Title: Hometown news (Daytona Beach, FL)
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Title: Hometown news (Daytona Beach, FL)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Hometown news
Publication Date: January 16, 2009
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Volusia -- Daytona Beach
Coordinates: 29.207222 x -81.037778 ( Place of Publication )
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Bibliographic ID: UF00081227
Volume ID: VID00105
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Full Text






TDAYTONA BEACH HOLLY HILL







Vol. 3, No. 51 Your Local News and Information Source www.HometownNewsOL.com Friday, January 16, 2009


Hi, Hometown News'
readers.


New state attorney
sworn in
The judge who presided
over the swearing-in cere-
mony called him the most
powerful public official in
the circuit. That man is R.J.
Larizza, newly sworn state
attorney for the Seventh
Judicial Circuit, which
includes Volusia and Flagler
,counties. Mr. Larizza, an
See BRIEF, A5


MARSALIS MANIA


City strategic planning set to


begin later this month


Meeting to include briefing on city's financials
By Bethany Chambers sioners will set
bchambers@hometownnewsol.com the priorities for
the 2009-2010
DAYTONA BEACH And so it budget. The
begins, meetings are
Again, typically fol-
The city's early budget season will lowed by budg-
start later this month with a strate- et workshops in
gic planning meeting between city the late sum-
staff and elected officials. mer. The final
The meeting is scheduled for 2 to budget must be
5 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 29 and is open approved
to the public. A location for the before Oct. 1. McKay Vaughn
meeting has not been announced. "This.year it'll
The meeting will also aired on gov-' be a little different. Usually the city
ernment access channel 199 and manager does a presentation
posted on the city's Web site. reviewing his goals," said city
It will be the first of several plan- spokeswoman Susan Cerbone.
ning meetings in which commis- "This year it's expected the city


commission will lead
a free flowing
our priorities ... (for)
the budget cycle." 0
Despite potential-
ly small coffers,
commissioners said
they will still
address the needs and
concerns of the citizens.
"The most important thing is that
everybody have a chance to express
... their concerns ... without being
tied down to, 'We can't afford it.'
That is (city manager Jim
Chisholm's) job afterwards to tell us
we can't afford it," commissioner
Shiela McKay-Vaughan said at a
recent commission meeting. "I
appreciate that needs to be done; I


Open air


Randy Barber/staff photographer
Sarah Smith (right) of Daytona Beach and Pat Schultz of Holly Hill, members of East Coast Plein Air, a
network of artists dedicated to painting outdoors to capture natural light, spend the day painting boats
docked at the marina in Daytona Beach. Plein Air is French for 'in the open air.'


Experts offer advice on historic


preservation for officials and residents


Preservation, redevelopment about consensus


By Bethaqny Chambers
bchambers@hometownnew-
sol.com
VOLUSIA COUNTY -
Florida is a transient
society that has capital-
ized on, a development
boom over the last


decade.
But those facts. don't
make the state devoid of
history and community
involvement, two state
experts in historic
preservation and rede-
velopment said last


weekend at the Heritage
Preservation Trust of
Volusia County's Educa-
tional Forum.
Delray Beach commtu-
nity redevelopment area
marketing and grants
coordinator Elizabeth


Butler and Palm Beach
County Historic Society
vice chairman Robert
Ganger anchored the
three-hour event at Day-
tona Beach's Schnebly
Center, which drew
about 75 residents,
including city and coun-
See ADVICE, A8


am
only a little bit concerned
we set a tone that won't free up con-
versation."
Mayor Glenn Ritchey agreed.
"I don't think we should restrict
our thinking based on budgetary
restrictions," he said. "I think what
we need to do is hqve visions and
look at things we need to accom-
See PLANNING, A2


New police

building

open this

week

By Bethany Chambers
bchambers@hometownnewsol.com
DAYTONA BEACH From his
office on the third floor of the city's
new police headquarters, police chief
Mike Chitwood can see it all. The
expanse of the 27-acre property, its
lake and walking trail spread out below
his arched windows.
Sitting at his hulking new .desk last
week, surrounded bybookshelves with
awards and famiJy photos and facing
his beloved Philadelphia Phillies
memorabilia on the adjacent wall, he
could also "see" something more: the
distance he'd come.
"My old partner came down here
and I gave him a tour of the building.
He said, 'In 22 years, I've never gone in
a bathroom where I didn't have to
bang my shoes and socks and pants to
get the roaches out.' And he was right,"
Chief Chitwood said.
"The first five years of my career ...
when it rained you had to wear your
boots to go back to your locker
because it flooded," he added. "It
(would have been) amazing to think
20-some years ago when I became a
cop, that I'd be sitting someplace like
this."
The plush new police digs at 129
Valor Blvd. near the comer of Mason
Avenue and Williamson Blvd. opened
Monday to rave reviews from Chief
Chitwood and many of the 250 sworn
officers who will now call it home.
The opening also left questions
about what will happen in the heart of
the city, where the former police head-
See STATION, A4


Wynton Marsalis and the
Jazz at Lincoln Center
Orchestra kicks off DBIF


Classified B6 Police Report AS
Crossword BS5 Sports B5
Golf B5 Star Scopes B1
Out & About B1 Viewpoint A6


Latest round of school cuts


angers community .


By Jamye Durrance
Durrance@hometownnewsol.com
VOLUSIA COUNTY -
Spruce Creek High School
sophomore Bardia Kajanori
had big plans.
He was supposed to go to
his school's science fair, for-
eign languages festival and
the social studies fair later
this year.'
His goal was to advance
to the state competitions.
But, Bardia, an Interna-
tional Baccalaureate stu-
dent at the Port Orange
school, recently found out
that the academic competi-


tions were eliminated as
part of an estimated $13.7
million in cuts by Volusia
County Schools to close a
budget shortfall by the end
of this school year.
"I don't get to put (going
to the competitions) on my
resume," Bardia said to dis-
trict administrators at a
recent meeting to discuss
the budget cuts at David C.
Hinson Middle School.
"That's one thing that
makes me less competitive.
I personally don't see how
taking away amenities that
we have will convince peo-
ple to come here or stay


here."
Bardia may still get to
compete, however, after
Volusia County Schools
superintendent Margaret
Smith met with a group of
community leaders who
vowed to raise the money
needed to save academic
competitions and IV sports
for this year.
The budget deficit is the
result of a downturn in state
taxes and declining enroll-
ment, Ms. Smith said. Next
year, they are anticipating a
loss in dollars twice as high.
In addition to academic
See CUTS, A3


Randy Barber/staff photographer
Students protest the proposed budget plan for schools
next year during a 'Call to Action' meeting with Volusia
County School officials at David C. Hinson Middle School
in Daytona Beach Monday.


4 1








Friday, January 16, 2009


A2 Daytona Beach/Holly Hill


Business News


Tourism industry
receives Enterprise
Award

The Tourism Industry of
Volusia County received
the chamber's highest
honor the Enterprise
Award at The Chamber's
89th Annual Meeting Jan.
13 at the Hilton Daytona
Beach Oceanfront Resort.
The Enterprise Award is
given to' corporations that
have made contributions
to the Halifax Area over the
years. Accepting the com-
bined award for this year's
event were representatives
from the three Convention
& Visitor Bureaus of Volusia
County: Debbie Boyd of the
Southeast Volusia CVB,
Sharon Mock of the Day-
tona Beach Area CVB and
Rene Tallevast from the
River of Lakes Heritage
Corridor. Additionally, Bob
Davis of the Hotel/Motel


Association of Volusia
County represented the
lodging industry, while
Daytona International
Speedway President Robin
Braig accepted for the
attractions component.
Helping to honor the
tourism industry was
keynote speaker and Major
League Baseball Hall of
Famer Cal Ripken Jr.
Mr. Ripken retired from
baseball in October 2001
after 21 seasons with the
Baltimore Orioles. He is
one of only eight players in
history to achieve 400
home runs and 3,000 hits.
In 1995, Mr. Ripken broke
Lou Gehrig's record for
consecutive games played
(2,130), and he voluntarily
ended his streak in 1998
after playing 2,632 consec-
utive games. In '2007, he
was elected to the Baseball
Hall of Fame with the third
highest percentage of votes
in history.


US looking for census workers


Make money and be part of history


By Jeanne Willard
Willard@hometownnewsol.com
VOLUSIA COUNTY -
Searching for a job?
You might want to con-
sider a position that
becomes available only
once in a decade.
The United States Census
Bureau is recruiting work-
ers for the 2010 census and
will likely hire between
26,000 and 39,000 tempo-.
rary workers in Florida over
the next year, said Manuel
Landivar, assistant regional
census manager.
Despite the fact that the
official census day on April
1, 2010 is more than a year
away, officials have begun
hiring workers for early
operations.
Depending on the type of
job and location, pay starts
at $11.25 per hour and can
run up to $26 per hour for
supervisory positions, Mr.
Landiver said.
"Generally speaking, we
pay above average rates," he
said. "We need good quality
applicants."
Although the census
bureau mails out most
questionnaires, census
workers still go door to door
to households that don't
respond and to verify
addresses prior to the mail-
ing.


Mr. Landivar, whose
region includes Alabama,
Georgia and Florida, started
as a census worker more
than 34 years ago and
turned the experience into a
career.
"I've knocked on a lot of
* doors and talked to a lot of
people," he said.
The congressionally man-
dated head-count goes back
more than 200 years to
1790, when the first census
conducted by U.S. Marshals
on horseback counted 3.9
million people.
Since then the U.S. Cen-
sus Bureau has conducted a
census every 10 years, with
the 2000 census counting
more than 281 million peo-
ple.
Participation in the cen-
sus is required by law and
information collected
includes age, gender, race,
relationships in a house-
hold and whether a home is
owned or rented.
Census data determines
congressional seats, defines
school districts, affects state
legislature districting and
determines who gets bil-
lions of dollars in funding.
The stakes are high for
local communities, Mr.
Landivar said.
With more than $300 bil-
lion in federal funds distrib-
uted to state and local gov-
ernments each year, it's the
best way to ensure that local
communities get their fair
share, officials said.
The census "makes a dif-
ference in the quality of life
of people in the communi-
ty," he said.
Efforts are made to place
field workers where they
live, Mr. Landivar said.
"The people who work in


neighborhoods are the peo-
ple from the same commu-
nity," he said.
To qualify as a census
worker, job applicants must
be 18 or older, a U.S. citizen,
have a valid social security
number and pass a basic-
skills written test and back-
ground check.
Applicants must be profi-
cient in English and bi-lin-
gual applicants are encour-
aged to apply.
A driver's license is
required for field jobs.
Available jobs run the
gamut from field workers to
technical, clerical and
supervisory positions.
The census bureau plans
to staff 33 offices in Florida
during the peak census
period and employees.
receive paid training.
The jobs are itinerant, Mr.
Landivar said, which means
employees work full or part-
time for as long as there's a
job to do.
Some positions will be in
demand through the com-
pletion of the census in
2010, he said.
A written employment
test, which takes 30 minutes
to complete, measures
basic clerical, reading,
number and organizational
skills.
Working as a census taker
is more than just a job, Mr.
Landivar said, it's part of an
important effort that will
involve millions of people.
"This is not only an
opportunity to secure a
job," he said, "it's an experi-
ence they will always treas-
ure and value."
See accompanying list of
local testing sites or call the
U.S. Census Bureau at 1-
866-861-2010 for more
information.


Some census workers
still go door-to-door to
collect information.














Photo courtesy of U.S.
Census Bureau



Upcoming census
job.testing.sites

Bring two forms of
identification such as a
passport, driver's
license, social security
card or birth certificate.

Port Orange Regional
Library
1005 City Center Circle,
Port Orange
Saturday Jan. 24 at 10
a.m.
Thurs. Feb. 12 at 1 p.m.

Grace Episcopal Church
4110 S. RidgewoodAve,
Port Orange, in the St.
John's room.
Wednesday Jan 21 at 1
p.m. and 6:30 p.m.
Friday Jan 30 at 2:30
p.m.

One-Stop Employment
Center
359 Bill France Blvd.,
Daytona Beach
Thursday Jan 22 at noon

Daytona Beach Region-
al Library (City Island)
105 E. Magnolia St.
Daytona Beach
Monday Jan. 26 at 11
a.m.

John Dickerson.
Heritage Library
411 S.Keech' Street,
Daytona Beach
Wednesday Feb 4 at 11
a.m.

For more information
and testing dates, call
the US Census Bureau at
1-866-861-2010.


Entries being
accepted for
upcoming art show

Entries are being accepted
for "Fast & Furious An Art
Event," which will encom-
pass the artist's translation
of life in the fast lane in tra-
ditional and new media.
All entries must be
received by Feb. 1. There is a
nonrefundable entry fee of
$25 per artist for up to three
entries and $5 for each addi-
tional piece. Make checks


payable to Artful Living LLC.
Resumes, artist statement
or bios may be included
with entries. Include list of
entries with the following
information: name, title,
media, date, dimensions
and price. A 35 percent sell-
er's commission will be
added.
All entries, list of entries,
entry fee and form must be
delivered to 508 Art Gallery,
508 S. Yonge St., Ormond
Beach, FL 32174.
A prize fund is guaranteed
for best of show and second


and third places. Award
money is dependent upon|
the number of entries(
received.
The show is open tol
artists 18 years and older;
all media will be accepted,
and the work must be orig-
inal.
The show will be held
from 6 to 11 p.m., Feb. 8, at
Razzle's, 611 Seabreeze
Blvd., Daytona Beach.
For more information,'
call (386) 235-4264 or e-
mail harperjejr@aol.com.

For Hometown News


Planning
From page Al
plish and do, and then figure
out how we're going to make
them work, rather than say-
ing, 'Here's the pot of money
we've got to work with, what
can we do?'"


Commissioner Pam
Woods said she wants to
assure the commission's
newest member, recently
elected Zone 5 representa-
tive Derrick Henry, will have
a chance to learn the ropes
and add his own recom-
mendations.
"I want to make sure


everybody can be comfort-,
able," she said.
Although detailed budget;
information may ,not be,
available this early in the,
year, Mr. Chisholm said city
staff has tentatively planned
a briefing on the financial,
status of the city so commis-;
sioners "have some bench-,
mark to look at before going
forward."
Unlike some of the com-;
missioners, Mr. Chisholm;
said he thinks that it would'
be difficult to set realistic'
goals without hard num-'
bers.
"It's very hard to talk
about what you may want to
do," he said, "without know-
ing what you've got to work
with financially."

To find out more about the
strategic planning meeting,
visit the city of Daytona
Beach Web site at
http://www.ci.daytona-I
beach.fl.us/ and -click on,
"Calendar of Events."


U 'N


MA


Hometown News













Community support saves JV spring sports -- for now


Group must raise $47,000 for sports; more next year


By Bethany Chambers
bchambers@hometownnewsol.com
VOLUSIA COUNTY -
Marina Merrell was
shocked.
She'd just gotten home
from Seabreeze High School
one day last week when she
heard the news: her junior
varsity cheerleading squad
was a victim of another
round of budget cuts
announced by the Volusia
County Schools.
"I had no idea! We're off
season right now," the 15-


year-old sophomore said.
"Hopefully it doesn't hap-
pen. They already cut the
freshman squad this year.
There's no way everybody
can make the varsity squad.
It's kind of ridiculous."
Marina, her teammates
and all the other athletes
who participate in JV cheer-
leading and the JV spring
sports that were to be cut
just got their wish.
For now.
On Wednesday, Volusia
County Schools Superinten-
dent Margaret Smith met


with community leaders
who vowed to secure private
funding to keep the sports
intact for this school year.
"It doesn't address our
problem next year," she
said.
JV spring sports and JV
cheerleading were just two
items on a long list of cuts
the district had to make to
compensate for a recent
additional -$13.7-million
funding loss from the state.
It will take about $47,000
in private investment to
bring back JV spring sports


and cheerleading for this
school year alone, Ms.
Smith said.
"We don't have district
money to do it, I assure
you," she said.
Each high school has a
different set of spring
sports, including track and
field, tennis, flag football,
weightlifting and wrestling.
The only certain cuts
announced were IV baseball
and JV softball, school
spokeswoman Nancy Wait
said, "but everything is on
the table."
That ambiguity has some
schools admitting: "We're a,


little confused."
"We don't know," said
New Smyrna Beach high
school athletic director Jose
Fernandez, who also heads
the school's baseball pro-
gram. "We're still waiting on
additional clarification."
Other school representa-
tives, like Seabreeze High
School head baseball coach
Anthony Campanella, were
less restrained.
He said he's taking the
cuts personally, but "there's
always hope."
"They're pulling the rug
out from beneath my feet,
taking our program away
from us. It hurts," said Mr.


Campanella, who has taken
his team to the state cham-
pionships. "I spent 15 years
building this program and
now it's gone?"
JV baseball, unlike some
of the other sports on the
chopping block, may be
given second life.
Coaches countywide are
devising a developmental
league for freshmen and
sophomores. It would be a
pay-to-play league, with
kids' contributing about
$185 to $200 a year, Mr. Fer-
nandez said.
The cuts came on the
heels of cuts to eighth grade
See SPORTS, A4


Cuts
From page A1
competitions, other victims
of the budget crunch were
junior varsity sports and the
teacher of the year banquet.
In the next year, the dis-
trict is planning a change in
class periods, which could
impact electives for middle
and high school students.
Additionally, college prepa-
ration programs such as
Advanced Placement, Inter-
national Baccalaureate, and
Dual Enrollment will be
under review for reductions
or elimination.
Ms. Smith said the school
district is dealing with dol-
lars handed to them by legis-
lators. She asked parents
and students to take their
frustrations to the state
capitol, 'putting pressure on
lawmakers to make changes
to the educational funding
system.
"We are asking (legisla-
tors) to carry out their para-
mount duty to fund quality
public education," Ms.
Smith said.
Jennifer Campanella, an
advisor at Seabreeze High
School with two children in
Volusia County Schools, said
the cuts are taking away a lot
of what students enjoy in
school.


"This is taking us back to
the 1920s, when everyone
went to school and sat in a
room and did reading, writ-
ing and arithmetic," she
said. "There's no incentive to
bring children to school.
There's nothing to tell them
there are other things they
need to do, like electives,
extracurricular activities and
sports."
Dorene Ross, a professor
of education at the Universi-
ty of Florida, said a full edu-
cation goes beyond text-
books and with no creative
outlets such as electives or
extracurricular activities,
students are denied.
"For some kids, that is the
most exciting part of their
day," she said. "When that
isn't there, that impacts their
'feelings about school. Espe-
cially at the high school
level, extracurricular activi-
ties create the connection
for students. That helps to
define who they are. They
begin to develop interests
and they don't get that
opportunity (when it is
cut)."
Ms. Campanella said, that
the recent cutbacks are rem-
iniscent of another econom-
ic crisis.
"We haven't seen it this
bad since the Depression,,
when they closed schools
and shut down education,"


she said. "It will take awhile
before we can recover. If we
don't do something drastic,
it will haunt us for the next
30 years."
Stan Stockhammer, a par-
ent of students at Pine Trail
Elementary and Spruce
Creek High School, said the
school board needs to look
closer at how money is being
spent in the budget.
"I go into this budget, we
.have fewer students, we
spend more money and it
seems like the front line of
our teachers and kids are
what are being cut," he said.
Changes at the front line
are inevitable because salary
is the biggest expenditure of
all school districts, Ms. Ross
said.
Layoffs affect the class-
room experience, Ms. Ross
said.
"Beginning teachers are in
a constant state of anxiety,"
she said. "When they are
pulled in another direction,
it impacts time with stu-
dents."
Seabreeze High School
principal Robert Wallace
said he has worked to make
sure teachers and students
aren't affected by the atten-
tion surrounding the current
financial constraints.
"I've asked the faculty to
step back and see the .forest
through the trees," Mr. Wal-


lace said. "Don't let it affect
students. It's not the stu-
dent's fault. We owe it to
them to do that. We don't
want them to suffer."
Parents, teachers and stu-
dents agree that any deci-
sions on education will have
long-term effects on the
area's businesses and popu-
lation.
"It just concerns me that
we havb initiated these cuts
to the students, to their
sports, their extracurricular
activities to where it may
actually have a negative
effect and give a bad percep- A
tion in the rest of the state of
Florida for people to move
here," Mr. Stockhammer
said. "People are more likely
to take their kids to private
schools and I think that is a
very bad perception."
Ms. Smith's call to demand
change in Tallahassee is a
good one, Ms. Ross said.
"We can't hold schools
hostage," she said. "We need
a more stable tax base. That's
how we're going to grow."
Mr. Wallace said' he
believes that with enough
noise, a change can happen.
"We put them in office to
work for us," he said. "The
people we put in office have
to answer. Education is the
foundation of our society,
why erode the foundation?"


A M 1 3 4 0







A M E R I C A S B E S T-. M U S I C


-Playing Your Favorites

Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Nat "King" Cole,
Barry Manilow & Barbra Streisand


Listen to Cadillac Jack
Monday-Friday 6am 10am

Taking your requess contests & Giveaways.

Listen to VOLUSIA CITIZENS FORUM with HOST ROLAND
VIA MONDAY thru FRIDAY 4:30PM till 6:OOPM
Listen to STRONG STOCK REPORT at 4:30PM
MONDAY thru FRIDAY with PAUL STRONG of Morgan Stanley |
Call: 386-255-1340


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oDaytona Beach/Holly Hill A3
Daytona Beach/Holly Hill A3


www.HometownNewsOL.com


Friday, January 16, 2009












Volusia County students speak out against school budget cuts


Ash leig h
Wachtel, 15,
Seabreeze High
School sopho-
more

The cut that
means the most
to me would be
the arts. My
whole life


Tim Gill, 17,
Seabreeze High
School senior


Ashleigh
Wachtel


revolves around them. I would
rather see the school board use
their money for activities than
trying to make the school look
better. Use it for something that
students care about.





Ammon, 16,
Seabreeze High
School junior

The biggest cut
affecting me
would be the cut
of sports teams. I Jordan
play soccer at
Seabreeze and it's Ammon
a major part of
my life and I would hate to have
it stripped away from me and
the other athletes.


I'm in the_
orchestra, jazz
band and chorus.
It's a big part of
my life. Without Tim Gill
it I don't know if I
can keep going to public school;
I might have to go to a school for-
the arts. They can't cut all
extracurriculars. I know they
can't cut the FCATs, but to save
money they could make them
like a regular test and then they
Wouldn't have to pay people to
grade them.


John Ehrhart,
17, Spruce Creek
High School
sophomore


The biggest
budget cut in my
life is band. Band
is my life. It's John
what' keeps me Ehrhart
active and out of
trouble. The school board needs
to realize that they're taking our
future away.


A 1 i c i a
Berdeguez, 17,
Spruce Creek
High School jun-
ior

Music is my
life. The current
budget cuts, Alicia
which sadly have Berdeguez
affected the All-
County Band program, were
both a shock and disappoint-
ment to me after three years of
participating in the competi-
tion. I received second chair
flute for this year's now-can-
celed performance.



Chad Wagner,
13, Hinson Mid-
dle School eighth
grader

The basketball
team (that was
cut last year). It
brought most of Chad Wagner
our school
together and represented the
athletic.students.


Max
Droznin,
Spruce
High
freshman


we l l
15,
Creek
School


IB, because it I
gives me a well
rounded educa- Maxwell
tion and will help Droznin
me get into the
college of my
choice, UF I want to be a doctor. I
would be extremely upset if they
cut this, and I might have to
change schools. One of the reasons
we moved here a year ago (from
Massachusetts) was because of the
IB program.



Katya Droznin,
9, Pathways Ele-
mentary fourth
grader

The best is stu-
dent council,
because without
student council Katya
we wouldn't get Dronn
most of the things Droznin
we have right
now. I would feel mad if they cut
student council, because I'm in
student council.


