Title: Hometown news (Daytona Beach, FL)
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00081227/00104
 Material Information
Title: Hometown news (Daytona Beach, FL)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Hometown news
Publication Date: January 9, 2009
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Volusia -- Daytona Beach
Coordinates: 29.207222 x -81.037778 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00081227
Volume ID: VID00104
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text






DAYTONA BEACH HOLLY HILL








Vol. 3, No. 50 Your Local News and Information Source www.HometownNewsOL.com Friday, January 9, 2009


Chamber. New taxes needed


i, Hometown News
readers.


Family faces sex
charges

I hope you had a safe and
happy NewYear celebra-
tion, though the news
doesn't stop when we are
marking family moments. A
bizarre story out of Flagler
County has its roots in the
Daytona Beach area and
more than likely has some
parents wondering if their
See BRIEF, A2


DUST IN THE WIND


Business group sets 2009 priori

By Bethany Chambers
bchambers@hometownnewsol.com
VOLUSIA COUNTY As area governments
set their priorities for 2009, one group of local
stakeholders hopes taxes and commuter rail top
those lists.
The Daytona Beach/Halifax Area Chamber of
Commerce released its 2009 Legislative Priority
Recommendations recently, a list of suggested
actions for local and state officials for the com-
ing year.
The list was compiled based on responses
received in a survey of the Chamber's roughly
1,000 members and approved by the Chamber's
legislative committee. Three priorities top the
list, while several other suggestions the Cham-
ber supports are also listed.
The first suggestion is that the Florida sales tax
statutes be revised to allow the state to collect


taxes on Internet sales. Currently, online busi-
nesses do not collect or pay taxes in the state.
They use that to gain a price advantage,
Chamber representatives say.
"We see it as a fairness issue. It puts local 1
businesses at a disadvantage because they
have to collect taxes," said Jim Cameron, vice
president of government relations. "These
bricks-and-mortar stores are here locally
with us every day. They're our neighbors,
they employ our citizens and they support our
(nonprofit groups)."
Twenty-two states have adopted similar legis-
lation taxing Internet sales, which are estimated
to generate more than $70 billion a year.
The priority "will be an uphill battle," Mr.
Cameron said, but is one that could add $2 bil-
lion to the state's coffers at a time when there is a
need for revenue enhancements.
The second priority listed is that the state leg-


May I have this dance?


Randy Barber/staff photographer
Nancy Cross of Daytona Beach dances with instructor Jack Hoyt during Winter
Dances at the City Island Recreation Center in Daytona Beach last week.




Trust to hold forum on local


historic preservation efforts


By Bethany Chambers
bchambers@hometownnewsol.com

DAYTONA BEACH If
you own a historic build-
ing, you may be sitting
on a cash cow without
knowing it.
Historic preservation
of homes and businesses
can be the impetus for
development and rede-


velopment in an area,
local experts say, and
they want residents to
know how preservation
can help them and their
hometowns.
The Heritage Preserva-
tion Trust of Volusia
County, a nonprofit
group dedicated to
restoring historical sites
in the county, will host
an educational forum


Jan. 10 at the Schnebly
Center on N. Atlantic
Avenue in Daytona
Beach.
The forum begins with
a donut and coffee
breakfast at 8:30 a.m.
Speakers will take the
stage from 9 a.m. to
noon.
"Historic preservation
is an important econom-
See HISTORIC, A4


isla- -"_ "
ture introduce property
tax legislation that makes taxes more equi-
table for homeowners, businesses and rental
properties.
"We're trying to find a balance between non-
homesteaded and homesteaded properties,"
Mr. Cameron said. "There's a big gap and it's get-
ting wider."
See CHAMBER, A4


Free cards offer


drug discounts


By Jamye Durrance
Durrance@hometownnewsol.com

VOLUSIA COUNTY As
the size of paychecks and
wallets decrease, the cost of
everything seems to go up.
Included in that are pre-
scription drugs, leaving
many people to choose
between their medicines
and food or utilities.
United Way of Volusia-
Flagler Counties has part-
nered with a national pro-
gram to help alleviate that
problem with a prescription
drug discount card for area
residents.
"Healthcare costs are one
of the top concerns for peo-
ple in our community," said
Ray Salazar, executive
director of United Way of
Volusia-Flagler Counties,
which distributes the cards.
"(The program) will help
individual and families who
otherwise could not afford
to buy the medicine they
need."
The FamilyWize prescrip-
tion drug discount card can
lower the cost of medicines
by an average of 20 percent,
according to the Family-
Wize Web site.
With a FamilyWize dis-
count card, those without
insurance or those needing
medicine not covered by
their insurance, can use the
card at participating area
pharmacies to receive the
discounted price.
More than 60 area phar-
macies, including Publix,
Wal-Mart, Walgreen's and
CVS Pharmacy, are listed on
the program's Web site as
participants.


The card is free and avail-
able to everyone in the
country.
United Way partnered
with FamilyWize after real-
izing the need locally.
Pennsylvania residents
Dan and Susan Barnes
started FamilyWize in 2005
with a small supply of the
cards for health centers
after hearing of families
who were having difficulty
paying for medications.
Their local United Way
joined in the.effort, distrib-
uting more cards through-
out the state.
"It really ballooned from
there," Mr. Barnes said. "I
don't think we realized the
need."
Participating pharmacies
voluntarily offer the dis-
counted prices, Mr. Barnes
said..
"The pharmacies are the
real heroes," he said. "They
don't have to (offer the dis-
counts)."
All other costs, including
printing and shipping of the
cards are also donated by
companies.
More than 10 million
cards have already been
distributed through the
FamilyWize program, sav-
ing more than $30 million,
Mr. Barnes said.
The program's openness,
with no requirements or
applications, is something
that sets it apart, Mr. Barnes
said.
"We wanted to keep it
simple," he said. "We want-
ed to eliminate any barriers.
Without this, we know
many people wouldn't get
See CARDS, A5


Resident pro James
Stammer takes a look
back at the 2008 season


Classified B6 Police Report A5
Crossword 85 Sports B5
Gardening B6 Star Scopes Bi1
Computers B5 Travel B4
Out & About B1 Viewpoint A6


New Web site teaches students


about Indian River Lagoon


Photo Courtesy of SJRWMD
Snooks' Cove is a new interactive Web site (above)
launched by the St. Johns River Water Management
District to teach children about the Indian River Lagoon.


By Jamye Durrance
Durrance@hometownnewsol.com
VOLUSIA COUNTY -
Sebastian Snook is an eager
learner.
The large fish with a dis-
tinctive black lateral line is
the mascot for the Indian
River Lagoon, which origi-
nates in.Ponce Inlet.
But, in between his duties
as the mascot for North
America's most diverse estu-
ary, Sebastian has taken on a
new job teaching children


about the biology of the 156-
mile Indian River Lagoon
with his new Web site,
Snooks' Cove.
Launched by the St. Johns
River Water Management
District, Snooks' Cove is
aimed at educating children
through various games,
videos and photos.
"Children are very com-
puter savvy today," said Jeff
Cole, director of communi-
cations and governmental
affairs for the water district.
"The Snooks' Cove Web


pages are designed to
engage children in a way
that is both educational and
fun."
Louise Chapman, envi-
ronmental teacher on
assignment for Volusia
County Schools, said she
has used educational mate-
rials from the water district
before and is excited about
the new site.
"(The materials from the
water district) are really


See LAGOON, A2


WY\M Tnl NM A DRA I








Friday, January 9, 2009


*L f ny L 11/, -1 .aill Hoym o wn News


Agency calling for a look at growth management process


By Jamye Durrance
Durrance@hometownnewsol.com
VOLUSIA COUNTY If a
group of developers has its
way, over the next 20 years,
Edgewater will double in
size.
For more than 17,000 resi-
dents, home will be Restora-
tion, a 5,181-acre mixed-use
development proposed west
Sof Interstate 95.
What is currently wilder-
ness will be transformed
into expansive boulevards
with streetcars chugging
down the middle, all leading
to a condensed town center
with a mixture of homes,
offices and commercial
space.
All of this will be nestled
against more than 3,000
wilderness acres that the
developers, Hammock
Creek Green, LLC, have
promised will stay that way.
While this future city is
still a few years away from
coming to fruition, the proj-
ect has become the center of
debate among planners
about how Florida's future
growth is managed.
A recent newspaper edito-
rial criticized rumored
attempts by the East Central
Florida Regional Planning
Council to remove the Flori-
da Department of Commu-
nity Affairs from the
approval process for large-
scale developments such as


Restoration.
Phil Laurien, the council's
executive director, said he
has no such intentions, but
is looking to open a dialogue
examining the process used
in the state for growth man-
agement.
His No. 1 goal? To stop
sprawl.
"I do think the Florida
model for growth has poten-
tial," Mr. Laurien said. "I
think it just needs reform.
The state's role can be more
defined."
James Miller, director of
public affairs for the DCA,
did not wish to go into fur-
ther discussions about any
changes to the approval
process for large scale devel-
opments, but said the state
should still be involved.
"We think the process
that's established now is the
proper one and an effective
one," he said. "Our goal is to
ensure smart growth
throughout the state."

The process as it is now
The state of Florida first
addressed growth manage-
ment in 1972 with a statue
defining the review and
approval process for large-
scale developments that
would affect neighboring
jurisdictions.
The statue requires any
such development to sub-
mit an application to the
DCA for review.


The application also goes
before a regional planning
council, which determines
sufficiency of the project.
Both agencies provide
their feedback and the
developer has a certain
timeframe with which to
address any problems.
After each agency has
given their feedback, the
application goes before the
local government.
If there were stipulations
included in the approvals
from the DCA or the region-
al planning council, the
local government must
make sure they are
addressed before allowing a
development order to be
issued.
The local government
must make those changes
before giving final approval
to the development or face
legal ramifications from the
DCA.
In some instances, large-
scale developments such as
Restoration also concur-
rently undergo city compre-
hensive plan amendments,
which also require review
from the DCA and regional
planning councils.
The comprehensive plan
establishes guidelines for
future growth, land use and
infrastructure of a city. Any
changes to the comprehen-
sive plan must go through
the DCA and regional plan-
ning councils as well as sev-
eral other agencies, includ-
ing water districts, school
boards and federal environ-
mental agencies.

What's wrong?
Mr. Laurien said the cur-
rent process has allowed for


too much sprawl and the
state needs to set long-term
goals that will provide
incentives for developers to
avoid sprawl.
The state can make sure
basic requirements from
developers are met and then
leave the rest to each region,
Mr. Laurien said.
"I just think there can be
more refinement," he said.
A good example for Flori-
da to follow would be the
state of Oregon, Mr. Laurien
said. Oregon encourages
redevelopment of core areas
rather building outside of it,
he said.
"We keep replicating
infrastructure, it's not sensi-
ble," Mr. Laurien said. "We
tend to always go for green
sites. If we look 50 years out,
you've sprawled all the way
out."
Mr. Laurien said that will
create additional traffic con-
gestion and destroy natural
areas that have made Flori-
da's quality of life so high.
The state hasn't planned
for growth far enough out,
either, Mr. Laurien said.
"The time horizon is too
short," he said. "We've got to
look 50 years out. We've got
the data."

A different approach
Palm Beach attorney Les-
ley Blackner would like to
bring another group into the
approval process for large-
scale developments the
voters.
Ms. Blackner is leading
Florida Hometown Democ-
racy, a petition that would
put comprehensive plan
amendments before the res-
idents for a vote.


"The voters should have
the final say, they are the
ones affected," Ms. Blackner
said.
Development has become
too corrupt, she said.
"The whole thing is politi-
cal theater," she said. "Poli-
tics in Florida is a develop-
ment machine. (The
process) just gives cover to
the developer's control and
what they want."
Hometown Democracy
eliminates the politics and
replaces it with the voice of
the voters, Ms. Blackner
said.
"There needs to be some
sort of watchdog," she said.
"Voters shouldn't have it
crammed down their
throats."
Ms. Blackner is also the
attorney for Edgewater Citi-
zens Alliance for Responsi-
ble Development, a group
that has fought Restoration.
Mr. Laurien said he has
worked in places with legis-
lation similar to Hometown
Democracy and found it dis-
astrous.
"It's almost impossible to
get any land use changes,"
he said. "I think it is a bad
thing. It would freeze the
process."
. Developments and land
use changes are complicat-
ed and getting all the proper
information to the various
agencies and governments
is hard enough, Mr. Laurien
said. With Hometown
Democracy, that would have
to be repeated in layman's
terms for the voting public
for the thousands of pro-
posed land use changes in
Florida each year, Mr. Lau-
rien said.


"It would be an educa-
tional effort for the entire
community," he said. "It
wouldn't get done. It would
take an enormous effort."
Mr. Laurien said with so
much information before
voters, they will resort to
casting ballots based on
superficiality.
"It becomes a beauty con-
test," Mr. Laurien said. "It's a
flawed concept in my hon-
est opinion."

Restoration's role
The East Central Florida
Regional Planning Council
recently gave approval to
Restoration, despite an 11-
page report from the DCA
questioning its need and
design.
Opponents have criticized
Restoration for potentially
destroying the land west of
1-95 but Mr. Laurien said
Restoration's developers are
preventing it from becom-
ing sprawl.
"They are going to restore
it and make it what it used to
be," Mr. Laurien said. "It's
far better than a large, gated
community that would've
made an environmental
impact. There's a lot to like
about it."
Mr. Laurien said he will be
pushing for a dialogue on
the future of growth man-
agement.
"It is clearly not working,"
he said. "The state has not
anticipated (such growth).
There is room for reform."
Even with a dialogue, the
answer to Florida's future
will be elusive, Mr. Laurien
said.
"I'm not sure there is an
ideal universe," he said.


Lagoon
From page A1
well-integrated," she said.
"They hit the right level.
(The students) really get it
when they are finished."
The Web, site features
Sebastian and his sister
Lucie, floating through the


lagoon. Children can click
on various items on the
page that open to other win-
dows.
There is a sweeping game
to clean up pollution along
the river, a coloring game in
which children can color
various birds and wildlife
found in and near the
lagoon.
Videos and pictures teach
children about the impor-
tance of sea grass, man-
groves and oysters in the


Brief
From page Al
children are victims.
A couple in Palm Coast
each face dozens of child
pornography charges after
Flagler County Sheriff's
investigators, looking into a
possible prostitution
operation, uncovered the
disturbing images on a
home computer. Tina
Smith, 43, and her husband,
Alton Smith, 46, have been
arrested, and investigators
have also caught up with
the couple's daughter,
Kristilyn Smith, who they
said was the original object
of their concern, accused of
running a prostitution
operation from the family's
home on Carlos Court.
Once inside the home,


lagoon.
The page also contains
links to the water district's
site with more information
and a book list that teachers
or parents can use to
expound upon the lessons
from Snooks' Cove.
Ms. Chapman said the
Web site gives students the
perfect opportunity to com-
bine their love-oftechnology
with learning.
"Because it is the internet,
it holds a lot of colors and


investigators found illicit
photos of children engaged
in sex acts and the older
Smiths engaged in sex acts
with minors. Deputies
believe some of the victims
may be from the Daytona
Beach area because the
Smiths ran a photography
studio called Hot Shots A1A
Models and Photography on
Mason Avenue until 18
months ago. The Smiths
later set up a photography
studio in their home, and
investigators said they
found hundreds of images
of children as young as 8
years old in compromising
positions. Some may-have
been victimized at the
Daytona Beach area studio
and some at the family
home.
Authorities want to talk to
anyone who may have had


pictures," Ms. Chapman
said. "The learning is really
incorporated to connect
with the real world."
Ms. Chapman said that
the water district's educa-
tional materials are always
free, giving teachers another
bonus for using them.
"Any great materials we
can get free helps a lot," she
said.
Snooks' Cove is located at
http://www.sjrwmd.com/sn
ook/


contact with the Smiths.
Citizens can use the Crime
Stoppers number at (888)
277-8477 to report any
concerns or call the Flagler
County Sheriff's Office.

Kohl's thief caught
after chase

A 32-year-old Daytona
Beach man is charged with
aggravated assault on a
police officer after authori-
ties said he intentionally
drove his car toward a Port
Orange police officer who
wanted to question him in
connection to a shoplifting
incident. Police were called
to a Kohl's store in Port
Orange for a suspicious
vehicle in the back of the
store. The driver, later
See BRIEF, A4


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riuay, yimal y 20ww me.%WOpw


Local student reflects

on trip to Africa


By Jeanne Willard
Willard@hometownnewsol.com
PORT ORANGE -
Although Katie Bentley's
first semester as a senior in
high school included a full
load of academic classes,
there was no homecoming
dance, cafeteria food or
football games.
Instead, as part of a study
abroad program called The
Traveling School, she and 17
other teens slept most
nights in a tent, "surfed"
sand dunes, went river raft-
ing and encountered ele-
phants, cheetahs, lions and
wildebeests while traveling
through South Africa.
The Atlantic High School
student also participated in
a native coming-of -age cer-
emony, helped restore a
high school library, fed
orphans and visited an aids
clinic before returning
home in December.


"I have a passion for
adventure," Katie said.
"I really wanted to try
something new."
Earning nearly $5,000
toward the $15,000 pro-
gram, she said she plans to
eventually pay back her par-
ents who covered the
remainder of the costs.
The Traveling School, a
Bozeman, Montana based
group, traveled through
Namibia, Botswana and
Zambia in a large blue safari
truck, staying in camp
grounds except for one 10-
day stay with a host family
in Cape Town.
Katie said she selected
Africa because it represent-
ed adventure.
"I was just always drawn
to it," she said. "It's some-
place you always hear
about, but you never vaca-
tion there."
Katie said the experience


Photo courtesy of Katie Bentley
Atlantic High School student Katie Bentley relaxes on the
desert sands of South Africa during a recent study abroad
trip during the first semester of her senior year.


created lasting bonds with
her fellow students.
"Now I have friends from
all over the United States,"
she-said.
The trip left her with a
greater appreciation of her
life, she said, and a desire to


help people that may lead to
a career in medicine.
"I felt like I came back a
better version of myself,"
she said.
Below is one of three arti-
cles Katie wrote as part of
her travel journalism class.


A South African School: My Joumey to Imemeza


By Katie Bentley
"God Bless!" The stu-
dents shouted as we exited
the classroom. I left with
the events of the morning
continuously running
through my head. I pon-
dered the way our lives
were so different, yet com-
pletely the same. The way
this world is so big, yet so
small. Standing in the
crisp morning air, I could
feel a new sense of life
pulsing through my body.
The event left me with a
broader knowledge and an
endless list of questions.
Growing up in the Unit-
ed States I was educated
about problems the world
faced, but I had not wit-
nessed very many of them
first-hand.
- When I awoke the morn-
ing of the township high


school visit in Waterval
Boven, South Africa, all I
could feel were the knots
constricting my stomach.
I dressed in the only skirt
I brought and pulled my
Traveling School t-shirt
over my head. I combed
my hair and stared myself
down in the mirror. More
than anything, I wanted to
look presentable because I
knew that in South Africa
they wore pressed navy
blue uniforms to school.
At 7:30 a.m. our Travel-
ing School group of 18 girls
and five teachers stepped
foot onto the Imemeza
High School campus.
The students greeted us
with curious stares and I
could not help but wonder
what they were thinking
about. Were they talking
about us? Did they even
care? All I could do was


guess while the students
darted knowing looks at
one another and
exchanged dialogue in a
language I could not-com-
prehend.
The morning assembly
began shortly after we
arrived. The students'
heart-melting voices drift-
ed through the air as a
hymn was recited in our
honor. The warmth from
their song lassoed around
my heart; they had me by a
string.
In order to get to know
the students on a closer
level, we broke up into sev-
eral small groups to visit
classrooms.
Fellow Traveling School
students Cheyenne, Sarah,
Evelina, and Taylor accom-
panied me as I stepped
awkwardly into the room
crammed with students.


