
flower beds. Lic/Insured.
386-846-8774; 257-0776




The hiring of a lawyer is an
important decision that
should not be based solely
on advertisements. Before
you decide, ask the lawyer to
send you free written infor-
mation about their qualifica-
tions and experience.
Under Florida law,
non-lawyers are permitted to
sell legal forms and kits and
type in the factual informa-
tion provided by their cus-
tomers. They may not, how-
ever, give legal advice.
$99.95 FLORIDA CORP.
$154.95 Florida LLC,
Complete & Includes
State Fees, Company
Book & Seal. Free infor-
mation packet: www.
amerilawyer.com Call toll
free 1-800-603-3900,
Spiegel & Utrera PA. L.
Spiegel, Esq, Miami.
ABORTION NOT an Op-
tion? Consider Adoption.
lI5 a Vu,,i-r'J ul ',ro,,:.
ior ar, Unplanned Pr,_q.
nancy. n a .r. ,'.uecdica

I n- e s r 6 7, J. re 4 I I p. -'
Atty Ellen Kaplan
(#0875228)
Arrested? Criminal De-
fense? Need a lawyer?
Now you have one 24/7
800-733-5342 AAAAttor-
neyreferralservice.com
Felonies, Misdemeanors,
DUI, Traffic, Seriously In-
jured? Personal Injury,
Auto, Bike, Truck, Bar All
Injuries Protect Your
Rights.


DIVORCE Starting at
$50. We cover Children,
etc. Guaranteed Excel-
lent Service! Only One
Signature Required!
*Excludes government
fees. 800-522-6000 ext
700 Baylor & Associates
GET HELP NOW! Modifi-
cations Bankruptcy, Fore-
closures, Repossessions,
Judgements, Credit Card
Debt, Medical Bills,
24hrs/ 7 days. AAA Attor-
ney Referral Service
800-733-5342
aaaattorneyreferralservic
e.com; freelegalsheild
.com



BANKRUPTCY
.... ......from $450
PLUS COURT FEES
WILLS ....from $110
Weekend appts
Free Consultation

1540 Cornerstone Blvd.
Daytona Beach |
1-888-372-4LAWS
(1-888-372-4529)
Se Habla Espanol




"DIVQRC S..."BaaKruplc.
a.-r, .-i -._ at $ 5 "1 S,.ina.
-*,ur D .o.,:e "r.l:-,r.,
Spouse Divorce "We
Corn to you!" Since 1992
1-888-705-7221.
LLC $149 w/ Free Single
Member Operating Agree
ment CORP $91.95 In-
cludes State, Attorney
Fees & Corporate Kit,
Attorney Nick Spradlin,
Tampa, Orlando, Jack-
sonville, WPB, Broward
& Miami, 877-845-0621
www.nickspradlin.com


GIGANTIC 72" x 100"
MIRRORS. (15) Sheets,
$165/ each. New, perfect
condition. Free delivery
(one or all). Installation
available. Also, 48" x 100"
(8) $115/ each. Whole-
sale Liquidators
800-473-0619

HIGH SCHOOL Diploma!
Fast, Affordable, Accred-
ited. Free Brochure. 800-
532-6546 www.continen-
talacademy.com

MEMORY FOAM Thera-
peutic Nasa Visco Mat-
tresses Wholesale! T-
$299, F-$349, Q-$399,
K-$499, Adjustables-
$799. Free Delivery, 25
year warranty, 60 Night
Trial, 1-800-ATSLEEP
1-800-287-5337 www.
mattressdr.com

MOBILE HOME ROOF
Experts 100% Financ-
ing, Free Estimates. We
Finance Almost Every-
one Reroof, Repairs, 30
years Experience,
Home Improvement
Services Toll-Free 877-
845-6660 State Certified
(Lic# CCC058227)

NATIONAL ADVERTIS-
INGI Reach over 30 mil-
lion homes with one buy.
Advertise in NAN! for only
$2,495 per week! Ask
about special Real Estate
Rates 1-866-897-5949


JIM'S
- PAINTING'-,

-Interior & Exterior
-Residential &
Commercial
-Licensed & Insured
-Fast & Reliable
Quality Products
cc
FREE ESTIMATES!.
386-383-8788
References Available
New Environment
Painting $75 SPECIAL
Each Interior Room
w/walls & trim! Exterior
Special Any Single story
home, pressure washed
and painted, including
quality paint $750.
386-677-3608
Thom's Quality Painting
All phases. 28 yrs exp.
Many references. Lic/Ins.
Call Thom 386-846-0313








S.I'aer Hearer
All ac[s
Garbage Disposal
Showers/Tubs

10/% Senior
Discount or
S on hourly rate
-------------
386-547-2304
DBA Boyd Plumbing
CFC044984


NEW COMPUTER you're
approved guaranteed.
Bad credit? No credit?
No problem! No credit
check. Name brands.
Checking account re-
quired. Free bonus with
paid purchase. 1-800-
507-4055 www.bluehippo
.com
TIRED OF the Laundro-
mat? You can own a
Brand Name New Wash-
er and Dryer Free! Units
are going fast! Log on
now for details!! www.
SUPERFREEWDSTORE
cornn



CELEBRATION
CHRISTIAN
YARD SALE/
BAKE SALE
Saturday April 4th
8am-2pm

Great Bargains,
coffee, donuts,
hotdogs, drinks,
homemade baked
goods + more!

1011 W. ISB
(Nova & ISB by
Tuscawilla Park.)
Tell 'em you saw It in
HOMETOWN NEWS
CLASSIFIEDSI
386-322-5949


CHRISTIAN
PLUMBING & TILE




Handicap Bathrooms
Drains Cleaned
Leaky ShowersiTubs/Faucets
*WaterHeaters 0
*Sprinkler/Solar Panel S
Bathl/Ktchen Remodels '
*TWe/Ceramic/Mosaic/Marble
Commercial Residential
Licensed/Insured CFC050578

672-3462



AWARD WINNING
ON-GROUND POOL!
Decking & Fencing
included. Limited demo
homesites wanted,
qualified save $$$.
Free Estimates! Fast in-
stallation! E-Z Financing!
Call now
1-866-989-7560
www.KayakPoolsFlorida.com

Tell 'em you saw
it in
HOMETOWN
NEWS
CLASSIFIED!
~86-322-5949


DAYTONA BEACH
SHORES- Attic Sale.
Saturday April 4
8am-2pm Westminster
by the Sea 3221 S.
Peninsula Dr. Jewelery,
toys, clothing, books,
hsehld & electrical items
Bake Sale and more!
ORMOND BEACH
ELKS#2193
Ladies Auxiliary
Flea Market &
Garage Sale
Saturday, April 4th
8AM 2 PM
285 Wilmette Avenue
Have breakfast or lunch
with coffee at a min price.
TABLES AVAILABLE
$15 or 2 for $25
Proceeds go to Children's
Therapy Services,
Children Charities &
Local Scholarships
More info 673-3836




SUPPORT
OUR
ADVERTISERS!
They make this
all possible!
HOMETOWN
NEWS
CLASSIFIED!
386-322-5949


METAL ROOFING SAVE
$$$ Buy direct from man-
ufacturer. 20 colors in
stock, w/accessories.
Quick turn around. Deliv-
ery. Gulf Coast Supply &
Manufacturing, Inc.
1-888-393-0335 www.
gulfcoastsupply.com
ROOFING EXPERTS
100% Financing, Free
Estimates. We Finance
Almost Everyone Re-
roof, Repairs, 30yrs
Experience, Home Im-
provement Services
Toll-Free 877-845-6660,
727-530-0412 State Cer-
tified (Lic# CCC058227)



*REDUCE YOUR Cable
Bill!*-, Get a 4-room, all
digital satellite system
installed for FREE & Pro-
ramming starting under
20. Free Digital Video
Recorders to new clients.
So call now, 1-800-795-
*3579



SWIM SPA, Factory
Close out. 2-14 ft models
$17,500/. each, Now!
$8900/ each. 1-18ft mod-
el-$27,900, Now $14,500.
5 Person Spa, Was
$3,995, now $1,995. Can
De"i Q04-9943


EMPLOYMENT


COOKS wanted w/Exp.
Apply: Mon-Thurs-Fri only
- JB's Fish Camp, 859
Pompano Ave. NSB.
CALL CLASSIFIED
and sell that boat
386-322-5949


^^^rfi


MAINTENANCE TECH -
Needed. Full-Time Posi-
tion with benefits. $12/hr.
Must be pool certified and
have exp. in Air Condi-
tioning. Apply In Person
at: Country Side Lakes
941 Village Trail, Port Or-
ange D/F/W/P
L h 1


LOOKING FOR A POSITIVE
WORK ATMOSPHERE?
GROWING CLINIC
GROWING PATIENTS
GROWING STAFF
seeks
EXPERIENCED DIALYSIS NURSE
FT OR PT with benefits
OR PER DIEM

Comparable wages
& supportive staff.