Zoee Neyland,-
16, Seabreeze
High School
sophomore


The Culinary :
Academy at
Seabreeze High is
one of the main Zoee Neyland
reasons I attend.
There is talk of eliminating all
academies at school. Cooking is
my passion and the program has
promising scholarship opportu-
nities. Without this and duel
enrollment, I don't know how I
will be able to afford college.
Please don't cut culinary!




S i m o n e
Symonette, 10,
Westside Ele-
mentary School
fifth grader

Westside Night
Alive. It's like a
place we can go Simone
to after school so Symonette
we're not home
alone.


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Station
From page Al


quarters now lie vacant in
one of the city's most trou-
bled neighborhoods.
The new facility is about
five miles from the old head-,
quarters at 990 Orange Ave.
The westward move was
meant to reflect population
growth in the outlying neigh-
borhoods, and Williamson
Blvd. is considered the geo-
graphic center of the city.
"We're hoping to ramp up
the level of service (here),"
Chief Chitwood said. "We're
pulling out of our worst
zone, where we had police
presence 24 hours a day,
seven days a week. Where
the police chief could get on
his bike and be in the midst
of everything in seconds.
That's a concern for the city,
but we'll make this work."
The site was chosen before
Chief Chitwood's tenure.
"I would have been closer
to where the action is," he
said.
While the new headquar-
ters may not have the ideal
location for helping those in
the inner city, it has every-
thing else to improve polic-
ing in the city.
With a $21 million-price
tag, the new facility features
state-of-the-art security -
complete with ID card read-
ers and finger-print recogni-
tion censors -
and modern technology
for crime scene investigation
and evidence control.
The 97,000-square-foot
building is also a bunker of
sorts, with bulletproof walls
and windows in public


Sports
From page A3


and freshman sports, which
were eliminated last year.
Some high schools also cut
bowling, swimming and
diving programs to com-
pensate for decreased ath-
letic funding.
Public school athletic
programs are facing cuts
statewide, a representative
of the Florida High School


reception areas and a steel-
reinforced concrete exterior
able to withstand a Category
3 hurricane.
With a generator that
could provide 100-percent
backup to the building for
weeks, the building has also
become the city's emergency
operations center and infor-
mation technology hub.
"I think when you look at
the ability we have to
process crimes, when you
look at ability of the public
to come in here, the ability
to transport prisoners, and
look at the ability ... our city
government has to stay up
and running (in a hurri-
cane)... I think that's what
this is about," Chief Chit-
wood said. "There's more
room to do things and more
room to expand here. This
building was built with the
future in mind."
The forward-looking facil-
ity includes an extra room
for dispatch, if consolidated
services should ever frag-
ment, a physical training
area for officers and a one-
acre K-9 training course. It
has room to grow with
mobile storage shelving in
the evidence and records
departments.
The building is also a nod
to the future with its energy-
efficient lighting and climate
control.
Perhaps the most futuris-
tic of the rooms is the crime
lab. The lab will allow irives-
tigators to do preliminary
examinations to determine
the best evidence to be sent
out to FDLE and the city's
independent DNA lab in
Deerfield Beach, where
analyses cost $500 per piece
of evidence.
The lab has a humidity


Athletic Association said.
"We're all trying to brain-
storm ways to help our
member schools get
through this. We've had
budget cuts, too. The entire
state is affected," said
Cristina Alvarez, director of
media relations and mar-
keting for the Gainseville-
based FHSAA.
Like the freshman cuts
before them, the JV sports
cuts leave holes in schools'
recruitment, retention and


Randy Barber/staff photographer
Daytona Beach police chief Michael Chitwood sits in his
office at the new police station located on the Corner of
Williamson Boulevard and Mason Avenue.


controlled, secure garage for
examining cars, too.
"Blood drying, finger
prints, DNA, tool impres-
sions. Anything you can
imagine, we can do," Chief
Chitwood said. "It's going
to help us process things
better to get it to the point
where we can send it out."
The facility's community
room will host its first event
Jan. 16, with a dinner and
tour sponsored by the
Beachside Neighborhood


training of athletes.
JV teams provide the
backbone to varsity pro-
grams, said Shelley Kinsey,
a Seabreeze sophomore on
the track and dance teams
who attended Monday's
meeting.
"Without JV teams, (ath-
letes) would have no moti-
vation to even try for a var-
sity team," she said. "They
wouldn't have the training.
(JV teams) give teens hope
and ... drive them forward


Watch, and the city will hold
a public grand opening cer-
emony from noon to 3 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 21.
The city has not yet
announced plans for the old
headquarters, but because it
is part of the midtown rede-
velopment area, it is possi-
ble the city will sell the
property to a developer
when the economy picks up,
city spokeswoman Susan
Cerbone said.


to achieve the dream to
make the varsity level."
Players on JV teams also
keep varsity athletes from
slacking off because
they're competing for the
same spots, said Spruce
Creek High School diver
and pole vaulter Kyle
Gaines.
Sports in general give
students who might not
otherwise value school a
reason to attend and
maintain their grade point
average, requirements to
play, said Seabreeze prin-
cipal Bob Wallace.
They also teach valuable
life lessons like time man-
agement, responsibility,
winning and losing and
working as a team, Mr. Fer-
nandez said.
"JV sports make the
teams better, make the
kids better," he said, "and
make the entire communi-
ty better when the kids
learn qualities and traits
that will carry them
through high school and
college."


4 T


Hometown News


Friday, January 16, 2009


A4 Daytona Beach/Holly Hill








Daytona Beach/Holly Hill A5


www.HometownNewsOL.com


rF ay, january ,


Police report


Editor's note: This is a list
of arrests, not convictions,
and all arrestees are pre-
sumed innocent unless or
until proven guilty in a
court oflaw.
Daytona Beach Police
Department

*Desiree E. Debonis, 45, of
128 Mallard Lane, Daytona
Beach, was arrested Jan. 2 on
charges of possession of
xanax and possession of
cocaine. Bail was set at $7,000.
.Patrick Michael. Robinson,
37, of 632 N. Beach St., Day-
tona Beach, was arrested Jan.
2 on charges of false impris-
onment. No bail was set.
*Jeneil Smith, 19, of 449
Walnut St., Daytona Beach,
was arrested Jan. 2 on charges
of possession of cocaine, car-
rying a concealed firearm and
possession of a stolen firearm.
Bail was set at $4,500.
*Alfonso Alexander Hall, 40,
of 340 North St., Daytona
Beach, was arrested Jan. 2 on
charges of possession of
cocaine. Bail was set at $1,500.
*Regina Lechelle Hall, 40, of
886 S. Nova Road, Apt. A25,
Daytona Beach, was arrested
Jan. 3 on charges of posses-
sion of a controlled sub-
stance. Bail was set at $1,100.
*Miles Joseph White, 22, of
41 Wild Olive Ave., Daytona
Beach, was arrested Jan. 3 on
charges of grand theft auto.
Bail was set at $3,000.
*Cody W. Hanson, 23, of
1024 N. Atlantic Ave., No. 512,
Daytona Beach, was arrested
Jan. 3 on charges of two
counts of aggravated battery.
Bail was set at $10,000.
*Michelle Christine Morris,
39, of 19 S. Hollywood St., No.
2, Daytona Beach, was arrest-
ed Jan. 4 on charges of posses-
sion of cocaine. Bail was set at
$2,000.
*Daryll Andre Holmes, 36,
of 132 Mary McLeod Bethune
Blvd., Daytona Beach, was
arrested Jan. 4 on charges of
aggravated battery. No bail
was set.
*Charles Kevin Smarr, 30, of
1049 Brentwood Drive, No.
-.61ii9, Daytona--Beach, was
'arrested'ni4i 'obn charges bf'
-,Ue -"ii'prinment and
aravated assault. No bail



Brief
From page All
attorney front St. Augustine,
beat 16-year incumbent
John Tanner in the primary.
Mr. Tanner may have lost
the top job because of a per-
ceived disconnect with law
enforcement after his inves-
tigation into possible
inmate abuse at the Flagler
County Jail. The sheriff later
said Mr. Tanner was on a
witch hunt because his
daughter had allegedly been
abused in the jail. Mr. Lariz-
za said he chose Flagler for
the swearing in for that very
reason. He said Flagler is
where the healing begins,
and there was a significant
show of supportive law
enforcement indicating they
embrace a change.
Mr. Larizza said fighting
crime on an ever-shrinking
budget is a priority, along
with pay parity in his office.


was set.
*Antonio Riveria Irizarry,
30, of 2412 Tulane Ave., No. 19,
Daytona Beach, was arrested
Jan. 4 on charges of battery on
a law enforcement officer and
resisting arrest with violence.
Bail was set at $4,250.
*Erika Nichole Sylvester, 32,
of 830 Winchester St., Day-
tona Beach, was arrested Jan.
5 on charges of aggravated
battery. Bail was set at $1,500.
*Michael James Coady, 30,
of 240 Birkdale Drive, Day-
tona Beach, was arrested Jan.
5 on charges of possession of
crack cocaine. Bail was set at
$1,500.
*Todd Phillip Almagnault,
28, of 142 Peninsula Drive, No.
1, Daytona Beach, was arrest-
ed Jan. 5 on charges of stalk-
ing and battery on a law
enforcement officer. Bail was
set at $13,000.
*Rebecca Williams Brown,
46, of 532 1/2 Orange Ave.,
Daytona Beach, was arrested
Jan. 6 on charges of child neg-
lect. Bail was set at $1,500.
*James Richard Lembert
Smith, 26, of 311 N. Oleander
Ave., Daytona Beach, was
arrested Jan. 6 on charges of
uttering a forgery. Bail was set
at $1,500.
*Gil Manuel Daponte, 46, of
153 Oakwood Drive, Daytona
Beach, was arrested Jan. 6 on
charges of burglary. Bail was
set at $5,250.
*Andre Edwards, 44, of 549
Mulberry St., Daytona Beach,
was arrested Jan. 6 on charges
of burglary. Bail was set at
$5,250.
*Isaac Morris, 41, of 1356
Imperial Drive, Daytona
Beach, was arrested Jan. 7 on
charges of possession of
cocaine. Bail was set at $3,500.
*Desiree Lynn Burbary, 21,
of 119 Village Park Drive,
Building 129, Daytona Beach,
was arrested Jan. 8 on charges
of retail theft. Bail was set at
$1,000.
*Neil Deutsch, 57, of 804 1/2
Lakewood Drive, Daytona
Beach, was arrested Jan. 8 on
charges of possession of
cocaine. Bail was set at
$12,000.
*Calvin J. Jackson, 49, of 815
-Marion St., DaytonadBi6Bach,
was arrested Jan. 8 on charges
',fpsesion of a schedule -II
controled substance arid,


He said he will address what
he calls a gaping difference
in top and bottom salaries
in his office. Mr. Larizza will
have his main office in Day-
tona Beach.

Fire causes damage
to condo

WESH 2 has learned that a
fire that gutted one condo-.
minium and badly damaged
a second in Daytona Beach
was deliberately set. Flames
were shooting out the third-
floor window of the unit that
was destroyed when fire-
fighters arrived at the Over-
look Condos on Seabreeze
Boulevard. Flames rolled up
to the fourth floor, damag-
ing the unit above. Several
people were in the unit
where the fire started, but so
far, no one has been charged
with arson. One hundred
people had to be evacuated
briefly from the complex.


possession of cocaine. No bail
was set.
*Robert L. Waterman, 52, of
209 S. Ridgewood Ave., No. 6,
Daytona Beach, was arrested
Jan. 8 on charges of burglary
and grand theft. Bail was set at
$10,000.
*Alan Maurice Black, 50, of
600 S. Beach St., Apt. 8K, Day-
tona Beach, was arrested Jan.
8 on charges of possession of
cocaine. Bail was set at $3,500.
*Ryan Thomas Callaghan,
20, of 3050 Princeton Ave.,
Daytona Beach, was arrested
Jan. 8 on charges of strong-
arm robbery. Bail was set at
$10,000.
*Nicholas Kane Racel, 18, of
2525 N. Oleander Ave., No.
3206, Daytona Beach, was
arrested Jan. 8 on charges of
grand theft and strong-arm
robbery. Bail was set at
$11,500.
*Marcus Leonard golden,
28, of 1221 Kennedy Road, No.
56, Daytona Beach, was
arrested Jan. 8 on charges of
armed robbery. Bail was set at
$2,500.

Holly Hill Police
Department

*Barbara Ann Ellis, 49, of
1000 15th St., No. 1606, Holly
Hill, was arrested Jan. 3 on
charges of aggravated battery
and criminal mischief with
property damage. Bail was set
at $3,500.
*Richard Arthur Andreucci,
28, of 615 State Ave., Holly Hill,
was arrested Jan. 6 on charges
of the sale of Ecstasy and tam-
pering with witness. No bail
was set.

Volusia County
Sheriff's Office

*Eugene Clark, 49, of 1209
Denise Terrace, Holly Hill, was
arrested Jan. 2 on charges of
possession of cocaine. No bail
was set.
*Leshon Ramon Williams,
28, of 236 Adams St., Daytona
Beach, was arrested Jan. 3 on
charges of possession of
cocaine with intent to distrib-
ute, possession of marijuana
with intent to distribute and
possession of more than 20
grams of marijuana. Bail was


Teens carjack
family car
Daytona Beach police
arrested five juveniles who
allegedly stole keys an 11-
year -old girl was carrying as
she walked toward the fami-
ly car. The girl was walking
to the car in the parking lot
of the Cypress Street Recre-
ation Center on George
Ingram Boulevard when
police said the teens con-
fronted her, grabbed the
keys and stole the car. Police
found the vehicle several
hours after the carjacking
incident. The 11-year -old
was not hurt.

Woman drives
through business

A Daytona Beach woman
wasn't hurt but was badly
shaken up after police say
she hit the gas instead of the
See BRIEF, A8


set at $5,500.
*Anthony Jerome Bolden,
20, of 1717 Mason Ave., No.
410, Daytona Beach, was
arrested Jan. 3 on charges of
possession of cocaine. Bail
was set at $2,100.
-Kurt Michael Adams, 21, of
133 White St., Daytona Beach,
was arrested Jan. 4 on charges
of battery on a law enforce-
ment/ corrections officer. Bail
was set at $2,000.
*Leo Borm, 56, of 1535
Granada Ave., Holly Hill, was
arrested Jan. 4 on charges of
possession of cocaine. Bail
was set at $1,000.
*Johnna L. Caruthers, 47, of
1027 1/2 June Terrace, Day-
tona Beach, was arrested Jan.
6 on charges of aggravated
battery. Bail was set at $1,500.
*Chad Tyrone Davis, 32, of
1128 Lakewood Drive, Day-
tona Beach, was arrested Jan.
6 on charges of two counts of
battery on a law enforcement
officer, possession of cocaine,
depriving communication to
an officer and resisting arrest
with violence. Bail was set at
$8,000.
*Fredrick L. Davis Reaves,
21, of 345 Division St., Qay-
tona Beach, was arrested Jan.
7 on charges of armed burgla-
ry and aggravated assault with
a deadly weapon. Bail was set
at $4,000.
*Demetrious Lavon Free-
man Jr., 22, of 418 Whitney St.,
Daytona Beach, was arrested
Jan. 8 on charges of dealing in
stolen property and violation
of the Pawn Broker Act. Bail
was set at $4,000.

Florida Highway Patrol

*David Joseph Brisson, 31,
of 331 Hartford Ave., Daytona
Beach, was arrested Jan. 4 on
charges of 'possession of a
controlled substance. Bail was
set at $1,500.

Volusia County
Beach Patrol

*Timothy Dwight Hastings,
50, of 140 Lynhurst Ave., Holly
Hill, was arrested Jan. 5 on
charges of possession of pre-
scription drugs. Bail was set at
$1,050.


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(888) 277-TIPS




Wanted


Wanted person:
Kerron Kenroy Walker

Birth date:
Nov. 13, 1988

Distinguishing
features:
tattoos of tear drops
under both eyes

Reason wanted:
robbery

Last known location!
Holly Hill

Crime Stoppers of
Northeast Florida is
seeking information on
the whereabouts of 20-
year-old Kerron Kenroy
Walker. Walker is want-
ed on an arrest warrant
charging him with one
count of robbery. He
also has two other open
warrants for failing to
show up in court to face
charges of burglary and
fleeing and attempting
to elude a law enforce-
ment officer.
Walker, who talks
with a Jamaican accent,
is 5 feet, 11 inches and
about 170 pounds, with
short black hair and
brown eyes. His last


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Kerron Kenroy Walker

known address was on
Alta Drive in Holly Hill.

If you see Walker or
know where he is, don't
attempt to apprehend
him. Anyone with infor-
mation regarding Walk-
er's whereabouts is
asked to call Crime
Stoppers toll-free at
(888) 277-TIPS or text
tips by texting "TIP231
plus the message" to
CRIMES. Callers to
Crime Stoppers will
remain anonymous and
can qualify for a reward
of up to $1,000.


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2582 S. Atlantic Ave
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Mon-Thurs: 9am-lopm
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di J 1 6 2009


I













VIEWPOINT.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 16, 2009 HOMETOWN NEWS WWW.HOMETOWNNEWSOL.COM


Got something to say?

Call the Hometown Rants & Raves line at

(386) 322-5900
or e-mail volnews@hometownnewsol.com.
Callers are asked to refrain from making slanderous
statements. Statements of fact will be checked for
accuracy.


In response to 'Driving too slow
on Williamson'.

If you can't get to where you are going on time, leave ear-
lier! Our safety is worth more than your time. Don't be in a
hurry to injure or kill yourself or others.
There is no law that says you must drive the same speed
as the speed limit. In fact, it says you should drive no more
than the speed limit. The speed limit is a maximum speed,
not an average!
Treat other drivers as if -you were standing face to face
with them; be polite and respectful.
Drive safe, slow down, save lives, save gas, save the cheer-
leader, save the world!
Conserve here, conserve now and pay less.

Driver doesn't want
to share the road with 9thers

I agree whole-heartedly with the writer complaining
about slow drivers on Williamson Boulevard.
In response to those who disagreed:
For the person who "was being pushed in the right-hand
lane at 82 miles an hour" on Interstate 95, maybe that's
exactly the reason her or she doesn't want to travel on that
highway.
If you don't feel safe going 55 milers per hour, then stay
off the roads posted for that speed limit and travel the side
roads.
Talk about comical! I don't remember the first writer say-
ing anything about text messaging and/or drinking coffee.
Leave earlier? What difference would that make when all
you daydreamers are out there all hours of the day?
All of you who are afraid to do the speed limit, stay off the
roads at least until commuter time is over. Some of us have
jobs we have to get to.

Resident's idea on how
to bring in more money

In our very desperate struggle to keep our communities
from having to put more tax burden and service cuts on the
taxpaying citizens, it would only make sense to me to try to


your love stories

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iHometown News
Published weekly by Hometown News, L.C.,
1102 South U.S. 1, Fort Pierce, FL 34950
Copyright 2008, Hometown News, LC.
Voted # 1 Community Newspaper in America
2005,2006,2007
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Pastor thanks
community for its
generosity

Dream-A-Wish would like
to send a very special thank
you to all those in the com-
munity who opened their
hearts to help us make this
Christmas holiday a very
special one for our special-
needs children in 2008.
We had. the biggest year
ever by giving out 3,319


Christmas gifts to the very
special-needs children
locally.
A special thank you goes
to the Gateway Banks for
opening their hearts for
allowing toy and food drop
boxes in wonderful estab-
lishments.
A very, very, very special
thank you to Walgreen Cor-
poration for choosing
Dream-A-Wish as their local
charity for toys to be deliv-
ered to the special-needs
children right here in our


move good solid businesses and/or major manufacturing
firms into Volusia County.
Being one of the lowest income-earning counties in the
state; I would think it a great boost to the county and cities
within to try to do anything to make this,a better,,place for
all to raise their children, from good educational bases for
the future of these children, make retirement for the seniors
easier instead of constantly raising costs to the breaking
point, and at the same time, excluding the goods and servic-
es we all need for success and good living standards, and try
to help the many families finding themselves on the street
because their homes have been foreclosed on.
Now to my point: Where were.Mayors Glen Ritchey of
Daytona Beach, Fred Costello of Ormond Beach, Roland Via
of Holly Hill, Sally Mackay of New Smyrna Beach, Michael
Thomas of Edgewater and all the mayors of the many other
cities in Volusia County when the desire to put a new jet
assembly plant in the state of Florida was being formed?
Why is the new jet assembly plant being built in South Flori-
da instead of Volusia County?
We have more than enough room at the Daytona Beach
Airport. We also don't have to worry about it causing any
delays or problems with air travel at this airport either.
Why are we sitting back and waiting for more condos and
hotels when we can no longer fill the ones we have? We need
to build a solid tax base to be successful, and the only way is
to think out of the box and stop using the old ways of think-
ing to guide out cities.

No more bailouts

Isn't it amazing that GM announced recently that it will
again be able to sponsor NASCAR? Wasn't GM just begging
our government for bailout funds because its business
could not survive without them?
It seems to me that if they have millions of discretionary
dollars to throw away like that, then they really didn't need
our tax dollars to begin with.
Since GM has demonstrated that they really don't need
the money, our elected officials should call those loans in. If
they don't, show your displeasure at the voting booth.

Citizen wants to keep small-town charm


Please, will someone help me understand something? For
many years, New Smyrna Beach has been on water restric-
tion, being reminded ever so often to conserve water. So,
why, oh why, does New Smyrna Beach keep building? Now
there is.talk of loads of building way in Edgewater.
What about the shortage of water? Very soon, if this keeps
up, we willbe the size of cities like Jacksonville and Miami.
What about New Smyrna's small-town "charm?" I guess if
you've got the money and power, anything goes.
I really do need help understanding all of this. Can any-
one help me understand?

Wonderful job

I'd like to tell all of you that you are doing a wonderful job
with Hometown News. This is a rave, not a rant.
It is obnoxious to read all of these rants. We are in a tough
time in the world. People should be a little more grateful
and happier.
It's too negative out there, and I think you guys do a won-
derful job, and I love your paper.
Bravo to all of you.

Resident not happy with Volusia County

I don't know what it is about Volusia County, but you have
to pay 15 cents extra for gas for these stupid roads you have
here.
And the airport, you have to pay $200 or $300 for the same


community.
There's not enough words
to express our wonderful
delight and love for those
who reached out to make
this all happen.
Please check our newslet-
ter on our Web site at
www. dream- a-wish.-org
every month and you will
see how many more schools
we're going to add and how
many more children we'll
reach out to care for in 2009.
United Way and Salva-
tion Army referred 14 dif-


ferent families to Drearmi a
Wish, and we were able to
reach out and help them
all.
We're asking the people in
our community to please
patronize our wonderful
sponsors: Cash Advance,
Check on Hold, Gateway
Banks and of course Wal-
green's.
Once again, thank you,
and God bless.

Pastor Woody Keiser
Port Orange


ticket that would cost you $300 less to fly out of Orlando to
places such as Las Vegas or Washington, D.C.
What is wrong with this county? It seems to be a bunch of
cheapskates and a bunch of rip-offs, from the County Coun-
cilQn ,downw.hoippl.,,stop this crap, ftom going on, but
they ddt do it.
They take advantage of us here in Volusia County. I don't
know why people want to move here because it is the
biggest rip-off ever.