Holding our breath, we
stood in front of the chalk-
board and were met with
dead silence. Bravely,
Sarah recited her name
and told the class where
she was from; we all fol-
lowed her lead. The stu-
dents stared back at us
blankly. To make the situa-
tion less formal we joined
the students at their
tables.
"Come sit! Sit!" The stu-
dents urged me. I sat
uncomfortably amongst a
group of five girls my age.
Their bodies were
perched on the table and
their eyes eagerly watched
me. I felt put on the spot.
Helplessly sitting in my
chair, my ind scrambled
for a conversation topic.
Rose, a bright eyed girl
with a toothy grin, broke
See IMFMEZA, A7


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A4 Daytona Beach/Holly Hill Hometown News Friday, January 9, 2009


Historic
From page Al
ic factor in the communi-
ty," said Neil Harrington,
vice president of the trust.
The three expert speak-
ers will discuss grants,
funding and tax incen-
tives available to owners
of historic buildings, how
community redevelop-
ment areas can benefit
from preservation and
Daytona Beach's new his-
toric preservation ordi-
nance..
"If you're interested in
increasing quality of life
in inner city neighbor-
hoods or stabilizing his-
toric neighborhoods, if
you're interested in beau-
tification, if you're inter-
ested in lower taxes and if
you're interested in saving
the integrity of some his-
toric structures in Volusia
County, this would be a
good start," said Gary
Libby, past president of
the trust and one of the
forum's speakers.
Mr. Harrington said he
hopes the forum will
attract residents from
across the county. He and


trust president Nancy
Long, a South Daytona
council member, organ-
ized the forum, the first of
its kind locally.
Mr. Harrington said he
was motivated to educate
others about historic
preservation after watch-
ing several historic struc-
tures torn down in Day-
tona Beach, particularly
in midtown.
The city has one of the
largest numbers of his-
toric homes in the state,
he said. In order to be
classified historic, a home
must be at least 50 years
old and must have been
home to a famous family
or the site of a notable
event. The architectural
style of the home is also
taken into consideration.
Mr. Harrington invited
two of the forums speak-
ers, Delray Beach preser-
vationists Elizabeth But-
ler and Robert Ganger,
after seeing what they had
accomplished in their
town.
"I heard about the qual-
ity of the CRA in Delray,
so I went down there to
visit," he said. "I was very
impressed. It's a thriving
area with clubs and shops


(that are open) all day. It's
different than Daytona
Beach; it's a citizen-driv-
en CRA."
Local city officials have
also been invited to the
forum, Mr. Harrington
said.
Mr. Libby, who owns a
home in a historic neigh-
borhood, will speak on
Daytona Beach's historic
preservation ordinance.
Although "people don't
understand some of the
provisions" of the ordi-
nance, he said, he
believes "a majority are
supportive of it." Because
of the ordinance, "people
should feel much better
about buying and living
in a historic neighbor-
hood," he added.
"Historic preservation
can be a rallying point to
rejuvenate a neighbor-
hood where people have
nothing else in common
but the fact they live in a
historic neighborhood,"
Mr. Libby said. "I think it
brings people together."

For more information on
the Heritage Preservation
Trust, visit www.heritagep-
reservationtrust.org


Catfish hunter


Monka the cat
looks for something fishy
as her owners
Jim and Becky Kopetz
of Holly Hill do some
fishing themselves
on the Halifax River
in Ormond Beach
recently.




















Randy Barber
staff photographer


Heritage Preservation


Trust Educational


Forum Speakers

Robert Ganger is the vice chairman of the Palm
Beach County Historic Society and president of the
Delray Beach Historical Society. He is the author of
"Lila Vanderbilt Webb's Miradero: Window on An Era,"
a book describing the history and restoration of the
Vanderbilt heiress' winter home in Gulf Stream, Fla.
Mr. Ganger is a retired business development consult-
ant who was inspired to get involved in preservation
after restoring his own home.

Elizabeth Butler is the marketing and grants coor-
dinator for the Delray Beach community redevelop-
ment area. She has experience in both the public and
nonprofit sectors.

Gary Libby, a resident of a historic Daytona Beach
neighborhood, will serve as master of ceremonies and
will speak on Daytona Beach's recently-adopted his-
toric preservation ordinance. He is director emeritus of
the Museum of Arts and Sciences and chairman of
Volusia ECHO, a county program that provides grants
to finance acquisition, restoration, construction or
improvement of facilities to be used for environmental,
cultural, historical or outdoor recreation purposes.


san, & Acura Repair Specialist
S We Also Service Domestic Cars


Chamber
From page Al
The final priority sug-
gested is that state and
local governments support
the Central Florida Com-
muter Rail Project to pro-
vide service from Orlando
to DeLand. Volusia County
would have to pay about
$138 million over 30 years
for the project, Chamber
representatives said.
The state must approve


Brief
From page A2
identified as Frederick
Davis, refused orders to get
out of the car and raced
away. Authorities said
Davis deliberately drove at
Officer Sean Sheridan,
barely avoiding a collision,
then raced through
Daytona Beach where he
crashed the vehicle and
fled on foot. He was quickly
captured, and police said
they found more than
$10,000 in stolen property
from the Kohl's store in the
suspect's vehicle.

Inmates forcibly
tattoo another

Volusia County Sheriff's
deputies said a jail inmate
was attacked on Christmas
Day in his cell at the jail
near Daytona Beach.
Investigators said Lempira
Norman was assaulted by
two inmates who forcibly
gave Norman a tattoo of a
male body part on his
shoulder. Norman told
investigators Justin Harris
and Ryan Collina tried to
pressure him in to joining a
club, and when he refused,
they jumped him in his
cell. Norman claims the


the project in the first half
of this year to receive feder-
al funding.
Although the first leg of
the project would not
extend to east Volusia
County, Mr. Cameron said
the Chamber would sup-
port that in the future.
"We want to get an arm
bone from DeLand to Day-
tona, but to get an arm
bone we've got to have a
backbone," he said. "That's
what's on the table right
now."


suspects threatened to give
him a severe beating if he
refused the tattoo. Harris
and Collina face new
charges of aggravated
battery.

Multi-million dollar
home fire caused
by arson

WESH 2 has learned the
fire that destroyed a multi-
million dollar oceanfront
home near Ormond Beach
Christmas Eve was arson.
Rolf and Brigitte Gardey
were asleep when they .
heard a noise that sounded
like trouble on the nearby
Ocean Shore Boulevard.
Minutes later, Mr. Gardey
heard something else, got
up to investigate and found
the house in flames. The
fire started outside on the
home's large, wrap-around
porch and quickly spread.
Mr. Gardey suffered burns
trying to put the blaze out
with a garden hose.
Investigators with the State
Fire Marshal's Office now
said a witness spotted a
man in dark clothing,
running north from the fire
scene just as the blaze
broke out. If you have any
information on the case,
call (877) NO ARSON or


For 2009, the Chamber of
Commerce also supports:
Finding new ways to
fund the Volusia County
Schools and barring enact-
ment of any new unfunded
mandates
Funding library
improvements at Bethune-
Cookman University
Funding the Florida
Resident Access Grant pro-
gram, which helps local
students pay tuition at
Embry-Riddle Aeronautical
University


(386) 323-0904. You may be
eligible for a reward.

Famous actor
loses son

Former area resident and
actor John Travolta and his
wife, actress Kelly Preston,
are suffering a terrible loss
after the death of their son
while on vacation in the
Bahamas. Authorities said
Jett Travolta, 16, who was
born at IHalifax Medical
Center, suffered a seizure
and apparently died after
hitting his head on a
bathtub.
The Travoltas lived in the
Spruce Creek Fly-In
community in Port Orange
in the early 1990s, though
he moved when neighbors
complained about the
noise from his Gulfstream
Jet. Travolta and his family,
including an 8-year-old
daughter, now have a home
at a fly-in community in
Ocala, and a spokesman
said that's where Jett
Travolta will be buried.
During his five years in
our area, John Travolta
earned kudos for his down-
to-earth attitude when he
and the family ran into
fans. Our thoughts and
prayers go out to them in
this terrible time.


Providing affordable
health insurance for small
businesses
Improving access to
quality care for Medicaid
and KidCare recipients for
uninsured Floridians
Funding Florida's Eco-
nomic Transportation Fund
for road improvements
Chamber representatives
will follow up on these pri-
orities by attending state
legislature discussions on
the budget in Tallahassee,
Mr. Cameron said.


Warm weather
brings tourists and
more money

The holiday break ,. ,
brought, for the most part,
unseasonably warm
weather to the area. On
Christmas Day, for exam-
ple, the beach was
jammed, and many visitors
were amazed that it was 80
degrees and sunny, while
friends and family back
home lived with snow or
freezing temperatures. The
warm weather may actually
have given area businesses
and hoteliers a bit of a
boost during tough eco-
nomic times. A spokesman
with the Daytona Beach
Area Convention and
Visitors Bureau said they
had a significant spike in
online traffic during the
holidays, and several
hoteliers report bookings
up over the holiday weeks.
The warm weather may
have also encouraged two-
or three-day stays ambng
folks who live closer to the
area. Some businesses saw
an increase in guests from
the Orlando area, among
others, who stayed just a
few days to enjoy Decem-
ber beach weather.


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Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Nat "King" Cole,
Barry Manilow & Barbra Streisand

Listen to Cadillac Jack
Monday-Friday 6am 10am

Taking your requess contests & Giveaways.

Listen to VOLUSIA CITIZENS FORUM with HOST ROLAND
VIA MONDAY thru FRIDAY 4:30PM till 6:OOPM
Listen to STRONG STOCK REPORT at 4:30PM
MONDAY thru FRIDAY with PAUL STRONG of Morgan Stanley ?'
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Friday, January 9, 2009 www.HometownNewsOL.com Daytona Beach/Holly Hill A5


Police report mummim


Editor's note: This is a list
of arrests, not convictions,
and all arrestees are pre-
sumed innocent unless or
until proven guilty in a
court of law.
Daytona Beach Police
Department

*Tamara Zandrell Maddox,
33, of 219 College Park Drive,
Daytona Beach, was arrested
Dec. 27 on charges of the sale
of cocaine. Bail was set at
$7,500.
*Zevrick Jarrod Lee, 29, of
608 Willie Drive, Daytona
Beach, was arrested Dec. 27
on charges of possession of
cocaine. Bail was set at
$1,500.
*Manuel Costa, 55, of 839 S.
Palmetto Ave., Apt. B, Day-
tona Beach, was arrested Dec.
27 on charges of trafficking
schedule III narcotics and
possession of schedule II nar-
cotics. No bail was set.
*Luis Carino, 51, of 334 S.
Atlantic Ave., No. 5, Daytona
Beach, was arrested Dec. 27
on charges of aggravated bat-
tery. No bail was set.
*Eric Patrick Belton, 23, of
708 Georgia St., Apt. E, Day-
tona Beach, was arrested Dec.
27 on charges of strong-arm
robbery. Bail was set at
$10,000.
*Faye Antionette Glenn, 48,
of 211 Garden St., Daytona
Beach, was arrested Dec. 28
on charges of possession of
cocaine. Bail was set at
$1,650.
*Elmundo Lopez, 30, of 133
Oak Tree Circle, Daytona
Beach, was arrested Dec. 28
on charges of writing worth-
less checks. Bail was set at
$1,000.
*Scott Andrew Pike, 36, of


Cards
From page Al
the medicines they need.",
Despite its simplicity and
popularity, Mr. Barnes calls
the program a "band-aid."
"We don't expect this to
go on forever," he said. "We


104 Maplewood, Daytona
Beach, was arrested Dec. 28
on charges of battery on a law
enforcement officer. No bail
was set.
eLaurence J. Hopkins, 42, of
1029 Cedar Highlands Blvd.,
Daytona Beach, was arrested
Dec. 29 on charges of posses-
sion of crack cocaine. Bail was
set at $1,500.
*Jonathan Home Stephen-
son, 47, of 218 Michigan Ave.,
Daytona Beach, was arrested
Dec. 29 on charges of strong-
arm robbery. Bail was set at
$5,000.
*Deanna Lynn Mann, 36, of
2509 S. Peninsula Drive, Day-
tona Beach, was arrested Dec.
30 on charges of cultivation of
cannabis. Bail was set at
$1,500.
*Donald Alexander Thom-
son, 33, of 2509 S. Peninsula
Drive, Daytona Beach, was
arrested Dec. 30 on charges of
dealing in stolen property
and the cultivation of
cannabis. Bail was set at
$11,500.
*Joseph Emanuel Phillips,
40, of 1221 Kennedy Road,
No. 41, Daytona Beach, was
arrested Dec. 30 on charges of
possession of cocaine. Bail
was set at $2,000.
*Simeon Symone Waters,
29, of 340 North St., Daytona
Beach, was arrested Dec. 30
on charges of possession of
cocaine. Bail was set at
$1,000.
*Fredrick Lamont Harris,
24, of 1312 Ginsburg Drive,
Daytona Beach, was arrested
Dec. 30 on charges of grand
theft auto. Bail was set at
$1,750.
*Kelly Marie Rodriguez, 26,
of 311 San Juan Ave., Daytona
Beach, was arrested Dec. 31
on charges of grand theft
auto. Bail was set at $1,500.


hope our elected officials
will come up with an
expanded healthcare plan."
Mr. Salazar said he appre-
ciates what the FamilyWize
program does.
"It's truly amazing what
we can accomplish when
we all work together," he
said. "So many people and


*Leslee Dawn Debord, 41,
of 1220 S. Nova Road, Day-
tona Beach, was arrested Dec.
31 on charges of possession
of a schedule III substance.
Bail was set at $1,500.
*Eddy Dexter Roderick, 51,
of 551 Eldorado St., Daytona
Beach, was arrested Dec. 31
on charges of possession of
narcotics. Bail was set at
$2,000.
*Jessica Lynn Williams, 22,
of 1717 Mason Ave., No. 1433,
Daytona Beach, was arrested
Jan. 1 on charges of grand
theft. Bail was set at $1,500.
*Rosa Luz Segarra, 33, of
441 Pine St., Daytona Beach,
was arrested Jan. 1 on charges
of soliciting to commit prosti-
tution. Bail was set at $1,500.'
*Diuan Marquest Canidate,
22, of 3 Starling Drive, Day-
tona Beach, was arrested Jan.
1 on charges of possession of
counterfeit payment and
uttering a forged instrument.
Bail was set at $2,000.
*Lawrence Jermaine Kloc,
18, of 732 Mercedes, Daytona
Beach, was arrested Jan. 1 on
charges of aggravated battery.
Bail was set at $2,500.
eDaniel L. Jeanbaptiste, 21,
of 1901 S. Clyde Morris Blvd.,
No.'20, Daytona Beach, was
arrested Jan.1 on charges of
aggravated battery on a preg-
nant person. No bail was set.
*Tony Arnez Davis, 33, of
430 N. Charles St., Apt. 6, Day-
tona Beach, was arrested Jan.
1 on charges of possession of
cocaine. Bail was set at
$1,650.
*Kenneth Edward Green,
37, of 1080 Marquet Drive,
Daytona Beach, was arrested
Jan. 1 on charges of posses-
sion of a firearm by a convict-
ed felon. Bail was set at
$1,500.


*Roger Lee Peterson, 26, of
316 Reva St., Daytona Beach,
was arrested Jan. 1 on charges
of burglary of a conveyance.
Bail was set at $5,000.
*Joseph Anthony Tribble,
26, of 620 Washington St.,
Daytona Beach, was arrested
Jan. 1 on charges of burglary
of a conveyance. Bail was set
at $5,000.

Holly Hill Police
Department

*Karen Marie Glaze, 34, of
1202 Ridgewood Ave., No.
132, Holly Hill, was arrested
Dec. 29 on charges of strong-
arm robbery and resisting
arrest with violence. Bail was
set at $17,000.

Volusia County
Sheriffs Office
*Racina J. Robinson, 24, of
1048 Peter Road, Daytona
Beach, was arrested Dec. 27
on charges of battery on a
person detained in jail. Bail
was set at $2,500.
*Antwone M. Thomas, 18,
of 1116 Lakewood Park Drive,
Daytona Beach, was arrested
Dec. 31 on charges of posses-
sion of cannabis and carrying
a concealed firearm. Bail was
set at $5,000.
eJabrielWayne Deloach, 30,
of 1532 Valencia Ave., Holly
Hill, was arrested Dec. 31 on
charges of possession of oxy-
codone and possession of
xanax. Bail was set at $3,000.
*Leo Francis Husk, 53, of
1224 David Drive, Daytona
Beach, was arrested Dec. 31
on charges of accessory to
burglary. Bail was set at
$5,500.


organizations have joined
together to make this possi-
ble."
To get a FamilyWize pre-
scription drug discount
card, contact United Way of
Volusia-Flagler Counties at
386-253-0563, extension
211. For more information,
visit www.familywize.org.


(888) 277-TIPS



Wanted


Wanted person:
Jacqueline Francis Parker

Birth date:
Jan. 6, 1985

Distinguishing features:
Scars on right leg

Reason wanted:
Purse snatching

Last known location:
Daytona Beach

Crime Stoppers of
Northeast Florida is
seeking information on
the whereabouts of 24-
year-old Jacqueline
Francis Parker. Parker is
serving two years of pro-
bation after pleading no
contest in July to a
charge of robbery by
sudden snatching. On
Dec. 12, a judge issued
.an arrest warrant for
Parker after she was
accused of violating the
terms and conditions, of
her probation.
Parker is 5 feet, 5 inch-
es and about 208
pounds, with short
brown hair and brown
eyes. Her last known
address was on Pine
Street in Daytona Beach.


Jacqueline Francis
Parker


She also previously lived
at a residence on Oak
Avenue in Ormond
Beach.

If you see Parker or
know where she is, don't
attempt to apprehend
her. Anyone with infor-
mation regarding Park-
er's whereabouts is asked
to call Crime Stoppers
toll-free at (888) 277-
TIPS or text "TIP231 and
the message" to CRIMES.
Callers to Crime Stoppers
will remain anonymous
and can qualify for a
reward of up to $1,000.


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VIEWPOINT

FRIDAY, JANUARY 9, 2009 HOMETOWN NEWS WWW.HOMETOWNNEWSOL.COM


Got something to say?

Call the Hometown Rants & Raves line at

(386) 322-5900
or e-mail volnews@hometownnewsol.com.
Callers are asked to refrain from making slanderous
statements. Statements of fact will be checked for
accuracy.


Humane Society offers spay/neuter
services at low cost


In reference to the senior who was complaining about hav-
ing to spay/neuter their pet, please call the Halifax Humane
Society. They offer this service as well as a number of other
organizations, and the cost is not $200.
I recently had my dog neutered at the Humane Society, and
it was only $35, if I remember correctly.

Help for spay/neuter expenses
In reply to this woman's complaint, the Halifax Humane
Society offers low-cost spay/neuter certificates for around
$50. Also, depending on where she lives, there is the Volusia
County Pet-Vet Cruiser that also does low-cost spay/neuter at
various locations throughout the county.
Ironically, the January schedule for the Pet-Vet Cruiser was
listed on the page opposite her posting under Community
Notes.
I just wanted to help her out; no one should feel as though
they must part with their pet over this issue. There is help out
there.
Editor's note: According to the Halifax Humane Society Web
site, the cost for spaying or neutering is $20 to $35 for cats and
$35 to $65 for dogs (according to weight). Also, Concerned Citi-
zens for Animal Welfare may be able to help with discounted
rates. (386) 852-2737.