Fax resume to 386-409-8755 or
Apply at 821 State Rt. 44, NSB



BUSINESS & FIA


Unbelievable
PALM BAY Restaurant:
Great location, 2000sqft,
All equipment included.
$80,000 321-626-6631
PARTNER / CHEF /
INVESTOR To open
Historic Hunt & Fish
Lodge with fine dining
restaurant & bar at the
newly remodeled Rod &
Gun Club in the Fell-
smere Inn. 305-393-2143
ww W



Highlight your
ad and get it sold
fast!
Whether Buying
or Selling we are
your total source
for classified! -
HOMETOWN NEWS
386-322-5949
Call Classified
386-322-5949


$$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT
Cash Now!! As seen on
TV. Injury Lawsuit Drag-
ging? Need $500-
500,000++ within 48
hours? Low rates. Apply
now by phone! www.Fast
CaseCash.com 1-800-
568-8321
$$$ ACCESS Lawsuit
Cash Now!!! As seen on
TV. Injury Lawsuit Drag-
g ing? Need $500-
500,000++ within 24hrs
after approval? Compare
our lower rates. Apply
Now! 1-866-386-3692
$$$ACCESS LAWSUIT
Cash Now!! Injury lawsuit
dragging? Need $500-
$500,000++ within 48
hours? 1-877-386-3692
www.casepay.com
$$$GET LAWSUIT Cash
Now Oasis Legal Fi-
nance #1. See us on TV
fastest cash advances on
injury cases within 24/
hrs. Owe nothing if you
lose your case Apply free
call now 1-866-353-9959
BANKRUPTCY LET us
handle your Entire Bank-
ruptcy $299 Plus $399 for
Court Costs Guaranteed.
No additional Fees. Call
800-878-2215 BBB Mem-
ber www.signhere.com


PARTS
DENPT

Full Time S
ATV AND
MOTORCYCLES
previous
experience
required.

Volusia
MotorSports
New Smyrna
Beach






ANCIAL


BANKRUPTCY $299
plus $399 for Court costs.
Experienced Professio-
nals handle your entire
Bankruptcy Fast, Easy,
No Risk, Guaranteed,
Proven. Call Now 1-800-
878-2215 www. signhere-
.org Better Business Bu-
reau member.
DEBT PROBLEMS. Too
many bills? Financial dis-
tress? No Need for a loan
or bankruptcy. We can
help immediately! Call
A.D.S. www.mydebtfree
.com 1-888-790-4660
LAWSUIT LOANS?
Cash before your case
settles. Auto, workers
comp. All cases accept-
ed. Fast approval. $500-
$50,000. 1-866-709-1100
www.glofin.com
LET A Provider pay your
Bills! New book tells how!
Order direct. Publisher
877-526-6199. www.
LoveThyProvider.com
RECEIVING PAYMENTS
For Seller Financed Real
Estate or Structured Set-
tlement? Investor will buy
your remaining Note or
annuity payments. Call
Rich 800-888-6450 www.
cashtoyou.com


$ AVON Beauty Co.
Needs Reps. Earn up to
50% Free Training.
866-362-1416 ISR. SAPA
INTERNATIONAL FEL-
LOWSHIP seeks volun-
teer host families for ex-
change students. Or earn
extra cash as an area
rep! International Fellow-
ship.org 1-800-647-8839
SEARS HOME Improve-
ment has openings for
inside marketing reps. PT
positions; Earn great
money talking to custom-
ers. Call 1-800-379-8310
Retirees always wel-
come. EOE/DFWP


$500 SIGN ON BONUS
Start work today! Seek-
ing 5 guys/gals. Join
Hip-Hop, Rock-n- Roll,
Bluejean environment,
Music Lovers welcome.
Wanda 888-375 -9795


NEED A Job? Start To-
day! $500 Sign-on &
$500 performance bonus.
Seeking 5 sharp
Guys/Gals, Travel Ha-
waii, Vegas, California!
Blue Jean environment,
Music Lovers wanted!
Jan 1-888-361-1526


DRIVERS- Miles &
Freight; Positions availi-
ble ASAP! CDL-A with
Tanker required. Top
pay, premium benefits
and Much Morel Call or
visit us online,
877-484-3042 www.
oakleytransport.com
TRUCK DRIVERS Want-
ed- Best Pay & Home
Time! Apply Online To-
day over 750 Companies!
One Application, Hun-
dreds of offersI http://
hammerlanejobs.com


- TRAINING & EDUCATION -


**BODYGUARDS AND
APPRENTICES WANT-
ED** Free Training and
Paid Apprenticeships. No
Experience OK. Excellent
$$$. Full & Part Time. All
Expenses Paid When
you Travel. 615-228-1701
www.psubodygaurds.com
ADULT HIGH School
Diploma at home fast!
Nationally accredited
$399. Easy payment
plan. Free brochure
www.diplomaathome
.com 1-800-470-4723


VISIT OUR
ONLINE SITE
www.HometownNewsOL.com
Photos with your ad,
High Definition Slide
Shows and more
386-322-5949


AIRLINES ARE Hiring-
Train for high paying Avi-
ation Maintenance Ca-
reer. FAA approved pro-
gram. Financial aid if
qualified Housing avail-
able. Call Aviation Insti-
tute of Maintenance
1-888-349-5387
ATTEND COLLEGE On-
line from Home. *Medical
*Business,*Paralegal,*Co
mputers,*Criminal Jus-
tice. Job placement as-
sistance. Computer avail-
able. Financial aid if
qualified. 1-800-494-2785
www.CentraOnline.com
ATTEND College Online
from Home. *Medical,
*Business, *Paralegal,
*Computers, *Criminal
Justice. Job placement
assistance, Computer
available. Financial aid if
qualified. 1-800-510-0784
www.CentraOnline.com


- REAL ESTATE FOR SALLY


Unbelievable
ORMOND AREA: Intra-
coastal comp renovated,
double lot, riparian rights.
$394,900 Barbara Sand-
berg, Coldwell Banker
Expert 386-677-7727
ORMOND BEACH: Wa-
terfront Living. Buy now
before prices increase.
Halifax Riverfront. Gor-
geous Estate Lot, 320'
deep w/Seawall. Only
$733,025 Volusia County
Assessment $963,175
Cinder Block Home with
Pool. 906 Est Riverside
Drive, Sol Sashin, Lic.
RE Broker Sashin Realty,
Inc 386-672-3220 or Hot-
line 386-295-4967
ORMOND BY THE SEA
RIVERFRONT Open
Fri-Sat-Sun 12-5p. 108
River Lane. Remodeled/
Furn. 2bed/2ba w/ofc.
Jacuzzi dock, covered
boathouse 2 lifts, metal
roof, 3 sheds, jet ski,
$750,000. 386-441-8437
seoo photo's at
www.hometownewsol.co
m
Please Tell Them...
I Saw It In
HOMETOWN NEWS
CLASSIFIED!
386-322-5949


ORMOND, Riverfront
Tomoka Estates, 2/2
Split plan, seawall w/
boat ramp, Lg carport,
Florida rm, Lg yard.
$249,900 386-547-4783
ORMOND, Riverfront
Tomoka Estates, 4/2 new
ba /2 block home, Con-
crete seawall, New Kitch-
en, Lg Florida rm,
$349,900 386-547-4783
S. DAYTONA, Canal
Front, Intercoastal Views,
3/2/2 + bonus rm, Lg
additional parking area,
new pool w/privacy wall.
open floor plan. Only
$549,900 386-547-4783
ST. JOHNS RIVER 133'
x80' waterfront lot.
Putnam County FL Deep
wide canal min. to St.
Johns River, 2001 2-br
moble home, new boat
house & seawall,
$149,900 386-931-2065



FORECLOSED HOME
AUCTION Florida State-
wide Auction starts April
18, 1000 Homes Must Be
Sold! REDC/ Free Bro-
chure 800-756-2155
USHomeAuction.com


CHEAP CHEAP
CHEAP
Make offers!!!!
HOMES
2 bed remodeled,
wow ..... ..............$89.000
2 bed furnished,
incl. TV.................$94.000
4 bed with florida
room ...................$19.000
3 bed with loft, divorce
sale .....................$260.000
CONDOS
NEAR GOLF
COURSE 2 bed,
remodeled ...........$89.000
RIVERFRONT 2 bed
furnished...........$158,000
RIVERFRONT 2 bed
furnished/
gorgeous ............$210,000
PENTHOUSE OCEAN
FRONT 2 bed estate
sale .................. $249,000
CITY REALTY
COMPANY
Ditha Sander
Broker/Owner
(386) 767-5609 Phone
(386) 760-0960 Fax
DithaSander@aol.com E-Mail