In response to 'Neighbors
examine pocket parks'

I have a solution for the pocket parks in New Smyrna
Beach.
One solution would be to make it where only residents of
New Smyrna Beach can go to these parks.
I am from Missouri, where if you are from a different city
in Missouri, you could not visit the city parks in the area
unless you paid a non-resident fee of $35 a year to go to the
parks.
I think something like that, plus an increase of police
presence to check if the people have the ID that shows they
are from New Smyrna Beach. If they are not, they should get
a ticket for $100. I think that would cut down on the prob-
lems.

Same-sex marriage not natural

Do those who advocate same-sex marriage know that the
human race cannot survive without the conception and
birth of babies?
I'm guessing they do, but are indifferent because they
know others will do it, if the advocates even think about it.
Nor do they care about how much effort and going with-
out the natural family must often go through to continue
the human race. Because infants cannot survive on their
own, they must be cared for until they become old enough
to do so.
At the same time, the child is taught necessary knowl-
edge, becomes accustomed to male and female personali-
ties by the presence of their parents and associates with
other people through school and activities of the family. The
child is prepared to lead its life in society.
The natural family is also a microcosm of the real world
the grown-up child will face on its own some day.
From an impersonal point of view, perpetuation of itself is
the guiding principle of any species. Marriage between man
and woman is both an acceptance and confirmation of that
principle. This kind of marriage is recognized by societies all
over the world.

Israel gives nothing but influence
in return for money

A reader asked what Israel has given America in return for
all the billions of dollars they continue to receive.
Well, they have given us all Israels' enemies, real and per-
ceived (Iraq and Iran).
Each newly elected congressman and senator with their
families are invited at no cost to them to visit Israel (to be
influenced to keep the money and military supplies coming
and to enact legislation favorable to Israel).
Students and educators are invited at very low cost to visit
Israel and be influenced (all forms of media are the end
result).
The list is endless; visit www.ussliberty.com.
Clinton, McCain and Obama will defend Israel to the last
real American. We are in a state of perpetual war for perpet-
ual peace. Our Orwellian "War Department" is Homeland
Security.


/ ll .,


WIRWINamurafmo REIM


vrotaew












Students' futures are at risk because of school budget cuts


I am the future.
Me and all of miy' fellow
classmates. Now, however,
any future we have
dreamed of is being
snatched away from us with
every round of school
budget cuts.
After finding out about
the most recent cuts from
distraught teachers and
enraged students, I decided


to use the only power a high
. school sophomore has -
my voice.
The state of Florida is
ranked as one of the worst
in the country for the
amount, of money it puts
into its educational system.
And now, it is taking away
even more money. Immedi-
ate cuts have been made to
things like new materials,


teacher training, student-
at-risk programs and
sports. Even this year's
graduating class is affected
as they are required to pay a
fee to attend their own
graduation.
Even more disturbing are
possible future changes due
to budget cuts to programs
such as advanced place-
ment classes, dual enroll-


HOMETOWN
VOICES


ALANA LITTMAN


ment, the International
Baccalaureate program and
the elimination of electives.
These are all programs that


help students get into col-
lege. Do we really want to
take them away?
It seems that those in
power have forgotten us. As
my fellow student Kylie
Wofford said: "Everyone
who's making the cuts has
already had their high
school experience, why
can't we have ours?"
The school district is


holding meetings on the
budget cuts to hear from
the community. I hope
there are good turnouts at
these meetings for the sake
of our future.


Alana Littman is a sopho-
more at New Smyrna Beach
High School.


Alley-oop!


Randy Barber/staff photographer
Three-year-old Melvin Ford of Daytona Beach shoots
for two at the basketball courts of Derbyshire Sports
Complex last weekend.


U


Volunteers needed
for The King Day of
Service

To commemorate the
vision and teachings of Dr.
Martin Luther King Jr., com-
munity volunteers will step
out in Volusia County on
Monday, Jan. 19, marking
Martin Luther King Day a "day
on, not a day off."
The Volunteer Center of the
United Way of Volusia-Flagler
Counties has joined forces
with Halifax Habitat for
Humanity affiliates and The
ARC of Volusia to host "The
King Day of Service-Building
on the Dream."
Throughout the Halifax
Area ofVolusia County, volun-
teers for Halifax Habitat for
Humanity will build new,
homes. Volunteers are needed
to paint pictures of paint-
brushes, hammers and paint
buckets on the storefront win-
dows of the Habitat Home
Store in Daytona Beach. This
project is open to all ages,
under 16 with adult supervi-
sion.
The Arc ofVolusia's Daytona
Beach Vocational Center are
in need of volunteers to help
paint inside and outside;
paint and supplies will be fur-
nished. This project is open to
all ages, under 18 with adult
supervision.
No special skills are needed
for the projects. There will be
people on-hand to train for


whatever skill is necessary for
each project.
To volunteer, donate funds
or supplies or for more infor-
mation, call (386) 253-0563 or
visit www.liveunitedinvolusi-
aflagler.org.

County seeks
providers for summer
camp programs

Volusia County's Commu-
nity Assistance Division has
funds for nonprofit and for-
profit organizations, cities,
schools and churches to pro-
vide summer camp services.
Participating agencies must
operate a camp from 8 a.m. to
5 p.m., Monday through Fri-
day, from June 15 through
Aug. 6. Services should
include supervised play-
ground activities, sports,
crafts and field trips for chil-
dren ages 5 to 14.
Funds will be available
through scholarships to chil-
dren whose families are at or
below 150 percent of the fed-
eral poverty guidelines. Fund-
ing is based on availability.
Applications are due by 5
p.m., Tuesday, Jan. 20 and
may be found at www.volu-
sia.org/countycouncil/cfab.ht
m. The Children and Families
Advisory Board will review
applications and make rec-
ommendations by Feb. 3.
For more information, call
(386) 254-4675.


Fundraiser to benefit,
Rescued Hearts

Rescued Hearts, a nonprofit
animal rescue group based in
Ormond Beach, will hold a
fundraiser Tuesday, Jan. 20, at
Bob Evans Restaurant, 100
Garden St. South, Palm Coast,
as part of its capital campaign
to build a shelter in Volusia
County.
Those who bring in the Res-
cued Hearts flier from 6 a.m.
to 9 p.m., the restaurant will
donate 15 percent of the meal
expense to the group, which
also offers bereavement
counseling for owners who
have lost pets and pet-sitting
for owners who are hospital-
ized.
To get a flier or for more
information, call (386) 566-
3734.

Retired, active federal
workers to meet

The Ormond Beach Chap-
ter of National Active and
Retired Federal Employees
held a Christmas party Dec.
15 at the Halifax River Yacht
Club. Entertainment was pro-
vided by Talk of the Town, and
Bob Wehrli, dressed as Santa
Claus, made an appearance.
The Ormond Beach chapter
of NARFE will meet at 11:15
a.m., Monday, Jan. 19, at Red
Lobster on AlA in Daytona
Beach.


For more information, call
(386) 672-5827.

Hospice volunteers
sought

VITAS Innovative Hospice
Care ofVolusia/Flagler is lobok-
ing for volunteers to visit vet-
erans at the end of life.
VITAS Veteran Volunteers
may or may not be U.S. mili-
tary veterans themselves.
They are trained to meet the
specific needs of terminally ill
veterans living in their own
homes, nursing homes,
assisted living communities
and veterans' medical cen-
ters. Some VITAS Veteran Vol-
unteers spend up to four
hours a week assisting a veter-
an; others volunteer annually,
helping VITAS coordinate
Memorial Day and Veterans'
Day celebrations. Assign-
ments are made according to
the volunteer's preferences.
Some volunteers become
specialists, replacing the mili-
tary medals a veteran may
have lost over the years,
recording life stories or per-
haps addressing veterans'
groups on hospice services.
To volunteer, call (386) 615-
2223 or e-mail
bridget.blevins@vitas.com to
inquire about the next VITAS
Veteran Volunteer trainingses-
sion.
-ForHometown News


Monday Friday 10am 6pm *
r0]l lWOUlEN:I 1 lll,]Izlm


Saturday 10am 5pm Sunday Closed


SOFF OFF

ANY PURCHASE ANY PURCHASE
OF $1000 OR MORE
Not valid with any other offer Not valid with any other offer
EXPIRES 02/03/09 ]- "'-- EXPIRES 02/03/09 2-


*LSC


386-428-2212
1701 SR 44, New Smyrna Beach
I I *I 6; 'fl49440,11I2 0


Community Legal Services of Mid-Florida, Inc.
Volunteer Lawyers Project


Legal Advice Clinic Wednesdays 3:00PM to 7:00PM

January 14,21,28


Foreclosure & Bankruptcy Clinic Fridays 8:45 AM

January 16,23,30


CALL IN ADVANCE TO QUALIFY FOR THE CLINICS
BY CALLING (386)-255-6573 x2445

128 Orange Avenue in Daytona Beach
Clients must meet income eligibility and asset guidelines and legal matter must be within CLSMF priorities
m"_'-'T ;4.- Z'


.............. .. Volusia-Ragter Counties


Daytona Beach/Holly Hill A7


www.HometownNewsOL.com


Friday, January 16, 2009








Friday, January 16, 2009


one
A8 Da tona Beach/Holly Hill


Adrian Killins (left)
and Larry Stoney
(right), both of
Daytona Beach,
were recently
,, promoted to
driver/engineer by
Chief Gary Hughes
(center).





Photo Courtesy DBFD




DB Firemlighters promoted


Chief: Utmost
confidence
they'll excel

For Hometown News
Volnews@hometownnewsol.com
DAYTONA BEACH Two
young firefighters started
the new year with new jobs,
as they received promotions
within the Daytona Beach
Fire Department.
Daytona Beach residents
Larry Stoney, 27, and Adrian


Killins, 29, were both pro-
moted to driver/engineer
after posting the two highest
scores on a promotional
exam.
"Both of these gentlemen
have proven through a rigor-
ous testing and
evaluation process the abili-
ty to perform the duties of a
driver/engineer," Fire Chief
Gary Hughes said. "I have
the utmost confidence that
they will perform' their
duties in the same excellent
manner they did at the rank


of firefighter."
Mr. Stoney is a seven-year
veteran of the fire depart-
ment and has served as fire
chaplain. He is a father of
one daughter, Lauryn.
Mr. Killins, a father of
three children ages 5, 7 and
10, has been a firefighter for
three years.
Both men will transfer to
different shifts to better bal-
ance the department's
needs, department
spokesman Lt. Fred Godawa
said in a press release.


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www.kirklandsod.netO


Using an automatic signature


file for your business e-mail


f you use e-mail, you
may have noticed that
messages that you
receive from some people
always end with the same
sign-off.
At a glance, it may seem
as though every time they
send an e-mail they end
their message by typing the
same little ending every
time.
This is not necessarily the
case. E-mail programs allow
what is called a "signature
(sig) file" to be automatical-
ly attached, every time an e-
mail message is typed.
People started using these
"sig files" because of spam.
Spam is the annoying form
of advertising that uses e-
mail to send a message to
thousands, even millions of
e-mail addresses simultane-
ously. The reason it's
annoying is, usually the
message is unwanted and
tends to clog the Internet by
using up precious band-
width.
Often, a person will
access his or her e-mail only
to find several useless
messages ranging from get-
rich-quick schemes to
online porn ads.
Since "spamming" is so
frowned-upon within the
online community (and the
practice can do a lot to ruin
a business' credibility),
many people started to use
the signature file as a
reasonable, accepted
alternative to get their
message out.
The sig file is an unobtru-
sive way to send the infor-
mation that's on your
business card in every e-
mail you send, without the


Brief
From page A5
brake and slammed into a
building. Florence Joseph, 50,
was at the wheel of her van in
the parking lot of a dry clean-
ing business in the 1400 block
of South Ridgewood Avenue.
Police said she was trying to
park, but hit the gas and went
through the plate-glass win-
dows, all they way into the
business. Several people were
inside working, but were not
hurt. Fortunately the building
was not structurally damaged.

NASCAR reduces
ticket prices

No one is immune from the
recent downturn in the econ-
omy, not even NASCAR. Day-
tona International Speedway


COMPUTE
THIS
SEAN MCCARTHY


worry that it will be consid-
ered spam. And, since it is
automatically included with
every message you send, it's
not necessary to type in the
same information over and
over.
"But I thought sending an
unsolicited advertisement
in e-mail is spam. Wouldn't
that mean that people who
use these sig files are
spammers?"
'No, using a sig file is a
generally acceptable way to
include your advertising or
contact information,
provided that the content of
the mail you are sending is
relevant to the recipients. If
you send only your sig file to
20 or more unsuspecting
recipients, however, this
would cross the line and
would be viewed as "spam-
ming."
Newsgroups (message
boards) are another area
where a signature file can.
work wonders.
Again, as long as the
message you post to the
group is relevant, your sig
file will go along for the ride.
Now everyone who reads
your message (could be
millions, depending on the
board) will also see your sig
file and most people will not
be upset about that provid-
ed the message you posted
was relevant to the discus-
sion.
Creating a signature, file is


recently announced it is cut-
ting ticket prices on a limited
number of tickets for the Day-
tona 500 next month. Four
thousand tickets in the super
stretch will sell for $55 instead
of $99, a 15-year low. Speed-
way President Robin Braig
said sales are off 10 to 15 per-
cent and he's hoping the cut
* will stimulate sales and give
fans who might otherwise not
have the opportunity to see
the big race. Mr. Braig said
they're also reducing on site
food prices and reminds fans
that parking is free at track-
owned lots and that fans can
bring in their own food and
drinks. Hoteliers are also hop-
ing to promote business by
reducing or eliminating mini-
mum stays and lowering
prices. Though pre-race test-
ing was cut to save teams
money, the speedway will
host a fan fest the weekend of
Jan. 16. The most popular


easy and can be done with
most e-mail programs.
There is a window where
you can type your signature
directly and then save it for
use in your e-mail. A good
sig file is usually only a
couple lines long and gets
straight to the point.
Typically, the same text
that would usually go on a
real business card can be
used. For security reasons,
however, you shouldn't put
personal information in
your signature file, so think
carefully before including
your home address or
phone number.
If your e-mail program
doesn't offer a way to create
a signature file directly,
there are still ways to set
one up.
Once you have decided
whatmessage you want in
your signature, you simply
type it up with a text editor
such as Notepad. Once the
message looks just right,
save it on your hard drive
(typically in the same folder
that your mail is stored in)
as "sig.txt."
Once your sig file has
been created and saved, go
into your e-mail program's
preferences and, under
"signature," direct your e-
mail program to your newly
created sig file.
Now, every time you send
a message, presto! Your
signature is automatically
included at the end of every
message.

Sean McCarthy fixes
computers. He can be
reached at (772) 408-0680 or
help@ComputeThisOnline.c
om (no hyphens).


drivers are set to attend to kick


drivers are set to attend to kick
things off.'The cost is $15.

Man loses trailer
home to fire

Edgewater firefighters said
a trailer home was lost to fire
in the Eastern Shores Mobile
Home Park off U.S. 1. Dan
Thompson, 65, was able to get
out, but he lost everything,
including medications. Mr.
Thompson, is a hospice
patient. He told firefighters he
got up to make coffee and saw
flames in the living room.
Three other trailer homes
were evacuated as well due to
excessive heat and smoke
exposure. Investigators with
the State Fire Marshal's Office
told WESH the fire was acci-
dental, started either by
improperly discarded smok-
ing materials or a lamp that
overheated on an end table.


Advice
From page Al
ty leaders.
"They represent two sides
of the coin of historic
preservation: the private
side done by citizens work-
ing outside government and
the government side," said
local activist Gary Libby, the
forum's emcee. "It's an inter-
esting perspective and an
interesting look from a city
that's a leader in historic
preservation, a city that mir-
rors us in population."
Mr. Ganger, who has
worked on several large
preservation projects, said
Florida's population is both
young and "rootless."
"The role of a historical
society is to create roots. I
think people generally want
to know, 'This is where I am'
and want to know the peo-
ple who lived here in the
past," Mr. Ganger said. "We
need to know who we are to
know where we are going."
Mr. Ganger, a retired cor-
porate consultant, has
restored his own homes
and, as part of several his-
torical societies, has
restored major buildings
such as the Palm Beach
County Couthouse built in
1916.
Projects like these require
funding, community sup-
port and active leadership,
he said.
Historical societies


receive their funding from
individual contributors
(many of whom bequeath
money posthumously),
grants, and special events.
"Basically we put on a hell
of a party," he said.
Some of the attendees
said they were skeptical that
the same type of fundraising
that works in Palm Beach
County would work in Volu-
sia County.
"They dipped into a pool
of private investment that
doesn't exist here," said
Hardy Smith, government
relations administrator for
the city of Daytona Beach.
Some of Delray Beach's
biggest successes, though,
were joint projects between
the city, county, state and
private groups.
Today the city's Old
School Square is well-
known nationally as a cul-
tural center and home to the
Cornell Museum of Art and
History. The museum was
an adaptive reuse of a for-
mer school.
"Our job is not to do rede-
velopment on our own, but
to partner with the citizens
and residents and property
owners," said Ms. Butler, a
Delray Beach native. "It's not
just good for the CRA; it's
good for the city as a whole.
The CRA has secured and
dispersed grants to both
home and business owners
in the city's seven historic
clusters.
Citizen advisory boards


represent the historic neigh-
borhoods, and developers
who try to usurp the local
input "don't get to do what
they Want to," Ms. Butler
said.
Even those outside the
CRA were asked to partici-
pate because "it's important
to make sure everyone felt
good about the downtown,"
Ms. Butler said.
To be more inclusive, the
city expanded its CRA to
include the west side of the
city, what was once a neigh-
borhood for African-Ameri-
cans during segregation.
Historic homes and busi-
nesses were saved and the
area is now known for the
Spady Museum, Palm Beach
County's only African-
American history museum,
she said.
Today Delray Beach has
gone from the days it was
called "Dull-ray Beach" to
twice winning the National
Civic League's All-America
City Award.
Cities must preserve.
buildings that are notable
nationally, statewide and
locally. Sometimes that his-
tory isn't pleasant, as was
the case of Delray Beach's
past segregation, Ms. Butler
said.
"History isn't always pret-
ty, but when we can make a
linkage between the past,
present and future, it only
increases the value of the
area and brings people
together," she said.


KIRK .1./


PI I y LIOfJ 4%M/9197R-


Hometown News













Dining &



Entertai nmeWit
SECTION B WVWW.HOMETOWNNEWSOL.COM FRIDAY, JANUARY 16, 2009


Daytona Beach/Holly Hill B1





AP


Out&






FRIDAY, JAN. 16'
*Starry, Starry Night and
Gallery to Gallery Walk: This
event will be held from 6-8
p.m. at The Casements,
Ormond Memorial Art Muse-
um and the Ormond Beach
Historical Society. This cultural
community event will allow
residents and visitors to see a
free showcase of each organi-
zation's activities. The three
sites are located within two
blocks adjacent to Granada
Boulevard, Halifax Avenue,
Riverside Drive and John
Anderson Drive on the beach-
side. A trolley will be available
between the locations. Enter-
tainment, displays and light
refreshments will be available
at each location. The featured
exhibition at The Casements
will be the works of artist Mar-
garet Hodge, titled "Inside
.Out." The Brio Trio will provide
musical entertainment. The
Ormond Beach Historical Soci-
ety will host its organization's
activities at The Casements in
the Dance Room located at 25
Riverside Drive, Ormond
Beach. For more information,
call (386) 676-3216.
-NASCAR Preseason Thun-
der Fan Fest: Blood donors
will receive a free ticket to the
Daytona 500 Qualifying Pre-
sented by Kroger at Daytona
International Speedway,
scheduled for Sunday, Feb. 8,
and a free collectible T-shirt
during this event. Florida's
Blood Centers and Daytona
International Speedway will
present the Fan Fest during the
blood drive. The Big Red Bus
will be located at the Turn Four
Tunnel (Bill France Boulevard)
entrance to Daytona Interna-
tional Speedway from 10 a.m.-
4 p.m., Friday and Saturday. All
donations will stay in the area.
For more information, visit the
Web site at www.floridas-
bloodcenters.org or call (888)
S9-DONATE.
*Social Club event: Halifax
Social Club will' host this event,
open to the public, at 6 p.m. at
the Port Orange Steakhouse,
3851 S. Nova Road. Partici-
pants will meet some of the
,club's leaders and have a
chance to ask questions. A fol-
low-up event for members will
be held at 6:30 p.m. There is
no charge to attend. For more
information, call (386) 589-
5643 or visit the Web site at
www.halifaxsocialclub.com.
*'Out of Order' perform-
ance: The Little Theatre of
New Smyrna Beach will pres-
ent this comedy at 8 p.m., Jan.
16-17, and at 2 p.m., Jan. 18, at
726 Third Ave., New Smyrna
Beach. The comedy centers
around English conservative
Parliament member Richard,
See OUT, B2


DBIF brings Wynton Marsalis and


orchestra to Daytona Beach area


By Jeannine Gage
gage@hometownnewsol.com
When Marcus Printup travels next week from the icy
streets of New York City to the balmy)sands of Daytona
Beach, he will be exited about more than just a change in,
weather.
"To know that we are coming to a place where there
has been a concerted effort to keep this event going is
very special," Mr. Printup said in a phone interview. "My
hat is off to those who kept it alive."
The event that the trumpeter for the Jazz at Lincoln
Center Orchestra is referring to is the Daytona Beach
International Festival, which many thought could not be
resuscitated from its near demise two years ago.
The orchestra's performance, with leader Wynton
Marsalis and 14 of Mr. Printup's colleagues also known
as some of the preeiminent jazz musicians in the country
- kicks off the festival with a bang.
"By inviting Wynton Marsalis and the Jazz at Lincoln
Center Orchestra to launch the 2009 festival, we want to
signal to this community that the festival is not only
moving forward, but beginning the best chapter in our
history," said Manuel Bornia, festival vice president of
marketing, programming and business development.
The concert at the Mary McCleod Bethune Performing
Arts Center on Jan. 23 is just one of many that reflect
changes to the event formerly known as the Florida
International Festival. Once made up of almost all classi-
cal music, the event has expanded, Mr. Bornia said, to


include more diverse musical acts in genres such as jazz,
bluegrass and Latin. The festival's longtime headliner the
London Symphony Orchestra, however, will retain that
title with several performances during the festival, most
of which will take place from April 16 to May 2.
Mr. Printup, who won the
International Trumpet Guild
Jazz Trumpet Competition
while in college, said the Trumpeter
Jazz at Lincoln Center Marcus
Orchestra will work extra Printup
hard for the show because
it opens the festival.
"I'll tell all the guys at
rehearsal that we need to
really step it up," he said.
Mr. Printup said the fact
that the concert is
happening in a the-
ater named for the
iconic Mary McCleod
Bethune is another
reason to be excit-
ed.
"I don't think
we have ever
played on a cam-
pus of a (historical-
See FESTIVAL, B2


STAR SCOPES
James Tucker
Week of 01-16-2009

Aries March 21-April 19
Finding, enhancing, increas-
ing and protecting your
divine purpose should be the
No. 1 priority in life. You are
the leader of the zodiac. A
true leader operates from
humbleness and gratitude
for all that has been given.
Move on and give hearty
praise to all who have
helped you thus far and
more will be given.

Taurus April 20-May 20
Find humor in little things.
Laugh a lot every day. Tell
someone a story that makes
them feel good. Get out of
your own way. Let your
humanity show. Poke a little
fun at yourself. People love
us as much for our realness
as for our talent. It's a good
part of being human and let-
ting your humor and joy
keep us safely balanced.

Gemini May 21-June 21
Wonderful motivation is
fueled by using your warm,
caring nature to help others.
You are at your best when
you are able to communi-
cate your visions and
dreams. You are in heaven
on earth when those in your
circle get it, respond and take
action. Wow! You are a mira-
cle worker. Keep the spirit
flowing.