Resident concerned about speedy drivers
Nestled among the large oak trees and surrounded by
palms, the neighborhood of Palm Grove in South Daytona
was the perfect place to raise our kids. Now that the kids have
left the nest, we, as senior citizens, enjoy the walks around the
community. However, the traffic on Magnolia Avenue from
Reed Canal to Big Tree Road is horrendous.
The speed limit is posted at 25 miles per hour, but there are
those who use Magnolia Avenue as a cut-through and pay no
attention to. the speed limit. Not only the short cutters, we
have plenty of locals who exceed the limit by a wide margin.
I know that our South Daytona police can't be in every place
all the time, but very seldom do we see them patrolling the
area for speeders. Magnolia Avenue has large, wide sidewalks
that are perfect for those who like to take an evening walk, but
we have to be vigilant for those erratic and unconcerned driv-
ers.
Reed Canal Park is near, and it is a lovely place for daily
walks, bike riding, or jogging. The park entrance is located on
Reed Canal, and to get there from Palm Grove, you have to
walk or bike down this road. The problem is the traffic is
heavy and very dangerous because of the high rate of speed
by some drivers. The sidewalk is very close to the street, and
with the slightest turn of a steering wheel, someone could be
hurt by an unconcerned driver because of speed. 4's
How do we get these people to slow down?

Police should patrol student motorcyclists
While many students at the Wyotech Motorcycle School in
Ormond Beach at U.S. 1 and Interstate 95 are safe drivers,
many are not.
Local and state law enforcement agencies need to target
reckless and speeding motorcyclists leaving the school on
U.S. 1 in the afternoons headed north toward Flagler and
south to Ormond Beach.
It's only a matter of time until someone innocent gets
injured or killed due to their recklessness.

Cigarette tax increase could bring in
much-needed funds
With the brainstorms in Tallahassee stating we could face a
$5 billion budget hole, can you believe we only have a 34-cent
tax for cigarettes when New York, New Jersey and Massachu-
setts are more than $2.50 per pack?
And to top it off, Republican leaders are against a tax
increase of $1 per pack. The increase should be $2 per pack.
The mentality of the southern states on cigarette taxing tells
you something about the government's concern for your
health, meaning they don't care.
The increased revenue from those who smoke and could




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Karen Scarborough ..... Advertising Consultant Stephen Sparacino ......District Circulation Manager
Chery Duffle ........... Advertising Consultant Jeannine Gage ......... Associate Managing Editor
David Jolly ............ Advertising Consultant Bethany Chambers ......Staff Writer
Cheryl Hamilton ........ Advertising Assistant Randy Barber ...........Staff Photographer
Mercedes Lee-Paquette .Production Manager Stephanie Dixon ....... News Clerk/
Rita Zeblin .............Pagination Manager Entertainment Writer


Phone (386) 322-5900
Fax (386) 322-5901
Classified (386) 322-5949
Rants & Raves (386) 322-5902
Circulation Inquiries 1-866-913-6397
circulation@hometownnewsol.com


CIRCULATION AUDIT BY

VERIFICATION


sS OF TIET1MES..O


care less about their health would be used to restore funding
for the state's medically needy program, which pays for the
medical bills of the working poor. Why is it smokers don't get
it?
Smoking causes cancer and heart disease. Yes, I hear it's very
hard to quit for some, but millions have succeeded, including
me. Adults portray their bad habits to schoolchildren. Watch
them leave the schoolyard sometime. How sad.
This writer has lost many of friends to smoke-related can-
cers. You could be next if you don't wise up and quit, but I
respect your privilege to smoke, but not at my expense.
The majority of lawmakers in this state need to be voted out
and replaced with newly elected individuals with some com-
mon sense.
This is a win-win situation on the tax increase more state
revenue, fewer cigarettes purchased and smoked and-fewer
health claims paid out by the state for smoking-related illness.
Wake up, Charlie; be the first southern state to set an exam-
ple for the well being of the citizens, and turn a deaf ear to the
tobacco lobbyists.

Shopper has bumpy experience at boutique
I consistently hear that merchants along Beach Street in
downtown Daytona Beach complain that nobody shops
downtown and how business is so bad. A recent experience of
mine may shed some light on why it is so much less of a hassle
to shop at a department or discount store, anything other
than self-proclaimed "boutiques" on Beach Street.
I shopped at one of the women's clothing/ accessories
"boutiques" on Christmas Eve and purchased a skirt and top
for $80, which I put on my debit card. I didn't try the skirt on
(big mistake), and when I got it home, I found that it didn't fit
me (poor quality/lousy fit).
I brought it back the day after Christmas (with receipt in
hand and the tag still on) and asked for a refund. The woman
behind the counter (the store's owner, I presume) told me
"You do know we don't give cash refunds."
I told her I didn't know and asked where the policy was post-
ed, as she hadn't told me when I bought the skirt, nor was it on
the sales receipt: She pointed to an 8 1/2-by-11 picture frame
on the counter that was covered by three pairs of sunglasses
and various necklaces; the writing on the sign was totally hid-
den.
I told her that that was not acceptable, that it needed to be
prominently visible so customers could see it. She told me
that "everyone knows my policy" and "even if I wanted to give
you a refund, my cash register won't do it." -
A younger woman who was apparently keeping her compa-
ny in the store piped in: "We're a boutique; boutiques don't
give cash refunds," which is hogwash. I have shopped at bou-
tiques all over the country and have never had a problem
returning anything with a sales receipt, especially if it was paid
using a debit or credit card. I took my credit (handwritten on
my sales receipt) and unhappily left.
The next day, I went back. After thinking about the bad
economy and how small stores are going under all the time, I
figured I'd better get in there and use my credit before they
went out of business! I found something to buy and handed
her my receipt. My new purchase was only $35 plus change
and my credit was for $42 and change, and lo and behold, she
pushed a few buttons on that ornery cash register and she
handed me cash back! But she still shorted me by $2, which I
brought to her attention. She made a comment that at least
she was giving me a refund (I should be grateful for any
amount). My response was "If you are going to give me a
refund, I would like it to be the correct amount I am entitled
to."
On my way out, I told her, "Don't worry; I will not be back." I
also filed a complaint with the State of Florida in regard to her
deceptive sales practices.

Praise for the president
President Bush will soon be leaving office, and there are
many of us who will be sorry to see him go. He is one-of the
most gracious and compassionate presidents we've ever had.
For the past eight years, there has been a calculated cam-
paign of hatred against him, the likes of which we have never
seen before. His opponents and much of the press have
blamed him for every bad thing that happened in America!
I believe all of these bad things were going to happen any-
way, and the Lord put George Bush in office because he is a
man of such inner strength and integrity He knew he would be
able to handle all the attacks and problems without cracking
under the strain.
His resolve after 9/11 was to protect America from further
attacks, and he has done that. He also resolved to go after the
terrorists and countries that support them, and he has done
that.
The criticism of him in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina
was unwarranted and started by the Democrats who were try-
ing to cover up the complete failure of their governor in
Louisiana to take charge and coordinate rescue efforts. Florida
has faced many disasters, and it was always the governor who
led the rescue and rebuilding efforts, with the help of the feder-
al government.


Iz3


As for the war in Iraq, don't forget that 71 percent of the
Democrats in Congress voted for it, but many of them "jumped
ship" when things weren't going well. No one likes war or wants
to see so many wonderful, youngAmericaris killed, least of all
the president, but everyone agreed that. Saddam Hussein was a
threat and needed to be removed. Only George Bush had the
guts to do it!
You would never know it by watching the news in this coun-
try, but the majority of the people in Iraq are happy to be free
from Saddam and appreciate what the Americans have done
for them. But mainly, they want their children to have a chance
to grow up in freedom, without the violence the terrorists are
forcing on them.
This financial crisis is also not of Bush's making. The Democ-
rats are so quick to run to the media to put all the blame on
President Bush, absolving themselves of any fault, but in fact
they are mainly at fault for consistently blocking all efforts of
the president to regulate the mortgage industry, specifically
Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, who the Democrats have been
protecting for years.
Don't forget, it was the Bush Administration that started
bringing the corporations such as Enron to justice shortly after
they took office. Their unethical practices were flourishing in
the 1990s.
I could go on and on telling all the good things that President
Bush has done in the past eight years that you would never
read about in the press, but I believe history will give a true pic-
ture of his accomplishments, after the Bush-haters have died
away.
I know itherevagoingto be a rash of letter writers respond-
ing to this letter with more of their hate-filled diatribes against
him, but I hope there will be some from people who agree with
me. I know there are lots of us out there. Let's hear from you! It's
our turn to speak up!

In response to 'Driving too slow
on Williamson'
I have the solution, and it's very simple: Don't drive on
Williamson!
If you get on Interstate 95 at Taylor Road next to Williamson,
you can go 80 miles per hour!
The other day as I was being pushed in the right-hand lane at
82 miles per hour, a sheriff passed right along with all the other
cars and trucks at 85 miles per hour.
I was trying to imagine what would happen if someone
made even a slight mistake, but moreover, I was wondering
why the police department was allowing such speed.
You will get to Beville Road much quicker.that way, but try to
remember how short life really is!

How to avoid slow drivers
If someone drives too slow for you on Williamson, leave
home earlier if going to your destination.
If someone doesn't feel safe driving 55 miles per hour, I'm
sure the law specifies a minimum speed that person can travel.
I've been tailgated regardless of what speed I drive.

Reader finds rants comical
I enjoy reading the free Hometown News on a weekly basis,
especially the Rants & Raves section.
Although the majority of the articles are.rants, they seem to
get more interesting. In fact, some of the rants are comical.
For example, the individual who ranted about the slow traf-
fic on Williamson Boulevard: Why don't you leave earlier and
go with the flow? Do all of your text messaging before you get
into your automobile, and get rid of the coffee cup. Did you
spill some on you?
"Slow down; the life you save might be your own."
Thank you, Hometown News, for the free entertainment.

A bad alliance
The money we send to Arab countries, we at least get oil that
can be used in Americas' national interest. What America gets
for being allied to Israel is grief and more enemies than the
armed forces can handle.
Wake up and smell the coffee.

No taxes to Saudi Arabia
In the Jan. 2 issue of Hometown News, I read a letter in Rants
& Raves complaining about the U.S. giving billions of taxpayer
money to Saudi Arabia for its outrageous oil prices.
Wrong. Oil prices are set at the Nymex in New York by market
forces. This guy's wet towel has slipped over his eyes.
The bulk of our daily oil (roughly 17 million barrels) comes
from Canada, Mexico, Nigeria and Venezuela. Yes, from Hugo
Chavez who in NewYork at the United Nations meeting called
our president Bush "the devil."
Exxon Mobil, Chevron and Hess are the biggest winners of
oil trade with Saudi Arabia. The shares of those oil companies
are owned by your average, hard-working, Main Street Ameri-
can employees (401Ks and pension funds).


lj liii


'BIG RETAILER


o a o








Daytona Beach/Holly Hill A7


Community notes CLOEA


Humane Society to
host free public
workshop

A free public workshop
titled "How to make a last-
ing relationship with your
dog" will be held at 4 p.m.,
Thursday, Jan. 15, at Halifax
Humane Society, 2364
LPGA Blvd., Daytona
Beach.
Participants will learn
tips and information on
dealing with problem
areas. Starting January,
workshops will be held
throughout the year on var-
ious animal and pet care
topics.
For more information,
call (386) 274-4703, Ext.
318, or send an e-mail to
katehhs@hotmail.com.
Schedules will be listed
on the HHS Web site at hal-
ifaxhumanesociety.org.

Fire department
announces
promotions

Daytona Beach Fire Chief
Gary Hughes promoted the
first- and second-place
firefighters who are on the
promotional exam to Dri-


Imemeza
From page A3
the ice and began asking
me questions. Before I
knew it, I felt at home.
Rose was playing with my
hair while we talked effort-
lessly about boyfriends,
celebrities, and sports.
When the topic of music
came up, their voices
raised' excitedly as they
exclaimed how much they
loved Jordin Sparks. We
sang "No Air" in unison
and I could not help but


ver/Engineers Dec. 24.
Larry Stoney, 27, a six-
year veteran and the
department's fire chaplain,
along with Adrian Killins,
29, a three-year veteran,
will transfer to different
shifts to better balance the
department's needs.
The promotions were
effective the first week of
January.

Genealogical Society
to meet

The Volusia County
Genealogical Society will
meet at 6 p.m., Thursday,
Jan. 15, in the auditorium
at the City Island Library,
105 E. Magnolia Ave., Day-
tona Beach.
Miles Gardener will pres-
ent the program entitled,
"What I Learned When
Researching and Publish-
ing a Book."
Visitors are welcome.
For more information,
call (386) 760-8851 or e-
mail vcgs@cfl.rr.com.

Residents to see
discounts on flood
insurance policies

The unincorporated area


grin as they never missed a
beat and knew every word.
Just as I was comparing
how these radiant girls
were similar to my friends
back home a wave of seri-
ousness engulfed our
table.
"My plans after high
school are to pursue a
higher level of education
at a university," I said.
When the girls heard this
our connection dissolved
instantly., I asked them
what they wished to do
and they proceeded to
slink back into their chairs.


of Volusia County recently
received an increase in its
Federal Emergency Man-
agement Agency Commu-
nity Rating System from
a class seven to a class six.
According to Volusia
County Emergency Man-
agement Director Charlie
Craig, the change trans-
lates to a 20-percent flood
insurance premium dis-
count for flood insurance
policy owners in unincor-
porated Volusia County.
The additional savings go-
into effect when flood
insurance policies are
renewed.
The Community Rating
System is a voluntary pro-
gram that any community
can take part in, as long as
it participates in the
National Flood Insurance
Program. Under the CRS,
there is an incentive for
communities to do more
than regulate construction
of new buildings to mini-
mum national standards.
In the program, flood
insurance premiums are
adjusted to reflect. com-
munity activities that
reduce flood damage to
existing buildings, manage
development in areas not
mapped by the NFIP, pro-
tect new buildings beyond


One of the girls men-
tioned prostitution as a
career most young women
fall into. I was speechless.
Prostitution is not a career
option for me because of
the way I have grown up.
My heart shattered inside
knowing these bright indi-
viduals do not have the
same opportunities that I
do.
As our time together
came to a close the stu-
dents swarmed me with
hugs, phone numbers, and
"I love you's."
Though I came into the


the NFIP protection level,
help insurance agents
obtain flood data and help
citizens obtain flood insur-
ance through public edu-
cation.
It is important that citi-
zens have flood insurance,
even in areas outside of a
mapped flood zone. Many
of the homes that flooded
during Tropical Storm Fay
did not have flood insur-
ance, according to Mr.
Craig.
Flood insurance policies
can be purchased through
most insurance profes-
sionals. When purchasing
a policy, it is important to
remember there is a 30-
day waiting period from
when a flood insurance
policy is purchased and
when the coverage goes
into effect.
For more information
about flood insurance,
visit FEMA's Web site
FEMA.gov and click on
"Plan Ahead."
For more information
about disaster prepared-
ness, visit Volusia.org and
click on "Emergency Man-
agement" from the drop-
down menu.

For Hometown News


situation as a stranger, I
left with new friends. Even
though we live on opposite
sides of the Earth, we are
all teenagers. We relate to
one another on the same
topics and enjoy the same
activities. We all have
struggles and we all have
dreams. In a world where it
is easy to feel alone, I now
feel connected.
I left that classroom with
a newfound inspiration
and purpose. Always
remember everyone is
human, everyone is just
like you.


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www.HometownNewsOL.com


dirF a January 9 2009












Clubs & Classes


*Peninsula Woman's Club:
Free beginner contract bridge
lesson and play is held from
9-11:30 a.m. each Monday at
Peninsula Club, 415 S. Penin-
sula, Daytona Beach. Con-
tract bridge, canasta and
lunch is held from 11 a.m.-3
p.m. each Thursday at Penin-
sula Woman's Club. For more
information, call (386) 760-
0487.
*Seaside Decorative
Painters of Daytona Beach:
This chapter meets at 9 a.m.
on the third Saturday of each
month at the ARC Center, 100
Jimmy Huger Circle, Daytona
Beach. For more information,
call (386) 677-2188 or visit the
Web site atwww.seasidedeco-
rativepainters.org.
*AARP No. 5355: The Holly
Hill Chapter meets at 11 a.m.
the second Friday of each
month at Bishops Glen on
LPGA Boulevard in Daytona
Beach. The public may
attend. For more information,
call (386) 253-0961.
*AARP: The Daytona Beach
Chapter 386 meets at 11:30
a.m. the second Thursday of
each month at the Country
Harvest Buffet on Ridgewood
Avenue in South Daytona.
This organization provides
various ways for participants
to get involved in community
projects and discuss senior
issues. Call (386) 756-7592 for
reservations or more informa-
tion.
*Al-Anon: Meetings are
held at noon Monday,
Wednesday and Friday at
Central Baptist Church, 142
Fairview Ave., Daytona'
Beach. This organization
offers families and friends of
alcoholics positive ways to
cope with the problems that
accompany alcoholism.. For
more information, call (800)
508-2512.
*Alzheimer caregiver sup-
port group: This group meets
at 10:30 a.m. the fourth Friday
of each month at Olds Hall
Good Samaritan. Center,
Archives Room, 340 S. Ridge-
wood Ave., Daytona Beach.
For more information, call
(386) 238-0066.
*Auto Racing Legends: This
club is dedicated to preserv-


ing the history of auto racing
and servifig the community.
The club meets on the last
Tuesday of each month at The
Clubhouse Restaurant, 600
Wilder Blvd., Daytona Beach.
Anyone interested in auto
racing may join. For more
information, call (386) 760-
9587.
*Bereavement Support
Group: This Florida Hospital
HospiceCare support group is
for those who have experi-
enced a recent loss. Meetings
are open to new members.
For more information and to
register, call (386) 671-4762.
*Better Breathers Club:
This club meets from 1-2:30
p.m. the third Wednesday of
each month at American
Lung Association, 412 S. Pal-
metto Ave., Daytona Beach.
The series is designed for any-
one with chronic obstructive
pulmonary disease. The pro-
gram reinforces new habits,
teaches techniques forbetter
breathing, offers plans and
solutions, answers questions
and improves the quality of
life for respiratory patients.
For more information, call
(386) 255-6447.
*Caregiver Support Break-
fast: Caregivers helping fami-
ly or friends at home or in
facilities may attend the sup-
port group breakfasts, which
meet twice each month at
Riviera Senior Living Com-
munity in Holly Hill. The
group shares concerns, frus-
trations and rewards of indi-
vidual experiences. For meet-
ing dates and more
information, call (386) 672-
1009.
*Citizen Observer Pro-
gram: This group of volun-
teers assists the Sheriff's
Office to fight crime and
patrol neighborhoods in
order to minimize crime in
Volusia County. For an appli-
cation and more information,
call (386) 672-0285.
*Community Club: This
club meets the first Thursday
of each month to learn about
home community education.
Visitors may attend. For more
information, call (386) 253-
1037.
*Corvette, Cruisers of