DAYTONA /ORMOND
BEACHSIDE Fix me up!
Buy a home for only
$90K, across from the
ocean. Owner Finance.
2br, detached garage, lot
75x135. City Realty, Di-
tha Sander 386-767-5609
Don't Miss the Bottom
FIRST TIME HOME
BUYERS GET $8000,
Tax Credit.Investors can
now cash flow! Sellers
can sell! Call the Moore
Team for Deal of the day.
Susan or Addam
386-566-4837 / 566-1812
Realty Pros & Associates
Gated Golf Community
Water Views!!! 3/2/2
2-sided fireplace. Spa-
cious eat-in kitchen, Din-
ing room. Enclosed patio.
Newer air, heat & roof.
Pelican Bay. $219K Terri
Headley, 386-235-7337
Watson Realty
MIMS, WATERFRONT
Home, 1 acre on deep
water lake, 3/2/2, relax on
back deck and enjoy a
beautiful lake view!
$155K. 321-961-2020
See photo on line
www. hometown
newsOL.com ad # 59419
BEST IN THE AREA
HOMETOWN NEWS
CLASSIFIEDSI
386-322-5949


ATTEND College Online
from home. Medical,
Business, Paralegal,
Computers, Criminal Jus-
tice, Job placement as-
sistance. Computer avail-
able. Financial aid if
qualified. 1-800-494-3586
www.CenturaOnline.com
AVIATION Maintenance
/Avionics graduate in 14
months. FAA approved;
financial aid if qualified.
Job placement assis-
tance. Call National Avia-
tion Academy today! 800-
659-2080 / NAA.edu
EARN YOUR High
School Diploma at Home
in a few short weeks.
Work at your own pace.
First Coast Academy.
Nationally Accredited.
Call for Free Brochure.
1-800-658-1180 ext 82
www.fcahighschool.org


OAK HILL Near river.
285 Sunrise Ave. '06
upgraded CBS, 3/2/2,
tile, custom kit., s/s appl.
1/2 ac. $217k. Rent poss.
$925/mo+ 386-402-1917
ORMOND 3bdrm/2bath,
Plantation Pines -
2.5acres for $210,000.
PORT ORANGE 3/2
split plan $99,000. Mariah
Hochhauser Crouch
Realty 386.233.9399 or
917.364.1549
PORT ORANGE Cypress
Cove, 3/2/2 New kitchen
2 sided fireplace between
LR & FR small dock on
lake. Solar heated pool
$240,900 See photos at
Buy Owner ORL26757
386-761-5938/299-1268
PORT ORANGE, Crane
Lakes, 55+ 2br/2ba, scrn
porch, all appl, tile,
Clubhse, golf, pool, Near
Beach, $84,900. Lease
option. 386-322-1304
PORT ORANGE- 2/2/1
Villa, Near beach! Appli-
ances, upgrades, Spar-
kling new Paint, Mainte-
nance free! Gated
comm., no age or pet
restrictions, Active
Clubhse, 2 pools, hot tub,
gym, tennis. Below mar-
ket @$135,000. Will
Lease, rent, or trade. -
Owner financing availa-
ble. 386-761-5674


HIGH SCHOOL Diploma
at Home, 6-8 weeks.
Accredited. Low pay-
ments. Free brochure.
www.diplomafromhome.c
om 800-264-8330
HIGH SCHOOL Diploma!
Fast, Affordable, Accred-
ited. Free Brochure. 800-
532-6546 Ext 412
continentalacademy.com
HIGH SCHOOL Diploma!
Fast, affordable, accredit-
ed. Free brochure, www.
continental academy.com
Call now! 1-800-532-
6546 ext 16
HVAC Tech Training!
Employment Opportuni-
ties for EPA and OSHA.
Nationally Certified. 3.5
wk training program. Lo-
cal Job Placement and
Financing available. 877-
994-9904


ORMOND BEACH- 2
story 3/2.5/2 end unit,
CBS const. cul-de-sac.
North of Granada. Close
to shopping, beach & 1-95
$169,900 386-677-3655
SATELLITE BCH 3/2-1/2
1c gar, Lg living & Dining
rooms. Gourmet S/S kit.
cherry cabinets, Ex-
tremely spacious. New
roof/ ac, all new flooring.
$159,900. 678-984-1115


ORMOND BEACH
Mother in law suite
70 x 140' lot 2/1 and 1/1
with older mobile home
completely remodeled.
Asking $69,000. $10,000
down. Owner financing
No credit check.
386-503-8082



DAYTONA PARK ES-
TATES $95 down $95/
mo. Build now or future.
Streets in, electric in.
Nine lots left! No credit
check. 386-566-7239
Tell 'em you saw it in
HOMETOWN NEWS
CLASSIFIEDSI
386-322-5949


Former Tax Auditor
^-1, 30+ years Experience ,
Available All YEAR For Consultation
,t. =, FREE audit support
BEST value rates
THIs TAX SASON NO hidden costs
Proet onal Free Pickup and Delivery

Handle All of 386-767-4272
Your Tax Needs arneytax@aol.com

Ug M MWhiii @ 6giMcjXDBfUft36


NEIL MARTIN CONSTRUCTION "

CONCRETE WORK
Concrete Work, Driveways, Patios, Additions
Beautify Your Home with Brick Pavers
Visa & Mastercard Accepted We Pull the Permits
Fast, Courteous Response State Certified Contractor
Locally Owned and Operated Licensed & Insured
Call to Select Your Colors :
(386) 795-1843


"- .


i i


.2oofBma










Bl2Port Orange/Ponce Inlet
Dirq, navt nna /Dtaa Rch Shores


Hometown News


Friday, April 3, 2009


FLAGLER COUNTY 5
acres, 285' on SR-100
West. Concrete driveway
includes culvert. $89,000.
Owner/agent
386-503-0936





LAKE HELEN: Beautiful
lakefront 3.5ac, horses &
cows. Reduced $110,000
Owner financing. Close
to Deland. NancyWelchert
Realtors 386-212-7442
NC MOUNTAINS
Warm Winters/Cool
Summers. NEW! E-Z to
finish log cabin shell
w/loft &basement,
includes acreage
$99,900. Mountain&
waterfront homesites
from $39,000-$99,000.
Financing Available!!
828-247-9966 (Code4l)
WESTERN KENTUCKY-
Hunting & Investment
properties. Trophy white-
tail & premier turkey
hunts featured on .TV.
50acs-5,000ac tracts,
80ac lake, timber, build-
ing sites, income produc-
ing starting@ $1,400/ac
270-554-4114




Edgewater
On the
Intracoastal
Waterway



Hacienda

Del Rio
386-423-5807
1-800-441-5807
U.S. I South -Edgewater
www.hacienda55.com
*Minutes from New Smyrna Beach
Manyresales
to choose from
starting n the 50's
Boating &
Fishing Haven
2 Clubhouses
& 2 Pools
2 Private Piers -
& Boat Ramp
Age Restricted
Community
*" Great Living on
the Indian River

Beautiful Palm Harbor
in gated comm, on the
intracoastal. 496 La
Coquina, Hacienda Del
Rio, Edgewater. Furn
split plan 3/2 1750 sqft.
Newer tile carpeted
bdrms. 20 0 FL rm with
heat and air. Lg kitchen
dbl carport, Ig shed &
storage for RV's & boats.
Asking $69,900 $10,000
below appraisal. Open
Sat and Sun 2 to 4
386-690-4436

[],Z-=


DAYTONA BEACH 55+
2/1, screen porch, shed
carport, Appis C/H/A
Some furn. Good cond.
$4000 352-344-8794
MELBOURNE Beach
2-br/2-ba 55+ furnished
apple's, newly renovated.
FL rm carport, Condo fee
$76/mo incl cable, lawn.
$75,900 321-951-8691
MELBOURNE MOBILE
Homes. 2BR from $2500
to $18,000 **Broadview
55+, Post Road. ** Tan-
tara, All family. Near
schools and shopping.
Office 321-259-3522
Park mgr 407-283-5277
MELBOURNE, WATER-
FRONT! 2/2 Immaculate
Condition! Must See! 55+
park w/comm. pool, ac-
tive clubhouse, $77,900
407-375-6992; 291-1458