Cancer June 22-July 22
This is your time of the zodi-
ac year. The question is what
are you going to do with this
great heart power? The
answer is simple: first, give
thanks for all you have been
given this year.. Second, find
ways to rally the family
together and share more
love. Third go to the world
and teach others what a spir-
itual life is all about.

Leo July 23-Aug. 22
Venus in Leo increases your
motivation because of the
love -that lives in your heart.
You may have wordly inclina-
tions, but your heart and
sprit rule you. It has to be all
right on the inside before it
can be OK on the outside.
The main lesson is follow
your heart and gut instincts
first. This your truest and
greatest blessing.

Virgo Aug. 23-Sept. 22
Your generous attitude to
others is your greatest bless-
ing. It starts with your family,

See SCOPES, B4


Photos courtesy of Jazz at Lincoln Center
The Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra




Tlie Cub Scene


*Bank & Blues Club:
Daytona Blues Society
"True Blues" Live Jam
open jam session is held
from 8 p.m.-1 a.m. each
Wednesday at 701 Main
St., Daytona Beach. This
nonprofit group is dedicat-
ed to preserving and
spreading the love of blues
music. For more informa-
tion and a full events
schedule, visit the Web site
at www.DaytonaBluesSo-
ciety.org.
*Cuvee Oceanside Wine
& Tapas: "Wine Down
Wednesday" is held each
week, featuring live music.
Bermuda High performs
from 7-10 p.m. each
Thursday. John Macker
takes requests from 10
p.m. to midnight, Friday,
with a late-night happy
hour. Breaking Bread per-
forms from 7-10 p.m., Sat-
urday. Cuvee Oceanside is


located at 188 E. Granada
Blvd., Ormond Beach. For
more information, call
(386) 615-4727 or visit the
Web site at www.cuveeo-
ceanside.com.
*Five O'Clock Charley:
This band will perform
rock 'n' roll, blues and
country hits from. 7-11
p.m., Saturday, Jan. 17, at
the Veterans of Foreign
Wars in Port Orange, and
from 7-10 p.m., Jan. 16, at
Julian's Landmark, 88 S.
Atlantic Ave., Ormond
Beach.
*Frappes North: Wine
tastings are held at 6 p.m.
the first Tuesday of each
month, beginning Feb. 3.
Reservations are required.
Live Music Friday Nights
are held from 7-11 p.m.
Frappes is located at 123
W. Granada Blvd. in
Ormond Beach. To make
reservations, call (386) 615-


4888 or visit the Web site at
www.frappesnorth.com.
The Garlic: Jazz and
blues musicians perform
seven days a week. Thorn
Chambers hits the stage
from 6-10 p.m., Monday
and Tuesday. Special
guests premiere each
Wednesday. Mark Hodg-
son performs at 6 p.m.
each Thursday and Friday
and at 7 p.m. Saturday and
Sunday. The Garlic is locat-
ed at 556 E. Third Ave.,
New Smyrna Beach. For
more information, call
(386) 424-6660.
*Inlet Harbor: Reuben
Morgan will perform from
noon to 4 p.m., Friday, fol-
lowed by 3D Band at 5 p.m.
5 O'Clock Charlie will per-
form from noon to 4 p.m.,
Saturday, followed by Cat-
egory 5 at 5 p.m.
*Java Jungle: Open Mic
Night is at 7 p.m. each


Thursday. Musicians,
authors, singers, poets and
composers are. welcome.
Wes Malone and other
artists also perform. Friday
night is Singles Mingle and
Date Night. Free desserts
are served. Saturday
evenings, Java Jungle pres-
ents live music from local
artists. This month, Julie
Baker is the featured musi-
cian, performing from 7-10
p.m. each Saturday. Java
Jungle is 'located' at 4606
Clyde Morris Blvd., Unit 21
Port Orange. For more
information, call (386)
760-8969.
*Norwood's Restaurant
and Wine Shop: Free wine
tastings are held from 5-7
p.m. each Friday on the
deck and Saturday in the
shop with complimentary
cheeses. Norwood's is


See SCENE, B4


I 790 S. Atlantic Ave., Ormond Beach I 386.672.6733 or 386.676-3173 U


Dinner 9 Take-out Buffet To Go


p iT ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ .








B2 Daytona Beach/Holly Hill Hometown News Friday, January 16, 2009

NIN & ENTERTAINMENT


Festival
From page BI
ly) black school," he said.
"I'm proud to honor her.
And just a few days after the
inauguration (of President
Barack Obama), that's won-
derful."
As a member of the
orchestra, Mr. Printup is
more than just a performer.
The organization is dedicat-
ed to music education and
outreach, especially to
young people.
"I love the teaching
aspect," he said. "It's very
rewarding."
With recent cuts to sports
and arts in the public school
system; he said that role is
even more important.
"I've always said that per-


formers on the level we're on
have a duty to teach," he
said. "We're trying to spread
the love and expose more
people to music."
Mr. Printup, who grew up
in Georgia and attended the
University of North Florida
in Jacksonville, said he loves
playing in the southern
states.
"We get the best audi-
ences down South," he said.
"It's something about their
roots in church, I think.
They're not afraid to holler
back at the preacher in
church and they're like that
at our shows very respon-
sive. It's wonderful."
The 15-member orchestra
includes one pianist, one
bass player and one drum-
mer; five saxophone players
(four of whom double on
clarinet) and four trum-


Arts center
In 1987, Wynton Marsalis co-
founded Jazz at Lincoln. Center
Orchestra with the mission to inspire
and grow jazz audiences. Under
Marsalis' direction, the program has
matured into' an internationally-
renowned group performing up to
400 events annually in 15 countries.
In the 2007-08 season alone, the
group produced neatly 2,000 events
in its home, Frederick P Rose Hall in
New York City, and throughout the
world. Over the years, Jazz at Lincoln
Center Orchestra has expanded to
offer education and broadcast events


peters, including Mr.
Marsalis, who also acts as
music director. Mr. Printup
said the fact that he plays
the same instrument as his
boss puts no additional
pressure on him.
"No, it's the opposite," he
said. "Wynton really wants
all of our voices heard. He'll
take one solo and I'll have
three."
Mr. Marsalis 'has per-
formed thousands of con-
certs, won nine Grammy
Awards, produced more
than 60 records and sold
more than seven million
albums worldwide includ-
ing three Gold. Records.
Despite all of this success,
he "is not an elitist," Mr.
Printup said.
"He's just one of the guys,"
he said. "He rides the bus
with us when we tour and


performance set for
for audiences of all ages, including performa
weekly national radio and television pre-perfo
programs, publications and an annu- include h
al high school jazz competition. by Carral
Wynton Marsalis and the Jazz at the Bet
Lincoln Center Orchestra will perform School oj
at 730 p.m., Friday, Jan. 23 at the agement
Mary McCleod Bethune Performing erages pr
Arts Center as part of the 2009 Day- ny a
tona Beach International Festival. post-perf
Single. tickets are available for $55, ture chan
$45, $37, and $29. For mi
DBIF will also sell Gala. tickets, chase tick
which include the pre- and post-con- www.dbi:
cert reception, and Class A seats at the at 212 S.


plays basketball with us; he's
a great bandleader."
Concert-goers should
expect a "very soulful"
event, Mr. Printup said.
"It will be a plethora of
music; we have more than
2,000 songs to choose from,"
he said. "There'll be some
Thelonious Monk, Duke
Ellington, Ornette Coleman
and some compositions by
the band."
That may include music
by Mr. Printup, who also
writes.
Mr. Bornia said he
believes the show will be a
great start to the best season
ever for the Daytona Beach
International Festival.
"This performance is only
the tip of the iceberg as this
new organization debuts
over the next several
months," he said. "Expect
bold, brilliant and block-
buster from this point on."


Jan. 23
nce for $200 per person. The
rmance reception will
eavy hors d'oeuvres provided
bba's Italian Restaurant and
hune-Cookman University
f Business Hospitality Man-
Program students, and bev-
ovided by Coca-Cola Compa-
and Budweiser The
ormance reception will fea-
npagne, desserts and coffee.
ore information or to pur-
kets, call (800) 849-0731, go to
f.com, or visit the DBIF office
Beach St. in Daytona Beach.


Photo courtesy of Jazz Lincoln Center
Wynton Marsalis and the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra
will play Jan. 23 as part of the Daytona Beach Internation-
al Festival.


Out
From page BI
Willey, played, by David Lowe,
who is attempting to have an
affair with one of the secre-
taries of the leader of the
opposition party in a London
hotel. He opens the curtains in
the room and finds a dead
body stuck'in the window! He
tries to hide the body from a
conniving waiter, a suspicious
hotel manager, an alert private
detective, an angry wife, a furi-
ous husband, a bungling secre-
tary and an unconscious nurse.
For ticket information, call the
box office at (386) 423-1246
or visit www.NsbPlayers.org.
*Arbor Day Celebration:
Ormond Beach will hold a


public celebration at 11 a.m. at
Central Park II on Hammock
Lane in Ormond Beach, mark-
ing this Arbor Day with a dedi-
cation of a park for children
with autism. There will be an
official proclamation from the
city and words from Kiwanis
President Ken Hinkle. The city
will combine this celebration
with the completion of land-
scaping at the site of the spe-
cially equipped playground.
Highlighting the event will be
the final planting of a live oak
tree. The equipment was
placed in this park through the
combined efforts of the
Ormond Beach Kiwanis Club
and the city. Kiwanis also con-
tributed $1,600 to cover the
cost of the live oak, its installa-
tion and the completion of a
natural fence of shrubs around


the play area.
*Cinematique of Daytona's
film showing: Sister Cities of
Volusia will show the cult clas-
sic "La Cage Aux Folles" (110
min., not rated, sub-titled) at 7
p.m. at The Book Store and So
Much More, 410 S. Nova Road,
Ormond Beach. This French
comedy, translated as The
Cage of Madwomen, won a
Golden Globe in 1980 and was
remade in the U.S. as "The
Birdcage." The film centers on a
man who wants to marry the
daughter of a high official. His
parents, gay nightclub owner
Renato and effeminate trans-
vestite Zaza, must meet his
pompous and conservative in-
laws. For their son, the gay cou-
ple decide not only to act
straight, but to pose as hus-
band and wife! On party night,


however, insanity reigns when
"mom" and "dad" fail to
adhere to the "straight" and
narrow. For more information,
call (386) 615-8320.
*Holiday Camp: The
Ormond Beach Department of
Leisure Services will hold a hol-
iday camp from 8 a.m. to 5:30
p.m. at 440 N. Nova Road.
Relays, kick ball, scooter rides,
movie, arts and crafts will be
among the activities. The fee is.
$15 for residents and $25 for
non-residents. Children should
bring a bagged lunch and
snacks. Play clothes and sneak-
ers are required. Registration is
required. The registration office
is located at 399 North,U.S. 1.
Office hours are Monday
through Thursday from 7:30
a.m.-4 p.m. and Fridays from
7:30 a.m.-3 p.m. For more
information, call (386) 676-
3252.

SATURDAY, JAN. 17

*Drumming for Peace: This
event will be held at 6 p.m. at
the fire pit on Hiles Boulevard
in New Smyrna Beach, weather
permitting. Drummers should
bring something to sit on. No
experience is needed; all ages
welcome. For more informa-
tion, call (386) 423-0083.
*Chinese Auction: The Elk-
hearts of Port Orange will hold
this annual event from 10:30
a.m.-3 p.m. at the Elks Lodge,
5207 S. Ridgewood Ave., Port
Orange. Proceeds from the
auction will benefit many char-
ities. A lunch will be served at
noon. The donation is $10.
Reservations are not required.
For ticket information, call
(386) 788-4531.
*Jewelry, Gem, Mineral &
Fossil Show and Sale: The
Tomoka Gem & Mineral Society
will present this 38th annual
event from 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat-
urday, and from 10 a.m.-5 p.m.,
Sunday, at the Volusia County
Fairgrounds in the Tommy
Lawrence Building. There will
be more than 40 exhibitors
from the southeastern United
States, plus lapidary arts
exhibits, faceting of gemstones
and a children's table to find
gems and minerals. There will
be hourly door prizes, a silent
auction and two grand prizes.
This year's show theme will be
turquoise. Admission is $4;
children 12 and younger will
-be admitted free. Parking is
free. For more information,
send an e-mail to
gem_showl5@yahoo.com.
*Historical Bus Tour: The
Ormond Beach Historical Soci-
ety will host this tour at 9:45
a.m. Each two-hour tour intro-
duces more than 30 historical
buildings and sites. The cli-
mate-controlled trolley makes
stops at the Fairchild Oak and
the Three Chimneys Sugar Mill
Ruins (ruins not otherwise
open to the public). The cost is
$20 for adults, $18 for seniors
(65 and older) and $7 for chil-
dren (5-12). Tours begin at The
Casements parking lot, 25
See OUT, B3


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Daytona Beach/Holly Hill B3


DINING & ENTERTAINMENT


Decorative Arts of Dining to


benefit Symphony Society

New location and new format will inspire guests


By Jeanne Willard
Willard@hometownnewsol.com
VOLUSIA COUNTY -
During tough economic
'times, people often look for
ways to enrich their lives
and escape from the ordi-
nary without spending a lot
of money.
For a $20 admission, the
,Decorative Arts of Dining
benefiting the Daytona
Beach Symphony Society
will provide such an afford-
able respite, organizers say.
Held in partnership with
Daytona State College and
the Southeast Museum of
Photography, the Jan. 24
'event will be held at the
!Mori Hosseini Hospitality
;Center at 1200 W. Interna-
'tional Speedway Blvd.
Featuring creative table
settings, a variety of coffees,
:teas and decadent treats,
this year's event will also
include a photography
exhibition, a film festival
and tour of the hospitality
center.
"It's been an evolution,"
said Carol Lively Platig,
event chairwoman and
society president.
For the past two years
local designers have show-
cased table-tops decorated
with fine linens, china, crys-
tal and antiques at a sit-
down tea or luncheon.
While inspiring table set-
tings will still be featured
this year, the format will be


"drop-in" with guests invit-
ed to stop by any time
between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m
to browse the tables and
sample sweets created by
DSC culinary students.
The event marks the kick-
off of the Society's 9th
annual Winterfest celebra-
tion that includes a concert,
dinner party andopera pro-
duction during the season,
Ms. Lively Platig said.
In addition to a photogra-
phy exhibition, a continu-
ous 20-minute film loop
featuring excerpts from
musicals and operas will be
shown in the center's the-
atre.
Prior events have been
sold out, Ms. Lively Platig
said, and she expects a good
crowd this year.
"There may even be more
interest," she said, "because
it's held at the Mori Hosseini
Center which many people
haven't seen."
From whimsical to ele-
gant, each table sports a
theme, such as the society's
"European Opera Celebra-
tion" designed by Ms. Lively
Platig and The Inkwell
Home, a store specializing
in home accessories, jewel-
ry and wedding invitations,
located at 142 East Granada
Blvd. in Ormond Beach.
The theme pays homage
to the society's 9th Annual
Winterfest which will pres-
ent Verdi's grand opera,
Aida, this season.


The table, done in gold
and cobalt blue, features
four Italian alabaster opera
plates that were donated to
the society from an estate
some years ago, and
antique and crystal pieces
owned by Ms. Lively Platig
together with sparkling
accessories from The
Inkwell Store.
"We tried to convey the
formal elegance of the
opera," she said.
Included on the table-top
are two Royal Worcester
creamers made for Japan's
Emperor Hirohito that were
given to Ms. Lively Platig's
father who was on General
Douglas MacArthur's staff,
she said.
Sheri Knaebel, who owns
The Inkwell with husband
Mike, said the event will
inspire people to design
their own elegant tables at
home.
"The idea is to use what
you have," she said. "Use
your good china and silver,
so that you are not just let-
ting it lay there."
The Decorative Arts of
Dining will be held Jan. 24
at the Mori Hosseini Culi-
nary Arts Center on the
Daytona State College Cam-
pus.
For information on the
DecorativeArts of Dining, or
The Winterfest Party and
other events please contact
the Symphony Society at
(386) 253-2901.


Randy Barber/staff photographer
Sheri Knaebel and Carol Lively-Platig of The Inkwell Home in Ormond Beach display a
table setting for the upcoming Decorative Arts of Dining that benefits the Daytona Beach
Symphony Society.


Out
From page B2
Riverside Drive, Ormond
Beach. Reservations are
required; seating is limited. To
reserve seats, call (386) 677-
'7005.
*Annual Italian Night: Elks
Ladies Auxiliary No. 2193 will
host this event at 285 Wilmette
Ave., Ormond Beach. Cocktails
will be served at 5:30 p.m., fol-
lowed by the dinner at 6:30
p.m. Music will be provided by
Goodtimes. Tickets cost $15;
proceeds will benefit local
scholarship funds, children's
abuse services and other chari-
ties. For tickets or more infor-
mation, call (386) 672-582Z
*GREEN Florida Arbor Day
Celebration: The Volusia Soil &
Water Conservation Native Tree
Sale will be held at Love Whole
Foods, 275 Williamson Blvd.,
Ormond Beach. Participants
will learn why preserving the
native ecosystem is important,
discover ways to celebrate the
"green" way, view photos and
examples of native landscap-
ing, purchase seedlings and
support The Art of Living's One
Million Trees Campaign. Atten-
dees also may sign up for a
free demonstration by an Art of
Living instructor. For more
information, call (386) 676-
0011.
*Hollywood icon coming to
Ormond Beach: Johnny Dun-
can, who played Robin in the
1949 movie serials "Batman
and Robin," will visit The Book
Store Cinema in Ormond
Beach to watch Episode No. 2,
"Tunnel of Terror," which will
be shown at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m.
at The Book Store, 410 S. Nova
Road, Ormond Beach. Mr. Dun-
can will tell all about those
days as the Boy. Wonder and
about the days that followed
during his 60-year acting
career. The public may meet
Mr. Duncan and participate in a
30-minute question and
answer session at 2:30 p.m.
(Bring Batman memorabilia for
autographs!) Then, "The Trail to
San Antone" will be shown.
The cost is $5, which includes a
free bag of popcorn. For more
information, call (386) 252-
3778 or (386) 615-8320 or
visit www.cinematique.org.

SUNDAY, JAN. 18
*Skate for a Cause: To raise
awareness about dementia
and Alzheimer's, Forest Lake
Manor assisted living residence
will host this event from 5-7
p.m. at Skate-n-Shake, 250
North U.S, 1, Ormond Beach.
The public may attend. Tickets
will be sold in advanced
through Forest Lake Manor or
at the door for $5 per person.


All proceeds will benefit the
Alzheimer's Association. Also,
sponsors are needed to donate
door prizes. For more informa-
tion or to donate, call (386)
760-7174.
*Nicholas Bowden Concert:
Our Lady of Hope Catholic
Church will present this con-
cert at 3:30 p.m. at 4675 S.
Clyde Morris Blvd., Port
Orange. Mr. Bowden ,is a
church musician and entertain-
er. He is senior organist at,
Atlanta's 10,000-member
Peachtree Presbyterian Church,
a position he has held since
1993. Mr. Bowden has per-
formed in venues across the


United States and in Europe as
an organ soloist and conduc-
tor. He has appeared on a
number of television specials
over the years from local
Atlanta stations to Diane Bish's
The Joy of Music, 'which is
broadcast the world over. This
event is free to the public. For
more information, call (386)
788-6144, Ext 314.
*Commemoration: The Port
Orange Historical Trust will
host the commemoration of
the Battle of Dunlawton, which
took place 173 years ago
between the Florida militia and
Seminole Indians, at 2 p.m. at
See OUT, B4


William Grant Gillespie, 76 of Holly Hill, left this
earth to be with his loved ones who departed before him
on January 11, 2009. Born in Kentucky, he made Florida his
permanent home in 1959.
Bill proudly served in the U.S. Navy in Korea from 1950 to
1952, where he was stationed'on the USS Wedderburn.
He retired from working as supervisor of street maintenance
for the City of Daytona Beach after 30 years of service. An
article was once published in the local paper about him, refer-
ring to him as the Sultan of Sweepers, keeping the town a
Bill Gillespie clean place to live and an enjoyable place to visit.
Bill was from the old school, a kind, loving man with a big heart, even though he
tried to portray a tough exterior. He loved hunting, especially his annual trip to West
Virginia with his son, Lonnie. He also loved fishing, woodworking, sitting in his
garage sharing a story or joke with his neighbors and most of all his fily. e leaves
behind his wife of nearly 50 years, Juanita, sons Lawrence (Lonnie) Sisson; William
Bradley (Brad) Gillespie; daughters Bobbie Gillespie; Marjorie Stohler (Rick); his
grandchildren Zachary, Ashley and Noel as well as great-granddaughter Isabel and
great-grandson Lucas.
A service of remembrance will be held at his home, 628 Winston Drive, Holly r.=
Hill, on January 17, 2009 at 1 pm. In lieu of flowers donations may be
'--- made to The Hospice of Volusia/Flagler County.


nd Vorda- 0r5 1,WWO --
"ed y'US This "must have"
for citrus lovers is one of
our most popular
offerings and with good
reason. These two
varieties are some of the
most flavorful fruit
Florida offers. "Sweet
lf oranges and Ruby Red
grapefruit, at such a
great price, get one for
ho- yourself and a friend.
Plus $10.95 S&H Approx. 10lIbs. #V10O

LaRoche Fruit & Gifts
Call (386) 672-7723
740 S. Yonge St. (1ml. S. of Granada Blvd.,)
U.S.1 Ormond Beach. Fl.


I


LaRoche
Used Furniture
(386)672-7723

ONE OF THE
LARGEST USED
FURNITURE
OUTLETS IN
THE AREA

Specializing in
Quality Wood
and Estate c
Furnishings o
Fresh Citrus
Available for
Pick-Up


Randy Barber/staff photographer


One of the table settings created for the event.


SHOP THRIFTY

Budget Fitting Bargains







Helping Homeless Families With Children
"A Hand-Up Not A Hand-Out"


Volunteers Needed for Both Locations



Always Accepting Donations








FAMILY RENEW COMMUNITY O


www.HometownNewsOL.com


Friday. January 16,2009








Friday, January 16, 2009


A soup with healing powers and a cake to enjoy


Hello smart shoppers.
As usual, there was a
bit of excitement in
the Borg family over the
holidays. My 19-year-old
grandson, Addison, had an
emergency appendectomy
on New Years Eve 2008, a
year to remember!
This week's recipe,
according to him, has
magical healing powers.
From the time he was a little
tyke, an upset stomach, a
cold, a headache, a scraped
knee even a burned finger
would surely get better if
only I would make him
some "tourkey soup."
Take the turkey frame out
of the freezer; it's soup time.
Many make turkey soup
just like chicken soup, but
take my word for it, once
you've tried it my mom's
way, you'll never like it any
other way. Tiny meatballs
and noodles make it a one
dish meal. It's a kid's
favorite.
Cook-a-cabulary- Scald:
To heat to just below the
boiling point.
Enjoy. See you next week.

TURKEY SOUP,
ITALIAN STYLE

To make soup, nothing
beats a pressure cooker. The
soup will take 1/2-hour
compared to two hours in a


ROMANCING
THE STOVE I
with the
Grammy Guru
ARLENE BORG

pot.