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Greater Daytona: This group
is a member of the National
Council of Corvette Clubs.
Monthly meetings are held on
the third Tuesday of each
month at the Clubhouse
Restaurant located at the
Daytona Beach Municipal
Golf Course. Participants are
invited to dine with the group
starting at 6 p.m., with the
meeting at 7 p.m. For more
information, call (386) 441-
1722, send an e-mail to
jquinn4@cfl.rr.com,
tjoleary@cfl.rr.com, or visit
the Web site at www.corvette-
cruisersdaytona.com.
eDaytona Area Chapter
Outside Sales Support Net-
work: This is an association of
independent contractors and
home-based travel agencies
committed to the profession-
al development of its mem-
bers. Chapter meetings allow
independent contractors to
meet other travel profession-
als with similar interests. For
monthly meeting informa-
tion, call (386) 233-3515.
*Daytona Beach Amateur
Radio Association: Open to
non-members and those
interested in networking,
trading radio information
and furthering the hobby. The
group meets at 7:30 p.m. the
third Monday of each month
at the social hall of the First
Presbyterian Church, 620 S.
Grandview Ave., Daytona
Beach. For more information,
visit the Web site at
www.dbara.org, the local
radio repeater on 147.150
MHz or call (386) 238-1308.
*Daytona Beach Boat Club:
This group meets the second
Thursday of each month at
Halifax Harbor Marina. Social
hour begins at 6 p.m., with
dinner at 7 p.m. A program
for boaters will take place
after dinner. For more infor-
mation, call (386) 253-6045.
*Daytona Beach Boppers:
This dance club meets from
7:30-10 p.m. each Wednesday
to swing, shag and bop at The
Elks, 285 Wilmette Ave.,
Ormond Beach. For more
information, visit the Web site
a t
daytonabeachboppers.com
or send an e-mail to
egss@mindspring.com.
*Daytona Beach Chess
Club: This club meets from
6:30-10 p.m. each Wednesday
at the Peggy Schnebly Recre-
ation Center, 1101 N. Atlantic
Ave., Daytona Beach. For
more information, call (386)
239-9485 or visit the Web site
atwww.daytonabchcc.org.
*Daytona Beach Down
Syndrome Association: This
nonprofit organization pro-
motes positive understand-
ing of Down syndrome in the
community and is a source of
support, information and
education for the families and
individuals affected by Down
syndrome. Meetings are held
the third Thursday of each
month at the ARC of Volusia.
DBDSA is in need of partners,
sponsors and volunteers. For
more information, visit the
Web site http://dbdsa.com or
call (386) 682-5197.
*Daytona Beach Red Hat-
ters: For ladies 50 years and
older, members must wear
purple clothes with a red hat.
A craft day is held the second
Thursday of each month, and
a luncheon is held the third
Saturday of each month, plus
other outings when they
come up. For more informa-
tion, call Queen Thea at (386)


254-0497, (386) 405-3267 or
send an e-mail to
theadian@yahoo.com.
*Daytona Beach Shag Club:
Members dance from 8 p.m.
to midnight each Saturday at
the Moose Lodge in Ormond
Beach. Four deejays provide
the music. There is no admis-
sion charge. For more infor-
mation, call (386) 837-5851.
eDaytona Metropolitan
Bridge Club: This club will
offer two free leam-to-play
bridge lessons. The lessons
are for beginners, people
returning to bridge after some
years, and social players who
want to learn modem bid-
ding and play. Lessons are
held at 9:30 a.m. each Mon-
day at 600 Driftwood Ave.,
Daytona Beach. Lessons are
open to the public, and hand-
outs will be given to all partic-
ipants. Attendees will play
bridge starting with the first
lesson. Free refreshments will
be available at all games, and
frequent bridge parties are
held during the year. For more
information, call (386) 852-
0037.
*Daytona Mustang Club:
This club is sanctioned by
Mustang Club of America and
includes Volusia and Flagler
counties. Members meet at 7
p.m. the first Tuesday of each
month at Gary Yeoman's Ford
Dealership. For more infor-
mation, call (386) 673-1676 or
visit the Web site at www.day-
tonamustangclub.com.
*Disc Golf Club: The group
meets at 4:30 p.m. each
Wednesday for doubles and
at 10 a.m. each Sunday at Tus-
cawilla Park in Daytona
Beach. For more information,
call (386) 212-2782.
*Domestic violence sup-
port group: Sponsored by the
Domestic Abuse Council,
meetings for individuals
involved in an abusive situa-
tion are held from 6-7:30 p.m.
each Wednesday at the Con-
klin Center for the Blind, 405
White St., Daytona Beach.
*Food Addicts in Recovery
Anonymous: This club will
.help those who suffer from
food obsession, overeating,
under-eating and bulimia. FA
is based upon the 12 steps of
Alcoholics Anonymous.
There are no dues, fees or
weigh-ins at meetings. This
club meets at 9 a.m. each
Wednesday at Unity Church,
908 Ridgewood Ave., Holly
Hill, and at 10 a.m. each Sat-
urday at the Terrace of Day-
tona Beach on Jimmy Ann
Drive in Daytona Beach. For
more information, call (386)
258-0610 or visit the Web site
atwww.foodaddicts.org.
*Friendship Force of
Greater Daytona Beach: This
nonprofit organization is
dedicated to bringing people
together. For more informa-
tion, call (386) 761-0062.
*Good Samaritan Society
Daytona: Speakers are hosted
each month open to the pub-
lic. All presentations are held
from 10-11 a.m. the second
Monday of each month at
Good Samaritan Daytona
Assisted Living, Fellowship
Hall, 338 S. Ridgewood Ave.
Light refreshments will be
served. To make reservations,
call (386) 253-6791.
*Greater Daytona Beach
Association of the Deafi All
deaf and hearing individuals
who love sign language may
attend meetings the first and
third Saturday of each month.
For a schedule of events and
locations, send an e-mail to
deafhands@cfl.rr.com.
*Greater Daytona Beach
Coin Club: This club meets at
7 p.m. the third Wednesday of
each month in Sica Hall, 1065
Daytona Ave., Holly Hill.
Guests are welcome. Exhibits
and lectures take place at the
meetings. The club is held
behind the Holly Hill Police
Station. Directions: Travel
east on LPGA Boulevard one
block past U.S. 1 to Daytona


Avenue, then turn right. Sica
Hall will be on the left.
eHalifax Area Veteran's
Council: This club meets the
third Saturday of each month
at the Emory L. BennettVeter-
ans Nursing Home, 1920
Mason Ave., Daytona Beach.
For more information, call
(386) 274-3460.
*Halifax Business and Pro-
fessional Women: This club
meets the second Tuesday of
each month. For more infor-
mation, call (386) 671-7164 or
send an e-mail to
cramirez@flcb.com.
*Halifax Singles: This group
meets at noon the fourth Fri-
day of each month for lunch
and cards at Riviera Country
Club Restaurant, 500 Calle
Grande, Ormond Beach. For
more information, call (386)
252-8783 or (386) 673-2155.
*Halifax Social Club: This
social group is for mature
adults older than 25. HSC has
no political or religious affilia-
tions. Group events can
include barbecues, happy
hours, hiking, art festivals,
theater nights, wine tasting,
comedy clubs or other events
members come up with and
organize. HSC is not a dating
service and has low monthly
dues. For more information,
visit the Web site at www.hali-
faxsocialclub.com.
*Kiwanis Club of Daytona
Beach: Meetings are held at
noon each Wednesday at the
Ocean Walk Resort's Eighth
Floor Conference Room, 300
N. Atlantic Ave., Daytona
Beach. Covered parking is
free in the Ocean Walk Resort
parking garage. For more
information, visit the Web site
at www.daytonabeachkiwa-
nis.org.
*Kiwanis Club of Holly Hill:
This club meets at noon each
Tuesday at Woody's Bar-B-Q
Restaurant, 1593 N. Nova
Road, Holly Hill. For more
information, call (386) 677-
0077.
*KoreanWarVeterans Asso-
ciation: The Central Florida
East Chapter 189 meets at 2
p.m. the third Tuesday of each
month at Emory L. Bennett
Veterans Nursing Home, 1920
Mason Ave., Daytona Beach.
Those who served during the
Korean War may attend. For
more information, call (386)
671-8701.
*Loners on Wheels: This
club is for campers and RV-
ers who are single or who lost
a mate and still want to camp,
but are reluctant to go alone.
This is not a dating service.
Members are primarily semi-
retired/retired. For more
information, call (386) 788-
4016 or (386) 538-1741.
*Mayor's Alliance for Per-
son's with Disabilities: This
group meets at 1 p.m. the
fourth Tuesday of each
month at the Braille and Talk-
ing Book Library, 420 Platt St.,
Daytona Beach. Meetings are
open to the public. For more
information, call (386) 852-
1285.
*M.I. Hummel Club of Day-
tona Beach: This nonprofit
organization holds meetings
the third Thursday of every
other month. For more infor-
mation, call (386) 761-0291 or
(386) 673-0534.
*Morning Star Quilt Guild:
This club meets at 10 a.m. the
first Wednesday of each
month at the United Presby-
terian Church, 730 Beville
Road, Daytona Beach., New
members are welcome. For
more information, call (386)
788- 7735 or (386) 756-8534.
*National Alliance for Men-
tally Ill: This club meets from
1-3 p.m. the second and
fourth Thursday of each
month at Act Corporation,
1220 Willis Ave., Building 9,
Daytona Beach. The family
and friends of people with a
mental illness provide sup-
port, friendship, guidance
and advice and advocate
quality services for those with


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mental disabilities. For more
information, call (386) 503-
7219.
*National Association of
Retired and Veteran Railroad
Employees: Unit 70 Daytona
Beach is seeking new mem-
bers. Meetings are held at
11:30 a.m. the second
Wednesday of each month
(September-May) at the
Whistle Junction Buffet &
Grill, 1584 S. Ridgewood Ave.,
Daytona Beach. Active and
retired railroad employees
may attend. For more infor-
mation, call (386) 428-9848,
(386) 767-9086 or (386) 734-
6098.
*Newcomers Club: Women
who reside in the Halifax area
may attend meetings at 11:30
a.m. the first and third Tues-
day of each month at Palmet-
to Club, 1000 S. Beach St.,
Daytona Beach. Lunch costs
$10, and members play cards
until 3 p.m. For more infor- -
mation, call (386) 761-8374.
*Orpenda Club: Women
meet for lunch and cards at
11:30 a.m. the third Wednes-
day of each month at the Pal-
metto Club, 1000 S. Beach St.,
Daytona Beach. For reserva-
tions and more information,
call (386) 441-4085.
*Overeaters Anonymous:
This club helps compulsive
eaters and those who are
ruled by food. There are no
weigh-ins, dues or fees. Call.
(386) 426-1558 or (386) 233-
9399 for the nearest meeting
location.
-Palette and Brush Club:
Members meet the first
Thursday of each month at
the Art League of. Daytona,
433 S. Palmetto Ave., Daytona
Beach. Guests may attend.
For more information, call
(386) 677-4654.
*Palmetto Club: Members
meet at 11:30 a.m. the first
Friday of each month for a
social with lunch, a business
meeting, and speakers at the
Palmetto Club, 1000 S. Beach
St., Daytona Beach. This is a
charitable organization that
plans projects for various
charities. For more informa-
tion, call (386) 673-2272.
*Pilot Club of Daytona
Beach: This club supports the
community through scholar-
ships and various community
projects. Meetings are held at
6:30 p.m. the fourth Tuesday
of each month at Pelican Bay
Country Club. For more infor-
mation, call (386) 756-9092.
*Recovery Incorporated:
This group meets at 1 p.m.
each Thursday at City Island
Library. This is a self-help
mental health organization
for those suffering from anxi-
ety, depression and fears.
*Republican Executive
Committee of Volusia Coun-
ty: This group meets at 10
a.m. the first Saturday of each
month. Meeting locations
alternate between Daytona
Beach and DeLand. For more
information, call (386) 235-
3011.
*Surfside Barbershop Har-
mony Chorus: Men of all ages
may attend for music, fun
and fellowship from 7-10 p.m.
each Tuesday at Daytona
Beach Community College,
Building 230, Room 123. For
more information, call FUN-
290-3452 or visit the Web site
at http://barbershopharmo-
ny.bolgspot.com.
*Daytona Beach Toastmas-
ters Club: Members meet
from 6-7 p.m. each Monday at
Embry-Riddle Aeronautical
University. Learn to commu-
nicate, listen, lead, motivate,
persuade, to be successful
and self-confident and to
reach goals. For more infor-
mation, send an e-mail to
dbtoastmasters@yahoo.com
or visit the Web site at
http://daytonabeach.free-
toasthost.ws/.
*Toastmasters on the Hali-
fax: This club meets at 6 p.m.
each Thursday at the Univer-
sity of Phoenix Campus, 1540
Cornerstone Blvd., Daytona
Beach. Directions are avail-
able at www.Toastmasters-
DB.com. For more informa-
tion, call (386) 527-0019 or
send an e-mail to toastmas-
ter@iselldb.com.
*U.S. Coast Guard Auxil-
iary: This auxiliary Flotilla 44
is the civilian branch of the
U.S. Coast Guard. Its goal is to
provide the public with boat-
ing safety classes, provide free
vessel checks, participate in


search and rescue in the air
and to provide assistance to
boaters. Meetings are held at
7 p.m. the second Tuesday of
each month at 355 Basin St. in
the Halifax Harbor Marina.
For more information, call
(386) 767-2000.


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Friday, January 9, 2009


A8 Daytona Beach/Holly Hill


Hometown News


1s











Dining fw



Enterti nWeit
SECTION B WWW.HOMETOWNNEWSOL.COM FRIDAY, JANUARY 9, 2009


Out &





FRIDAY, JAN. 9
*2009 Homegrown Roots
Fest: Clay Jackson will perform
at 7 p.m. at Ormond Wine Co.,
1108 W. Granada Blvd.,
Ormond Beach. Skavaganza
will be held at the Bank and
Blues Club and Full Moon
Saloon on Main Street in Day-
tona Beach, with Skif Dank,
The Sweet Kings, Royal City
Riot Suicide Clubs, The Lee-
side and We Hooked Your
Heros performing. On Jan. 10,
Hip-Hop Hustla's Night will be
held at the Full Moon with The
Watchmen: The Elevated Hip-
Hop Experience. On Jan. 11,
the grand finale will be held at
Frank's Front Row, 308
Seabreeze, Daytona Beach.
Smokestack and the Foothill
Fury will perform. For more
information, e-mail
hmegrown@yahoo.com or
visit the Web site at
myspace.com/homegrown-
rootsorg.
*Historical Bus Tour: The
Ormond Beach Historical Soci-
ety will host this tour at 9:45
a.m. Each two-hour tour intro-
duces more than 30 historical
buildings and sites. The cli-
mate-controlled trolley makes
stops., at the Fairchild Oak and
the Three Chimneys Sugar Mill
Ruins (ruins not otherwise
open to the public). The cost is
$20 for adults, $18 for seniors
(65 and older) and $7 for chil-
dren (5-12). Tours begin at
The Casements parking lot, 25
Riverside Drive, Ormond
Beach. Reservations are
required; seating is limited. To
reserve seats, call (386) 677-
7005.
*Ben Franklin Birthday
Party: The Culture & Entertain-
ment Board of Daytona Beach
Shores will hold this. birthday
party at 5 p.m. at the Oceans
Racquet and Recreation Club.
Vernon Weidner, a longtime
historian of Ben Franklin, will
entertain the fourth-grade
class of Long Street Elemen-
tary. Snacks and refreshments
will be served.
*'Out of Order' perform-
ance: The Little Theatre of
New Smyrna Beach will pres-
ent this comedy at 8 p.m., Jan.
9-10 and Jan. 15-17, and at 2
p.m., Jan. 11 and Jan. 18, at
726 Third Ave., New Smyrna
Beach. The comedy centers
around English conservative
Parliament member Richard
Willey, played by David Lowe,
who is attempting to have an
affair with one of the secre-
taries of the leader of the
opposition party in a London
hotel. He opens the curtains in
the room and finds a dead
body stuck in the window! He
tries to hide the body from a
conniving waiter, a suspicious
hotel manager, an alert private
See OUT, B2


TIRE
Motorcycle and


Homegrown performance


Photo courtesy of Stephen Sparacino
Halifax Contraband performed at Frank's Front Row in Daytona Beach during the 2009 HomeGrownRoots Fest last
Sunday.




Hear ye, hear ye: Senior theater


workshop creates medieval madness


For Hometown News
Volnews@hometownnewsol.com
The Ormond Beach
Theatre Workshop will
present "SurelyYou Joust,"
a two-act original musical
comedy set in medieval
times and written by
resident Lois Miller.
Show times are 7:30
p.m., Jan. 23, and 2:30
p.m., Jan., 24-25, at the
Ormond Beach Perform-
ing Arts Center, 399 North
U.S. 1.
Cast members ages 50
and older have been busy
erecting the set the
castle hall at Crestfallen
Manor and dreaming
up costumes for nobility
and peasants of the
period. Directed by Ms.
Miller, she said people


eAngell & Phelps Caf6:
Bob Thames and Walt
Andrews will perform at
7:30 p.m., Saturday, at 156
S. Beach St., Daytona
Beach. For more informa-
tion, visit the Web site at
www.myspace.com/bobth
ames.
*Bank & Blues Club:
Daytona Blues Society
"True Blues" Live Jam open
jam session is held from 8


seeking roles in her plays
are never turned away.
"We want to give
everyone a chance if they
show up," she said. "We
usually have more than 20
people."
"Surely" is the tale of
knights of old and their
ladies, which lends a
comic edge to the plight of
an elderly lord and his
spoiled daughter.
The inspiration behind
the play began one day
when Ms. Miller sighed,
"Lord help us."
"And I thought he (the
lord) would have a castle, a
daughter too old to hang
around and he wants to
get her married," she said.
"Generally, when I start
writing, I write a few lines
and see if anything clicks.


p.m.-1 a.m. each Wednes-
day at 701 Main St., Day-
tona Beach. This nonprofit
group is dedicated to pre-
serving and spreading the
love of blues music. For
more information and a
full events schedule, visit
the Web site at www.Day-
tonaBluesSociety.org.
eCuvee Oceanside Wine
& Tapas: "Wine Down
Wednesday" is held each


If it does, I can write for
hours. If not, I walk away.
It is a labor of love."
The tale goes on to
reveal that the lord's
fortune is dwindling, yet
his daughter remains
unmarried. His solution is
to invite all eligible knights
to the castle for a joyous
weekend celebration.
The outcome is not what
he expects.
Ms. Miller, a Florida
resident since 1974 who
started writing and
directing in 1999, said the
hardest part about writing
plays is being original.
"It should be nothing
done by someone before,"
she said. "It is a struggle to
take a different tack on
everything."'


week, featuring live music.
Bermuda High performs
from 7-10 p.m. each Thurs-
day. John Macker takes
requests from 10 p.m. to
midnight, Friday, with a
late-night happy hour.
Breaking Bread performs
'from 7-10 p.m., Saturday.
Cuvee Oceanside is locat-
ed at 188 E. Granada Blvd.,
Ormond Beach. For more
information, call (386)


But her greatest joy is
naming characters.
"If the cast is laughing,
I'm hoping everyone else
will laugh, too."
Ms. Miller will have a
part in the play. '
"Because this is a senior
theater group, every year '
we lose a person along the
way," she said. "And I have
to step in and take a part.
These things aren't
planned; they just hap-
pen."
Tickets cost $15. The
Senior Theater Workshop,
an offshoot of the Friends
of the Performing Arts
Center, now in its 20th
year, donates all proceeds
to the PAC.
To order tickets, call
(386) 676-3375.