MU$T
$ELL
MELBOURNE: New
2007 DOUBLEWIDE
Horton Home, All set up
& ready for you in adult
park. Reduced to
$39,995 866-797-6106
Call for move in specials!
MELBOURNE: Only
$2995 3/2 12"x60" All
New: CHA, vinyl siding,
skirting & concrete drive-
way. Adult park.
866-797-6106
ORMOND BEACH 55+
12' x 60' fully furnished.
Sun room, shed, carport.
A/C heat pump. $9000.
386-615-5481 Diane
386-677-8378
ORMOND BEACH 55+
community, 12x60, 2br/
1.5ba, glassed in porch
$14,900. Also, 2 lots avail
for newer MH's $325/mo.
386-672-1276 / 451-4018
ORMOND BEACH
completely renovated
2-br/1/ba. Lot 110x60.
Fenced yard, carport,
glassed in Florida room.
Off Nova Rd. Convenient
to everything. $60,000
386-615-9473
ORMOND BEACH, Bear
Creek, 3/2 + all season
rm, Park has 3 club hous-
es & 3 pools, Shuffle
board, active/gated 55+
comm. New AC, wood
floors, Immac. Fully furn.
Move -in Ready! $95,000
386-677-0214
PORT ORANGE 55+
Colony in the Woods. 2/2
24 x 40, screen room,
new wood floors & carpet
$13,900. 501-940-8458
or 870-854-3767
PORT ORANGE, 2/2,
55+, Colony in the
Woods. .New appl./tile/
carpet/kitchen/bath. Lrg.
Screen patio & Fla. rm.
$37,500 386-212-4801
PORT ORANGE-
WILL FINANCE Double-
wide, 2 br. $12,900, sin-
lewide 2Br, needs work
5000 cash, No banks
needed. 386-566-7239
So DAYTONA Lakeview
Estates newly remodeled
12'x56' 2/1 roofover, Ig
FL rm, opens to LR. New
plywood floors, large
laundry rm Heat pump
$16,000 386-562-1821


SOUTH DAYTONA- 2/1
own land, NO rental
fees. Scrn porch, Car-
port, A/C, Very quiet &
private. 1072 Palm View.
One block from Reed Ca-
nal. $55K 904-824-9206
TITUSVILLE, 14'x52',
55+ park, 8'x20' work
shop, laundry rm, 8'
grnhouse, lot rent $235/
mo. incls. w/s/g, $11,500
/obo 321-268-2131
Titusville, 2/2, '05 Beau-
tiful Dblwide w/Indian Riv-
er View, end lot, several
upgrades, all appliances,
$105K/neg. Family leav-
ing area. 712-299-3252
VERO BEACH: Anxious
seller. Own your own lot
in 55+ comm. New Furn
2/2, fl room. Considering
all offers. Financing avail-
able. 866-605-7255



AAAHI AFFORDABLE
HOMES, CABINS, LAND
FREE BROCHURE
877-837-2288
EXIT REALTY MVP
MURPHY, NC
www.exitmurphy.com
AAHI Affordable Homes
Cabins, Land.. Free Bro-
chure 877-837-2288, Exit
Reality MVP Murphy, NC
www.exitmurphy.com
BIG Beautiful AZ lots
near Tucson. $0 Down,
$0 Interest. Starting
$129/mth. Guaranteed
Financing. No Credit
Check. Pre-recorded
Message 800-631-8164
mention code NANI.
www.sunsitedlandrush
.com
BUY TIMESHARE Re-
sales Save 60-80% off
Retail! Best Resorts &
Seasons. Call for Free
Timeshare Magazine!
1-800-639-5319 www.
holidaygroup.com/flier
FINAL CLOSEOUTI Golf
Lot Bargain! from
$19,900 (was '$69,900)
Golf, Amenity Package,
Developer closeout, re-
maning lots champion-
ship, 18 hole course,
Blue Ridge Mtns- near
Asheville, NC. All infra-
structure completed-
build when ready! 1 lot
per customer! excellent
financing. 866-334-3253
ext 2194
FLORIDA LAND Bar-
gainsl 2 to 150 acres.
From Sebring to Gaines-
ville. $49,900 to
$499,900. Tremendous
land value below market
prices, Financing. Call
Jack at 800-242-1802





FORECLOSURE
PROPERTIES
In beautiful N. Georgia,
TN & NC. cabins, homes
& mountain lots. Call for
details or visit website:
www.ucbi.com/property
Call 706-400-9971 or
706-400-9973

1 w I -


nN
BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT I

NEW HOMES, GREAT PRICES, QUALITY BUILDER
SEAGATE HOMES
When your family wants a new home you want someone you
can trust to provide a quality home at an outstanding value.
Founded in 1994 by John R Gazzoli, Seagate Homes is proud of
their solid reputation in the industry. Under the Gazzoli family
leadership, SeaGate Homes has become one of the fastest grow-
ing builders in the country and has been recognized by Builder
Magazine. With corporate headquarters in Palm Coast, Florida,
SeaGate is the area's largest "On Your Lot" builder as well as
developing its own communities throughout Northeast Florida.
Providing free site evaluations for lot owners, SeaGate offers
over 50 plans which can be customized as well as building from
customers' plans. If you don't own a lot, they offer lots from
$14,000 and have home/lot packages in their communities from
$120,000 to over $400,000. Utilizing the latest construction tech-
niques and quality materials, Seagate has been able to keep new
homes affordable, even in today's competitive real estate market;
one of the reasons that so many families are repeat customers or
referrals. In addition to offering one of the best home values in the
area, each SeaGate built home is backed by a 15 year structural
warranty, one of the best in the nation.
If you are looking to take advantage of record low interest rates
and some of the best home prices in years, contact a SeaGate
Homes Model Center in your area for pricing and special incen-
tives. You will be surprised how affordable a new home is!

i h 386-478-1415 (Daytona Area)

386-437-6188 (Palm Coast)

www.SeaGateHomes.com




- TRANSPORTATION


82 CHEVY SHORTBED
Hot Rod. 400 small
block. Very 'clean. Must
see. $6500/obo
386-569-3542
CADILLAC, 1967 Fleet- CHEVY BEL-AIR 1957
wood Eldorado, First Per- 6cyl, auto, 4-dr sedan.
sonal Luxury compact, no Driven weekly. Excellent
rust, low miles, $7,500. condition. $11,000/obo
386-672-7366;453-6677 772-770-9407

BOatS
I~lllilligaD


24' PRO LINE OPEN
FISHERMAN, exc cond.
250HP Merc, trailer &
equip. $14,000 offers. 1
owner 386-846-4076 see
photos online www.
ometownnewsol.com ad
# 36183


VISIT OUR
ONLINE SITE
www.HometownNewsOL.com
Photos with your ad,
High Definition Slide
Shows and more
386-322-5949


34' WELLCRAFT Scarab
II, 1985. Twin 454's,
clean fast cigarette boat,
fully equipped, ready to
run, full canvas, sleeps 3,
dry stored Brevard Coun-
ty. $17,500/OBO. e-mail
for photos & details at
SBCruiser@aol.com or
call 407-422-6095
BOATS; 1000's of boats
for sale www.florida-
mariner.com reaching 6
million homes weekly
throughout Florida. Tide
charts, Broker Profiles,
Fishing Captains, Dock-
side Dining & More
1-800-388-9307


Sharp
FORD CUSTOM 1951
2-dr sedan. All oig. 6 cyl.
Needs very little work!
Can drive anywhere.
$11,900/obo
772-766-2636

LINCOLN Continental
Collector Series. 1979
78K miles, Replaced gas
tank, carb etc. $5000/obo
321-733-1234


GEORGIA LAND
23.65acres, Evans
County. 4acre pond,
16acres mature timber.
Balance in Coastal
Bermuda. 10mins. to
1-16, 40mins. to
Savannah. $3500/acre.
More tracts available.
706-840-2136
LAND IS STILL THE
BEST INVESTMENT -
Stop losing money in the
stock market!
TEXAS & OLD MEXICO
Affordable Hunting &
Fishing Property.
100Acres for $79,000
w/10% down & no credit
check. All sizes available
up to 20,000 acres.
1-877-77-BIGLAND
(1-877-772-4452)
BEST IN THE AREA!
HOMETOWN NEWS
CLASSIFIEDSI
386-322-5949


GAINESVILLE, Florida
Keystone Heights golf
community, 1.87 acres,
336' road frontage, could
be separated. Reduced!
$65,500 772-971-1251
NANTAHALA Real Es-
tate Co. National Geo-
graphic & ABC News has
rated this as a #1 summ-
er destination! Vacation
homes/rentals! White
water rafting! Located in
Beautiful high elevation
western North Carolina
surrounded by the Nanta-
hala Nat'l Forest. Only
2.5 hours NE of Atlanta,
GA, only 1.5 hours out-
side Asheville, NC & 30
minutes NE of Murphy,
Pristine Lake, Lake/River
front mountain view,
large tracts 866-218-8439
www.nantahalaproperties
cornn
Classified 386-322-5949


GEORGIA 10+ acres.
Ware County Georgia
near Waresboro on
McDonald Road, lots of
beautiful trees.
$22,500.00 for complete
package. 912-427-7062
Cell# 912-269-9349
N. GEORGIA MTNS -
Beautiful Completely re-
built 3/2 cabin, noisy
stream, spring. Also,
completely rebuilt double-
wide 2.5ac also building
lot 706-273-4514
NC MOUNTAINS
Warm Winters/
Cool Summers.
NEW! E-Z to finish log
cabin shell w/loft & full
basement, includes
acreage. $99,900.
Ask about our mountain
& waterfront homesites
from $39,000-$99,000.
Financing Available!!
828-247-9966 (Code19)