1 turkey frame
1 large onion, 3-inches in
diameter, peeled and
sliced
3 large stalks celery with
leaves, cut up
1 teaspoon salt
1/2-teaspoon black
pepper
2 tablespoons chopped
fresh parsley, or 1
tablespoon, dried
Half of an 8-ounce can
tomato sauce (adds nice
color, very little flavor)
6-quart stock pot or
pressure cooker

Wash turkey frame,
remove traces of skin and
stuffing. If the turkey frame
is very large, you might have
to do this in two batches.
Leftovers freeze great.
Place all in the pot and fill
two-thirds with water. Cook
two hours in pot or as
instructed with pressure
cooker. Pour soup into large
colander that has been
placed over a large contain-
er. Let cool. Remove meat
from bones and add to


soup. Too much meat?
Freeze it for a casserole.
Mash vegetables with fork
or hands and add to soup.
Return soup to pot and
bring to a boil. Drop raw
baby meatballs into boiling
broth. Cook about 10
minutes. Chill soup.
When ready to serve,
remove congealed fat. Bring
soup to a boil, add medium
size noodles that have been
cooked halfway and cook
until tender. Serve with a
sprinkling of grated Italian,
cheese.
NOTE: My family always
used Mueller's Kuluski
noodles for this soup.
Although not easy to find,
they're sure worth the
search. I have recently
found that linguini broken
up works great.

"BABY MEAT BALLS
OR COCKTAIL MEAT
BALLS

Make them 3/4-inch in
diameter for soup and a
little larger for cocktail
meatballs.

1 pound "fat-free" fresh
ground beef or brand
name ground turkey*
1/2-teaspoon garlic
powder
2 eggs or egg whites or
equivalent amount of egg


substitute
1/2-cup bread crumbs
1/2-teaspoon salt
1/4-teaspoon pepper
1 tablespoon parsley
flakes
Handful grated Romano
- cheese

Mix all together with your
hands, shape and proceed
as explained above.
*Beware of store ground
turkey it can contain
quite a lot of fat.

MAPLE WALNUT
CAKE
regular and low fat

If you like the flavor of
maple, you'll love a maple
walnut cake. You can make
it regular or low fat. Either
way, it's delicious.

1 package yellow cake mix
1 teaspoon maple extract
1/4-cup coarsely chopped
walnuts
Flour

Prepare cake according to
package directions or follow
my recipe for fat- and
cholesterol-free cakes; add
the maple flavoring.
Put a little flour in a
plastic bag, add walnuts to
coat. Shake off excess flour
and fold nuts into cake
batter.


Bake in layer cake pans
that have been treated with
cooking spray.
NOTE: When you coat any
nut or fruit with flour before
adding it to a batter, it won't
sink to the bottom of the
cake.

FAT- AND
CHOLESTEROL-FREE
CAKES

1. Use applesauce in place
of the oil.
2. Use egg substitute or
egg whites in place of whole
egg.
NOTE: Add 1 extra egg
white or use 1/3-cup of egg
substitute for each egg
required.
3. Add 1 tablespoon flour.

Mix and bake according
to package directions. Use
cooking spray to grease the
cake pans.

MAPLE
BUTTERCREAM
FROSTING
regular or low fat

4 tablespoons butter or
butter substitute,
softened
3/4-box 10OX confec-
tioner's (powdered) sugar
1 teaspoon maple extract
Milk or evaporated skim


milk, undiluted or fat-free
half and half
1/4-cup finely chopped
walnuts

Using an electric mixer,
beat butter, sugar and
maple extract together,
adding milk a few drops at a
time until of desired
consistency. Frost cake;
sprinkle with nuts.

lam available for talks
from south Vero to Hobe
Sound, call (772) 465-5656.
When'a recipe is not in my
cookbook it will have (NIB)
next to the title.
For an autographed
cookbook, "Romancing The
Stove with the Grammy
Guru,"send $19.60 ($15-
book, $1-tax, $3.50 for
shipping and handling) For
multiple books sent to one
address it's $3.50 S&H for 1
book, add $2 postage for
each additional book ($15
plus $2.00). Send to:Arlene
M. Borg, 265 SWPort St.
Lucie Blvd, No. 149, Port St.
Lucie, FL 34984. Check,
money order or Paypal
accepted.
Visit my Web site at
www.romancingthestove.ne
t or send me an e-mail at
arlene@romancingthestove.
net.


Scene
From page B1
located at 400 Second Ave.,
New Smyrna. Beach. For
more information, call (386)
428-4621.
*Ohana Luau Dinner
Show: This dinner show
spectacular and family-style
feast, with a 6:30 p.m. seating,
dinner served at 7:15 p.m.
and show time at 7:30 p.m., is
held Thursday, Friday and
Saturday, at the Hawaiin
Inn, 2301 S. Atlantic'
Ave., Daytona Beach Shores.
Participants will learn tradi-
tional dances with Polyne-
sian women, warriors and
keikis (children). A flaming
fire knife dance and hula with
audience participation will


be featured. For more infor-
mation, call (386) 255-5411,
Ext. 186, or visit
www.ohanaluau.com.
*OM Bar & Chill Lounge:
Free wine tastings are 'held
from 4-8 p.m. each Sunday
at 392 Flagler Ave., New
Smyrna Beach. Tasters will
have a selection of up to 10
different wines. Acoustic
performances are provided
by Rhonda Patrick. Free
salsa lessons are given at 8
p.m. each Thursday, with
open salsa dancing held
from 9 p.m.-1 a.m. For more
information, call (386) 423-
2727 or visit the Web site at
www.theombarhcom.
*Ormond Beach Eagles
No. 3800: Games are played
at noon each Thursday. One
mini jackpot and door prizes


will be available. Free coffee
and doughnuts will be
served. Proceeds got to
chartists. For more informa-
tion, call (386) 672-3663.
*Ormond Beach Senior
Center: The Vagabonds per-
form from 2-4 p.m. once per
month. For more informa-
tion, call (386)- 763-0355.
*Peanut's Restaurant &
Sports Bar: Rhythm Sharks
will perform at 9 p.m., Fri-
day and Saturday. Open Jam
Night is held at 8 p.m. each
Sunday. The Pirates perform
at 8 p.m. each Thursday.
Texas Hold 'em is played at 6
p.m. each Monday and
Thursday and at 2 p.m., Sat-
urday. Free Bingo and Com-
edy Auctiop is held at 7 p.m.
each Tuesday. Lotta
Wednesday is held from 7-


10 p.m. each Wednesday.
Peanut's is located at 421
Flagler Ave., New Smyrna
Beach. For more information,
call (386) 423-1469.
, *Rockin Ranch: Whiskey
Basin will perform Jan. 21
and Jan. 23-24 at 801 S. Nova
Road, Ormond Beach. For
more information, visit
www.rockinranchnight-
club.com.
*Seabreeze Coffee Con-
nection: A hand drum circle
is held at 8 p.m. each
Wednesday at 315 Seabreeze
Blvd., Daytona Beach. For
more information, visit the
Web site .at www.drumcir-
cle.meetup.com/327.,
*Venetian Bay Town and
Country Club: The Venetian
Bay Annual Music "Festival
will be held from lla.m.-5


p.m., Saturday, Jan. 17, at
424 Luna Bella Lane, New
Smyrna Beach. Live music
will be available all day! Max
Q, Evolution, JP Inc, Light
* House Praise and Drill Team
will perform. Admission is
free. Lawn chairs are sug-
gested. Party in the Park is
held from 1-5 p.m. the third
Saturday of each month at
424 Luna Bella Lane, New
Smyrna Beach. Lawn chairs
are suggested; no coolers.
Admission is free. .Also, a
farmers' market is held from
8 a.m.-1 p.m. each Saturday
at the town center. For more
information, call (386) 428-
8448.
*The Vinyard: An all reds
wine tasting will be held at
6:30 p.m., Thursday, Jan. 22,
at 1395 W. Granada Blvd.,.


Ormond Beach. A selection
of fine cheeses, crackers and
bread will accompany these
robust reds. To make reserva-
tions, call (386) 672-5223.
*Wmine Warehouse New
Smyrna Beach: Free wine
tastings are held from 4-7
p.m. each Friday at 636 Third
Avenue, New Smyrna Beach.
Six wines are tasted. For more
information, call (386) 426-
6133.
*WineStyles events: At the
Shoppes of Yorketown, 1665
Dunlawton Ave., Suite 105,
Port Orange, a weekly tast-
ing is held from 5:30-8 p.m.
each Thursday, open to the
public. The cost is $5 and
complimentary to wine club
members. For more infor-
mation, call (386) 788-7188.


Out
From page B3
Riverside Pavilion Port Orange
Chamber of Commerce, 3431
Ridgewood Ave. The 35-piece
Daytona Beach Concert Band,
Embry-Riddle Aeronautical Uni-
versity Color Guard and a pro-
gram with the story of this his-
toric event will "be featured.
Admission is free. For more-
information, call (386) 252-
6133.
*Pancake breakfast: Knights
of Columbus St. Paul's Council
1895 will host this breakfast
from 8:30 a.m. to noon at the


Basilica Church of Saint Paul,
317 Mullally St., Daytona
Beach. The cost is $3 per per-
son, which includes pancakes,
sausages, juice and coffee. All
tickets will be sold at the door.
Proceeds will benefit the
upcoming humanitarian mis-
sion trip to Haiti. Donations will
.be accepted. For more infor-
mation, call (386) 252-5422.

MONDAY, JAN. 19

*Afternoon at the Movies:
"Mamma Mia" (PG-13, 108
mins.) will be shown at 2 p.m.
in the Port Orange Regional
Library Auditorium, 1005 City


Center Circle. For more infor-
mation, call (386) 322-5152,
Ext 4.

TUESDAY, JAN. 20

*Free program: The Guild of
MOAS will present "Experience
the Culture of Wuhan, China"
at 10:30 a.m. at 352 S. Nova
Road, Daytona Beach. Sue
Fream, a former teacher in
China, will be the presenter.
Refreshments and White Ele-
phant Boutique will be fea-
tured. The public may attend.
For membership information,
visit the Web site at
www.GuildMOAS.org.
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 21

*Winter Dessert & Card
Party: Sacred Heart and St.
Gerard Council of Catholic
Women will hold this annual
event from noon to 4 p.m. in
the parish social hall behind
Sacred Heart Church, 998


Father Donlon Drive, New
Smyrna Beach. Those who do
not wish to play cards may play
Bingo. Light sandwich items
will be available for purchase. A
basket of cheer, raffle prizes,
door prizes and a 50/50 draw-
ing will be ,featured. Dessert
and coffee will be provided in
the price of $5 admission. Pro-
ceeds from the card party will
fund the council's charitable
works. The public may attend.
Tickets are available at the
parish office and at the door.

THURSDAY, JAN. 22

*Social/Networking/Health
event: The Executive Women's
Golf Association will hold this
event from 5-6 p.m. at Fresh
Taste of Italy, 1130 Ridgewood
Ave., South Daytona. The cost
is $8.75 for members and
12.75 for nonmembers, which
includes appetizers and a
speaker. Crystal Maples, a


licensed acupuncturist and Chi-
nese herbalist, will speak.
Reservations may be made by
sending a check to Kris Fischer
at 725 Orchard Ave., Ormond
Beach, FL 32174. Checks must
be received by Saturday, Jan.
17.

ONGOING EVENTS

*Barbie Doll: Celebrating 50
Years of an American Icon: This
exhibit will be on display
through April 5 at the Daytona
Beach Museum of Arts & Sci-
ences. In celebration of Barbie
doll's 50th birthday on March
9, more than 400 dolls will be
on display from the private col-
lection of Jo Anne Winspur. The
exhibition will feature Barbie
dolls modeling casual sports-
wear to Parisian haute couture
dating from the original 1959
Barbie Dolls into today. Barbie
Doll's friends and family also
will be featured including


Steffie, Cara, Julia, Midge, Skip-
per and of course Ken. MOAS is
located at 352 S. Nova Road,
Daytona Beach. For more infor-
mation, call (386) 255-0285 or
visit the Web site at
www.moas.org.
*Daytona Metropolitan
Bridge Club: Duplicate Bridge
is played Monday through Sat-
urday at 600 Driftwood Ave.,
Daytona Beach. For the sched-
ule, call (386) 255-7744 or.visit
the Web site at www.Day-
tonaBridge.org.
*Winter Dances: Dances are
held from 2-4 p.m. each Friday
at the City Island Recreation
Center, 110 E. Orange Ave.,
Daytona Beach. Music will be
provided by Talk of the Town
and Dream. The cost is $5,
which includes a lesson at 1
p.m., dancing and refresh-
ments. Singles are welcome.
This event will be held through
Feb. 27. For more information,
call (386) 676-2150.


Scopes
From page.BI

friends and associates. You
are happy. Your energy is
strong. Your spirit is high.
Refuse to let your own
demands pull you down and
get you stuck in the worldly
side. Stay focused on today
and everything will work out.

Libra Sept. 23-Oct. 22
i It's time to surrender to your
inner guidance, get your own
will out of the way and let
spiritual guidance direct you
to your main cause and mis-
sion. Have you ever thought
that you don't have to be bal-
anced all the time? It's time
to rejoice and let the power
flow and connect you to the
source.

Scorpio Oct. 23-Nov. 21
You continue to be faced
with new, creative spiritual
challenges. Just be patient


and wait for a sign before you
make any major changes.
Your heart energy is strong. It
knows the truth. Let your
inner knowingness guide
you. Be patient and act only
when the sign comes. This
put the probability of success
squarely in your corner.

Sagittarius Nov. 22-Dec. 21
Hello archer and goal setter
of the universe. Being the last
fire sign has a great responsi-
bility. It gives you the authori-
ty to be the highest inspira-
tion. The high fire of spirit
was given to you at birth. Be
a guiding light. Help others
on the path of truth. Do this
above all other things and
your life is justified.

Capricorn Dec. 22-Jan. 19
Listen to your inner guidance,
move forward and continue
to make progress. You are on
a positive roll in life. Your
renewed self respect and
love is like a magnet drawing


more of life's great blessings.
This positive energy should
translate into greater peace,
love, health and abundance.
You are on a terrific roll.

Aquarius Jan. 20-Feb. 18
Keep the ideas coming from
the heartwell and the creative
genius living in you will con-
tinue to create new and
mighty causes that give your
life special meaning and
powerful opportunities to
transform your world and
make it better for everyone
for a long time to come. You
have a true blessing on your
life.

Pisces Feb. 19-March 20
The two basic ways we live in
this works are by chance or
by choice. The mind lives by
chance. The heart lives by
choice. Pisces is the strongest
heart in the zodiac. You are
so special. Be bold. Surrender
totally and listen. You know.
Don't worry about what oth-


ers think Do what feels right


ers think. Do what feels right
and everyone wins.

Star visions

James Tucker will be doing
readings at the South Florida
Fair in West Palm Beach from
Jan. 16-Feb. 1 In Exhibit Hall
9. Would love to see you
there. It's a lot of fun.
I can help bring renewed
hope in these challenging
times. A personalized astrolo-
gy chart a private reading,
an exciting home or office
party or an inspiring group
talk are just a few of the serv-
ices he offers. Call (772) 334-
9487 or e-mail
jtuckxyz@aol.com for details
and prices.
Remember to sign up at per-
sonalspiritguide.com. to
receive your free weekly
inspirational message.
Have a starry week, every-
one.

- James Tucker


. .-II-


h.[


Hometown News


B4 Daytona Beach/Holly Hill


( ^








Friday, January 16, 2009 www.HometownNewsOL.com Daytona Beach/Holly Hill B5


Rascally fish seem to know when the new season is open


The water quality in the
Halifax has returned to a
more healthy condition.
That took five months, but
considering the poor tidal
flow, that was fairly rapid.
After Tropical Storm Fay
dropped more than a foot
of much-needed rain on
our area, a good portion of
it wound up in the river in
the form of polluted run-
off. Now the river is, once
more, clear and green, and
with that will come better
fishing.
Spotted sea trout is open
now, and after biting just


about everywhere during
the closed season, they will
now probably become
scarce.
Al Houser and I went out
north of Granada to try
and get a few of the nice
trout we had been releas-
ing, but came away with
bluefish instead. We went
to a place where I had just
caught 17 trout (all on
plugs) only a few days
prior, but now those tasty
rascals had gotten the
message about the season
opening and developed
lockjaw.


FISHING
WITH
DAN
DAN SMITH


No matter, the blues
were fun to catch, and as I
pen this, the smell of hick-
ory drifts to me from my
little electric smoker. Soon
I will turn them into deli-
cious smoked fish dip, the
perfect accompaniment
for a cold beer and a foot-
ball game.


I spent a few mornings
on a dock on the river
catching weakfish that
were large for the species. I
had two more than 16 inch-
es on a sinking plug. Weak-
fish are pretty much trout
without the spots. More sil-
ver in color with pro-
nounced yellow inside the
mouth, there is nothing
"weak" about them. Good
scrappers, they will put up
a solid fight. '
Captain Leo down in
Edgewater guided his
friend Chuck to a nice red
and trout. From the photo,


they both looked to be in
the 24-inch range.
The surf is slow, but those
who are willing to put in
some time seem to be com-
ing away with one or two
nice-sized pompano. They
are hitting sand fleas,
which may be dug with a
tool or by hand..The cool
water usually sends the
fleas deep, but right now,
they are still plentiful.
Whiting and drum will
also take them and are
preserlt in fair numbers.
The beach is now a great
place to be, for it is the


peak of our whale-watch-
ing season. If your timing is
good, you may see a big
mama right whale accom-
panied by her calf. Watch
for the birds first and then
the dolphins. The whales
will give themselves away
with an occasional V-
shaped blow. The huge tail
will have a deep wedge in
the center.
I hope everyone will get
down to the beach before
month's end. Beginning in
February, the tollbooths go
back up, reserving our
beach for the tourists.


Winter practice can help your summertime golf swing


Shis is not only the
best time of year for
golf, but the worst as
well. The weather is
perfect right now for golf.
Not too hot, not too cold,
just right. In fact, I believe
that I saw the Three Bears
over on the 12th fairway.
The problem with this
time of year is everyone
wants to play golf, so the
courses are crowded and
the economics of supply
and demand is at its
greatest.
What to do? Well, there
is an old saying that you
should "Practice to play,
not play to practice". Here
is your chance to get that
game in shape so that
when the rates do drop
and the tee sheets aren't as
full, you will shock your
friends with just how good
your game has become.
We are fortunate enough
to live in an area where
there are many dedicated


ranges and courses with
practice areas that will
allow you to get in some
swings. All you need is
about an hour of free time
to hit a bucket of balls. I
can usually do this during
lunch. I pack a canned
drink, a sandwich and a
piece of fruit to eat on the
way or at the course. Okay,
sometimes it's a brownie
instead of a banana, but I
have needs.
With so many courses
here, finding one within a
few minutes drive from
your home or office isn't
.difficult. I usually spend
two or more days each
week at Hammock Creek
in Palm City. The course is
right down the street from
my office and sponsors my
golf radio show, so they
treat me just like family.
I'll hit balls one day, chip
another, and work on
smoothing out my'putting
stroke another.


JAMES
STAMMER'


If you'd rather stay
home, try your garage or
back yard. Set up a net or
even hang an old set of
drapes from the ceiling in
the garage to hit balls into.
The new practice balls,
made from the same
* material that goes into the
synthetic corks in wine
bottles, fly just a short
distance and bounce
harmlessly off windows,
doors, cars and cats,
eliminating the need for
nets and such.
Practicing your,putting
is even easier. You can putt
nearly anywhere and even
get in some television time
while working on that
stroke.


If you prefer a real range,
a bucket of balls should
cost you well under 10
dollars. That's nothing
compared to the price of
an actual round of golf at
this time of the year. Some
ranges have lighting so
that you can get in your
practice after work or after
dinner if you prefer. I take
the bucket of balls to the
chipping and bunker area
and work on those shots.
Then I pick them up and
hit full shots.
If money is a problem,
there is no cost to use a
putting green at just about
any public club facility. In
addition, practicing your
putting is the fastest way
to improve your scores on
the course. If you take two
putts per green, that's 36
shots on the greens alone.
If you can gain some
confidence with your
putter and sink a few more
of those five-footers and


avoid three-putting,
imagine how quickly your
scores will drop.
The same goes for
chipping. Most amateurs
miss three out of every
four greens during a
round. Keeping your feel
and touch for those chip
shots sharp is one key to
scoring well. How often
have you spent the entire
winter without picking up
a club, and find that the
deft scoring touch you had
perfected is absent from
your game for about the
first half-dozen rounds of
the season?
If money is not a prob-
lem, but time is, consider
getting lessons. There is a
multitude of teaching
professionals here on
Florida's east coast. Some
teach one-on-one, which
can be quite expensive,
while others teach in a less
expensive group setting.
You and your friends could


approach a professional
about a group lesson and
save a few dollars. Getting
lessons in this way relieves
you of the worry of embar-
rassing yourself in front of
strangers and your entire
foursome stands to gain
some improvement.
Should you decide on a
lesson and a teaching pro,
make sure that he or she
understands what you
want to accomplish and
you must have realistic
expectations. It's very
important that you are
both on the same page.
Whatever your plan is to
cope with the winter,
remember to enjoy it.
Besides, with enough
winter practice, you could
shock all of your sofa-
bound partners once your
season begins.

Contact ames Stammer
at jstammer@yahoo.com.


Sports Briefs


Golf tournament to
benefit students

Halifax Academy, a local
private school located in
Daytona Beach, will host its
inaugural Golf Tournament
Saturday, Jan. 17, at Crane
Lakes Golf Course in Port
Orange.
Registration will begin at
7:45 a.m., followed by the
start at 8:30 a.m.
The fee is $50 per player
or $200 per team.
Prizes will be awarded to
the two top teams, as well as
closest to the hole, best putt
and mulligan. Raffles, free
beer (while supplies last)
and complimentary lunch
also will be available.
For more information or to
register in advance, call
(386) 252-9557 or (386) 212-
7388.

Legion to host golf
tournament

American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 267 will host "Win-
ter on the Golf Green Tour-
nament" Saturday, Jan. 17,
at Tomoka Oaks Country
Club.
A shotgun start will be at
8:30 a.m.
The cost is $50. Compli-
mentary dinner and door
prizes will be available.
To make reservations, call
(386) 672-7678 or sign up at
156 New Britain Ave.,
Ormond Beach.

Sports registrations
open

The City of Ormond
Beach Leisure Services Reg-
istration Office at 399 North
U.S. 1 in Ormond Beach is
accepting registrations as
follows:
Boy's baseball, T-ball and
girl's softball registration
dates will be through Jan. 23
for ages 5 and 6 for T-ball, 7


to 15 f6r baseball and 6 to 15
for softball.
First-time registrants
must bring a copy of their
birth certificate.
Flyers with more informa-
tion are available at the Reg-
istration Office or visit the
city's Web site at www.
ormondbeach.org and click
on "Leisure Services."

Free umpire clinic
slated

The City of Ormond
Beach Leisure Services
Department will host a
three-day umpire clinic,
offered by the"Harry Wen-
delstedt Umpire School for
age 16 to adult. The clinics,
beginner and advanced, will
be taught by major- and


minor-league umpires on
the Wendelstedt staff.
The clinics will be held
from 9 a.m. to noon on three
consecutive Saturdays, Jan.
17, Jan. 24 and Jan. 31, in
Ormond Beach. Clinics will
cover basic fundamentals of
a two-man system, plate
work, the strike zone and
other encountered rules.
Advanced umpire training
will focus on the obstruction
and interference rule.
This clinic is free; howev-
er, registration is required.
Minors can only be regis-
tered by their parents or
court-ordered legal
guardian.
To reserve a place in class,
call (386) 676-3251.