615-4727 or visit the Web
site at www.cuveeocean-
side.com.
*Five O'Clock Charley:
This band will perform
rock 'n' roll, blues and
country hits from 5-8 p.m.,
Friday, Jan. 10, at River-
Grille on the Tomoka, 950
North U.S. 1, Ormond
Beach, and from 7-10 p.m.,
Jan 9, Jan. 14 and Jan. 16, at
See SCENE, B2


STAR SCOPES
James Tucker
Week of 01-09-2009


Aries March 21-April 19
Count your blessings. This is
a New Year. The past one has
given both challenges and
blessings. This year will be
better with the rewards out-
weighing the challenges.
Make an accounting on a
regular basis about how
much good is coming your
way and you will increase
the odds of success and put
them in your favor.

Taurus April 20-May 20
Making wise decisions based
on your instincts will keep
you focused on the main
issues that need to be
addressed. You are at your
best when you follow your
heart not the head. Stay firm
in your basic beliefs. Others
around you may not always
agree, but they will respect
you for your firm resolve. Just
be flexible when needed.

Gemini May 21-June 21
You are a creative free spirit.
Use your powerful gift of
communicating when life
gets sticky or begins to slow
down. Be sure to make qual-
ity time for yourself each
week and keep your mental
batteries charged. The begin-
ning of the year is no time to
start feeling burned out.
Strong concentration on your
main objectives will bring
positive results.

Cancer June 22-July 22
This will be a good year for
you. You are more relaxed,
your mind is clear, your heart
is open and your visions are
strong. This balanced life will
help you expand your goals
and help them grow earlier
than usual. It's good to see
you taking better care of
yourself. You are well known
for taking care of everyone
else first. This is a nice
change. Good job.

Leo July 23-Aug. 22
You have the power of posi-
tive influence like few others.
Why? Because of your fiery
nature. You get a good idea
and you put it into action.
Two thousand nine will be a
year of continued action and
many new adventures. Your
good nature and encourage-
ment is a large part of your
success. It's part of your nat-
ural leadership. Enjoy the
rewards. There will be many.

Virgo Aug. 23-Sept. 22
You have done a lot of heal-


See SCOPES, B4


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)







Friday, January 9, 2009


DINING & ENTERTAINMENT


Out
From page BI
detective, an angry wife, a furi-
ous husband, a bungling secre-
tary and an unconscious nurse.
For ticket information, call the
box office at (386) 423-1246
or visit www.NsbPlayers.org.
*Harvey Robbins Royalty of
Doo-Wopp: This music of the
early 1950s will be showcased
by Hlarvey Robbins at the
Peabody Auditorium. The line-
up will include George Galfo's
Mystics, Clyde McPhatter and
The Drifters, Jimmy Beaumont
& The Skyliners, The Diablos
featuring Jay Johnson, Reunion
of Boston's Original Interludes
and The Knights of Doo-Wopp.
Tickets may be purchased at
,f the Peabody Auditorium box
Office, 600 Auditorium Blvd.,
* Daytona Beach, by calling
(407) 839-3900, online at
www.ticketmaster.com or at
any Ticketmaster outlet Tickets
cost from $45-$29, plus service
fees. For more information, call
the box office at (386) 671-
3462.
"'* Reader's Theater: Port
Orange Regional Library will
present this event at 3 p.m.
1005 City Center Circle. The dif-
ference between theater and
reader's theater is there is no
stage setting. The actors and
actresses read from scripts and
act and interact with each
other with minimal props-as
they bring scenes to life. Chil-
dren in grades second through


fifth may perform. For more
information, call (386) 322-
5152, ExL 4, or visit www.volu-
sialibrary.org.
*Cinematique of Daytona's
film showing: Sister Cities of
Volusia will show the cult clas-
sic "La Cage Aux Folles" (110
min., not rated, sub-titled) at
The Book Store and So Much
More, 410 S. Nova Road,
Ormond Beach. This French
comedy, translated as The
Cage of Madwomen, won a
Golden Globe in 1980 and was
remade in the U.S. as "The
Birdcage." The film centers on a
man who wants to marry the
daughter of a high official. His
parents, gay nightclub owner
Renato and effeminate trans-
vestite Zaza, must meet his
pompous and conservative in-
laws. For their son, the gay cou-
ple decide not only to act
straight, but to pose as hus-
band and wife! On party night,
however, insanity reigns when
"mom" and "dad" fail to
adhere to the "straight" and
narrow. Showings will be held
at noon, Wednesday, Jan. 14,
and at 7 p.m., Thursday, Jan.
15, Friday, Jan. 9 and Jan. 16.
For more information, call
(386) 615-8320.
*Seaside Balloon Fest: The
City of New Smyrna Beach will
sponsor this inaugural event
Jan. 9-10 at the New Smyrna
Beach Airport (wind and
weather permitting). The festi-
val kicks off at 5 p.m., Friday,
with music, food, festivities and
a traditional "Balloon Glow,"
which occurs after sunset


when balloon pilots synchro-
nize the flames of their burners
to the beat of popular tunes.
Guests may encircle the glow
area with blankets. On Satur-
day, from 7-8 a.m., up to 20 hot
air balloons will dot the skies
over New Smyrna Beach, wind
and weather permitting.
Guests are encouraged to
arrive early, as hot air balloons
need the cool morning air to
fly. Flights are available and
offer passengers an eagle's
view of Ponce Inlet, Turnbull
Bay and the surrounding area.
A limited number of hot air bal-
loon flights are available;
make reservations early by
calling (407) 897-5432.
*Singles Dance: This event is
held at 8 p.m. at the Moose
Club, 601 W. Granada Blvd.,
Ormond Beach. DJ Dave
Blasko provides the music. The
dance is for the 50 and older
crowd. The cost is $7. For more
information, call (386) 255-
220Z

SATURDAY, JAN. 10

*Wood Carving Show: The
Friends Carving Club of Port
Orange will hold its annual
show from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. at the
Port Orange Gymnasium, 4655
City Center Circle. Chain saw
carving, different styles of
woodcarving, unique gifts from
vendors and a chance to meet
the club members will be fea-
tured. Door prizes and a 50/50
drawing will be held. A dona-
tion pf $2 will be accepted at
the door; children younger


Open for Breakfast 7am 11am Lunch 11am 3pm
Dinner 3pm 10pmr
Full Bar Happy Hour Every Day 2 -7pm
2 for 1 Margaritas Well Drinks & Draft Beer


than 12 will be admitted free.
For more information, call
(386) 506-5500.
*Fifth Year Anniversary:
Daytona Beach Shores Eagles
No. 4469 at 3516 S. Atlantic
Ave. will celebrate its anniver-
sary. Any Eagle member may
attend at 4:30 p.m. for cock-
tails, followed by dinner at 5:30
p.m. Dinner is either surf or turf
and costs $10 per person. For
more information, call (386)
852-6665 or (386) 322-1094.
*Ballroom dance: The
Greater Daytona Chapter of
USA Dance will host this event
from 7-10:30 p.m. at the City
Island Recreation Center, 108
E. Orange Ave., Daytona Beach.
Ballroom, swing and Latin
music will be provided by a
local deejay. The cost is $6 for
members, $8 for non-members
and $3 for students. Attire is
dressy casual. For more infor-
mation, call (386) 756-8433.
*Doug Halper Concert:
Warner Bros. hammered dul-
cimer recording artist Doug
Halper will perform at 6:30
p.m. at Unity of Daytona Beach.
Mr. Halper also will perform on


Scene
From page BI
Julian's Landmark, 88 S
Atlantic Ave., Ormonc
Beach. The band also will
hit the stage from 4-8 p.m.
Sunday, Jan. 11, at Halifax
River Yacht Club, 331 S
Beach St., Daytona Beach.
*Frappes North: Wine
tastings are held at 6 p.m
the first Tuesday of eaci
month, beginning Feb. 3
Reservations are required
Live Music Friday Nights
are held from 7-11 p.m
Frappes is located at 123W
Granada Blvd. in Ormonc
Beach. To make reserva
tions, call (386) 615-4888 o;
visit the Web site a
www.frappesnorth.com.
*The Garlic: Jazz anc
blues musicians perforn
seven days a week. Thon
Chambers hits the stage
from 6-10 p.m., Monday
and Tuesday. Special guests
premiere each Wednesday
Mark Hodgson performs a
6 p.m. each Thursday and
Friday and at 7 p.m. Satur
day and Sunday. The Garlic
is located at 556 E. Thirn
Ave., New Smyrna Beach
For more information, cal
(386) 424-6660.
*Inlet Harbor: 5 O'Clocl
Charlie will perform front
noon to 4 p.m., Friday, fol
lowed by Les B Fine at i


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the acoustic guitar, Native
American and traditional flutes,
piano and vocals. Tickets cost
$10 for adults ($15 at door)
and $5 for students (11-17). To
order tickets, call (386) 253-
4201.

MONDAY, JAN. 12

*Afternoon at the Movies:
"The Dark Knight" (PG-13, 152
mins.) will be shown at 2 p.m.
in the Port Orange Regional
Library Auditorium, 1005 City
Center Circle. For more infor-
mation, call (386) 322-5152,
Ext 4.

THURSDAY, JAN. 15

*Daytona's Got Talent: This
event will debut at 7 p.m. at
the Coliseum Music Theater,
176 N. Beach St., Daytona
Beach. Tickets cost $10. For
tickets, more information or to
audition, call (386) 852-7890.

ONGOING EVENTS

*A Taste of Wines: Port


p.m. Greg Cardino and
Mike Caso will hit the stage
from noon to 4 p.m., Satur-
day.
*Java Jungle: Open Mic
Night is at 7 p.m. each
Thursday. Musicians,
authors, singers, poets and
composers are welcome.
Wes Malone and other
artists also perform. Friday
night is Singles Mingle and
Date Night. Free desserts
are served. Saturday
evenings, Java Jungle pres-
ents live music from local
artists. This month, Julie
Baker is the featured musi-
cian, performing from 7-10
p.m. each Saturday. Java
Jungle is located at 4606
Clyde Morris Blvd., Unit 2P,
Port Orange. For more
information, call (386) 760-
8969.
*Norwood's Restaurant
and Wine Shop: Free wine
tastings are held from 5-7
p.m. each Friday on the
deck and Saturday in the
shop with complimentary
cheeses. Norwood's is
located at 400 Second Ave.,
New Smyrna Beach. For
more information, call
(386) 428-4621.
*Ohana Luau Dinner
Show: This dinner show
spectacular and family-
style feast, with a 6:30 p.m.
seating, dinner served at
7:15 p.m. and show time at
7:30 p.m., is held Thursday,
Friday and Saturday, at the
Hawaiin Inn, 2301 S.
Atlantic Ave., Daytona
Beach Shores. Participants
will learn traditional
dances with Polynesian
women, warriors and
keikis (children). A flaming
fire knife dance and hula
with audience participa-
tion will be featured. For
more information, call
(386) 255-5411, Ext. 186, or
visit www.ohanaluau.com.
*OM Bar & Chill Lounge:
Free wine tastings are held
from 4-8 p.m. each Sunday
at 392 Flagler Ave., New
Smyrna Beach. Tasters will
have a selection of up to 10
different wines. Acoustic
performances are provided
by Rhonda Patrick. Free
salsa lessons are given at 8


Royal Caribbean Restaurant
will host this event at 6:30 p.m.
the second Wednesday of each
month inside Pirates Cove
Resort, 3501 S. Atlantic Ave.,
Daytona Beach Shores. During
this semi-formal gathering,
four-course meals will be
served with wines that comple-
ment each course. A wine
expert will teach facts about
each wine. Reservations are
required, and guests must be
21. years old. The cost is $30
per person. Proceeds will ben-
efit the Children's Home Soci-
ety. To make reservations, call
(386) 788-3922.
*ArtHaus: Wee Create, a col-
lection of kindergarten artwork
from 11 teachers in Volusia
County, will be on display
through Jan. 9 at 3840 Ridge-
wood Ave., Port Orange.
Gallery hours are from 9 a.m.-5
p.m., Monday-Friday. Also,
ArtHaus in connection with the
News-Journal Center will
showcase the Volusia Star
Artists Exhibition. The exhibit
will feature artworks created by
See OUT, B4


p.m. each Thursday, with
open salsa dancing held
from 9 p.m.-1 a.m. For
more information, call
(386) 423-2727 or visit the
Web site at www.theom-
bar.com.
*Ormond Beach Eagles
No. 3800: Games are
played at noon each Thurs-
day. One mini jackpot and
door prizes will be avail-
able. Free coffee and
doughnuts will be served.
Proceeds got to chartists.
For more information, call
(386) 672-3663.
*Ormond Beach Senior
Center: The Vagabonds
perform from 2-4 p.m.
once per month. For more
information, call (386) 763-
0355.
*Peanut's Restaurant &
Sports Bar: Cheap Thrills
will perform at 9 p.m., Fri-
day and Saturday. Open
Jam Night is held at 8 p.m.
each Sunday. The Pirates
perform at 8 p.m. each
Thursday. Texas Hold 'em is
played at 6 p.m. each Mon-
day and Thursday and at 2
p.m., Saturday. Free Bingo
and Comedy Auction is
held at 7 p.m. each Tues-
day. Lotta Wednesday is
held from 7-10 p.m. each
Wednesday. Peanut's is
located at 421 Flagler Ave.,
New Smyrna Beach. For
more information, call
(386) 423-1469.
*Pub 44 Riverfront:
Riverdan Band will per-
form from 9 p.m.-1 a.m.,
Jan. 9-10, at 115 Main St.,
Daytona Beach. For more
information, call (386) 428-
6523 or visit the Web site at
www.RiverdanBand.com.
*Rockin Ranch: Saloon-
atix will perform Jan. 9-10
at 801 S. Nova Road,
Ormond Beach. For more
information, visit www.
rockinranchnightclub.com
.*Seabreeze Coffee Con-
nection: A hand drum cir-
cle is held at 8 p.m. each
Wednesday at 315
Seabreeze Blvd., Daytona
Beach. For more informa-
tion, visit the Web site at
www.drumcircle.meetup.c
om/327.
*Venetian Bay Town and
Country Club: Party in the
Park is held from 1-5 p.m.
the third Saturday of each
month at 424 Luna Bella
Lane, New Smyrna Beach.
Lawn chairs are suggested;
no coolers. Admission is
free. Also, a farmers' mar-
ket is held from 8 a.m.-1
p.m. each Saturday at the
town center. For more
information, call (386) 428-
8448.
*Wine Warehouse New
Smyrna Beach: Free wine
tastings are held from 4-7
p.m. each Friday at 636
Third Avenue, New Smyrna
Beach. Six wines are tasted.
For more information, call
(386) 426-6133.
*WineStyles events: At
the Shoppes of Yorketown,
1665 Dunlawton Ave., Suite
105, Port Orange, a weekly
tasting is held from 5:30-8
p.m. each Thursday, open
to the public. The cost is $5
and complimentary to
wine club members. For
more information, call
(386) 788-7188 or visit the
Web site at www.PortOr-
angeWinestyles.com.
*0 0


USE
AR S"
with tj is special!


oon
B2 Daytona Beach/Holly Hill


Hometown News







Daytona Beach/Holly Hill B3


ININH & E o WOIfl


A cook-a-cabulary


and great ways


with leftover turkey


Hello smart shoppers.
This week we're
gonna make some
delicious meals with
leftover turkey.
First, let's get even
smarter by learning what
cooking terms mean with
my cook-a-cabulary: a
vocabulary about cooking.
Alphabetically speaking,
here we go!
BASTE: to moisten food
while cooking with pan
drippings to prevent
dryness.
BLANCH: to precook in
steam or boiling water to
remove skin or to prepare
food for canning or freezing.
BLEND: to thoroughly
mix ingredients with an
electric mixer or a whisk
until smooth.
BRAISE: to cook slowly in
a little liquid with the pan
tightly covered.
BREAD: to coat with
breadcrumbs before
cooking.
BROIL: to cook by direct
heat under the broiler of a
stove.
BUTTERFLY: to split
foods horizontally, such as
chicken breasts or meat,
without separating the
sections, then laying flat.
CARAMELIZE: to melt
sugar slowly over low heat
until it becomes brown in
color. To caramelize onions,
the same process is fol-
lowed, using a little shorten-
ing or water, until they
become lightly golden and
translucent.
COAT: to cover foods with
crumbs, flour or batter
before cooking.
DREDGE: pressing food
firmly into seasoned flour to
coat heavily.
FOLD: to add ingredi-
ents gently, such as folding
in beaten egg whites by
placing a spatula down
into the mixture at the side
of the bowl, scraping along
the bottom then coming
up and over, turning the
bowl often until well
incorporated.
GLAZE:,to brush a
mixture over top of food to
give it a shine or hard finish.
KNEAD: to work dough
with the heel of your hand
in a pressing and folding


ROMANCING
THE STOVE
with the
Grammy Guru
ARLENE BORG


motion.
PUREE: to convert food
into a liquid or paste using a
blender, food processor or
food mill.
REDUCE: to boil a
mixture to evaporate liquid
so it becomes thicker.
SCORE: to cut narrow,
criss-cross slits on each side
of meat or poultry without
cutting through.
Any more questions?
Can't you feel yourself
getting smarter by the
minute?
Enjoy. Next week it's
turkey soup.

LEFTOVER TURKEY
OR CHICKEN CURRY
serves 4 to 6
regular or low fat

This curry is a simple
variation of the real thing. It
is a winner and takes almost
no time to prepare.

1/2-cup each of finely
chopped onion and celery
1 tablespoon canola oil -
or water
2 cups chicken broth,
homemade or canned
1/2-cup tomato sauce
1/2-cup water
1/2-teaspoon Worcester-
shire sauce
Several sprigs fresh Italian
parsley, chopped, or 1
tablespoon dried parsley
Salt and pepper
1 teaspoon up to 1
tablespoon curry powder
(depending on how
strong a flavor you want)
3-4 cups cooked turkey or
chicken, cut up
1/4-cup flour
3 to 4 cups cooked rice or
noodles
Cooked broccoli spears

Lightly brown onion and
celery in oil, adding water if
necessary.
Add all but 1/2-cup of
broth, along with the


Making the rounds


Doris Williams of Daytona Beach dances with Joe Farmarco of
Island Recreation Center in Daytona Beach last week.


tomato sauce, water, a little
salt and pepper, Worces-
tershire sauce, parsley and
curry powder. Cook,
covered, about 10 minutes.
Add turkey; cook 10
minutes longer.
Shake remaining 1/2-
cup of broth with flour and
add to the pot, stirring
until thickened., adding
more water or flour and
water if necessary.
Serve in individual
dishes or any way you
choose. Try laying broccoli
spears over rice or noo-
dles, then ladle on the
curry.

MOCK TURKEY OR
CHICKEN DIVAN
regular or low fat

Leftover turkey or chicken
Leftover gravy
Fresh or frozen broccoli,
cooked
Cooked medium or wide
noodles*

Thaw cooked poultry; let
sit out one hour to reach
room temperature. Thaw
gravy, bring to a boil; whisk
to reconstitute.
Add cut up poultry; heat
though. Serve in individual
au-gratin dishes, topping a


serving of noodles with a
couple of broccoli spears,
turkey and gravy.
Beware of egg noodles. If
their first name is egg,
they're high in fat and
cholesterol. Use no-yolk egg
noodles instead. Season
with salt and pepper and a
little butter substitute.

GRANDMA'S ICE
BOX CAKE
serves 6 or more
regular or low fat

I bet most of you remem-
ber grandma's icebox cake.
Now by following my lead,
you can make it low fat.
Remember, pudding is
and always has been fat
free. By using fat-free milk
or evaporated skim milk,
undiluted, and fat-free
topping you will have a fat


Randy Barber/staff photographer
Ormond Beach during Winter Dances at the City


and cholesterol-free
dessert.