NORTH FLORIDA LAND
871acs in Jefferson Co.
Timberland, planted pine
mixed w/hardwood bot-
toms, grt hunting. rd
frontage,$1995/ac.!
Southern Pine Planta-
tions 352-867-8018
OWNER FINANCE N.
Florida Land. Beautiful
area near springs & riv-
ers. 1.5 to 5 acre tracts.
$1500 down with no cred-
it check! Call for free col-
or brochure. 1-800-
754-4531
TENNESSEE
DEVELOPER
acre to 35 acre lots;
community City water,
roads, electric, near town
Owner Financing. w/10%
down.
Inquire about House
& Land packages.
1-888-811-2168


REAL ESTATE FOR RENI


DAYTONA BEACHSIDE
Female to share with
same. 2/1 House priv.
$450/mo + 1/2 utilities.
Sec dep. Walk to Beach.
email aprilshowers123@
people pc.com
ORMOND BEACH-
Townhouse to share. Pri-
vate bath, bed & TV
room. All amenities No
Pets. $135 weekly
386-615-8264





REDUCED
DAYTONA -
Country Club Condo-
lbr/lba pool, 2nd floor,
new carpet $545/mo incl.
water, pest control & ca-
ble. 386-299-1538
DAYTONA Aliki Forum
3/3 $1500/mo 2200 N At-
lantic Tanya Ottaviani
Weichert 386-295-7277
DAYTONA BAYSHORE,
Renovated furnished
1lbr/lba Top floor with
Oceanview, new carpet,
tile. Gym, sauna & pool.
No Smoking, No Pets.
For info: 386-427-2980
Daytona Bch Harbour
2/1 $700/mo 3015 Halifax
Ave, Tanya Ottaviani
Weichert 386-295-7277

BENT NOW
Daytona Bch Shores
Oceanview! Beautiful 2nd
fl, 3Br/lba. 3106 S. At-
lantic. No pets $850 mo.
386-788-6063/248-1076
DAYTONA BEACH -
Oceanfront, luxury condo.
12th floor in the Horizons
1420 N Atlantic Ave.
2br/2ba, pool, workout
room, sauna, year lease
$1100/mo. 419-351-1430


DAYTONA BEACH Cen-
tral Manor Apts serving
adults 62+ or mobility
impaired. 1,r/l 1ba.
Income based rent. EOH,
Handicap accessible
386-255-2622 TTY
1-800-955-8771
Daytona Beach Shores-
Across from bch. Gated,
2br/2ba, in & outdoor
pools, gym, all amenities,
cable/water, W/D incl.
$1,095mo. 407-310-6991

Affordable

&

Effective

HOMETOWN
NEWS
CLASSIFIED
Martin County
thru
Ormond Beach

Special
Programs for
Businesses!

Special Private
Party Rates!

Give us a call!
You'll be
glad you did!
Hometown News
386-322-5949
Please Tell Them...
I Saw It In
HOMETOWN NEWS
CLASSIFIEDSI
386-322-5949


N


DONATE A Car today to
help children & their fami-
lies suffering from Can-
cer. Free Towing. Tax
Deductible. Children's
Cancer Fund of America,
Inc. www.ccfoa.org
1-800-469-8593
Tell 'em you
saw it in
HOMETOWN
NEWS
CLASSIFIED!
386-322-5949


DAYTONA BEACH-
SIDE- 1/1, Behind Bellair
Plaza. No pets. Water
included Central A/C.
$500/mo. 386-447-5699

Unbelievable
NEW SMYRNA $495
Moves you in! Downtown!
Close to everything.
Small 2Br/1Ba apt,
C/H/A, gas fireplace.
Rent incl w/d $549/mo.
Also Riverview 2Br/1Ba
A pt$615/mo
386-689-1243



NEW SMYRNA Free
1st Months Rent. $595.
moves you in! Very Lg
2br/lba. $650. Xtra Lg
3Br/2ba w/bonus ofc area
$785. $595 dep. w/d
hkup. Huge closet, C/A/C
water incld. Great loc. No
dogs. 386-689-1243


LOP
PORT ORANGE- Large
2/2. Newly remodeled,
Includes W/D hook-up &
cable. Small pets OK.
$700/mo Call Patty
386-405-9887
SEBASTIAN- 3/2 apts.
Move in special Call
772-581-4440 *Income
Restrictions Apply*


REDUCED
SOUTH DAYTONA
Lake Front! Studio/Apt.,
Furn., Incls. all utils., ca-
ble TV & Internet.
$600/mo 386-316-2979

WOW
VERO BEACH: Call for
specials! lbr's from
$475, 2br's from $550.
Tile, New apple. Close to
Beaches, Parks & Res-
taurants. 772-563-0013


DAYTONA BEACH
Golfer's Paradise! LPGA
community 3/2/2, W/D,
screen porch, $1200/mo
F/S 386-852-8298 Leave
Message
EDGEWATER Bring
Your Boat! 2/1.5 on ca-
nal, completely remod-
eled. New kitch., carpet,
paint. Boat lift. No
dogs/smoking $775/mo
321-749-6199 ; 749-6198


REDUCED
EDGEWATER-
Nice Neighborhood, 3/2/2
w/garage door opener.
W/D, split plan, vaulted
ceiling, new carpet,
fenced backyard. Florida
Shores $975/mo
386-423-8695
HOLLY HILL 2br/1ba,
$750 mo 241 15th St
Tanya Ottaviani Weichert
RE 386-295-7277
NEW SMYRNA BEACH
Beachside on canal, 3/2
1.5-cg. tile and wood
floors, A/C, screened
porch. Inside laundry with
W/D, Cathedral ceilings
fenced yard with boat
dock. $1400/mo + utilit-
ies. 386-447-2013
NEW SMYRNA BEACH
Sugar Mill Golf Course
2/2/2, W/D. gated com-
munity with heated pool
access. $1150/mo FLS
386-441-5824.
NEW SMYRNA Historic
1920 cottage. 900 sqft
2/br-lba on 1/2 ac. De-
tached gar. 203 Spruce
St. Lease req'd $750/ mo,
1st & sec. 386-423-9134






HONDA ACCORD'96 4dr
auto, a/c, 4cyl, garage
kept, Texas car, 97k,
30+MPG, perfect cond.
$3850. 386-527-8876
Lincoln Continental '99
4dr. leather, PW/PL,
23MPG hwy., grt tires,
brakes & a/c.,garage kept
$4850. 386-527-8876
PONTIAC, Convertible
G-6, 2007, Black
retractible hard top.
20,000 mi, heated leather
seats, satellite radio,
great buy! $18,000/obo
606-791-4780


S BRIGHTSIDE RV CENTER
NOW OPEN at New Location! Watch for Open House Date
",o414 (o ( c W4 -
A/C Body Generator & Rubber Roof Repair
Warroa.i Work Tow Bors Winche, Gibson Performance -
*E-lhauttSydtems *Pre-purchae RV survey evaluation
Personal ,nstruchon for riew RV owners
Horse Traders & More '
SCI
69 N.,S-, ak il L


NEW SMYRNA
BEACHSIDE
839 25TH AVENUE
2 Br, Carport, tiled
throughout, furnished,
close to beach
$800/mo
MINORCA CONDOS
Karpathos 804 3/2 -
$2,500/mo
Paros 506 3/2 -
$2,300/mo
SaUna 303 4/3.5 -
$2,500/mo
Karpathos 201 4/3 -
$2,200/mo
6871 S. ATLANTIC
Beach front, furnished;
3/2, the ultimate ocean
home
$3,000/mo
CEDAR DUNES
2 br plus bonus room,
private courtyard, balcony
off the master bedroom,
reserved parking.
$1,000/mo
DIAMOND HEAD
Spectacular views, deep
water boat slip, galley'
kitchen, community pool.
From $1,400/mo
BOUCHELLEASLAND
2/2 with great intracoastal
views. Community pool,
tennis, boat slip available.
$1,200/mo'
EDGEWATER
2417 MANGO TREE
3/2, fully applianced
kitchen, wall-to-wall
carpet, 2 car grage
$950/mo -
1600 BRADFORD ROAD
3'?, iloi uf iOle large
screened poIch', garage
$950/mo
129 RANKEN AVENUE
2/1, huge yard, 2 car
carport
$695/mo .
1854 VICTORY 8
PALM DRIVE I
3/2,1500 sq. ft.,
split plan, 2 car garage.
$950/mo