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Friday, January 16, 2009


BR Daytona Beach/Holly Hill Hometown News


We all yearn for a



purpose


In the soul of a caterpil-
lar lives a beautiful
butterfly yearning to be
set free. In the soul of
every human being on
earth lives a beautiful,
magnificent purpose
wanting the same.
Sometimes, we mistake
the hunger inside for what
it really is. We think it is
love of another person,
fame or fortune and other,
worldly comforts.
The true hunger is the
yearning in our deeper self
to find our destiny. The
No. 1 job in life should be
to go inside, find our true
self, bring it out and set it
free.
Much of our life is lived
in bondage to the world,
family, work or the differ-
ent hungers that enslave
us and keep us bound in
the lower, earthly nature.
It all comes down to the
quality of life and the level
of joy we feel. How happy
are you in life? If the
answer is anything other
than "very" there is a
missing link. There is a
much better way to live
than to be hungry and
unhappy.
It starts when the outer
ways no longer satisfy our
needs and we begin the
inner journey. To find
inner peace and fulfill-
ment we must begin to
follow our heart instead of
head. The process for
mastery over life begins
when we let go of negativi-
ty and trash that which
has accumulated from the
past. We can't change the
past, but we can learn
from it, bless it for what it


SPIRIT
GUIDE
JAMES TUCKER




has taught us, forgive it
instead of judging it,
release it and move
forward.
A healthy life is a flowing
life. If you block a stream
from flowing, it will
become polluted and the
fish will die. Huran life
must flow as well. We are
supposed to be channels
not depositories of the
flow.
Is health an issue? Find
out where the blockage of
the energy is, release it '
and health will begin to
return.
Next begin to feed your
life spiritually, emotional-
ly, mentally and physical-
ly. Engage in positive
things that enrich it
instead of tearing it down.
Renew your soul. Feel
safety instead of fear. Take
a little time each day to
play just for the pure joy of
it.
A balanced life is a
healthy life. Then begin to
make a list of the top
priorities in life. If it
doesn't make you happy,
don't do it. Who said we
have to suffer? Listening to
the gut instinct, which
speaks, first will give us
choices based on how we
feel not by what we think.
When we surrender to this
inner guidance and let it
work for us and through ius


Wind master


/


Randy Barber/staff photographer
Reno Johnson of Daytona Beach flies a stunt kite on a warm morning at City Island Park in Daytona Beach. Mr. John-
son says that Daytona Beach is a perfect place for flying kites because of the great weather and cool ocean breezes.


change begins to happen.
Our stress level goes
down, we have more time.
Trust and faith in the
universe increases. It is
our job to read the signs of
renewed joy and do things
to enhance it every day.
When positive increase
happens, others will take
notice and begin to
wonder why you are so
happy and they are not.
First take care of your
own and family needs. You
did most of the hard work


to get here. Then give back
Love unconditionally.
Teach others how to find
the freedom and happi-
ness that you have. They
have to be ready and have
the desire in the heart for
change.
This is a great life well
lived and entirely within
your means to accomplish
by taking these simple
steps, going within and
making wise choices
The sweetest is yet to
come.


A voice of hope

James Tucker can help bring renewed hope and joy to .
your life in-the New Year. A personalized astrology chart,
a private reading, an exciting home or office party, an
inspirational group talk or a business motivational
seminar are just a few of the special services offered. Call
(772) 334-9487 or e-mail jtuckxyz@aol.com for details
and prices.
He will be doing readings at the South Florida Fair in
West Palm Beach from Jan. 16-Feb. 1. This is my 17th year
there. Would love to see you. It's a lot offun.
Don't forget to sign up at personalspiritguide.com for
your free weekly inspirational message.
Until next time, never give up on your dream, your
purpose and your passion. Keep on keeping on.


Notice of Public Auction
for monies due on,
storage units located at
U-Haul company
facilities. Storage
locations are listed
below. All goods are
household contents or
miscellaneous and
recovered goods. All
auctions are hold to
satisfy owner's lien for
rent and fees in
accordance, with Florida
Statues, Self-Storage
Act, Sections 83.806 and
83.807. The auction will
start at 8:00 a.m. and
others will, follow on
February 5, 2009.
U-Haul Storage of
Daytona Beach, 700
West International
Speedway Blvd, Daytona
Beach, FL 32114, 1002
Stefanie Martin $322.85,
1008 Sherry Hatnes
$378.10, 1010 Jessica
Tomlinson $543.11, 1011
Kenneth Hope $282.24,
1012 Carly Gaffney
$388.74
Pub: January 16, 2009


GREY CAT found near
Saint Brendans Church,
Ormond Beach. Kitty has
collar. Will need you to
describe kitty and collar.
386-672-1667 / 795-4261
Call Classified
386-322-5949


BELVIEW MEMORIAL
Park, Daytona Beach, 2
prime lots, Garden
Tranquility side by side.
Valued at $5500 will sell
for $3500/obo
956-831-9257
956-346-4904
ORMOND,VOLUSIA
Mem 2 plots, incl. vaults,
opening/closings, military
marker,Garden of Faith
$7000 386-233-9149



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A D O P T I O. N
1-866-633-0397 Unplan-
ned Pregnancy? Pro-
vide your baby with a
loving, financially se-
cure family. Living/
Medical/Counsellng
expenses paid. Social
worker on staff. Call
compassionate Attor-
ney Lauren Feingold
(FL Bar # 0958107) 24/7


* BUSINESS &


RESTAURANT Sale or
Lease a turn key busi-
ness in Brevard Co.
Would consider a work-
ing partner w/Capital or
Owner fin. 321-890-7022


Sell or Rent
your home in
The Hometown
News
Martin County
thru
Ormond Beach
386-322-5949


SIN INVERSIONIII Con-
lenza Tu Propio Nego-
clo. Gana 48% y Mas.
Pide Catalogo Gratis.
1-877-420-2627 Catalo-
go Gratisl www.
Colchasintima.com



$$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT
Cash Now!! As seen on
TV. Injury Lawsuit Drag-
ging? Need $500-
500,000++ within 48
hours? Low rates. Apply
now by phone www.Fast
CaseCash.com
1-800-568-8321


1-888-812-3678 Living
Expenses paid. Choose
a Loving, Financially
Secure family for your.
child. Caring & Confi-
dential. 24 hours/7
days), Attorney Amy
Hickman, (LIc# 832340)


$ CASH FOR GOLD $
We buy Gold, Silver &
Platinum. Get Cash Nowl
Highest Payouts Satis-
faction Guaranteed.
1-888-245-4517
$$CASH FOR GOLD $$
We buy gold, silver &
Platinum. Get cash now.
Highest pay outs, satis-
faction guaranteed
877-505-3166
GUNS wanted collector
paying top dollar. Colt,
S & W, Winchester,
Drillings, Luger, Gatling
Doubles and other fine
guns. 772-528-7020


WANTED JUNK CARS
Running or not $200 &
up. We pay cash! 24-hrs.
Call 321-631-0111
Affordable and
Reliable
Hometown News
CLASSIFIEDSI
386-322-5949


SFINAA


$$$ACCESS LAWSUIT
Cash Nowll Inju lawsuit
dragging? Need $500-
$500,000++ within' 48
hours? 1-877-386-3692
www.casepay.com
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Now Oasis Legal Fi-
nance #1. See us on TV
fastest cash advances on
injury cases within 24/
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lose your case Apply ree
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BANKRUPTCY LET us
handle your Entire Bank-
ruptcy $299 Plus $399 for
Court Costs Guaranteed.
No additional Fees. Call
800-878-2215 BBB Mem-
ber www.signhere.com


ANTIQUE CLOCKS
Beautiful German Ameri-
can antique clock collec-
tion. Wall and mantle
321-783-2356
GRANDFATHER Clock
Ridgeway-Pioneer, W24"
D14" H80". Burnished
oak, just serviced,
must sell, $900obo
386-690-4436/428-1861
SANLANDO
DEPRESSION
GLASS SHOW
Sanford Civic.Center,
401 E. Seminole Ave
Sanford, FL

SHOW & SALE
Fri. 1-23 6pm-9pm
(Preview & Shopping)
Sat. 1-24 9am-5pm
Sun. 1-25 10am-4pm
$6.00 (fri night only &
good for all 3 days)
Admission $4.50
$4.00 w/this ad
(Sat. & Sun. only)



CAGE w/ wheels, for
African Grey or same
size bird, $150,
386-589-6600


WCAL-


BANKRUPTCY $299
plus $399 for Court costs.
Experienced Professio-
nals handle your entire
Bankruptcy Fast, Easy,
No Risk, Guaranteed,
Proven. Call Now
1-800-878-2215 www.
signhere.org Better Busi-
ness Bureau member.
LAWSUIT LOANS?
Cash before your case
settles. Auto, workers
comp. All cases accept-
ed. Fast approval. $500-
$50,000. 1-866-709-1100
www.glofin.com
CALL CLASSIFIED
and sell that boat
386-322-5949


AIR COMPRESSOR,
Sears, 3hp. 30 gal. tank
w/water separator, $150,
386-290-8707
BAR STOOL- r swivel,
$15, HP printer, $10, 3
speed rotating pole fan,
$10, 386-236-8486
BAR STOOLS, w/ back
$85, boys bike, 16" $20.
good find 386-334-0697
BARBELL & weight
stand, 2" square, $38, leg
lift machine, $50,
386-235-4390 Vol
BATHTUB- Porcelain on
steel, 5' neutral color.
faucet on left, $39,
386-426-8200 Vol
BEANIE BABIES-
90-100, $150 take all,
386-663-7515
BICYCLE mountlain
bike, 21 speed, men's,
aluminum 17" frame,
$80, 386-788-1141
BIKE, BOYS 16" $20,
Bar 'stool (4) black with
back $90 386-672-8463
BRIDGESTONE- 4,
235/55/R 18, 2- 4/32nd
tread, 2- 7/32nd tread,
$75/obo, 386-673-4480
CD PLAYER & speakers,
Panasonic 5 disc, $25,
surround sound speakers
$50 386-492-4513
CHAIR, CAPTAINS-
w/arm rests, Stomps-
Burkhardt Co, spring slip
seat, $45,386-673-1330
CHAIR, RECLINER out-
side chair $25, PVC Patio
set w/6 chairs, $25,
386-316-2407 Vol
CLOTHING MISSES, sz
16, L-XL, next to new,
slacks, tops, & outfits
$40 all, 386-760-1259





Photos say it alli
Photos with your ad,
High Definition Slide
Shows and more
VISIT OUR
ONLINE SITE
www.HometownNewsOL.com
386-322-5949


COFFEE MAKER- Melit-
ta, new in box, w/2 travel
mugs, $12,
386-252-9007
COLEMAN STOVE- pro-
pane, $40, shrimp net,
fish net on pole (4), $70
for all, 386-672-4255
COMPUTER WIN 2000
pro Internet ready, mncl.
monitor keyboard,morse
$75, 386-307-4106
CONGAS SET of head-
liners, Sunburst color
complete w/ stands, like
new, $200,386-871-4480
COUCH, LEATHER- tan,
faded and worn, very
comfortable, $199, must
pick up, 386-235-7319
DESK W/ HUTCH- dark
oak, decretive glass
doors, L-shaped, $75,
386-383-2553
DESK, LARGE, light
wood, 2 drawers+ 3 file
folder drawers, $500 val-
ue, $200, 386-673-3426
DESK, OFFICE, Ig, mid-
dle drawer, file drawer,
solid wood, $200,
386-672-4428
DINING ROOM Set- anti-
que, Pine Trestle table, 2
leafs, 5 chairs; $160,
386-428-6033 Vol
DINING ROOM SET- ta-
ble with leaf, 6 chairs &
matching hutch, $199,
386-761-5973 Vol
DINING ROOM table,
Farmer's style, wood, 4
chairs + insert, never
used $200 386-212-6698
DRESSER WHITE, with
baby blue trimi, all
wood,$75, 386-254-4814
DRESSES, EVENING 1
black lace, 1 black velvet,
size 7-8, $20 ea, $35 for
both 386-304-0056 Vol
DRYER large capacity,
electric, excellent cond,
can deliver, $120,
386-689-3019
DVD PLAYER, GPX,
$15.00, with remote,
386-788-5762
FILE CABINET, black,
new metal, 4 drawer,
home or office. $100.
386-760-6100


FLUTE, BUNDY by
Selmer, standard key of
C, closed hole with case,
$165, 386-441-0069 Vol
FREEZER CHEST-
small, garage kept, runs
good, small than washer,
50, 772-335-1961
FULL MATTRESS & box
spring, $20, carpet pad,
$40, 386-290-2221
FUTON, LL BEAN,
mission-style, light col-
or, incl. slip cover & pil-
lows $195 386-788-9881
GOLF BAG & Clubs,
set of 8 Irons, putter,
1-3-5 woods $46
386-761-8127
HOOVER SHAMPOO
$10, 3 36" vinyl white
roll-up blinds $3 ea. or $5
for 3 386-676-0781
JAPANESE BAYONET
WWII w/scabbard, $100
or trade, buy WWI, WWII
items. 386-252-3007


KENMORE REFRIGER-
ATOR- 21 cubic feet, bot-
tom freezer, good cond,
$175 obo,386-451-7265
KITCHEN RANGE- like
new, hot point, self clean-
ing oven, $150 obo,
386-428-6085
KITCHENAID BIG LOAD
washer & dryer set,
Works great $199 for the
set. 386-788-1619
LOUNGER BARCO
Chair Rocker recliner $75
386-852-7798 Daytona
LOVE SEAT- floral pat-
tern, great cond, $40,
kitchen table w/4 chairs,
$70, 386-341-2967
MATERNITY CLOTHES
excellent condition size
medium & large, 20 pcs.
$75, 386-481-4772
MICROWAVE over the
stove, white, good cond,
$75, 386-322-9841


MICROWAVE NEW
white $20. Weight bench
& set of 160lb weights
$40. 954-632-5735
MICROWAVE PANA-
SONIC 700 watts. Tab-
letop, excellent condition.
$25. 386-677-9507
MICROWAVE, FOR $15,
Like new, electronic
snooring sleeping Santa,
$10, 386-322-8900
MIRROR antique, 6'x3',
$100, head-board mirror,
$25, 386-258-5162
MOWER, REEL Task-
force, 16" cut, new, $25,
chair small straight leg,
$10, 386-673-8214


HometownNews
YOUR LOCAL NEWS & INFORMATION SOURCE c
www.HometownNewsOL.com

386-322-5949


Hometown News


B6 Daytona Beach/Holl Hill










Friday, January 16, 2009 www.HometownNewsOL.com Daytona Beach/Holly Hill B7


OCCUPIED JAPAN, 19
pieces, excellent condi-
tion $175 for all,
386-756-2273
ORGAN, BALDWIN, fun
machine w/ books,
$125, Tile cutter, elec.
12", $60 386-322-7906
OUTBOARD MOTOR-.
Electric, 4 speed,plus jog,
12 volt,36 amp, 42" shaft,
$190, 386-424-7309
POOL CUE Brand New,
Viper 19oz w/ case $75.'
386-427-6651 Vol
POOL TABLE- Slate,
great condition, $175,
china hutch, good cond,
$75, 386-322-1498
POOL TABLE- slate,
plays great $110, fax
machine, 9 new, $25,
386-428-4976
POSTERS OLD DAY-
TONA, bike week, 14,
excellent shape! $196
386-252-4115
RECLINER, DOUBLE,
beige with underlying
hunter green $195
386-523-4261 Volusia
REFRIGERATOR, AMA-
NA- 20 cf, white, w/ top
freezer, very spacious
$140 386-441-6815
REFRIGERATOR- Magic
Chef, 31", $60,
386-673-1102
ROTISSERIE carousel,
dishwasher safe, owners
manual & cook book,
$45, 386-423-1715
ROTISSERIE IBBQ, $50,'
massaging seat, $30,'
386-788-0883
ROWING DINGY,10' fi-
ber glass,wheels on back
that retract, $200,
386-852-0242
RV electric box, 45amp,
almost new, $125, porta-
ble holding tank, large,
$75,386-427-2051
SAW, CRAFTSMAN 10"
chop, dual laser track,
new in box, never used
3HP $165 386-677-0116
SCULPTURE mother
and child, mounted, Aus-
tin 1991, $135,
386-615-4812
SEATS LEATHER con-
version van, 2 capt. &
rear seat. $175 all. Quik
snap rel. 386-795-4994
SEWING MACHINE in
cabinet with lots of extra
notions, old $199 for all
386-760-5127
SHEET MUSIC- antique,
great for framing, $4,
386-322-5979


SINKS CULTERED,
Marble, 30"x22", $75
obo, 2 bar stools, bam-
boo $10, 386-871-8053
SNOWBABIES- b 13
snowbabies, all w/boxes,
w/waterglobe,$195,
386-426-8512
SOFA & Recllner, match-
ing, good condition,
$100, 386-409-0895 Vol
SOFA large, striped,
high back, new custom
washable slip covers,
$195, 386-322-9952
SOLOFLEX top of the
line exercise machine, all
accessories and bands,
$200, 386-308-0667
STAR WARS books,
tapes, magazines, misc.
All for $100'
386-314-6993
STEP LADDER wooden
7', excellent condition
$10.386-673-8214
STOVE, 36" ELECTRIC,
black Kenmore $150,
over-stove microwave
$50 386-631-8312
STOVE, ELECTRIC 30
inch, almond, works
good, clean, $75,
386-295-0365
STOVE- ELECTRIC 20",
apartment size, $150,
386-290-3252 VOL
TANK, RV, large, fresh
water, $75, large hitch fit
bike rack, $50,
386-576-6359
TANKS 265 gallon tote
tank, poly tank in steel
cage, used once, $80,
386-345-2422
TAPE PLAYER- reel to
reel, circ 1970's, sharp
solid stereo with tapes,
$20, obo 386-672-8961
TELEVISIONS, (2) one
21" color $50, black and
white 10" $25, obo
386-238-4045





SUPPORT
OUR
ADVERTISERS!
They make this
all possible!
HOMETOWN
NEWS
CLASSIFIEDS!
386-322-5949


TIRES 4 new Firestone,
P215/70R15/A/S, w/
Toyota Tacoma rims,
$200, 386-426-2944
TIRES w/rims, Good-
year, P215/65R17,
maybe 1,000 miles,
$180, 386-589-4082
TRAILIER KIT, Baby
Jogger II, storage bag,
bicycle trailer, 16" wh.
$100 386-314-6902
TREADMILL WESLO,
cadence c42, $35,
426-2372
TV EMERSON 27" with
DVD player. Good condi-
tion. $100. Call Glenn
386-690-9017
VIDEOS, VHS, children's
74 many Disney, 32 hard
case, $100 all
386-852-8289
WALL TILE 6"x8" off
white 300 pcs. $150.obo
Bose Car Radio $50 obo
cell 732-991-4196
WASHER & DRYER
Sears $125. both. TV 13"
RCA w/remote. Works
$35. 386-760-1539
WASHER& DRYER-
Kenmore, 70 series,
heavy duty, excellent
cond, $175obo,
386-308-3091
WASHER, heavy duty
$30, Electric Dryer,$30,
both run great!
386-441-6385, 212 3827
WEIGHT BENCH with
attachments & 160lbs of
weights $175 Stat bike
$25 386-689-0520
WHEEL CHAIR ramps,
front & back door, alumi-
num & adjustable, $200,
386-424-1933 Vol
WHEELCHAIR Light
weight, travel, like new,
$70, 10" Radial arm saw,
$110, 386-677-1984
WINDOWS Aluminum 4
36" x 62-1/2" w screens.
$30 ea. Sofa Sleeper $60
Will delv. 386-795-4459
WINE CABINET ;- iron,
holds 50 bottles, $100, 2
exterior lantern lights $25
ea. 386-589-6125



LUMBER LIQUIDA-
TORS Hardwood Floor-
Ing, from $.99/Sq.Ft.
Exotics, Oak, Bamboo,
Prefinished & Unfinish-
ed. Bellawood with 50
year prefinish, Plus A
Lot Morel We Deliver
Anywhere, 5 Florida
Locations 800-356-6746
1-800-FLOORING


STEEL BUILDINGS 5
only 25x28,30x42-, 40x44,
45x106, 80x150, Must
move nowl Will sell for
Balance Owed / Free
Delivery! 1-800-211-9594
ext 51



GET A New Computer
brand name laptops &
desktops, Bad or No
credit no problem. Small-
est weekly payments
available. Its yours now!
1-800-932-3721


*REDUCE YOUR Cable
Bill!* Get a 4-Room All
Digital Satellite system
installed for Free & pro-
ramming starting under
20. Free Digital Video
Recorders to new callers
call now 1-800-935-9195
DIRECTV FREE 4 Room
System 265+ Channels
Starts $29.991 Free HBO,
Showtime, Starzl 130 HD
Channels! Free DVR/HDI
No start up costs! Local
Installers! 800-973-9044



ENTERTAINMENT CTR.
European styling,24x53
x81,pd. $1199, fits most
36" tv's,, $499, will email
photos,386-304-8521
MAHOGANY DINING rm
set,' 6 chrs. w/leaf, per-
fect cond. $1000,Enter-
tainment Ctr. w/ roll out
shelves plus free 46"
TV,$600, 386-763-3344



ERECTILE Dysfunction
can be treated safely &
effectively without drugs
or surgery. Covered by
M e d i c a' r e I
1-800-815-1577 ext 362
www.lifecarediabetic
.supplies.com
ONLINE PHARMACY-
Buy Soma Ultram Fioricet
Prozac Buspar. 90 Qty
$51.99, price includes
prescription! We will
match any competitor's
prices 888-248-8193
PhoneMedication.com
PHENTERMINE- SOMA,
FIORICET & more. Doc-
tor CONSULTATION in-
cluded. Shipped FedX
1-3 days. 877-453-7701
www.EasyBudgetRx.com


QUICK WEIGHT LOSSI I
Phentermlnie,' Phendl-
metrazine & Adipex.
Anxiety? Pain? Head-
aches? Xanax, Soma,
Tramadol, Fioricet, more
discounted prices. Guar-
anteed FEDEX also go
online' 24/7 lowerrx.com
1-866-788-4530.
WEIGHT LOSS:
Phentermine, Xanax,
Carisoprodol & more.
Doctor Consultation in-
cluded. Shipped FedEx
overnight.
www.BestB]UdgbtRX.com
866-683-5744


**ALL SATELLITE Sys-
tems are not the same.
Programming starting
under $20 per month,
HDTV programming un-
der $10 per month &
Free HD & DVR systems
for new callers. Call Nowl
1-800-799-4935
A New Computer Brand
name laptops &, desk-
tops. Bad or No Credit-
No problem smallest
weekly payments availa-
ble. Its yours Now!
1-800-804-7475
A NEW Computer Now!
Brand Name. Bad or NO
Credit- No problem.
Smallest weekly pay-
ments available. Call
NOWI 1-800-838-7127
ADOPTION Give your
baby the best in life.
Living Expenses Paid.
Medical Expenses/'
Counseling, Paid. Many
Loving, Educated, Very
financially Secure Cou-
ples Walting! Call Jodi
Sue Rutstein, an Attor-
neyl Social Worker who
truly cares. #133050;
1-800-852-0041.