Two 4-serving packages
chocolate pudding (cook
and serve style, not
instant), either regular
or sugar-free
4 cups milk
graham crackers, regular
or low fat
Whipped cream or
whipped topping

Prepare pudding accord-
ing to package directions.
The microwave method is
great, with no pot to wash.
Place a layer of graham
crackers in an 8-inch
square pan. Top with half
the pudding, crackers and
then the rest of the pud-
ding. Crumble some
crackers on top; refrigerate
until cold. Cut in squares
and serve with whipped
cr ram.


lam available for talks
from south Vero to Hobe
Sound, call (772) 465-5656.
When a recipe is not in
my cookbook it will have
(NIB) next to the title.
For an autographed
cookbook, "Romancing The
Stove with the Grammy
Guru," send $19.50 ($15-
book, $1-tax, $3.50 for
shipping and handling)
For multiple books sent to
one address it's $3.50 S&H
for 1 book, add $2 postage
for each additional book
($15 plus $2.00). Send to:
Arlene M. Borg, 265 SW
Port St. Lucie Blvd, No. 149,
Port St. Lucie, FL 34984.
Check, money order or
Paypal accepted.
Visit my Web site at
www.romancingthestove.n
et or send me an e-mail at
arlerie@romancingtheatbv


Evening adult
art classes offered at
Ormond Memorial

A four-week adult draw-
ing class will be held from
6 to 8 p.m. each Wednes-
day beginning Jan. 14 at
the Ormond Memorial Art
Museum, 78 E. Granada.
The class will run


through Feb. 2 and will be
taught by professional
artist and art educator,
Karlene McConnell.
The course will include
an introduction to the
fundamentals of drawing,
instruction in value and
composition, warm up
exercises, such as gesture
and contour drawing, and
will progress into value


scales and perspective.
The tuition for the pro-
gram is $60, and a supply
list is available in
advance.
Beginners are welcome.
To register, call (386)
676-3347 or send an e-mail
to bsaunders@ormondart-
museum.org.

For Hometown News


I


ooo
dirF a Januar 9 2009


I


www.HometownNewsOL.com







Friday, January 9, 2009


DINING & ENTERToANMIENT


Scopes
From page B1
ing, changing and growing the past
year. The key to success is to get a
second wind when you begin to
tire and use it to help you finish
your projects in a timely manner.
Your desire and visions are focused
and strong. Stay on this edge and
your life will be so magical that it
will surprise even you.

Libra Sept. 23-Oct. 22
You have created many new excit-
ing changes in life. Your spirit is
strong and your attitude is positive.
Keep your life tools honed and
sharp. The main one is balance.
You are our leader in this area. You
have the patience, faith and trust in
spirit. Stay focused on your pas-
sions and get ready for an exciting
ride all year.

Scorpio Oct. 23-Nov. 21
Your self-confidence is growing.
You worry less. You live a day at a
time. You are happier. Why?
Because you continue to release
the past and plan for the future.
You are creating your own reality.
You are a player in the game of life,.
not a spectator. The greatest is your
open heart to receive and give love.
In the game of life you are a win-
ner.

Sagittarius Nov. 22-Dec. 21
Where do you get all the energy?
You amaze your friends. You
have a never-ending supply of
determination. You know what
you want. You usually get what
you desire. The key for stamina
is to pace yourself. Make a list of
your top priorities every day, and
take care of the most important
ones first. This is the formula of
champions.

Capricorn Dec. 22-Jan. 19
You have a rare universal blessing.
The sun, Mars, Jupiter and Pluto are
all in Capricorn right now. This
gives you a highly-focused mirror


into your own inner universe. The
greatest thing you could do would
be to meditate every day and listen
closely to this rare guidance. Then,
take action to create a great reality in
the days and months ahead.

Aquarius Jan. 20-Feb. 18
Few can keep up with you at the
beginning of the year. Your sign is
coming up next. .The anticipation
and joy of achievement is the fuel
that fires your soul. The timing is
perfect to launch your new proj-
ects. With Venus and Neptune in
Aquarius the next two months will
be very productive. Your hard work
has paid off. Nothing can stop you
now.

Pisces Feb. 19-March 20
With Venus and Uranus in Pisces it
is time to show gratitude every day.
Say this out loud every day. "I am
continually fed by the unlimited
good in the universe. I am thankful
for my many friends who bring me
great joy and love. I see good in
everyone I meet. I am thankful
when they see it in me. My heart is
filled to overflowing. Thank you,
universe."

Star visions

James Tucker can help bring
renewed hope in these chal-
lenging times. A personalized
astrology chart, a private read-
ing, an exciting home or office
party or an inspiring group talk
are just a few of the services he
provides. Call (772) 334-9487
or e-mail jtuckxyz@aol.com for
details and prices.
I will be doing readings at the
South Florida Fair in West Palm
Beach from Jan. 16-Feb. 1 In
Exhibit Hall 9. Would love to see
you there. It's a lot of fun.
Remember to sign up at
www.personalspiritguide.com to
receive your free weekly inspira-
tional message.
Have a starry week, everyone.


- James Tucker


Solo travel a r EL


Solo travel a rewarding experience


Traveling solo does not have
to mean traveling alone.
There are so many options
out there for the person that
chooses to travel alone or do not
have a travel partner.
Generally speaking most travel
offers are per person, based on
double occupancy, and single
travelers pay a single supplement
to travel alone. This, to the single
traveler, feels so unfair- because
they are being penalized for not
being partnered up.
That being said there is a
discount if they are traveling as a
triple, then the fare goes down per
person as long as three are
occupying the same room or ship's
stateroom.
So who is the single traveler? The
first obvious answer is a single
person looking for other single
persons with the same interests
and maybe even a relationship.
Many of those 'singles' might
also be thought of as young and
wild and looking for the all-night
parties. You know the type -
SINGLES CRUISE aboard a cruise
to the Caribbean what a party.
Yes, they are singles, but not
necessarily the definition of the
solo traveler.
The 'solo traveler' can be
anybody. Many are people that
have a particular interest and do
not want to have to cater to
another's interest and/or needs.
Couples that have the same
interests are fortunate to be able to
travel together and both get what
they are looking for. Unfortunately,
some couples that travel together
because they happen to be.
married may not have the same
interests; therefore one or the
other may become bored (this is
another story).
Widows and widowers are
another example of the solo
traveler. They may have traveled a


TRAVEL
PATTY TOPPA


lot with their spouse over the years
so they decide to keep on travel-
ing. Unfortunately, most decide
not to because they do not want
to experience traveling alone. But
those that do find that there is just
as much joy in it as before the
death of their beloved.
There are also solo travelers that
are happily married to their
spouse but have different interests.
So they travel together when they
wish and they travel solo to
experience something the other
has no interest in.
I have married clients-he
enjoys golf and she loves the spa -
and this works well for them for
the most part, since many spas
have golf courses attached. But
both go on different trips as well -
he goes to Ireland to golf, and she
goes to the islands with her friends
to a spa resort. I also have seen the
wife go to Italy on a cooking tour
and he stayed home. They seem to
be very comfortable.
The solo traveler that just
fascinates me decides where they
want to go, and then goes. These
are the more adventurous travel-
ers. They want to see what the
world has to offer and nothing is
going to keep them from it. They
want to feel it. To taste it. They
want to meet the people and
experience the culture. Many meet
others during their travel that they
keep in touch with and sometimes
meet on their future travels, after
all they have the same interests.
I recall being on board the
Regent Seven Seas Mariner along
with my husband on an Alaska


will be featured including
Steffie, Cara, Julia, Midge, Skip-
per and of course Ken. MOAS is
located at 352 S. Nova Road,
Daytona Beach. For more infor-
mation, call (386) 255-0285 or
visit the Web site at
www.moas.org.
*Bunko, Bridge and Poker:
New groups are starting at the
Port Orange Adults Center,
4790 Ridgewood Ave. Resi-
dents meet at 4 p.m. each Fri-
day to play games. For more
information, call (386) 761-
7633.
*The Casements Cultural
Center of Ormond Beach:
Free tours are provided at the
home of John D. Rockefeller
from 10 a.m.-2:30 p.m., Mon-
day-Friday, and from 10-11:30
a.m., Saturday, at 25 Riverside
Drive, Ormond Beach. Large
groups should call for reserva-
tions at (386) 676-3216.
*Cracker Creek's Pirate
Cruise: Featuring the Pirates of
Spruce Creek, cruises are held
at 1 p.m. each Saturday and
Sunday at 1795 Taylor Road,
Port Orange. Costumed pirates
create a live, interactive experi-
ence as young buccaneers
learn navigation, pirate
weaponry, knotting or rope
tying and pirate lingo, all the
while searching for the lost
treasure at Spruce Creek.
Pre-registration is required by
calling (386) 304-0778. Also,
the Snow White Cottage, a
near-replica as seen in the
1937 Walt Disney. animated
classic "Snow White and the
Seven Dwarfs," is located on
the Gamble property. Canoe
and kayak launch and rentals,
guided eco-history Pontoon
boat tours and golf cart tours of
the conservation nature trails
also are available. For more
information, visit the Web site
at www.OldFloridaPioneer.com
or send an e-mail to cracker-
creek@OldFloridaPioneer.com.


*Dance on Thursday Nights:
Everything from ballroom
dance to doing the YMCA will
be on tap at 6:30 p.m. each
Thursday at' the4 Brannon Cen-
ter, 105 S.! Riverside' Drive, -New
Smyrna Beach; This is a time to
party, make new friends and
dance. Tickets cost $5 at the
door. For more information,
call (386) 424-2280.
*Daytona Metropolitan
Bridge Club: Duplicate Bridge
is played Monday through Sat-
urday at 600 Driftwood Ave.,
Daytona Beach. For the sched-
ule, call (386) 255-7744 or
visit the Web site at www.Day-
tonaBridge.org.
*Democracy Now: Internet
news with Amy Goodman will
be presented at 10:30 a.m.
each Thursday at Unitarian Uni-
versalist Society, 56 N. Halifax,
Ormond Beach. News and
analysis will be covered. Coffee
and donuts will be served. The
public may attend.
*Edgewater Fire-Rescue
Bingo: Games begin at 6:30
p.m. each Tuesday at the Fire-
Rescue Association Fire Hall,
2616 Hibiscus Drive. Two
games have $100 jackpots. The
facility is non-smoking. snacks
and soft drinks are available for
purchase. All proceeds benefit
the Fire-Rescue Association's
various causes. For more infor-
mation, call (386) 424-2445.
*Marine Discovery Center:
Mosquito Lagoon eco-tours
and kayak tours and rentals are
available daily from-the Marine
Discovery Center, 116 N.
Causeway, New Smyrna Beach.
For times, call (386) 428-4828.
*Music for Healing: Spon-
sored by the Port Orange Min-
isterial Association, "Music for
Healing: Body, Mind and Spirit"
is held from 12:15-12:45 p.m.
each Wednesday at the All
Saints Lutheran Church, 751
Dunlawton Ave., Port Orange.
Musicians from local churches


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and schools present instru-
mental music for peaceful con-
templation, reflection, self-care
and meditation. At the Jan. 14
meeting, Susan Pitard Acree
and Rusty Baker will provide
the music. The public may
attend. Instrumental musicians
are needed. For more informa-
tion, call (386) 761-9129.
*Sica Hall Senior Center:
Nickel and dime poker is
played at noon each Thursday.
Donations are all that is asked
to play. Several different games
are played, and rules are post-
ed. Line dancing takes place at
2 p.m. each Thursday and costs
$4 for members. Also, from 2-4
p.m. each Tuesday, a live band
plays music from the 1940s
and up to dance to. Refresh-
ments are served. Singles or
couples may attend. The cost is
$4.50 for nonmembers and
$3.50 for members. Bingo is
held at 1 p.m. each Monday
and Wednesday. Drawings,
prizes and free refreshments
are available. The cost is $1 for
members and $2 for nonmem-
bers. The Sica Hall Senior Cen-
ter is located at 1065 Daytona
Ave., Holly Hill. For more infor-
mation, call (386) 236-2997
*Super Singles of Florida: A
dance is held from 8-11:00
p.m. each Wednesday at the
Eagles Club, 190 S. Nova Road,
Ormond Beach. Music is pro-
vided by Jim & Vicki of Mr. DJ.
Entertainment. The cost is $5
for members and $7 for non-
members. Participants must be
single. For more information,
call (386) 736-0749 or send
an e-mail to Darlin115308
@yahoo.com.
*Vagabonds Performance:
Residents may dance to the
music of The Vagabonds from
6-8:30 p.m. each Sunday at the
Moose Lodge on Granada
Boulevard in Ormond Beach.
The event is open to members
and their guests. The cost is $4
at the door.
*Winter Dances: Dances are
held from 2-4 p.m. each Friday
at the City Island Recreation
Center, 110 E. Orange Ave.,
Daytona Beach. Music will be
provided by Talk of the Town
and Dream. The cost is $5,
which includes a lesson at 1
p.m., dancing and refresh-
ments. Singles are welcome.
This event will be held through
Feb. 27. For more information,
call (386) 676-2150.
To include an event on the
Hometown News Calendar,
send an e-mail to volnews
@hometownnewsol.com or
fax information to (386) 322-
5901. For more information,
call (386) 322-593Z


Hometown News


B4 Daytona Beach/Holly Hill


itinerary last year. I was just blown
away with how many solo passen-
gers there were. We met many in
the navigation lounge while we
were pulling into port or during
the at sea times. There was a 40-
something lady who happened to
be a CEO and needed to have time
to relax. Another was a 50 year-old
school teacher on summer break.
There were two gentlemen in their
early 70s that had met on board.
One was a long time cruiser who
enjoyed the on-board lectures on
nature and the other was a rather
new cruiser and an amateur
photographer who could not
believe the pictures he was getting.
They all seemed to be getting what
they needed out of the cruise, as
were we.
Now with the economy in such
disarray, many of the cruise lines
are offering lower fares and we are
seeing the single supplement
reduced or completely waived.
The European River Cruises have
some incredible fares for both
couples and singles. They have
waived the single supplement on
many of their 2009 cruises. What
savings.
Once such cruise itinerary is the
Tulip Time cruise aboard AMA
Amadeus Waterways. This is
always a popular springtime cruise
through Holland & Belgium. One
should spend a couple of days in
Amsterdam before or after the
cruise to really get the full effect of
the tulips in bloom.
Do not let the fact that you
might have to travel solo stop you.
There are many that are enjoying
their travels even though they are
traveling solo they are not
alone.

Patty Toppa is a travel consultant
with Gadabout Travel. She can be
reached at patty@cruisetravel-
tours.com.







Daytona Beach/Holly Hill B5


Remembering the year in golf: a few eagles, a few bogies


'd like to make a toast and wish
a happy New Year to one and
all.
By most standards, 2008 was a
pretty rough year. We golfers and
our friends in the golf business
certainly took our fair share of
shots to the chin.
While many will look back at
2008 and be happy that it's over,
there are a few memories worth
storing from these past 12 months.
Here are mine.
The year began with the stun-
ning announcement that the
greatest female golfer the world
has ever known, Annika Soren-
stam, was hanging up her equip-
ment at year's end. It was a blow to
the LPGA Tour and to golf fans
worldwide.
Annika wants to begin a life
away from the hustle of tour life.
She wants to start a family with
her fianc6 and settle down for a
bit. Life is too short to put things
off too long and I'm happy that


she is doing what she wants in her
life. We'll miss her dearly.
Many may think her to be very
aloof and guarded. The times that
I have met her she was never that
way. She's actually pretty funny
and loose when the moment is
right. Good luck in your retire-
ment, Annika.
Another big story this past year
was that of Michelle Wie. After a
disastrous 2007, the teenage
sensation needed some positive
news.
On Dec. 7, Wie tied for seventh
place at the 2008 LPGA Q-School
tournament and is now a full-
fledged member of the LPGA Tour.
The news wasn't just great for
Michelle, but a huge shot in the
arm for the LPGA.
Anyone who has followed this
column knows how hard I have
been on Michelle at times. I am
very happy for her and that she
has "earned" her way onto the
LPGA Tour. I hope that she breaks


GOLF
JAMES STAMMER


through and wins that elusive
event and goes on to great things.
With Annika stepping away, we
need someone to carry the
banner. If Michelle wants to be
that one, I'll cheer loudly when
she does.
One of the best stories of the
year was that of the U.S. Ryder
Cup team. Without Tiger Woods
and reeling from three straight
defeats, the U.S. squad was
considered by most to be the
underdog going into the event.
The U.S. team thumped the
Europeans, 16-1/2 to 11-1/2, to
return the cup to U.S. soil for the
first time in this millennium.
Boo Weekly showed us that


professional golfers can have fun.
He kept the team loose and won
2.5 points for the team.
Anthony Kim backed up his
bedazzled belt buckle with great
play, as well. With cup rookie
Hunter Mahan winning 3.5 points
for the team and all the young
guys playing so well our
chances of defending the cup in
the future look very bright.
Last but not least, I give you my
favorite golf memory from 2008.
In early April, I was invited to
cover the Champions Tour Cap
Cana Championship in the
Dominican Republic. It was my
moment to capture and report on
history being made as the
Dominican hosted its first-ever
professional tour event.
What I remember and enjoyed
most was not so much the golf,
but the beauty of the country and
the people that I met.
Being a south Florida resident,
one would think that I'd have


picked up some Spanish along the
way. Such is not the case, and
while most of the people I met and
became friends with in the
Dominican couldn't understand
what I was saying nor I they, we
got along so well and became
great friends over the course of
that week.
Seeing first-hand how people in
a foreign country embrace the
game that I so love and having
them welcome me so warmly to
their home and culture was the
greatest experience I have had in a
very long time.
Now I shall retreat to my recliner
and take a lesson that I learned
from the warm people of the
Dominican. "Relax and hdve a rum
drink," they would tell me when I
needed to get away from things.
What a perfect plan and a great
way to ring in the New Year.

Contact James Stammer at
jstammer@yahoo.com.