ORMOND BEACH
gated community 3 pools.
2Bdrm/2Bath living & din-
ing rms,kitchen, screened
porch, lawn maintenance
included, completely
renovated. $825/mo.
386-672-6899; 299-6737
ORMOND BEACH This
is a steal! Rebuilt split
2/2/1-cg, fireplace, W/D
mod. kitch, FLA. rm, back
patio, frnt porch, Partially
furn. Beautifully fenced
back yd, Some pets OK.
$995/mo 386-677-3844
ORMOND BEACH- 55+
gated comm. Furn. 2/2,
carport, yard, LakeView!
pools, clubhouse & more
No pets. No smoking.
$850/mo. 386-673-2963
PALM COAST INTRA
COASTAL BEACHSIDE
Over 3000sf w/boat lift.
upgraded, like new. Only
$1695/mo. 386-569-1811







DONATE A CAR- Help
Children Fighting Diabe-
tes. Fast, Free, Towing.
Call 7 days/week. Non
-runners ok. Tax Deducti-
ble. Call Juvenile Diabe-
tes Research Founda-
tion. 1-800-578-0408
WANTED JUNK CARS
Running or not $200 &
up. We pay cash! 24-hrs.
Call 321-631-0111



WANTED JAPANESE
Motorcycles Kawasaki,
1970-1980 Z1-900, KZ90
0, KZ1000, S1-250, S2-
250, S2-350, S3- 400,
H1-500, H2-750, Cash
Paid, Free Nationwide
Pick Up 800-772 -1142 or
310-721-0726.
WANTED JAPANESE
Motorcycles Kawasaki,
Z1-900, (KZ900) 1972-
1976, KZ1000 (1976-
1980), KZ1000R (1982-
1983), Z1R, S1-250,
S2-350, S3-400, H1-500,
H2-750, Honda CB750
(1969- 1975), Susuki
GS400, GT380, Cash
Paid, Free Nationwide
Pick Up 800-772-1142 or
310-721-0726.


PONCE INLET Pool
home unfurn., dock on
deep water canal, 2 blks
to beach, $1795/mo. 404-
734-7880; 843-341-5999
PONCE INLET- beautiful
3-br/2-ba/2-cg oceanfront
home 20' x 50' deck
overlooking beach, Newly
renovated. New appraisal
value, $1.288 mil. $4000
per month, 1 year lease
with option to extend. 1st
& last, $2000 damage
deposit. 407-321-2007
PORT ORANGE 3/2/3
Royal Palm, Fitness, pool
club, no maint. Avail April
16. Close to colleges
$1500/mo. 386-763-1141
SCOTTSMOOR 5744
Stanford St. 11 Miles to
Titusville! 3BR/2BA/1CG
Large fenced yard, cent-
ral a/c, new paint, apple's,
Sale $150k. Rent $800/m
1st/sec. 305-582-0147
SPRUCE CREEK
FLY-IN
Gated Comm. 2bdrm,
2ba, double garage, new
carpet, on golf course,
$1,050/mo $1,400, Furn.
White Real Estate
386-689-4887



ORMOND BEACH-South
40. 2bdrm/2ba/2 car gar,
Florida rm, screened
porch, new carpet/tile,
private courtyard, $1000/
month. (386)679-0159


NC BLUE Ridge Moun-
tains Log Cabin $87,900.
Owner sacrificing a 1320
sq ft unfinished cabin on
2 acres w/ stream. Has a
loft deck and covered
porch 808-286-1666
TEXAS LAND SALEII
20 Acres, $0 Down.
Only $15,900., $159/mo.
Near Booming El Paso.
Beautiful Mountain
Views. No Credit Checks.
Money Back Guarantee.
Roads/Surveyed.
1-800-843-7537
www.sunsetranches.com
WESTERN KENTUCKY-
Hunting & Investment
properties. Trophy white-
tail & premier turkey
hunts featured on TV.
50acs-5,000ac tracts,
80ac lake, timber, build-
ing sites, income produc-
ing starts@ $1,400/ac
270-554-4114


r -



ORMOND BEACHSIDE-
furn lbr/lba duplex apt.
ideal location, steps to
ocean. All new mod. furn,
carpet, tv, dishwasher,
Fla. rm, beau landscaped
large fenced yard. Must
see! $850/mo. short term
leases avail. Some pets
welcome 386-677-3844
ORMOND Duplex, 3/2,
$1000/mo 1405 Carlos
Cir Tanya Ottaviani Wei-
chert Re 386-295-7277




OAK HILL 2/1 mobile
home, clean, quiet park,
$480/month plus deposit.
Eric 386-589-3358


PORT ORANGE Mobile
Home on private lot. 2 br
extra clean. New paint &
carpet. W/D inc. $650
mo. 386-451-5180
PORT ORANGE, 112
Hickory Ln, Summer
Trees 55+ pool com-
munity, 2br/2ba/lcg, free
cable, $850/mo Call
Jeanne Bush at Alexand-
er R.E. 386-690-9018
PORT ORANGE- 40+
comm, pool gym rec
room, jacuzzi library
2/1.5, w/d, near every-
thing, $395/mo Rent to
own also 386-566-7239


Vacation &
lTravel


GATLINBURG TENN
Near Dollywood. Plan
your break now. 2 & 3 br
chalets with mountain
views, hot tubs, Jacuzzis,
game rooms. Pet
friendly. 1-877-215-3335
www.marysescape.com




Highlight your
ad and get it
sold fast!
Whether Buying or
Selling we are your
ONE call solution!
HOMETOWN NEWS
386-322-5949


35' WINNEBAGO 2001,
2/slideouts, 46k/mi., with
Back Br. Well maint. &
extras, N/S. Asking
$42,000. 386-956-0710





SIZZUN' RV SAVINGS
Factory Incentives,
Manufacturer Closeouts,
Giant Discounts
FRESH TRADES
PRICED TO SELL
'02 BOUNDER DIESEL,
LOW MILES. 39FT
$59,000
'99 FOUR WINDS
WINDSPORT MH,
WON'T LAST LONG
$34,900
Trade anything of value


A I


MARATHON. LUXURY
1-6 bedroom vacation
front properties. Pool,
hot tub, docks & more!
Weekly & long weekend
rates. Call now and Plan
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NEW SMYRNA- Sun
Beach Club 2/2 furnish-
ed. Avail 4/1 $500/wk
Call Susan Solon of
Grace Realty
386-235-4473
Classified 386-322-5949


SELL/RENT YOUR
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VISIT OUR
ONLINE SITE
www.HometownNewsOL.corn
Photos with your ad,
High Definition Slide
Shows and more
386-322-5949







SO DAYTONA- 2 units
for rent. US-1 can be
rented as a restaurant, or
office/retail. 1st mo rent +
deposit. 386-871-6030








TITUSVILLE 1 Month
FREEI (*with this ad.)
Offices from 150-4000sf
Totally renovated w/view
of Cape Canaveral. Co
Brokers welcome. Call
Miriam at 954-961-0500




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ORMOND BEACH -
North US1, w/offc &bath
1,000sf $485 mo. similar
savings on 1250sf.
386-451-4018/672-1276


NORTH CAROLINA
MOUNTAINS
Discounted spring rates
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Pet friendly units
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1 4


NOTICE OF ACTION
BEFORE THE FLORIDA CONSTRUCTION
INDUSTRY LICENSING BOARD

IN RE: The practice of contracting
Wade L. WNhite
707 Samms Ave., Unit H
Port Orange, FL 32129
CASE NO.: 2007062295, 2007060928
LICENSE NO.: C1326979
The Department of Business and Professional
Regulation has filed an Administrative Complaint
against you, a copy of which may be obtained by
contacting, Jamie Duran, Office of General
Counsel, Department of Business and
Professional Regulation, 1940 North Monroe
Street, Suite 33, Tallahassee, FL 32399-2202,
(850) 487-9651.
If no contact has been made by you concerning
the above by May 1, 2009, the matter of the
Administrative Complaint will be presented at a
hearing pursuant to 120.57(2), F.S. before the
Florida Construction Industry Licensing Board.

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities
Act, persons needing a special accommodation to
participate in this proceeding should contact the
individual or agency sending notice not later than
seven days prior to the proceeding at the address
given on notice.
Telephone: (850)257-6097; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD)
or 1-800-955-8770 (v), via Florida Relay Service.