Why not
the best!
HOMETOWN
NEWS
CLASSIFIEDS
5 Counties!
Martin through
EastVolusia
Programs
for Businesses/
Special Rates
Private Party I
Give us'a call
386-322-5900
1-866-897-5949


CHROME WHEELS 4, 8
LUG, 16" $275, Miller
Welder, $400 Johnson
Outboard Motor. $400,
386-547-9867
DIRECTV FREE 4 Room
System 265+ Channels
Starts $29.99! Free HBO,
Showtime, Starz! 130 HD
Channels Free DVR/HD!
No start up costs! Local
Installers! 800-973-9044
FREE DIRECTV 4 Room
System! 265+ Channels
Start $29.991 Free HBO,
Showtime, StarzI 130 HD
Channels Free DVR/HDI
No start up costs! Local
installers! 800-620-0058
FREE DIRECTV 4 Room
System! 265+ channels
Starts $29.991 Free HBO,
Showtime, Starz! 130 HD
Channels! Free DVR/HD!
No start up costs! Local
installers! 800-203-7560
FREE DIRECTV 4 Room
System 265+ Channelsl
Starts $29:99! Free HBO,
Showtime, Starzl 130 HD
Channels! Free DVR/HD!
No start up coss! Local
Installers 1-800-216-7149
Generator Guardian
/Genrpac, 7KW natural.
gas/propane incl. auto
transfer switch, tested lx,
$600 386-366-2154
GET A NEW Computer
Brand name laptops &
Desktops. Bad or NO
credit- No problem.
Smallest weekly pay-
ments avail. It's Yours
NOW 800-640-0656
GET A NEW Computer-
Brand. Bad or NO credit-
no problem. Smallest
weekly payments availa-
ble. Call NOW!
1-800-624-1557
HARDWOOD FLOOR-
ING, 165 sq'ft. maple
tongue & groove, New in
box, 25 yr. warranty,
$450 obo, 386-673-7800
MEMORY FOAM Thera-
peutic Nasa Visco Mat-
tresses Wholesale! T-
$299, F-$349, Q-$399,
K-$499, Adjustables-
$799. Free Delivery, 25
year warranty, 60 Night
Trial, 1-800-ATSLEEP
1-800-287-5337
www.mattressdr.com .
MULTI ARCADE video
games w/ 48 games in
one, + Pin ball, coin op-
erated, low prices
Wayne: 386-748-4946
NATIONAL ADVERTIS-
INGI Reach over 30 mil-
lion homes with one buy.
Advertise in NANI for only
$2,495 per week Ask
about special Real Estate
Rates 1-866-897-5949


POWER CHAIR-Jet 3 Ul-
tra by Pride Mobility Prod-
ucts. Exc. conditional Cost
$6500; call w/ serious of-
fer. 386-760-5127
STEEL BUILDINGS. All
sizes welcome. Steel pri-
ces are down! Will help
with design. Additional
discounts available.
www.grevlensteel.com
1-866-802-8573



OLD GUITARS wanted.
Fender, Gibson, Martin,
dretsch, D'Angelio, rick-
enbacker 1930's-1980's.
Top dollar $$$ paid Call
1-866-433-8277 toll free





BICHON FRISE puppies,
white powder puffs, akc
reg. shots, health cert.
affectionate, $500, M
$650 F, 386 747 5629
CHIHUAHUA PUPPY
10wks,one loving male
tan w/ white markings,
family raised,not teacups
$350ea. 386-795-3188




SCHNAUZERS, S & P,
10 wks, $350, Maltese, 8
wks,M $600, F, $800,
shots & wormed,cash,
386-698-2787

Spay/Neuter
Walk-In Appe. or Drop Off
Dogs V
Male
$60.00 (Up to 29 Ibs.)
$70.00 (Up to 59 Ibs.)
$80.00 (Up to 80 Ibs.)
Female
$70.00 (Up to 29 Ibs.)
$80.00 (Up to 59 Ibs.)
$90.00 (Up to 80 Ibs.)
*over 80 bs. by spedd
awamenwt only by appoiment
-411 Cats
Male $45.00 Female $60.00

Val-U-Vet
Animal Health Inc.
Full Service Veterinary Clinic
549 Beville Rd
South Daytona
386-763-5208 E
1104 S. Nova Rd. L
Ormond Beach
386-672-3544


BOWFLEX XTREME,
new $500 obo plush,
Mickey Mouse $20, Mick-
ey Mouse vases $10ea.
386-566-0315


ORMOND BY the Sea,
1/17, 7:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m,
143 Laurie Drive, 9 pc
Living Rm set, farmer's
dining rm table +chairs,
boos block tbi & stools,
garden equip,& misc.
items, 386-212-6698
Please Tell Them...
I Saw It In
HOMETOWN NEWS
CLASSIFIEDSI
386-322-5949








Pet Nanny Plus
Pet Sitting in your home.
Domestic and exotic pets.
Many years of experience.
Daily visits dr 24 hr. service.
Licensed Bonded
and Dependable.
Plus~ *'.
House Sittirn
*Errands ~ *-
*Driver *.

386-252-4022

Why not

the best!

HOMETOWN
NEWS
CLASSIFIEDS

5 Counties!
Martin through
East Volusia

Programs
for Businessesl,

Special Rates
Private Party I

Give us a call!
386-322-5949
www.HometownNewsOL.com


PORT ORANGE, Sat,
1/17 & Sun. 1/18, 8:00
a.m.-3:00p.m, 1218 Tho-
masina Drive, Adult &
boys clothing, children's,
books misc. toys, glass
ware, dishes, and much
more, 386-761-6034




Highlight your
ad and get it
sold fast!
Whether Buying or
Selling we are your
ONE call solution
HOMETOWN NEWS
386-322-5949







Walk-in Clinic
Monday Friday
10:00 am 6:oopm
Saturday.
10:00 am 4:00pm
Rabies $8 .
Dogs lo
5-Way $12
6Way $15
3 Year Distemper $26
Bordetella $14
3DX Heartworm Testing $22
Routine Worming $7-$15
C0e cats

4-Way $12
5-Way $24
Leukemia/FIV $35
Worming $7-$15
Fecal Flotation $11.60
AVID Microchips $30
Best Prices!
Heartguard Plus
Frontier Plus Interceptor
Advantage Feline
Revolution Advantix R
Capstar Confortis

Spay/Neuter by Appt.
Val-U-Vet
Animal Health Inc.
Full service Veterinary Clinic
549 Beville Rd
South Daytona
386-763-5208
1104 S.Nova Rd.
Ormond Beach
386-672-3544


- PROFESSIONAL SERVICE GUIDE


CALL THE MANI He will
fix your heating'' or AC
problems. Used units
available. United Serv-
ices, LLC Lic. #CACO
58104 386-767-8237






WANTED JUNK CARS
Running or not $200 &
up. We pay cash! 24-hrs.
Call 321-631-0111
Tell 'em you saw it in
HOMETOWN NEWS
CLASSIFIED!
366-322-5949


BOB MILLAN!
CARPENTRY LLC
Speclallizing in DOOR &.
WINDOW' Installations,
Chair Rail, Crown & Base
Molding, Attic.' Stairs,
Kitchen Cabinrits,. Cus-
tqm, Work*&A, other car-_
.pentry solutions. 30+ yrs.
Lic./lns.'386-304:-1228



CHIMNEY & Dryer Vent
Cleaning Since 1965. All
Repairs Fireplace Serv-
ices Inc. 386-767-9392
GREAT NEWS AND
CLASSIFIED ADSI
HOMETOWN NEWS
386-322-5949


A NEW Computer Now!
Brand .Name Laptops/
Desktops. Bad/No Credit,
No Problem! Smallest
Weekly Payments.
1-800-645-0287



CALL THE MANI Electri-
cal contractor w/45 yrs
exp. Lack of work means
good prices for you. Unit-
ed Services LLC. Lic.#ES
0000157. 386-767-8237
$$$$$$$$$$ -
IN A HURRY
TO SELL??
Call the
BEST
classified
section
on the east
coast!
HOMETOWN NEWS
CLASSIFIEDS!
386-322-5949
$ $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$


KIRK'S
Home Improvements
*Painting
*Pressure Wash
*Everythirgfrom the
ground up.
No job too ,,big or too
small. 15 yrs in busi-
ness in Volusial
*Very neat, clean, or-
ganized work!
Free Est. Lic/Ins
386-451-5520

Kirkshomeimprovements
.comr



The hiring of a lawyer Is an
important decision that
should not be based solely
on advertisements. Before
you decide, ask the lawyer to
send you free written infor-
mation about their qualifica-
tions and experience.
Under Florida law,
non-lawyers are permitted to
sell legal forms and kits and
type in the factual informa-
tion provided by their cus-
tomers. They may not, how-
ever, give legal advice.


A D O P T IO N
*1-877-341-1309* A won-
derful choice pregnant?
Loving, stable, financially
secure couples seek to
adopt newborns or in-
fants. Expenses paid.
Call 24 hours. *Atty Ellen
Kaplan FL Bar #0875228
ARRESTED? Accused?
Accident Victim? Hurt?
Talk to a Lawyer Now!
Statewide... 24 Hours
Personal Injury Criminal
Defense Attorney Refer-
ral Service, Protect Your
Rights. 1-800-733-5342
freelegalshield.com,
aaaattorneyreferral.com



*DIVORCE* *Bankruptcy
Starting at $65 *1 Signa-
ture Divorce, *Missing
Spouse Divorce "We
Corn to youl" Since 1992
1-888-705-7221.
Tell 'em you
saw it in
HOMETOWN
NEWS
CLASSIFIEDS!
386-322-5949


JIM'S
PAINTING

-Interior & Exterior
-Residential&
Commercial
-Licensed & Insured
-Fast & Reliable
Quality Products

FREE ESTIMATES
386-383-8788
References Available.
Call Classified
386-322-5949


CHRISTIAN
PLUMBING & TILE




Drains Cleaned
* Leaky Showers/Tubs/Faucets
*WaterHeaters
*Spinkler/Solar Panel
* MBatWMtcen Remodels D
*TI.lCeraml.Mobalc-aite
Commercial Residential
Licensed/Insured CFC050578
672-3462
Call Classified
386-322-5949


METAL ROOFING SAVE
$$$ Buy direct from man-
ufacturer. 20 colors in
stock, w/accessories.
tuick turn around. Deliv-
ery. Gulf Coast Supply &
Manufacturing, Inc.
1-888-393-0335 www.
gulfcoastsupply.com

NEED
TO HIRE??
CALL
CLASSIFIED
386-322-5949


*REDUCE YOUR Cable
Bill!*- Get a 4-room, all
digital satellite system
installed for FREE & Pro-
gramming starting under
20. Free Digital Video
Recorders, to new clients.
So call now,
1-800-795;3579



FINE LINE Wallpaper &
Painting Wallpaper in-
stall & removal. Interior
&Exterior painting. No job
too small Serving Eastern
Volusia 386-492-5350


McKenzie's
Home Improvement



Door & Window Installation
Storm Shutters Installed
All Types Roof Repairs
S*30 Years Experience
Licensed & Insured
CRC1327744 CCC1328086
www.bmckenzie.com .


FREE ISGHAVSOMETHING TO-SELL


Household Merchandise? Under 200oo?

BY EMAIL classified@HometownNewsOL.com

or log onto www.HometownNewsOL.com to place your ad
,Please Mail, Fax or Email Your Free Ad No Phone Calls
Thanks to all of our readers for submitting your Free ads for merchandise priced under $200.
A gentle reminder: We allow 4 lines only including your phone number and only 2 ads per month per household.
Ads are scheduled for 2 consecutive Friday publications. If you sell the item, you can cancel it and submit an ad to replace it.
All FREE ads must be submitted by mail, fax or email. We cannot handle phone calls for free ads at this time.
And finally, please remember to include your name and address when submitting your ads.
Our advertisers make this service possible, so thank you for supporting our advertisers and
thank you for reading the HOMETOWN NEWSIIII
HOME OFFICE SOUTH DAYTONA OFFICE
1102 S. U.S. 1 2400 S. Ridgewood Ave. #22
Fort Pierce, FL 34950 South Daytona, FL 32119
IFax77 ,45566 a 386-322-5944


r-----------------------------------.
For private party use only Commercial advertising is not eligible 2 ads per month



-;-- --- -











Address City State Zip

Home Phone Daytime Phone

Mail or Fax Coupon to the Hometown News Office Nearest You!
Deadline for Free Ads is Monday at 5:00 pm


- EMPLOYMENT


LOOKING FOR Stylist,
Cosmetologist, Barber,
Massage Therapist booth
rental/commis, &salon
assistant. Great location.
Please call 386-760-7929
or apply at 927 Beville
Rd, So. Daytona, FL
INDEPENDENT Beauty
Consultants. L'Bel a
luxury French skin care
company Is currently
seeking Independent
Beauty Consultants to
expand Its direct selling
business. Great 2nd in-
come opportunity. Call
1-877-511-1618 or www.
Lbel.com/pennysaver



Photos say it all!
VISIT OUR
ONLINE SITE
www.HometownNewsOL.com
Photos with your ad,
High Definition Slide
Shows and more
386-322-5949


FREE TO travel? Are you
free to travel? 18 or old-
er? Travel sale jobsI No
experience Necessary!
Commission Weekly.
Daily Cash Bonuses. Call
Today, Start Today Ms
Cooper 1-888-384-8021
REAL ESTATE SALES
Now hiring licensed real-
tors. We are now in the-
Port Orange area. This is
your chance to see how
Weichert Realtors works.
Candice 386-679-4613


CNC MACHINIST
Programmer experience
on Mazak Milling Centers
and Lathes required. All
applicants must be able
to lift 50 Ibs. First shift
available.
We offer competitive
wages and a great bene-
fit package. Please apply
or send resumes to:
Microflex, Inc., 1800 N.
US Hwyl. Ormond Bch,
FL 32174 DFWP/EOE
386-672-7623


DRIVERS- Miles &
Freight! Positions availa-
ble' ASAP! CDL-A with
tanker required. Top pay
& Premium benefits &
much morel Call 1-
877-484-3042 or visit:
oakleytransport.com
TRUCK DRIVERS Want-
ed- Best Pay & Home
Time Apply Online To-
day over 750 Companies!
One Application, Hun-
dreds of offers! http://
hammerlanejobs.com


Photos say it alll
Photos with your ad,
High Definition Slide
Shows and more
VISIT OUR
ONLINE SITE
www.HometownNewsOL.com
386-322-5949


- TRAINING & EDUCATION


ADULT HIGH School
Diploma at home fast
Nationally accredited
$399. Easy payment
plan. Free brochure
www.diplomaathome
.cornm 1-800-470-4723
AIRLINES ARE Hiring-
Train for high paying Avi-
ation Maintenance Ca-
reer. FAA approved pro-
gram. Financial aid if
qualified Housing avail-
able. Call Aviation Insti-
tute of Maintenance
1-888-349-5387
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
IN A HURRY TO
SELL????
Call the best
classified section
on the east coast!
HOMETOWN NEWS
CLASSIFIEDSI
386-322-5949


AIRLINES ARE Hiring-
Train for high paying Avi-
ation Maintenance Ca-
reer. FAA approved pro-
gram. Financial aid if
qualified Housing avail-
able. Call Aviation Insti-
tute of Maintenance
1-888-349-5387
AMERICAN ACADEMY
Home Study earn your
adult high school diploma
in 6 to 12 weeks. Tuition
$399 payment plan avail-
able start today: visit web
site www.
diplomaathome.com
1-800-470-4723
ATTEND COLLEGE On-
line from Home. *Medical
*Business,*Paralegal,*Co
mputers,*Criminal Jus-
tice. Job placement as-
sistance. Computer avail-
able. Financial aid if
qualified. 1-800-494-2785
www.CentraOnline.com


ATTEND College Online
from Home. *Medical,
*Business, *Paralegal,
*Computers, *Criminal
Justice. Job placement
assistance, Computer
available. Financial aid if
qualified. 1-800-510-0784
www.CentraOnline.com
AVIATION Maintenance
/Avionics graduate in 14
months. FAA approved;
financial aid if qualified.
Job placement assis-
tance. Call National Avia-
tion Academy today!
800-659-2080 / NAA.edu
BODYGUARDS Coun-
ter Assault Teams!
Needed/USA & Overseas
$119-$220K year. Body-
guards $250-$750 day;
18 older 615-885-8960 or
615-942-6978 Ext. 600
internationalexecutive.net
Call Classified
386-322-5949


CAN YOU Dig It? Heavy
Equipment School. 3
week training program.
Backhoes, Bulldozers,
Trackhoes. Local job
placement assistance.
Start digging dirt now.
1-866-362-6497
COUNTER-ASSAULT
TRAININGI Protect over-
seas contractors. Earn
upto $220K/yrl 80% Tax
E x e m p t i o n I
Military/Police experience
necessary. Professional
Bodyguards. PAID Train-
ing available. Up to $400
,/day. www.lnternationalExe-
cutives.net 615-885-8960
ext.233

AAAAAA
NEED tO HIRE..
CALL CLASSIFIED
386-322-5949


EARN YOUR High
School Diploma at Home
in a few short weeks.
Work at your own pace.
First Coast Academy.
Nationally Accredited.
Call for Free Brochure.
1-800-658-1180 ext 82
www.fcahighschool.oro
HIGH SCHOOL Diplomat
Fast, Affordable, Accred-
ited. Free Brochure. 800-
532-6546 Ext 412
continentalacademy.com
HIGH SCHOOL Diplomat
Fast, affordable, accredit-
ed. Free brochure. www.
continental academy.com
Call now!
1-800-532-6546 ext 16
LEARN PARALEGAL,
Legal Nurse Consultant
and Criminal Justice. Af-
fordable, accredited col-
lege, Online courses
available. Free info.
800-354-1254 Visit www.
theparalegalinstitute.edu


Looking for a
career change?
Looking to earn
more income? ,
Average income
$38K/year with
incomes over $100k
Call Nate, LLC
1-888-924-0004
for recorded message
and/or live support.
,. OR visit us online
wwW.nateLLC.com
NOW HIRING!
PROFESSIONAL BODY-
GUARDS needed. Free
training with membership.
No experience. Excellent
$$$$. No Felonies.
615-228-1701 www.
psubodyguards.com


'S KITCHENS &
BATHROOMS

B JO Our Specialty

No job too Big or too Small
Tile Sheet Rock Plaster s(

License I 2I I4nsured2


NEIL MARTIN CONSTRUCTION CGC1511436

BRICK PAVERS
Beautify Your Home with Pavers
Concrete Work, Driveways, Patios, Additions
* Visa & Mastercard Accepted We Pull the Permits
* Fast, Courteous Response State Certified Contractor
* Locally Owned and Operated Licensed & Insured
Call to Select Your Colors 8
(386) 795-1843


AMMI E V I' a a Mil 0 E 3WA- WWK am M MR 2 a a a Ell a I










B8 Daytona Beach/Holly Hill


Hometown News


Friday, January 16,2009


- REAL ESTATE FOR SALE
76 ut 725 Resid iL 730 tuiential M
6E'iiEi~rpeorSle Ae|^age orSal Homes^^^ for^u3B SaefrSl


NSB Waterfront, Home-
stead, 3/2, deep H20 NEW SMYRNA BEACH
Canal, tile, sunroom. Ap- Beautiful 2.5 acres.
raised at $595K Brina Cleared, fenced ready to


ALL offersI $540K Must
see! 407-474-0696



JENSEN BEACH Ocean
Bay Villas 3/3/1 brand
new on the ocean!
Elevator and beautiful
views. Must see.
$575,000 561-427-9770
email lory43@aol.com
ril]1[ ]'. 8


build. Country setting
Close to 95 & local
shopping. Owner forced
to sell due to illness.
$125,000/obo
386-689-3045
NORTH CAROLINA
MOUNTAINS
Easy to finish new log
cabin shell on 1.7 acres,
$89,900. 2acre-5acre wa-
terfront homesites from
$99,900. Easy access
mountain homesites
$29,900-$89,900.
R9a.4A7.QQRa irain1Q\l


ABSOLUTE AUCTIONS:
Condo & Commercial
Building. Also at Auction, 70Mauacue
Beachfront Homes, 6bed-
room Bayfront Estate,
Deepwater Canal Lot
6Acre Estate Home. EDGEWATER 55+ split
941-488-1500 plan furnished 1/1, open
VanDeRee Auction LR & kitchen. Screen
www.vanderee.com room, laundry workshop,
roofover. Central A/C,
DAYTONA BEACH (2), heat. $7000 terms.
old,3 bdrm homes, on 1 386-424-1890
1/4 acres of Forested_
secluded, prop. This is a FISHERMANS Paradise
find! Needs work! on Lake Marian 2/2
$150,000, 386-238 -7045 2005 724sqft, Cent A/C,
DAYTONA/ HOLLY HILL w/d, Low rent Inc. water,
2-br/1-ba, very nice. sewer, garbage. Fin avail
Concrete block with $35,000 407-436-1334
C/H/A. 158 Edwards St.
For sale by owner/realtor. MELBOURNE MOBILE
$69,000 386-295-6294 Homes. 2BR from $2500
OAK HILL- 4/10 mile to to $18,000 **Broadview
Indian River. Well main- 55+, Post Road. Tan-
tiained 3/2/2 + bonus rm tara, All family. Near
14 x 22.5 & fireplace on schools and showing,
.9. acres, fenced yd Office 321-259-35227
$269K 386-345-0113 Park mgr 407-283-5277
PORT ORANGE 3/2/2 NEW SMYRNA BEACH
pool home on 2/3 acre. 55+ Singlewide. Large
S265K. Fireplace, home screened patio & carport,
100% renovated, close to 3-br/1.5-ba, C/H/A, Newly
1-95 & schools. Must See renovated, Brand new
386-756-0435 berber carpet throughout
Close to everything.
$8,500 Possible
RE U E F n an ci n g
386-416-9189/427-9888
Port Orange- 10 min. to 386-416-9189/427-9888
beach! For $137,000 not
only get a home in a gor- ORMOND BEACH Falls
geous, gated comm. you Health issues forces
also ,e a lifestylel 2//1. widow to sell exceptional
Activities 2 alore 1376sqft plus. 12x16 FL
Clubhse, 2 pools, hom
tub, tennis, etc. Lease or room & 10x10 storage.
.rental,: trade- looking to Tastefully decorated.
downsize. Appliance Move in cond. Priced
.uPgrades. 386-761-5674 below value $49,500/obo
oto ad #58351 www. 386-671-3046
HometownNewsOL.com___


- REAL ESI


Daytona Beach- Newer
home, 1-95 & LPGA. Furn
rm w/bath, house privi-
leges. Non smkr. $125
wk +dep. Incls.util. inter-
net acc. 386-274-2054
SOUTH DAYTONA Lake
FrontI Studio/Apt., Furn.,
Incls. all utils., cable TV &
Internet. $325/bi weekly.
386-316-2979




Highlight your
ad and get it sold
fast!
Whether Buying
or Selling we are
your total source
for classified!
HOMETOWN NEWS
386-322-5949
Classified 386-322-5949


1976 PLYMOUTH VOL-
ARE Roadrunner. Re-
stomod., custom paint.
performance upgrades,
garage kept, $9800. of-
fers. Jim evens.
386-673-9077
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
IN A HURRY TO
SELL????
Call the best
classified section
on the east coast
HOMETOWN NEWS
CLASSIFIEDSI
386-322-5949


DAYTONA 820 State Av
2br,lba renovated, 2nd
fir, balcony & back yard
for barbeques. Water,
sewer, garb Incld $699. +
dep. call Adam for details
386-547-2357
DAYTONA BCH Ocean
front 16th fir. 2/2 unfurn.
1275sf. kit, dining, 50'
priv balcony. Pool, clbhs,
fitness. $1225. 1st last
sec. yrly. Ocean Ritz
386-316-8050
DAYTONA BEACH -
1-bdrm, 1-ba, $416/mo.
$250 MOVES YOU IN!
Large pets welcome! Call
Elaine at Nbvawood
Apartments, 1220 South
Nova Road, Daytona
Beach, FL 386-257-1110


DAYTONA BEACH Cen-
tral Manor Apts serving
adults 62+ or mobility
impaired. lbd/lba Rent
based on income.
386-255-2622 EOH&


BLOWN HEAD Gasket?
State of the art 2-part car-
bon metallic chemical
process. Repair yourself.
100% guaranteed.
1-866-780-9038 or. 1-866
-750-8780 (Se Habla Es-
panol) www.RXHP.com
CHEVY ASTRO Van,
2003,8 pass, 58k ml, pwr
window, locks,& mirrors,
great cond. $7600
386-761-6034, 795-2348