Managing spam is no easy task even for the pros


Every day when I open
my e-mail, I am
flooded with spam.
I get messages trying to
sell me everything from Via-
gra to discount mortgages to
memberships at adult Web
sites.
I even get an occasional
message from a "dethroned
prince" from Nigeria prom-
ising that if only I help him
(by giving him my bank
account information) he'll
be able to get access to his
frozen assets and give me
several million for my trou-
bles.
It's gotten to the point that
out of 60 to 70 messages,
only a handful are legiti-
mate.
How is it that I, a comput-
er fixer with, decades of
experience, can get flooded
with spam?
Don't I, of all people, know
how to manage this scourge
any better? Frankly, no. But
it's not from lack of trying.
Unfortunately, just about
everything I've tried to stem
the flow of spam has had
either negative or short-
term effects.
I've found the most effec-
tive way (for me anyway) is
to just scan the subject
headers and click the delete
button and nuke all the


COMPUTE
THIS
SEAN MCCARTHY


unwanted
one.


e-mails one by


I know what you are
thinking. Many of you are
successfully using some sort
of spam filter and are think-
ing, "If Sean would just
switch to this method, all of
his spam woes would be
over."
All I can really say to that
is thanks, but no thanks.
Over the years, as I have
tried one method after
another to manage unwant-
ed e-mail, I've noticed a
common thread: many
spam filters are too aggres-
sive and have a tendency to
delete messages I actually
want.
Many spam filters will
look at the sender's domain
name and;filter the message
that way. The problem with
that is I may actually want
messages from that domain
and the spam filter can
unintentionally red flag
messages that I actually
want to read.
An example of that would
be the time I was trying to


refinance my home. My
father, being ever helpful,
sent me an e-mail listing the
mortgage rates of a certain
lender. The spam filter spot-
ted the key words "low
mortgage rates" and filtered
that message as spam. Then,
since the offending message
came from my dad's e-mail
address, all future messages
from him were filtered.
The really frustrating
thing was that I didn't know
my dad's e-mail was getting
filtered, so I didn't know he
was trying to e-mail me until
he called, annoyed that I
was "ignoring his e-mail."
Other methods have had
mixed results, too.
One question that always
comes up is "how do these
spammers get your e-mail
address in the first place?
It's not like you go to some
site and sign up for spam.
I've seen cases where people
get new e-mail accounts
and within a week, the flow
of spam begins.
How's that?
There are dozens of ways
e-mail addresses end up as
targets for spammers, but
I'll just cover a couple.
Forwarding e-mail mes-
sages to everyone in your
address book (or actually
corresponding with some-
one who engages in this


practice) can expose your
address to the spammers,
because as the messages
gets forwarded on and on,
so do all the addresses listed
in the e-mail. Then, once
they're out in cyberspace,
there are a number of ways
that the addresses can get
harvested from that e-mail.
Another method is the old
"random e-mail address"
trick. What they do is use a
computer program to gen-
erate thousands of e-mail
addresses using random let-
ters and numbers before the


Champioqns
ReeM J.o De ,I Bt. 1994


"at" (@) symbol and domain
name. Then they send out
test messages to these ran-
domly-generated addresses;
the ones that don't get
rejected by the mail system
as a bad address, they keep.
They end up with a list of
addresses they know go
somewhere. If you have ever
gotten an e-mail with no
subject and no message it's
possible that that's where
that message is coming
from, and unfortunately, by
the time you get the mes-
sage, it's too late. They


already know that the e-mail
address is a good one.
Until I find a method to
manage the flow of spam
that does not have unwant-
ed side effects, I guess I will
just continue to just delete
them as they come in. At
least I don't have to walk out
to the mailbox in the rain to
get my junk mail.

-Sean McCarthy fixes com-
puters. He can be reached at
(772) 408-0680 or
help@ComputeThisOn-
line.com (no hyphens).


LPGA n<"e

INTERNATIONAL
Arthur HiUl De4gn E0t, 1997


ugW~.fsDrtlng.il


WMII'QQu4vptaa*


AwtwWMarCUX~wmtbintu


Sports Briefs


Golf tournament to
benefit students

Halifax Academy, a local
private school located in
Daytona Beach, will host
its inaugural Golf Tourna-
ment Saturday, Jan. 17, at
Crane Lakes Golf Course in
Port Orange.
Registration will begin at
7:45 a.m., followed by the
start at 8:30 a.m.
The fee is $50 per player
or $200 per team.
Prizes will be awarded to
the two top teams, as well'
as closest to the hole, best
putt and mulligan. Raffles,
free beer (while supplies
last) and complimentary
lunch also will be avail-
able.
For more information or
to register in advance, call
(386) 252-9557 or (386)
212-7388.

Three-time Daytona
500 winner added to


make his appearance from
noon to 4 p.m., Saturday,
Jan. 17.
Other additions and
changes to the NASCAR
Preseason Thunder Fan Fest
schedule include 2008
NASCAR Sprint Cup Series
runner-up Carl Edwards
moving to the Friday, Jan. 16
evening session and Marcos
Ambrose appearing in the
Saturday, Jan. 17 evening
session.
Among the activities
planned for both days
include interactive fan
forums, autograph sessions,
show cars, displays, music,
online auction and blood
drive.
Tickets cost $15 with
autograph session availabil-
ity limited to only 100 peo-
ple per driver in advance.
To purchase tickets and
request access to the auto-
graph sessions, call (800)
PITSHOP

Youth Baseball &


NASCAR preseason Softball Association
. t . . . .


Three-time Daytona 500
winner Jeff Gordon is the
latest driver added to the
driver appearance schedule
for the annual NASCAR Pre-
season Thunder Fan Fests
Friday, Jan. 16 and Saturday,
Jan. 17 at Daytona Interna-
tional Speedway.
Gordon, a four-time
NASCAR Sprint Cup cham-
pion and driver of the No.
24 DuPont Automotive Fin-
ishes Chevrolet for Hen-
drick Motorsports, will


n oitartSiger open


Registration for the
spring 2009 season of the
Ormond Beach Youth Base-
ball & Softball Association
will be through Friday, Jan.
23.
Registration will be held
from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.,
Monday through Thursday,
or from 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.,
Friday, at Ormond Beach
Leisure Services Office, 399
North U.S. 1, Ormond
Beach.


Children ages 5 to 15
years may join.
For more information, call
(386) 676-3250 or visit
OBYBSA.org.

Legion to host golf
tournament

American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 267 will host
"Winter on the Golf Green
Tournament" Saturday,
Jan. 17, at Tomoka Oaks
Country Club.
A shotgun start will be at
8:30 a.m.
The cost is $50. Compli-
mentary dinner and door
prizes will be available.
To make reservations,
call (386) 672-7678 or sign
up at 156 New Britain Ave.,
Ormond Beach.

Lady Renegades
tryouts slated

The Ormond Beach Lady
Renegades will hold spring
season tryouts for 8u, 10u,
12u and 14u competitive
softball teams at 9 a.m., Sat-
urday, Jan. 10, at the Dale
Buttleman Softball Quads
located at the Ormond
Beach Sports Complex.
The makeup date will be
at 6:30 p.m., Tuesday, Jan.
13.
For more information, call
(386) 673-8915 or e-mail
ladyrenegadespres
@yahoo.com.

For Hometown News


(386) 274-574- LPGAInternational.com
LPGA International is open to the pblic. Every skill level welcome. Proper Golf Attire Required.


*l


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*

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*
Avail.


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: "Copyrighted Material 5

: Syndicated Content%


able from Commercial News Provi


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ders"


www.HometownNewsOL.com


Friday, January 9, 2009


VoUISM/ J,'IA(,, DAYTONA
GOLF RAT.1-7,,S"
Wc,(,,Id.ays
7:-3'Oan.,i, 11:00-1-ADI
$5(). oo
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Friday, January 9, 2009


B6 Daytona Beach/Holly Hill Hometown News


Taking care of yourself is worth it


I recently received a letter
from a reader and it made a
profound impression on
me.
She discovered a lump on
the day that she read my
column about getting a
mammogram. She wants to
protect her privacy, so I
have edited her letter in the
hope that it may help
others.
"I am in my early 50s and,
am ashamed to admit,
never went for a mammo-
gram because breast cancer
does not run in my family
and I have always been
exceptionally healthy.
"Something about this
lump did not feel right. I
went into the kitchen and
found Hometown News on
the dining room table. I
read your column.
"I was laid off from my job
earlier this year and do not
have medical insurance.
"Then I read what you
wrote about the Depart-
ment of Health Florida.
breast and cervical cancer
screening program. I
discovered that my county
health department (Indian
River) offered it. I called
them and was approved for
the program in one day. I
subsequently discovered
that I was the last eligible
woman approved for the


ALIVE
& WELL
SHELLEY KOPPEL


program due to a shortage
of funds.
"I have since discovered
that I do have breast cancer
and have been approved for
Medicaid. I have had all of
the pre-operation tests and
throughout the ordeal, the
care has been exceptional.
"I had never heard of
these programs before and
if I did not learn about
them from your column, I
do not like to anticipate
what may have happened."
As you can see, the
program this reader turned
to has limited funds. It is so
important that you get the
testing and treatment you
need, and I have turned to
another reader, Cheryl
Norman Caldwell, a
volunteer with Pink Tie
Friends, to explain that
there is help out there.
Pink Tie Friends helps
underinsured and unin-
sured breast cancer
patients in Indian River,
Martin and St. Lucie
counties. While they have
not yet had patients from


Indian River County, they
would like to, and when
they hear from patients
they will begin seeking
medical providers there to
work with Pink Tie to help.
At this time, most
patients are referred to Pink
Tie by the Martin Memorial
Health System Breast
Health Navigator program.
You can find out more
about Pink Tie Friends at
the Web site, www.Pink-
TieFriends.org.
The cost of breast cancer
treatment can be so
overwhelming and what
Pink Tie does is negotiate
with providers based on the
medical needs of the
patient and what insurance
coverage they may already
have, even if it isn't enough
to cover treatment.
"There is no set dollar
rate or standard amount
paid," Ms. Caldwell said.
"Breast cancer is so unique
to the physiology of the
patient, which is funda-
mental to why a cure is so
elusive."
In addition, Soroptomists
of Stuart, the American
Cancer Society and the
Susan G. Komen Founda-
tion are resources for
women who cannot afford
mammograms or need help
affording treatment.


Wind in their sails


Randy Barber/staff photographer
'And their off!' Sailboats hoist their sails as the Big Boys Racing event starts on the Hali-
fax River in front of the Halifax Sailing Association in Daytona Beach last weekend.
More than a dozen participants took to the water during the race.


I was so moved by the
courage of the reader who
took the steps to find out
about the program and go
on Medicaid. She had
always worked, done all
the right things and had
had health coverage. This
was a crisis not of her
making, and it is happen-
ing to people all over this
country.


She took the steps
necessary to give herself
the best chance at survival.
No woman should put
off a mammogram if it is
recommended for her age
group, regardless of
medical history. Most
breast cancer is not
hereditary.
If you have already
found a lump, get treat-


ment immediately. Call the
organizations listed. If they
can't help, perhaps they
can lead you to someone
who can. Do not put your
life in jeopardy.

Shelley Koppel is the
former editor of"Today's
HealthCare" magazine and
a member of the National
Association of Science


The right plants to attract hummingbirds to your garden


Long with colorful
flowers, gardens are
also made up of
strategically placed rocks,
figurines, low- voltage or
solar lighting and attractive
bird feeders. Attracting birds
to the yard is more than just
fun, for many, it is an
amazing hobby.
One of the most interest-
ing and challenging birds to
attract is the hummingbird.
They are called hummers for
short. These delicate crea-
tures are hard to attract at
first, but once you. get a few
to find your feeder, you're in


GARDEN
NOOK
JOE ZELENAK


for a treat.
Hummers are very inter-
esting creatures as their
wings flap at an amazing 55
times per second and they
can fly at 25 miles per hour.
Hummingbirds have a
lifespan of about four years
on .average, but have been
known to live as long as 12


years. Hummers are very
territorial and if you attract
several to your feeder at the
same time, they will fight for
their space.
There are several ways to
attract hummers to your
garden and the first step is
to purchase a hummingbird
feeder. These feeders are
available at almost all gar-
den outlets and are available
in many styles from a simple
plastic model to more elab-
orate glass feeders. Once
you choose and take home
,your feeder, find an area that,,
is around trees or shrubbery


to hang your feeder.
Taking care of a hum-
mingbird feeder requires
dedication and some work.
Keeping the feeder clean
and changing the nectar is
vital. You can either pur-
chase hummingbird nectar
mix or you can make your
own. Simply use one part
white cane sugar to four
parts ordinary tap water. You
can store unused nectar in
the refrigerator for about
two weeks. During hot
weather, you should change
,he ,,mixture,i...,the, feeder
about every two days. You


should clean your feeder
thoroughly at least once a
month.
Another way to attract
hummers to your yard is by
planting hummingbird-
friendly plants. Many of our
common flowers are good
for attracting hummers. One
such plant is the bottlebrush
tree. I have three huge bot-
tlebrush trees in my yard,
and we have seen hum-
mingbird activity around
them on several occasions.
Some other plants that
attract,ftg.. deliqate,,crea-
tures, n .,, azalea, ,lantana,


canna lily, impatiens and
petunia. These plants in
conjunction with a feeder
are a good start to a great
hobby.
Oh, did I mention they
also eat insects? That can be
an added bonus to attract-
ing them to your garden.

Joe Zelenak has 26 years
experience in gardening and
landscape. Send e-mails to
gardennook@bellsouth.net.
He is' also available to
answer plant questions at
Sears Essentials in Stidart.


GREY CAT found near
Saint Brendans Church,
Ormond Beach. Kitty has
collar. Will need you to
describe kitty and collar.
386-672-1667 / 795-4261
NEED TO HIRE?
CALL CLASSIFIED
386-322-5949


BICHON FRISE puppies,
white powder puffs, akc
reg. shots, health cert.
affectionate, $500, M
$650 F, 386 747 5629
CHIHUAHUA PUPPY
10wks,one loving male
tan w/ white markings,
family raised,not teacups
$350ea. 386-795-3188

KITTENS DEVON Rex,
curly haired babies for
Christmas, $750
sunnyshorescattey.com
386-304-2810
POMERANIAN PUP-
PIES, 3 males. 12 wks
old, 1st shots, dewormed.
$300. Call 386-734-4736


SCHNAUZERS, S & P,
10 wks, $350, Maltese, 8
wks,M $600, F, $800,
shots & wormed,cash,
386-698-2787

Why not
the best!
HOMETOWN
NEWS
CLASSIFIEDS
5 Counties!
Martin through
East Volusla
Programs
for Businesses/
Special Rates
Private Party I
Give us a call!
386-322-5900
1-866-897-5949


BELVIEW MEMORIAL
Park, Daytona Beach, 2
prime lots, Garden
Tranquility side by side.
Valued at $5500 will sell
for $3500/obo
956-831-9257
956-346-4904


Spay/Neuter
WVd-ln App or Drop Off
Dogs 0V
Male
$60.00 (Up to 29 lbs.)
$70.00 (Up to 59 Ibs.)
$80.00 (Up to 80 Ibs.)
Female
$70.00 (Up to 29 Ibs.)
$80.00 (Up to 59 lbs.)
$90.00 (Up to 80 Ibs.)
over 0obbysped"l
arrangents, onby appoinlnMnt
^Vf Cats
Male $45.00 Female $60.00
Vat-U-Vet
Animal Health Inc.
Full Service Veterinary Clinic
549 Beville Rd
South Daytona
386-763-5208
1104 S. Nova Rd.
Ormond Beach S
386-672-3544




Pet Nanny Plus
Pet Sitting in your home.
Domestic and exotic pets.
Many years of experience.
Daily visits or 24 hr. service.
Licensed Bonded
and Dependable.
~ Plus ~ *
*House SittinW
*Errands ;~;'
*Driver *
386-252-4022


*REDUCE YOUR Cable
Bill!* Get a 4-Room all
Digital Satellite system
installed for free & pro-
ramming starting under
20. Free digital video,
recorders to new callers,
Call now 1-800-725-1835
Call Classified
386-322-5949






Walk-in Clinic
Monday Friday
10:00 am 6:oopm
Saturday
10:00 am 4:00pm
Rabies $8
Dogs lo
5-Way $12
6Way $15
3 Year Distemper $26
Bordetella $14
3DX Heartworm Testing $22
Routine Worming $7-$15
S Cats
4-Way $12
5-Way $24
Leukemia/FIV $35
Worming $7-$15
Fecal Flotation $11.60
AVID Microchips $30
Best Prices!
Heartguard Plus
Frontier Plus Interceptor
Advantage Feline
Revolution Advantix
Capstar Confortis
Spay/Neuter by Appt.
Val-U-Vet
Animal Health Inc.
Full Service Veterinary Clinic
549 Beville Rd
South Daytona
386-763-5208
1104 S. Nova Rd.
Ormond Beach
386-672-3544
Call Classified
386-322-5949


A D 0 P T I 0 N
1-866-633-0397 Unplan-
ned Pregnancy? Pro-
vide your baby with a
loving, financially se-
cure family. Living/
Medical/Counseling
expenses paid. Social
worker on staff. Call
compassionate Attor-
ney Lauren Feingold
(FL Bar # 0958107) 24/7
A D O P T I O N
1.888-812-3678 Living
Expenses paid. Choose
a Loving, Financially
Secure family for your
child. Caring & Confi-
dential. 24 hours/7
days), Attorney Amy
Hickman, (Lic# 832340)


$$$ BUYING $$$ Cash
cow. Midwest Collectors
in town paying cash
pre-1970 Sports cards,
autographs, sports mem-
orabilia & golden age
comics, us coins. No col-
lection too large cash
paid! Call Paul at
216-219-6827
$$CASH FOR GOLD $$
We buy gold, silver &
Platinum. Get cash now.
Highest pay outs, satis-
faction guaranteed
877-505-3166
GUNS wanted collector
paying top dollar. Colt,
S & W, Winchester,
Drillings, Luger, Gatling
Doubles and other fine
guns. 772-528-7020


WANTED JUNK CARS
Running or not $200 &
up. We pay cash! 24-hrs.
Call 321-631-0111





ANTIQUE CLOCKS
Beautiful German Ameri-
can antique clock collec-
tion. Wall and mantle
321-783-2356
GRANDFATHER Clock
Ridgeway-Pioneer, W24"
D14" H80". Burnished
oak, just serviced,
must sell, $900obo
386-690-4436/428-1861

IN A HURRY
TO SELL??
Call the
BEST
classified
section
on the east
coast!
HOMETOWN NEWS
CLASSIFIEDSI
386-322-5949
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AIR COMPRESSOR,
Sears, 3hp. 30 gal. tank
w/water separator, $150,
386-290-8707
BAR STOOL- swivel,
$15, HP printer, $10, 3
speed rotating pole fan,
$10, 386-236-8486
BELT MASSAGER fir
model massager $75. in
box. 4 hd stereo vcr $75.
386-767-5840 /405-1960
BIKE RACK, Hitch fit,
$50, large, new, fresh
water, RV tank, $100.
386-576-6359
BIKE, BOYS 16" $20,
Bar stool (4) black with
back $90 386-672-8463
CD PLAYER & speakers,
Panasonic 5 disc, $25,
surround sound speakers
$50 386-492-4513
CHAIR, RECLINER out-
side chair $25, PVC Patio
set w/6 chairs, $25,
386-316-2407 Vol
CLOTHING MISSES, sz
16, L-XL, next to new,
slacks, tops, & outfits
$40 all, 386-760-1259
DESK, LARGE, light
wood, 2 drawers+ 3 file
folder drawers, $500 val-
ue, $200, 386-673-3426
DESK, OFFICE, Ig, mid-
dle drawer, file drawer,
solid wood, $200,
386-672-4428


Showcase your Business in
Distributed from Key West Thi
including Florida's W
Promote your business to over 15