So. a
y
ona a
y
ona ea


910 Antique/Classic





J '.7 5 S Volusia County-SOUTH
Friday, April 3, 2009 GREE I9 9 7 k HOMETOWN NEWS


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2 Volusia County-SOUTH
HOMETOWN NEWS


Friday, April 3, 2009


Keep it green with less water


'- anne W al--:la


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'. ;rfnocklocated at the Museum
Sa diters'Guided .ouis.4 a
a l iI 8' if inhial. tibii call
5


By Jamye Durrance
Durrance@hometownnewsol.com
As more municipalities strengthen
their water conservation regulations,
keeping a green lawn and garden is
becoming more difficult.
But, it doesn't have to be.
With the right planning, a little bit of
water can go a long way.
Square foot and rain gardens use rain
water and minimal space to grow vegeta-
bles and flowers.
"It's very important because (the water
supply) is not getting any better," said
Kevin Bagwell with Full Moon Natives in
Port Orange.
At his nursery, Mr. Bagwell sells native
plants and teaches classes on how to
make square foot and rain gardens as
well as waterwise landscaping.
According to the University of Florida
Gardening in A Minute Web site, rain gar-
dens are created in a depression in the
ground. They capture water and slowly
filter it through the soil. Typically, they
contain wildflowers and native plants
that can survive in both wet and dry con-
ditions.
Square foot gardening is exactly what it
says, Mr. Bagwell said.
Each "grid" contains a different veg-
etable or plant. They require less water-
ing, because of the high quality soil and


smaller space.
"They are perfect for condos and
apartments and tabletops," Mr. Bagwell
said. "The yield beats anything I've ever
gotten from any other garden."
Rain barrels are another good way to
save and utilize water that would other-
wise saturate the ground.
"Mother nature provides the best
water," Mr. Bagwell said. "The best water
doesn't have impurities."
But, Mr. Bagwell said the biggest
reminder he gives to customers is to
remember where you live.
"Choose the right plant for the right
place," he said. "Keep in mind what
region you are in. We are not tropical."
By planting drought tolerant and
native plants, residents will save money
and water.
Local nurseries such as Full Moon
Natives and Lindley's Nursery in New
Smyrna Beach offer classes and assis-
tance with choosing the right plant, not
only for this area, but for a particular spot
in your yard.
"It takes strategic planning and plant-
ing accordingly," Mr. Bagwell said.
Limiting the use of fertilizers and pesti-
cides is also important.
'A little bit goes a long way," Mr. Bag-
well said. "Don't fertilize near (water)
banks."
For more information, visit
http://www.gardeningsolutions.ifas.ufl


Reap the benefits


Randy Barber/staff photographer
Mary Silver of New Smyrna Beach works at
the Fair-Share Urban Garden Project at the
Daytona Beach Lions Club. The project,
sponsored by Salt of the Earth, offers plots
of land for vegetable planting. Crops raised
will go to low-income families through Hal-
ifax Urban Ministries. In the future, plots
will be available to families to grow their
own food. For more information about the
project, call Joel Tippens at 386-451-9003.


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Friday, April 3, 2009


d Volusia County-SOUTH
HOMETOWN NEWS


Rebates offered for washing machines, rain barrels


By Bethany Chambers
bchambers@hometownnewsol.com
It was "just time" for a new washing
machine when Mitchel Novas of
Ormond Beach headed to a local big-box
store, Consumer Reports in hand. His
choice: a top-ranking, energy-efficient,
water-wise model by LG that cost a cool
$1,000.
"I spent more (money) because I want-
ed to save water," the 46-year-old father
said.
He also got rewarded for the "green"
purchase: a $100 rebate from the Water
Authority of Volusia, or WAV, a govern-
mental planning organization with 12
member cities within the county.
This year, residents of those cities are
eligible for rebates if they purchase qual-
ifying low-water volume washing
machines and rain barrels.
"Rebates are a nice incentive to get
consumers to make the choice to con-
serve water," said Lindsay Roberts, exec-
utive director ofWAV "We want people to
get the idea that water conservation
needs to happen inside and outside (the
home)."
And conserving water isn't just about
saving the planet or the aquifer below us.
"This keeps us from talking about
expensive alternative water sources like
seawater desalination," Ms. Roberts said.


"It puts that off another 50 to 100 years.
This is a way to save us all money."
One hundred washing machine
rebates worth $100 were offered and 150
rain barrel rebates worth $20 were
offered. A limited number of both are still
available.
Locally, residents of Ormond Beach,
Holly Hill, South Daytona, Daytona
Beach Shores, Ponce Inlet, Port Orange,
Edgewater and unincorporated Volusia
County are eligible.
WAV uses membership funds, which
are paid by participating cities from their
utility taxes, to foot the bill for the unique
program.
"We'll be at a bare minimum (budget)
by next year, but this is such a very effec-
tive way to promote water conservation,
we probably will continue (offering
rebates)," Ms. Roberts said. "We want to
return the money paid by the taxpayers."
If 100 people switch from regular
washing machines to the low-water vol-
ume machines typically the chic-look-
ing front-loaders you see in the commer-
cials 600,000 gallons of water will be
saved, Ms. Roberts said.
"A small project can have a big
impact," she said.
These new washing machines can also
have an impact on the owner's budget,
said Dave Cheezum, sales manager at












.
4082 Ridgewood Ave.

(Corner of US1 & Dunlawton)
236-9993 O
r-
_________________________


You Deserve The Best... You Deserve

S.. I- slander B&


John's Appliance City in Daytona Beach.
By spraying the laundry as opposed to
saturating it, a low-water volume wash-
ing machine uses about 20 gallons of
water as opposed to the 45 gallons your
old clunker chugs.
A new washing machine will last about
12 years, Mr. Cheezum said, and each
year a consumer might save about $100
to $150'on water and electricity depend-
ing on their usage.
So it's no surprise he's seen sales of
energy-efficient, water-saving machines
pickup, he said.
"People are buying more energy-effi-
cient models to save the environment
and save money, and
because there are more
choices in the category,"
Mr. Cheezum said. "In -.
my opinion, people
are still driven by
price, load capacity .
and color. There are -
more choices avail-
able than ever in
the (energy-effi-
cient front-loading) .
category, while the '.
choice in top-loaders is
dwindling."
Rain barrels, which
come in a variety of styles
and sizes, cost about $70


on average and can be purchased at
hardware stores. Not many of those
rebates have gone out, Ms. Roberts said,
but as people begin gardening this
spring and summer, she expects that to
change.
"Rain barrels reduce withdrawal from
the fresh water aquifer and wells for irri-
gation," she said.
For more information on the program,
visit www.wavh2o.com or call (386) 226-
0422 ext. 27.
Below: Dave Cheezum of John's Appliance
City shows off an energy efficient washer
and dryer.



4.-

10 : _. ..-,


Here's
Doody Calls Pet Waste Removal
Srh e P o o p 1.800.DoodyCalls (366.3922)
www.DoodyCalls.com


WASTE NOT. WANT NOT: LEAVE
THE POOP-SCOOPING TO THE
PROS
DoodyCalls provides a year-round
professional pet waste removal
service to residential yards,
apartment communities and Home
Owner Associations. If you think
there is no market for what we do,
think again.
S.The pet services industry, which
includes dog droppings disposal
services, continues to expand
rapidly. Unfortunately, the rise in dog
waste as a major cause of pollution
continues to develop as well so
much so, the EPA was forced to deem
it a nonpointt source of pollution" in
1991, which put poop in the'same
category as oil and toxic chemicals!
FAR FROM FERTILIZER
Dog dilettantes beware: woof-woof
waste does not a good fertilizer
make. It is actually toxic to your
lawn, causing burns and unsightly
discoloring.
Beyond your grass, it has been
estimated that a single gram of dog
feces can contain 23 million fecal
coliform bacteria, which are known
to cause cramps, diarrhea, intestinal
illness, and serious kidney disorders
in humans.

A TOXIC CYCLE
The thing about persistently
disposing of stools improperly (or not


at all) is that it kicks off a harmful
cycle that can affect your whole
family including your pet.
According to the U.S. Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention
(CDC), pet droppings can contribute
to diseases animals pass to humans,
called zoonoses. When infected dog
droppings are deposited on your
lawn, the eggs of certain
roundworms anti other parasites can
linger in your soil for years. Anyone
who comes into contact with that soil
- be it through gardening, playing
sports, walking barefoot or any other
means runs the risk of coming into
contact with those eggs; especially
your dog.
WHAT YOU CAN DO?
If you are far too harried to keep
vigilant watch over your dog's
leftovers, you may want to hire a
pooper-scooper company to manage
the waste. That's where DoodyCalls
comes in. We offer a variety of
flexible and affordable services and
schedules for homeowners' and
communities. We are fully insured,
drive marked vehicles and our
employees are always in uniform.
We also disinfect our tools between
each cleaning. Our prices start at $12
per week and your first visit is always
free! .
We also sell, install and service pet
waste stations and provide
community common area cleaning.







S Volusia County-SOUTH
4 HOMETOWN NEWS


^ .' ^ "e- Friday, April 3, 2009


'Going green' taken seriously by many in Volusia


By Bethany Chambers
bchambers@hometownnewsol.com
Call them the Incredible Hulks of the
environmental movement. Several
local residents are just as green and
are lifting the weight of the planet's
future on their shoulders.
Hometown News caught up with a
few of these movers and shakers
recently and asked them about how
they're helping to save the Earth one
project at a time, and how the rest of
us can get involved, too.


JOEL TIPPENS, 52, a
Daytona Beach native,
is founder of Salt of the
Earth, Inc., a nonprofit
group that creates
community gardens in
the Daytona Beach
area.