MERCEDES,1985,380
SE, new engine, well
maint, mechanically
sound, Nice Ride! $35K
obo 615-419-3555


ORMOND BEACH- 55+
community, Best Priced
Homes&Lowest Rents 28
years of business with
you.6 great buys $4500
-$6000 386-672-1276 /
451-4018
ORMOND BEACH-
Ready to Deal Beautiful
2008 MH in 55+ park
all the bells & whistle.
$46,900. 6 mos free lot
rent. 386-672-1276 or
386-451-4018
PALM BAY,'05, 2br/2ba/
carport. In Holiday Park.
Close to 1-95, Shopping,
& Restaurants. $67,000.
321-725-0305
PORT ORANGE New
homes in beautiful 55+
community the low $90's
New clbhse & pool. Mod-
el Open 10-4 Daily & Sun
12-4. Call 386-562-6836
or 386-756-8700
MaplewoodEstates.net
PORT ORANGE Newly
remodeled beauty, fully
furn. 50+, 2/2 C/H/A, car-
ort, shed W/D, poss. 3rd
rm. Possible owner finch.
63 Regency Pickwick Vil-
lage. Reduced to
$22,900. 386-547-4175
USE YOUR mobile home
as a down payment on
my single family home.
386-547-4175
VERO BEACH: Motivat-
ed Seller, Financing Avail
for Furnished 2br/2ba, FL
room. $62,900 plus op-
tion to rent or buy land.
Take advantage of Go-
vernment First Time
Home Buyers Program.
Up to $7500 can be ap-
plied toward down pay-
ment. 866-605-7255



20+ ACRES post & beam
barn $119,900. New 22x
30 post & beam barn built
on gorgeous 20+ acres in
the country. Potential to
subdivide. Near FL/GA
border- 90 minutes Jack-
sonville Excellent fi-
nancing. Call now
1-800-898-4409, x.2169


ATE F0,



DAYTONA BEACH, ren-
ovated furnished 1/1 Top
floor with Oceanview,
new carpet, tile, gym,
sauna and pool. No
Smoking / Pets $800/mo
386-427-2980
DAYTONA BEACH- 1/2
blk to BeachI Clean, spa-
clous 900sf 4-plex, new
paint, nice area 2/1 $695
mo. + dep. incld some util
386-235-2561 '



LS
DAYTONAIORMOND
BCH beautiful 2/2, com-
pletely upgraded, all
stainless 'steel apple, new
w/d, hdwd. firs, spanish
tile, gated comm. Avail.
now. Pets ok. Amazing
.$785mo 386-214-0085
GREAT NEWS AND
CLASSIFIED ADSI
HOMETOWN NEWS


MUSTANG,Convertible
Red, 2000, very low ml
leather inter. loaded,17"
TR whis, upgraded ster-
eo sys. 386-788-2563




DONATE YOUR CAR...
To the Cancer Fund of
America. Help those suf-
fering with Cancer Today.
Free Towing & Tax de-
ductible. 1-800-835-9372
www.cfoa.org


-3I.to Ae


I -


* Volusia County (4 papers)
(Port Orange/New Smyrna/South Daytona;
Daytona Beach/Ormond Beach)
Brevard County (5 papers)
(Palm Bay/Melbourne;
Beaches/Suntree/Viera/Rockledge;
- Cocoa/ Merritt isl./Cocoa Bch/Cape;
Titusville/ PSJ/Mims)
Indian River County (2 papers)
. (Vero Beach/Sebastian)
-, St. Lucie County (2 papers)
(Ft. Pierce/Port St. Lucie)
S Martin County (1 paper)
(Stuart/Jensen/Palm City/
Hobe Sound/Sewalls Pt.)


DAYTONA BEACH -
Studio, 1 room, furnish-
ed. Lights, phone & cable
included. *On the Beachl
$600mo. 904-993-2910
DAYTONA BEACHSIDE
1 bedroom, In four-plex.
located near Main Street.
Off street parking. Utilit-
ies incl. $600/mo.
Call Bill 914-806-0502
FLAGLER BEACH 1/1
2nd floor high rise, furn,
across from ocean,
secure bldg. $725/mo
386-439-5866
HOLLY HILL, Sq. Beau-
tiful 2br/2ba fresh paint-
new carpet, pool Tennis,
Lndry, no smok. $675,
$325 dep 386-258-5420
HOLLY HILL- Brand New
Marina Grande on the
Halifax River, fully fur-
nished, 2Bed/2Bath, 12th
Floor. Tower 1, great riv-
er view, new weight rm,
$2,500/mo, 1st, Last &
Sec. Bkgrnd chk re-
quired. No Pets allowed.
Call Laurie 386-451-2597
INDIAN HARBOR BCH
Newly renovated Spanish
style 2/2 incl water & W/D
Close to Ocean $850/mo
321-777-2368
NEW SMYRNA Free
.1st Month Rent $595.
moves you in. 2br, lba.'
1200sf. $650. 3BR 2BA
1300sf. Bonus office area
$785. $595 dep. Great
location W/D hkup. Huge
closet, C/A/C water incld.
No dogs. 386-689-1243
NEW SMYRNA OCEAN
VIEW Large studio con-
do, directly across street
from ocean. First floor.
beautifully decorated.
Utilities & Cable incl. pool
& laundry facility on
premises. Monthly or
Yearly 386-689-1243
ORMOND BEACH 2/2
furn or unfurn, freshly
painted. All amenities
$675/mo F/L/S 1 yr. min.
352-978-6377

WOw
PORT ORANGE 1Br
/1BA studio, Walk to
beach! No pets 1st, last.
security. $575 mo.
386-756-0435








WANTED JUNK CARS
Running or not $200 &
up. We pay cash! 24-hrs.
Call 321-631-0111

Tell 'em you
saw it in
HOMETOWN
NEWS
CLASSIFIEDS!
386-322-5949


ORMOND BEACH,26'
Ocean deck, River View,
1200 sf, 2BR/2BA, Furn,
Pool, Prkg, $850 mo,
386-492-7548




SEBASTIAN-SPACIOUS
& AFFORDABLE- 2/2 &
3/2 apts. $600 Deposit
moves you ,in w/good
credit, + 2 months Free
Rent! CALL TODAY!!
772-581-4440 *Income
Restrictions Apply

wow
VERO BEACH: Call for
specials! Great 1br & 2br
from $500. Tile, New
apple. Close to Beaches,
Parks & Rest.
772-563-0013


DAYTONA BEACH -
Great Home Great Price!
Remodeled 3bdrm, 1.5ba
tile/hardwood floors, car-
port, family room, patio,
washer & dryer, central
A/C, ceiling fans. Quiet
area. Affordable $890/mo
386-313-6908 ; 569-5944
Daytona Beach
2br, 2ba condo, pool,
near beach, shopping,
dining &morel $850/mo.
Ormond Beach
3br, 2ba, 2cg, mins to
beach, $1200/mo.
Holly Hill 3br, 2ba
house, fresh paint, car-
pet, tile. $850/mo. Call
Select Ormond Homes
386-615-7870 or view
online at www.
selectormondhomes.com
DAYTONA MAINLAND -
Clean 2 Bedroom, 1 bath.
Large Florida Room, ga-
rage, central heat/air,
fenced yard. No pets.
$750/month. First and
Security. 386-252-5738
GOLF FRONT LPGA ,-
Brand New Home, Never
lived in. 3bdrm +
study/possible 4th bdrm.
3 baths. 2 car garage.
Modern, open floor plan,
ceramic tile. Fairway
view. $1,750/mo or lease
w/option to buy
407-342-7941


DIRT BIKE HENSIM,
150cc, I yr old, w/pads &
helmet, excel, beg. bike,
less than 60 hrs. of use,
$900 obo 386-673-7800



SELL YOUR
HOME
with an ad in the
Hometown News
5 COUNTIES
Martin County thru
Ormond Beach!
386-322-5949


AAAHI AFFORDABLE
HOMES, CABINS, LAND
FREE BROCHURE
877-837-2288
EXIT REALTY MVP
MURPHY, NC
www.exitmurphy.com
BUY TIMESHARE Re-
sales Save 60-80% off.
Retail! Best Resorts &
Seasons. Call for Free
Timeshare Magazine!
1-800-639-5319 www.
holidaygroup.com/flier

*WEa iP.....
EAST CENTRAL GA
21 AC -$1,995/AC
Hardwood bottom,
planted pine,
surrounded by
farms & timberland.
stregispaper.com
478-987-9700'
St. Regis Paper Co.
GEORGIA Claxton.
Evans County 8.5 acres
on beautiful flowing creek
1/4 mile from river boat
landing, road frontage on
hwy 129 and country road
frontage, large trees, ex-
cellent fishing. $35,000
for quick sale, possible
owner financing.
912-427-7062 or Cell#
912-269-9349
Please Tell Them...
I Saw It In
HOMETOWN NEWS
CLASSIFIEDSI
386-322-5949


GEORGIA Southern
Wayne County. 25 Acres.
2 small fish ponds, coun-
ty and private road front-
age, beautiful land, would
make excellent blueberry
farm or small ranch.
$2,500/ac. Poss. owner
financing. 912-427-7062
Cell 912-269-9349


AFFORDABLE
GEORGIA, BEAUTIFUL
tracts in Toombs County
Georgia. County. Road
frontage & private roads,
cleared & ready to build
or put doublewide. Some
lake front tracts. Each,
tract is 3 to 5 acres.
$2500/acre CASH. 7 dif-
ferent tracts to choose
from. 912-427-7062
912-269-9349
GOLF LOT BARGAINI
NOW $39,900 (was
$139,900)lncludes Mem-
bership! Rare opportunity
to own a beautiful view
homesite, In upstate SC's
finest golf community-
Now for a fraction of it's
value. Paved rds, water,
sewer, all infrastructure
completed. Get much
more for much less. Low
rate financing avail. Call
now 866-334-3253 ext
2132


REAL ESTATE

FOR SALE!

Line Ad Promotion

Buy 1 Week

Get 3 Weeks FREE!
ADD A PHOTO ON LINE AND IN PAPER!


&RmetownNews
866-897-5949

386-322-5949


DAYTONA- HOLLY HILL
Absolute best value.
Almost 2000sf, 3/2/2,
completely updated, lots
of tile, new carpet, celling
fans, located off Nova &
3rd St. $925 + util
386-237-1295
NEW SMYRNA
Beachslde 822 Hope
Ave, 1/1 bonus & sun
room, w/d, 100 yds to
beach, pets negot
$700/mo, 386-316-9834
NEW SMYRNA Florida
Shores, Executive home
onm 1/2ac-,4/2/2 jacuzzi &
walk In closet in master
Lg. kitchen, 14x28 great
room, too many extras to
list. $1,000/mo. First &
Deposit. Pet ok w/deposit
N/S. 386-547-2862
NEW SMYRNA BEACH
Sugar Mill Golf Course
2/2/2, W/D. gated com-
munity with heated pool
access. $1150/mo FLS
386-441-5824.
ORMOND BEACH Ex-
ceptional! Large 2000+sf.
3br/3ba/2cg in The Trails.
New carpet & apples. Fplc:
$1,250mo + security. No
pets. Call 386-677-3782
ORMOND BEACHSIDE -
2br, lba, kit, living rm,
W/D, Irg scrned porch.
Use of pool, club hse
close to ocean. incids
lawn care. $700. + sec.
386-672-0711
ORMOND BY THE SEA
- Spacious 3bdrm,lba,
central heat & air, private
fenced yard, W/D, walk to
beach, small pets OK.
$795/mo 310-804-3266


REDUCED
ORMOND BY THE SEA
Remodeled 2/1 all tile,
Living Room, Dining
Room & Family Room,
fireplace, 11x24 screened
in porch; Private fenced
in yard. New Roof & A/C.
$750/mo + Security.
Walk to shopping and
B e a c h
piperno@earthllnk.net
Call 386-677-3999
ORMOND BY THE SEA-
Great .beachside neigh
borhoodl 3/2/2, LR, DR,
FR,, oak floors. Walk to
beach. $1100/mo.
305-394-0212


5TH WHEEL & pickup
truck 33' CEDAR CREEK
'00 sleeps 4, 2 slide outs
Top of the line. $23,000
for both 772-464-6568

CAMPING MEMBER-
SHIP LIFETIMEl
Camp Coast to Coast
USA/Canada/Florida. $10
per night (full hook-up)
Year Round. Paid $1595,
illness forces sale $595.
1-800-236-0327
DUTCHMAN 26', 2002
full kitchen retract. awn-
ing, sleeps 6, 2 showers,
exc. cond. $9000, obo
407-920-6849




GB Pursuit, 35' '05, class
A, Ford V-10, dual slides,
18K/mi., extras, extw,
$51K/obo 804-994-318


GEORGIE BOY 00: 35.5'
Sleeps 5/6, 29kmi, driver
door, 1 slide, 2 A/C, heat-
er & TV's, full bath, 5KW
gen $32k 321-452-5897


DAYTONA BEACH Pool
home 3/2/1cg. new kit.
fenced yard, pets okay.
Furn or unfurn. Seasonal,
yearly. 386-562-6100
PORT ORANGE Availa-
ble Jan 1st, 2BR home,
screened porch, private
rd, fenced in yard, alum.
shed, 1st/ last month req.
$900mo. NO PETS.
386-316-7330'til 8pm
PORT ORANGE 3/2/2
Pool home. Near 1-95 &
School. NO pets, 'boats,
RV okay, $1750 mo 1st
last; sec. 386-756-0435-
PORT ORANGE- 3bdrm,
1.5ba, 1 car garage.
1200+sqft. Large fenced
backyard w/6ft. privacy
fence. Quiet neighbor-
hood, close to shopping
& restaurants. $1400/mo
Available January 31st
386-492-6884
PORT ORANGE- very
,clean dblewide spacious
3br/2ba, w/d hk-up in-
side, Ig screened porch,
carport. No smoking/pets
$750/mo. 1 year lease.
Lawn & pest Incl. F/US
386-767-0020



DAYTONA BCH: LPGA
3/2/2 Villa 2 yrs nflew, pri-
vate, secure; overlooks
lake. Golf community.
$1250/mo Security
386-441-2874
DAYTONA TOWNHOME
2br/2ba 913 Willard Ct.
$760 mo. +sec. dep.
Avail now. 386-676-1018,
386-451-0509
NEW SMYRNA BEACH
unfurnished Beauty on
the lake. 3/2.5-ba W/D,
Large patio Cedar Dunes
$1100/mo 386-4?8-7753
ORMOND BEACH The
Trails, 2br/2ba, on lake,
granite counters, like
new, comm. pool. Only
$895mo. 386-569-1811
ORMOND TRAILS TH
2br, 2.5ba, Jacuzzi, fire-
place, end unit w/2 court
yards. 1600sf. $995.mo
386-672-9991
PORT ORANGE TH, 2br
1.5ba, fully remodeled.
Dishwsher, W/D Fenced
yard w/pool $895.mo Call
Dana 386-763-5475


940 Ri/Tavel
rlai IncmriClers
Ma Iae 1esels,

FRESH TlMDES
PRICE TO SEMi
62753A-03
Wi 2-SLO nDE& S.
$20.000.00 OFFL UST
6XOO7A-S91 PACE ARROW
35V I1-$14.900.00
88 1TiY RESORT 27'
TT-42,500.00 AS-IS










CHEVY 1990 utility bed'
1992 305 engine. New
paint, dual tires, runs
Seat. Exc. work truck.
3000/obo 386-689-1772


SOUTH DAYTONA -
Riverbreeze Townhomes.
2 bedrooms, 2 baths,
completely remodeled.
Tiles floors, new kitchen
cabinets, 1100sqft. From
$650 $750/mo. Pets
under 201bs welcome.
386-566-8379
TRAILS LAKEVIEW TH
2/2/1. Newly remodeled.
$900mo $895.mo if pd by
1St. A12t off 1st mo. rent
$1000 sec. 386-334-2247



DAYTONA BEACH Ab-
solute best value! Over
1000sf 'of living, 2/2, just
remodeled, conveniently
located off Nova & 3rd St.
$675/mo. + utilities
386-237-1295
DAYTONA BEACH
Mainland 2 bedroom
Duplex. Central Air,
Porch; $650/mo.
Call Bill 914-806-0502
DAYTONA DUPLEX 2br,
1 bath apt. Quiet Street.
$625 plus security dep.
386-676-1018
EDGEWATER, 2b/2b,
duplex, 1100 sf cul-de-
sac, wd, tl, crpt, firs. 1/cg,
fcd.yd, no pets, no smkg,
$850 mo, 386-679-8658


GEORGIA, WHITE
PLAINS: $287/mo Pay-
ments to Seller! 5 Acres
for sale, owner financing,
(property is part of a larg-
er 650acre plantation al-.
so for sale). Located 1hr
from Atlanta & Augusta,
Other parcels range from
$3,950/ac.-$5,950/ac,
www.reedplantation.com,
chrls@reedplantatlon.com
Call 404-354-5872
LAND IS STILL THE
BEST INVESTMENT -
Stop losing money in the
stock market!
TEXAS & OLD MEXICO
Affordable Hunting &
Fishing Property.
10OAcres for $79,000
w/10% down & no credit
check. All sizes available
up to 20,000 acres.
1-877-77-BIGLAND
(877-772-4452)
MID TENN MTNS
By Owner, 5 acres, per-
fect mountaintop
cabin-site "w/woods.
Small stream In back of'
property. A must seel
26,,900. Owner Financ-
lhg 931-445-3611


WOW
NC: Smoky Mountains
Log Cabin, Furn 2br/2ba,
Porch, Hot tub, Fireplace,
Vacation home or Daily
'Rental Prog. Must Sell.
321-432-1557 $145,000


Colonial Colony So. Lrg
dblewde 2/2 unfurn. 2
pools, water, cable, trash,
lawncare. No smk/no pet,
$850mo. + sec. 1294
Bunker Hill Daytona Bch
386-383-4685




PORT ORANGE 500sf
retail office $575 mo. 1st,
last,. security. On US Hwy
1 High visibility.
386-756-0435

SOUTH DAYTONA
Professional Ofcs
& Small Retail.
High traffic location, plen-
ty of parking. 750sqft-
1350sqft. Best value in
area. 386-451-5720




SOUTH DAYTONA
Wow! Contemporary
Plaza 800 sq ft office on
2nd fl. Nowonly $400/mo
386-677-3741


HOLLY HILL: Newly ORMOND BEACH- Best
decoratedlbr w/fullkitch- prices we've donethe
en, carport & laundry cmps north US1, w/ of-
room. Near buses, city head door 1,000sf over-
head door $485 mo. aim-
hall, library, shopping, liar savngs on2sf.
parks. $5 moFLS ilar savings on 1250 sf.
r $500/mo FLS 2054 Lease bonus talk to us.
Sherwood 386-671-2030 386-451-4018/672-1276

Vacation &






MARATHON. LUXURY ST. AUGUSTINE, BCH
1-6 bedroom vacation Oceanview Condo fr $99
homes. Beautiful ocean- nit, ,r fr. nO fn* hnou


front properties. Heated
pools, hot tub, docks.
Weekly & long weekend
rates. Call now for last
minute special rates
1-888-564-5800
American-Paradise.com


fr. $199nite/$1399wk,
Oceanfront wedding $359
or Historic District from
$129nite Discount Cruise
from $259. 904-825-1911
www.sunstatevacatlon.com


34' TRAILER,enclosed,
gooseneck, drop rear MOPED, KINETIC, TFR,
gate, 5' bender window& 50cc 2 stoke, complete
side door, $2500, 14' w/basket,owner's/shop
landscaped trailer, drop manual, runs good
tail gate dbl. axle, $250 $350obo, 386-316-9708
386-852-0242
PRESSURE WASHER
DETAIL TRAILER. Start
your own business 5x8 Affordable & reliable
with 200 gal water tank, Hometown News
generator, tool box & CLASSIFIEDSI
partial stock $3900 CLASSIFIEDS!
772-571-0521 386-322-5949

Boats A
-" Wa erraft


15' PONTOON BOAT,
'98 Crest, 25hp Suzuki
motor & trailer, Excellent
Condition. ONLY $6500!
315-723-5603
17' PROLINE w/110hp
OMC. A must seel Many
extra's;Teak, bimini top,
depth-finder,VHF/stereo
radio. $4K. 386-527-2547
BEST IN THE AREAl
HOMETOWN NEWS
CLASSIFIEDSI
386-322-5949


34' CRUISERS- 334
Espirit Cruise or Live-
A-Board. Air/heat, stove,
micro, refrigerator, full
enclosure, color TV, AM/
FM/CD, VHF, plus more.
Sleeps 6. Halifax Harbor
obo 407-310-2678 (c),
386-424-3220 (work)
Photos ad #34476 www.
HometownNewsOL.com
Outboard Motorboat,14",
20hp elec. start. Yamaha
w/trailer, nice,$2500obo
386-345-3065or
607-222-1286


GET IT SOLD FAST in the HometownNews

CARS! TRUCKS! BOATS!

Buy 1 week, BEST VALUE ALL ZONES
Get 3 weeks From Martin County
Weeks through Ormond Beach
Add a photo for only $5 per zone

Online photos available
*REE. Pr n
Private Party Onlyn


iljpilglplgi! Iggiggig !I
iiiii I 1 1 1 IN !: a ll Ill li, I I .......... .. . ...... .


I


NORTH CAROLINA
MOUNTAINS
New log cabin shell on
1.7 acres, $89,900.
2acre-5acre waterfront
homesites from $99,900.
Easy access mountain
homesites
$29,900-$89,900.
828-247-9966 (Code 41)

NORTH FLORIDA LAND
1,955acs in Jefferson Co.
Timberland, mixed w/
hardwood bottoms & cut-
over, grt unting. rd front-
age, Reduced $1900/ac.!
Southern Pine Planta-
tions 352-867-8018

OCALA FL 40+/- acres,
2 miles W of 1-75 on Hwy
326, 1300 fti frontage on
Hwy 326, specialized
Commercial district. By
owner. $1,100,000.
561-307-3539

OWNER FINANCE N.
Florida Land. Beautiful
area near springs & riv-
ers. 1.5 to 5 acre tracts.
$1500 down with no cred-
it check Call for free col-
or brochure.
1-800-754-4531
Panama, Chirlqul Prov-
ince Prime Building lots
$35,000/ea. SW Pacific
Coast. Beautiful views.
239-220-4502
dicnjulli@ymail.com


SOUTH CAROLINA
ACREAGE 5 Acres.
Beautiful Homesite only
30 minutes from Colum-
bia. East Access off 1-26.
Only $37,500.
Owner financing.
Call 1-803-505-2161
TENNESSEE LAND
RUSHI 1+acre to 2acre
homesites, wood, views.
Starting at $59,900. Tenn
River & Nick-a-Jack view
tracts now available! Re-
tirement guide rates this
area #2 Is U.S. places to
retire. Low cost of living,
no impact fee.
1-330-699-2741
or 1-866-550-5263,
Ask About Mini Vacation!
lEEGISWE CO..U.C
WEST MIDDLE GA
31 AC- $1,995/AC
Hardwoods!
Pond Site!
Open land!
Paved road!
st.reglspaper.com
478-987-9700
St. Regis Paper Co.

AFFORDABLE
WHITTIER,NC: Smoky
Mtns, 3.49ac pvt cove
2/2/cp Ig porch, Spring,
Creek, Koi pond. Historic
Barn, Shed 2 RV sites
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See photos: Ad# 58354
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PORT ORANGE Multi
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