JOEL
TIPPENS


About your green
initiative: We look for opportunities to
serve the community for social, eco-
nomic and environmental justice by
providing community food security.
It's a high priority with so many fami-
lies seeking emergency food assis-
tance. Of course we need more people
to donate cans of beans to the food


pantries, but rather than do just that it
might be a more sustainable solution
to encourage more people to grow
fresh vegetables themselves. We start-
ed the first community garden on
White Street (at the corner of Willis
Street) and the long-term plan would
be to establish a network of communi-
ty gardens through the area.

How you got involved in the green
movement: It goes back to growing up
in the 1970s "Think global, act
local." I was always concerned back
then about ... protecting the whales,
but I didn't see myself being able to
join up with Green Peace and sail the
seven seas, so I thought saving the
planet starts (at home). So many envi-
ronmental issues are interconnected
with economic issues and social issues
in your own community.

Most important green issue: I think
sustainability. We've been doing a lot
of things that seemed to work well for
the last 50 years, but we're realizing
these ways aren't sustainable. We can't
do it for another 50 years.

One way for everyone to go green
today: The simplest thing would be
participating in your municipality's


recycling program. It's that old mantra:
"Reduce, reuse recycle." And that just
starts right there in the house. You can
do that every day. I also think you
should grow some of your own food for
the kitchen. You wind up taking better
care of your property if you're a gar-
dener, and who knows ... what kind of
long-term impact that could have on
the environment and on the society.

JAMES STOWERS, 31, a two-year


resident of Ormond
Beach,. is a land use
attorney for Cobb Cole.
He was the first attor-
ney in Volusia County
to become an accredit-
ed professional
through the U.S. Green
Building Council Lead-
ership in Energy and
Environmental Design
LEED.


JAMES
TOWERS


program, or


About your green initiative: We try
to integrate sustainable practices, or at
least inform our clients about those
practices, such as walkable neighbor-
hood development. The idea is if you
have more dense infrastructure
around a town center, it allows for
people to walk to and from the store


S FINANCING AVAILABLE _2
See our website for special incentives: www.DGmeyer.com

S.. INFINTr Tlurn to the Experts.



ii, ,,, .... ",,


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29th Annual Florida Native

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,May 21-24 -.West Palm Beach Marriott
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and work, taking automobiles off the
road and reducing greenhouse gases.
The U.S. Green Building Council ...
verifies the types of green building
practices that lead to sustainability,
from low flow toilets to reducing
impervious surfaces or locating new
development within an urban core. All
the components help to minimize the
impacts of development in a financial-
ly feasible manner.
From my perspective, it makes sense
as a land use attorney to help educate
our clients. It's not only a win for them,
but also reduces some of the impact
(on the environment), and cities look
positively on that during the negotia-
tion process for entitlements.

How you got involved in the green
movement: I have a master's in urban
and regional planning from the Uni-
versity of Florida. When I went to law
school (at UF), I became acquainted
with (a student) whose father, Dr.
Charles Kibert, is one of the state's
leading experts on sustainable prac-
tices and green building. At one of our
young lawyer meetings, (Dr. Kibert's
daughter) talked about green building
... and I was pretty intrigued.
See GREEN, 5








Friday, April 3, 2009 R -


Volusia County-SOUTH
HOMETOWN NEWS


Green
From page 4


Most important green issue: Unfor-
tunately, the development model that
has been put in place is so dependent
on the automobile. You think about a
large city developed before the auto-
mobile, like New York, and there's an
ability for people to live and work and
play all in the same area without hav-
ing a car. Throughout Florida, that is
virtually impossible.
Having those types of choices -
where we can live in Ormond Beach
near the downtown and work at city
hall and go eat at Caffeine and shop at
a grocery store and not have to drive -
would put everyone in a better posi-
tion. It is a difficult model. A lot of
effort needs to take place up front to
get the infrastructure (in place).

One way for everyone to go green
today: One thing I've tried to do is buy
Florida drought-tolerant plants and
xeriscape. Basically, it's just getting
landscape materials that don't require
all kinds of water. In Florida, (land-
scaping) accounts for a huge percent-
age of the water consumption, so hav-
ing all native plants is a huge factor in
saving water.


KEVIN PARA, 47, a
30-year resident of ,
New Smyrna Beach, is I m
a former utilities com-
missioner and a cur-
rent certifying agent
for the Florida Green KEVIN PARA
Building Coalition. He
has led the search for
renewable energy. His current venture:
turning waste vegetable oil into an
alternative fuel source that can be
used in modified diesel engines.

About your green initiative: I'm a
hobbyist. I've done a few things over
the years, such as solar heaters, and a
number of years back I was appointed
as a utility commissioner. One of the
things I wanted to bring to the utility
commission was awareness of the
value of trying to move toward renew-
able energy. I'm a businessman, and
being in business in the area of
research and development is risky. I
invested quite heavily in (the waste
vegetable oil) equipment thinking it
would become a business, and now it's
just a hobby. If (gas) gets up to $2.50 a
gallon again, it will make sense (to use
vegetable oil).

How you got involved in the green
movement: I've had a passion for
renewables that goes all the way back
to my teenage years. Sustainable prac-


tices are a lifestyle. I grew up in Upstate
New York and it was popular in that
area along with environmental issues
that were prominent in the early 1970s,
and that has always stayed with me

Most important green issue: I would
say cheaper (solar energy) is the thing
that will get us out of this mess.
Despite what politicians pontificate in
Washington and in our capital, we
need the (matching funds) to do the
necessary research. If all the politi-
cians realized that giving tax exemp-
tions would promote the product fur-
ther, that would be a real easy step, but


it just doesn't work that way. There's no
real desire to solve this problem; the
problem of the future. I hear people
whining about the money in the (fed-
eral) stimulus package that went to
renewables, but it is far less than it
should be.

One way everyone can go green
today: The first thing to start with is
LED replacements (for light bulbs).
They are the best mechanism to alter-
native lighting. LED diodes are bullet-
proof; they don't break. They're quite a
value. Your lighting is very important.


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Volusia County-SOUTH '
HOMETOWN NEWS Friday, April 3, 2009


Recycling garden and kitchen waste into compost is easy
By Jeanne Willard have to do." The resulting nutrient-rich compost "It rots," he said. "It really doesn't
Willard@hometownnewsol.com Mr. Janson and his partner Varuni goes right back into two gardens where compost."
Roberts routinely drop garden and the couple grows a variety of vegetables Kevin Bagwell, owner of Full Moon
You're probably already recycling kitchen waste into their outdoor com- and herbs, he said. Native nursery, concurred.
paper, plastic and aluminum, post containers. It's good for the environment, reduces Yard clippings, shredded paper, leafy
Why not kick that up a notch and turn Compost is created when microor- the burden on water purification sys- vegetables, coffee grounds, eggshells
garden and kitchen waste into a healthy ganisms break down organic material. teams and landfills and saves money, Mr. and other food scraps are fine, Mr. Bag-
diet for your plants? It can take three months or more to Janson said. well said, but no proteins.
A New Smyrna Beach resident who break down, Mr. Janson said, depending Most garden and kitchen scraps can The Port Orange nursery sells com-
has been composting for decades said on the outside temperature and scraps be used, he said, except meat and post bins but demand for the containers
it's easy to get started. used. cheese products. has not been great, Mr. Bagwell said.
"Purchase a black composting bin," "It's so hot, it usually composts pretty A vegetarian, Mr. Janson does not eat
said Michael Janson, 64. "That's all you quickly," he said. meat and said it doesn't compost well. See COMPOST, 7


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- Volusia County-SOUTH 7
HOMETOWN NEWS


Friday, April 3, 2009


Compost
From page 6
He said he sees interest after the nurs-
ery holds periodic gardening, plant and
landscaping seminars.
Karen Stauderman, University of
Florida residential horticulture exten-
sion agent, said fancy compost bins are
available, including those with
mechanical mixers, but any plastic con-
tainer with a lid and vent holes will
work.
"Why spend the money?"
Ms. Stauderman said. "You can even


use a Tupperware container."
Compost bins need both "green" and
"brown' materials which provide both
nitrogen and carbon-rich materials, she
said.
Brown materials include fallen leaves,
twigs, shredded newspaper, tea bags
and coffee grounds.
Green material includes vegetables,
egg shells, grass clippings, farm animal
manure and green plants.
Items should be layered like lasagna,
she said, adding water to keep it moist
and turning the pile about once a week.
Compost is ready when the material
breaks down and looks coarse and


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crumbly, Ms. Stauderman said.
Adding worms to outdoor bins will
help break the materials down faster,
she said.
"They speed it up," she said.
Compost containers can be purchased
online at Websites such as howtocom-
post.org.
Full Moon Natives is located at 1737
Fern Park Drive, Port Orange, 386-212-
9923.
For literature on composting go to the
University of Florida Extension Data
Web site at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu or


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