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HometownNews

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DINING TABLE, nearly HOOVER SHAMPOO MICROWAVE NEW
new, solid oak, with leaf $10, 3 36" vinyl white white $20. Weight bench
and chairs, $100, roll-up blinds $3 ea. or $5 & set of 1601b weights
386-673-3432 for 3 386-676-0781 $40. 954-632-5735
DINING TABLE. solid JAPANESE BAYONET MICROWAVE PANA-
wood, 4 chairs, micro- WWII w/scabbard, $100 SONIC 700 watts. Tab-
fiber chestnut colored or trade, buy WWI, WWII letop, excellent condition.
covers $50 386-314-6993 items. 386-252-3007 $25. 386-677-9507
DRESSER WHITE, la- KENNEL& PET supplies, MICROWAVE, FOR $15,
.quer w/ blue trim, in very feed bins, auto watering Like new, electronic
good condition $75, dish,for large/small pets, snooring sleeping Santa,
86-589-6600 all for $35, 386-235-4390 $10, 386-322-8900
DRESSER WHITE, with LADDER Versatile Go- MOTORCYCLE TRAIL-
baby blue trim, all rilla 4-in-, extends to 22', ER for a single bike,
wood,$75, 386-254-4814 $195, 386-212-0426 $150, 386-846-9927
LIVING ROOM set
DVD PLAYER, GPX, couch & swivel rockers: NINTENDO DS- pink, w/
$15.00, with remote, tan, smoke free home 4 games, mint cond,
386-788-5762 $150 386-690-6598 $100, 386-314-3573 Vol
FAX, BROTHER, with LIVINGROOM SET- 90" OCCUPIED JAPAN, 19
extra film cartridge, $50, reclinersofa, matching pieces, excellent condi-
386-253-1950 recliner/rocker, $200, tion $175 for all,
FILE CABINET, black, 386-424-6783 Vol 386-756-2273
new metal, 4 drawer, LOUNGER BARCO ORGAN, BALDWIN, fun
home or office. $100. Chair Rocker recliner $75 machine w/ books,
386-760-6100 386-852-7798 Daytona $125, Tile cutter, elec.
FREEZER CHEST- MATERNITY CLOTHES 12", $60 386-322-7906
small, garage kept, runs excellent condition size POOL TABLE- Slate,
Stood, small than washer, medium & large, 20 pcs. great condition, $175,
50, 772-335-1961 $75, 386-481-4772 china hutch, good cond,
FURNITURE Mauve $75, 386-322-1498
Lay-z-boy, $50, floral love POSTER, GARFIELD,
seat, $50, dresser, $80, numbered,10th, Ann.
386-671-0664 1988, w/Lithograph letter
FUT-ON-0--6 Photos say it all! by Davis, 386-441-0791
FUTON, LL BEAN, VISIT OUR
mission-style, light col- ONLINE SITE
or, incl. slip cover & pil- m eo e m
lows $195 386-788-9881 www.HometownNewsOL.com
GOLF__BAG_&_Clubs, Photos with your ad,
GOLF BAG & Clubs, High Definition Slide
set of 8 Irons, putter, Shows and more
1-3-5 woods $46
386-761-8127 386-322-5949


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Daytona Beach/Holly Hill B7


www.HometownNewsOL.com


Friday, January 9, 200'


POSTERS OLD DAY-
TONA, bike week, 14,
excellent shape $196
386-252-4115
POWER CHAIR Durs-
care brand new batteries
and front wheels. $200.
Nancy 386-868-3491
RANGE ELECTRIC, per-
fect, white, $85, 2 reclin-
ers, 'good shape, $100
both, 386-304-3005
REFRIGERATOR GE 24
top mt glass shelves,
exc. cond. can deliver,
$195 386-689-3019
REFRIGERATOR, AMA-
NA- 20 cf, white, w/ top
freezer, very spacious
$140 386-441-6815
ROCKER/ RECLINER-
medium green cloth, ex-
cellent cond, $35,
386-756-1920
ROWING DINGY,10' fi-
ber glass,wheels on back
that retract, $200,
386-852-0242
SAW, CRAFTSMAN 10"
chop, dual laser track,
new in box, never used
3HP $165 386-677-0116
SEATS LEATHER con-
version van, 2 capt. &
rear seat. $175 all. Quik
snap rel. 386-795-4994
SEWING MACHINE in
cabinet with lots of extra
notions, old $199 for all
386-760-5127
SNOWBABIES- 13
snowbabies, all w/boxes,
w/waterglobe,$195,
386-426-8512
SOFA & Recliner, match-
ing, good condition,
$100, 386-409-0895 Vol
STEP LADDER wooden
7' good condition. $11.
386-673-8214


STEP LADDER wooden
7', excellent condition
$10. 386-673-8214
STOVE, 36" ELECTRIC,
black Kenmore $150,
over-stove microwave
$50 386-631-8312
TABLE SAW- older mod-
el, 12", cast Iron, 220
volt, good cond w/10'
cable, $80, 386-258-8122

TABLE SAW- w/dust
bag, new, w/free power
vac, $55, power drill,
$20, 386-252-9007
TAPE PLAYER- reel to
reel, circ 1970's, sharp
solid stereo with tapes,
$20, obo 386-672-8961
TELESCOPE MEADE,
w/ accessories, $50,
Piano keyboard w/ stand
$50, 386-677-3038
TIRES 4 new Firestone,
P215/70R15/A/S, w/
Toyota Tacoma rims,
$200, 386-426-2944
TOOL BOX- for small
pick-up,diamond plated,
$60, 4 rims for dodge,
$100, 386-322-8131 Vol
TOTE BAG; new, black
patent leather w/beige
leather handles $100,
386-760-7228




SUPPORT
OUR
ADVERTISERS!
They make this
all possible
HOMETOWN
NEWS
CLASSIFIEDS!
386-322-5949


TRAILIER KIT, Baby
Jogger II, storage bag,
bicycle trailer, 16" wh.
$100 386-314-6902
TREADMILL SEARS
Preform, almost new. Pd
$599 Sell $200. Moving
North. 386-322-7083
TREADMILL WESLO,
cadence c42, $35,
426-2372
VIDEOS, VHS, children's
74 many Disney, 32 hard
case, $100 all.
386-852-8289
WALL TILE 6"x8" off
white 300 pcs. $150.obo
Bose Car Radio $50 obo
cell 732-991-4196
WASHER & DRYER
Sears $125. both. TV 13"
RCA w/remote. Works
$35. 386-760-1539
WASHER, heavy duty
$30, Electric Dryer,$30,
both run great!
386-441-6385, 212 3827
WEB TV Terminal & HP
printer. Email & Surf in-
ternet w/out computer.
$75. 386-767-9720
WEIGHT BENCH with
attachments & 160lbs of
weights $175 Stat bike
$25 386-689-0520
WHEEL CHAIR ramps,
front & back door, alumi-
num & adjustable, $200,
386-424-1933 Vol


Sell or Rent
your home in
The Hometown
News
Martin County
thru
Ormond Beach
386-322-5949


LUMBER LIQUIDA-
TORS Hardwood Floor-
Ing, from $.99/Sq.Ft.
Exotics, Oak, Bamboo,
Preflnlshed & Unfinish-
ed. Bellawood with 50
year preflnish, Plus A
Lot Morel We Deliver
Anywhere, 5 Florida
Locations 800-356-6746
1-800-FLOORING



*REDUCE YOUR Cable
Bill!* Get a 4-Room All
Digital Satellite system
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ramming starting under
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Recorders to new callers
call now 1-800-935-9195




ENTERTAINMENT CTR.
European styling,24x53
x81,pd. $1199, fits most
36" tv's,, $499, will email
photos,386-304-8521
MAHOGANY DINING rm
set, 6 chrs. w/leaf, per-
fect cond. $1000,Enter-
tainment Ctr. w/ roll out
shelves plus free 46"
TV,$600, 386-763-3344

MEMORY FOAM All Vis-
co New Thera-Peutic
Mattresses, Member
BBB 60 night trial, As
seen TV, High Density
25 year warranty, T/F-
$348; Q-$398; K-$498;
Free FL delivery. Thera-
Pedic, Dormia, # beds,
Craftmatic adjustables.
Best price guaranteed!!
Whoalsale showrooms
www.mattressdr.com
1-800-ATSLEEP or
1-800-287-5337


ERECTILE Dysfunction
can be treated safely &
effectively without drugs
or surgery covered by
Medicare! Also diabetic
supplies at little or no
cost. 1-800-815-1577 ext
361 www.lifecarediabetic
supplies.com
ONLINE PHARMACY-
Buy Soma' Ultram Fiori-
cet Prozac Buspar. 90
Qty $51.99, price in-
cludes prescription! We
will match any competi-
tor's price! 888-248-8193
PhoneMedication.com
QUICK WEIGHT LOSS I
Phenterminie, Phendi-
metrazine" & Adipex.
Anxiety? Pain? Head-
aches? Xanax, Soma,
Tramadol, Fioricet, more
discounted prices. Guar-
anteed FEDEX also go
online 24/7 lowerrx.com
1-866-788-4530.


A NEW Computer Now!
Brand Name. Bad or NO
Credit- No problem.
Smallest weekly pay-
ments available. It's
yours NOW. Call
1-800-838-7127
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
IN A HURRY
TO SELL??
Call the
BEST
classified
section
on the east
coast!
HOMETOWN NEWS
CLASSIFIEDS!
386-322-5949
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$


A NEW Computer Now.
Brand name laptops &
'desktops. Bad or No
Credit- No problem
smallest weekly pay-
ments available. Its yours
Now! 1-800-932-4501
ADOPTION Give your
baby the best in life.
Living Expenses Paid.
-Medical Expenses/
Counseling Paid. Many
Loving, Educated, Very
financially Secure Cou-
ples Waitingl Call Jodi
Sue Rutstein, an Attor-
ney/ Social Worker who
truly cares. #133050;
1-800-852-0041.
CHROME WHEELS 4, 8
LUG, 16" $275, Miller
Welder, $400 Johnson
Outboard Motor $400,
386-547-9867
CHURCH FURNITURE -
Does your church need
Pews, Pulpit set, Baptis-
tery, Steeple, Windows?
Big sale. New cushioned
pews & upholstery for
hard pews. 800-231-8360
www.pewsl.com
CALL CLASSIFIED
and sell that boati
386-322-5949


DIRECTV FREE 4 Room
System! 265+ Channels
Starts $29.99! Free HBO,
Showtime, Starz! 130 HD
Channels Free DVR/HD!
No start up costs! Local
Installers! 800-973-9044
FREE DIRECTV 4 Room
System! 265+ channels
Starts $29.991 Free HBO,
Showtime, Starz! 130 HD
Channels! Free DVR/HD!
No start up costs! Local
installers! 800-203-7560
FREE DIRECTV 4 Room
System! 265+ Channels!
Starts $29.99! Free HBO,
Showtime, Starzl 130 HD
Channels! Free DVR/HD!
No start up cossl Local
Installers 1-800-216-7149
FREE, Pet loss grief re-
sources For children,
adults, seniors, other
pets. www.PetLossCare
.com Love Never Leaves
- Celebrate the love you
shared. www.PetAngel
Memorials.com

Generator Guardian
/Genrpac, 7KW natural.
gas/propane incl. auto
transfer switch, tested lx,
$600 386-366-2154


BUSINESS &


RESTAURANT Sale or
Lease a turn key busi-
ness in Brevard Co.
Would consider a work-
ing partner w/Capital or
Owner fin. 21-890-7022


Affordable & reliable
Hometown News
CLASSIFIEDSI
386-322-5949


- PROFESSIONAL SERVICE GUIDE


$$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT
Cash Now!! As seen on
TV. Injury Lawsuit Drag-
ing? Need $500-
500,000++ within 48
hours? Low rates. Apply
now by phohe! www.Fast
CaseCash.com
1-800-568-8321
$$$ACCESS LAWSUIT
Cash Now!! Injury lawsuit
dragging? Need $500-
$500,000++ within 48
hours? 1-877-386-3692
www.casepay.com


GET A NEW Computer-
Brand name laptops &
desktops. Bad or NO
credit- no problem.
Smallest weekly pay-
ments available. Its yours
NOW! 1-800-624-1557
MULTI ARCADE video
games w/ 48 games in
one, + Pin ball, coin op-
erated, low prices
Wayne: 386-748-4946
NATIONAL ADVERTIS-
INGI Reach over 30 mil-
lion homes with one buy.
Advertise in NANI for only
$2,495 per week! Ask
about special Real Estate
Rates 1-866-897-5949
NEW COMPUTER you're
approved guaranteed.
Bad credit? No credit?
No problem! No credit
check. Name brands.
Checking account re-
quired. Free bonus
w/paid purchase.
1-800-507-4055
www.bluehippo.com
POWER CHAIR-Jet 3
Ultra by Pride Mobility
Products. Exc. condition!
Cost $6500; call w/ seri-
ous offer. 386-760-5127


FINAA


ARE YOU tired of the
shakey Stock Market?
Earn 10-15% interest on
your monhy Safely se-
cured by FL Real Estate.
Call Joe 321-773-5360
BANKRUPTCY LET us
handle your Entire Bank-
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ber www.signhere.com
Classified 386-322-5949


BOWFLEX XTREME,
new $500 obo plush,
Mickey Mouse $20, Mick-
ey Mouse vases $10ea.
386-566-0315



DAYTONA BEACH, 1/9,
1/10,1/11, 8:00 a.m.-4:00
p.m. early birds wel-
come, 708 Butler Blvd.
tools, antiques, princess
hse, baby accessories,
Tv's, much more,
386-523-7752





Highlight your
ad and get it sold
fast!
Whether Buying
or Selling we are
your total source
for classified!
HOMETOWN NEWS
386-322-5949


ICIAL


BANKRUPTCY $299
plus $399 for Court costs.
Experienced Professio-
nals handle your entire
Bankruptcy Fast, Easy,
No Risk, Guaranteed,
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signhere.org Better Busi-
ness Bureau member.
IRS TAX Problems?
FREE Consultation if you
owe 10OK+. Eliminate
Penalties, Interest & Tax
Liens. 1-800-832-0537.


CNA/COMPANION
Home Health Care: Live
in F/T Position.17yrs exp.
Lite cleaning / cooking.
Can meet all needs. Refs
772-323-4735/220-4825
DON'T WANT TO GO
TO A NURSING HOME?
Get excellent, care at our
small licensed adult living
facility. Private Room
Available. 386-677-1080.



CALL THE MANI He will
fix your heating or AC
problems. Used units
available. United Serv-
ices LLC Lic. #CACO
58104 386-767-8237






WANTED JUNK CARS
Running or not $200 &
up. We pay cash! 24-hrs.
Call 321-631-0111
$$$$$$$$$$$$$S
IN A HURRY TO
SELL????
Call the best
classified section
on the east coast!
HOMETOWN NEWS
CLASSIFIEDSI
386-322-5949


BOB MILLANI
CARPENTRY LLC
Specializing in DOOR &
WINDOW installations,
Chair Rail, Crown & Base
Molding, Attic Stairs,
Kitchen Cabinets, Cus-
tom Work & other car-
pentry solutions. 30+ yrs.
Lic./ Ins. 386-304-1228




CHIMNEY & Dryer Vent
Cleaning Since 1965. All
Repairs Fireplace Serv-
ices Inc. 386-767-9392




A NEW Computer Now!
Brand Name Laptops/
Desktops. Bad/No Credit,
No Problem! Smallest
Weekly .Payments.
1-800-645-0287


CALL THE MAN! Electri-
cal contractor w/45 yrs
exp. Lack of work means
good prices for you. Unit-
ed Services LLC. Lic.#ES
0000157. 386-767-8237



The hiring of a lawyer is an
important decision that
should not be based solely
on advertisements. Before
you decide, ask the lawyer to
send you free written Infor-
mation about their qualifica-
tons and experience.
Under Florida law,
non-lawyers are permitted to
sell legal forms and kits and
type in the factual Informa-
tion provided by their cus-
tomers. They may not, how-
ever, give legal advice.


Affordable & reliable
Hometown News
-'CLASSIFIEDS!
386-322-5949


$99.95 FLORIDA CORP.
$154.95 Florida LLC,
Complete & Includes
State Fees, Company
Book & Seal. Free infor-
mation packet: www.
amerilawyer.com Call
toll free 1-800-603-3900,
Spiegel & Utrera PA. L.
Spiegel, Esq, Miami.
A D O P T I O N
*1-877-341-1309* A won-
derful choice pregnant?
Loving, stable, financially
secure couples seek to
adopt newborns or in-
fants. Expenses paid.
Call 24 hours. *Atty Ellen
Kaplan FL Bar #0875228
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
IN A HURRY TO
SELL????
Call the best
classified section
on the east coast
HOMETOWN NEWS
CLASSIFIEDSI
386-322-5949


ARRESTED? NEED a
Lawyer? Arrested? Ar-
rested? Accused? Ac-
cused? Criminal Defense
Protect Your Rights Let...
A-A-A Attorney Referral
Service Help you All Le-
gal Matters & Injury Cas-
es 1-800-733-5342.




*DIVORCE* *Bankruptcy
Starting at $65 *1 Signa-
ture Divorce, *Missing
Spouse Divorce "We
Corn to you" Since 1992
1-888-705-7221.

LLC $149 w/ Free Single
Member Operating Agree
ment CORP $91.95 In-
cludes State, Attorney
Fees & Corporate Kit,
Attorney Nick Spradlin,
Tampa, Orlando, Bro-
ward. Miami & WPB
1-877-845-0621
www.nickspradlin.com


JIM'S
PAINTING

-Interior & Exterior
-Residential &
Commercial
-Licensed & Insured
-Fast & Reliable
Quality Products '

FREE ESTIMATES
386-383-8788
References Available.
KIRK'S
Painting, Pressure Wash
Home Improvements.
Everything from the
ground up. No job too big
or too small. 15 yrs in
business in Volusia Very
neat, clean, organized
-work!- Free- Est. Lic/Ins
386-451-5520
Kirkshomeimprovements.c
om


CHRISTIAN
PLUMBING & TILE



* Handicap Bathrooms
*Drains Cleaned
* Leaky Showers/Tabs/Faucets
*Water Heaters (D
* Sprilnlder/Solar Panel 0
* Bath tchen Remodels CO
*TileCeramic/MosalcMartle
Commercial Residential
Licensed/Insured CFC050578
672-3462

Tell 'em you
saw it in
HOMETOWN
NEWS
CLASSIFIEDSP
386-322-5949


METAL ROOFING SAVE
$$$ Buy direct from man-
ufacturer. 20 colors in
stock, w/accessories.
Quick turn around. Deliv-
ery. Gulf Coast Supply &
Manufacturing, Inc.,
1-888-393-0335 www.
gulfcoastsupply.com
SUPPORT
OUR
ADVERTISERS!
They make this
all possible!
HOMETOWN
NEWS
CLASSIFIEDS!
386-322-5949


*REDUCE YOUR Cable
Billl*- Get a 4-room, all
digital satellite system
installed for FREE & Pro-
ramming starting under
20. Free Digital Video
Recorders to new clients.
So call now,
1-800-795-3579



FINE LINE Wallpaper &
Painting Wallpaper in-
stall & removal. Interior
&Exterior painting. No job
too small Serving Eastern
Volusia 386-492-5350
Tell 'em you saw
it in HOMETOWN
'NEWS
CLASSIFIEDS!
386-322-5949


McKenzie's1
Home Improvement


Door & Window Installation

Storm Shutters Installed
All Types Roof Repairs
30 Years Experience
Licensed & Insured L
CRC1327744 CCC1328086 L
www.bmckenzie.com


FE I GO HAV SOMETHING TO.."$


Household Merchandise? Under $200?

BY EMAIL classified@HometownNewsOL.com

or log onto www.HometownNewsOL.com to place your ad
Please Mail, Fax or Email Your Free Ad No Phone Calls
Thanks to all of our readers for submitting your Free ads for merchandise priced under $200.
A gentle reminder: We allow 4 lines only including your phone number and only 2 ads per month per household.
Ads are scheduled for 2 consecutive Friday publications. If you sell the item, you can cancel it and submit an ad to replace it.
All FREE ads must be submitted by mail, fax or email. We cannot handle phone calls for free ads at this time.
And finally, please remember to include your name and address when submitting your ads.
Our advertisers make this service possible, so thank you for supporting our advertisers and
thank you for reading the HOMETOWN NEWS!!!
HOME OFFICE SOUTH DAYTONA OFFICE
1102 S. U.S. 1 2400 S. Ridgewood Ave. #22
Fort Pierce, FL 34950 South Daytona, FL 32119


Fax 72-45-566 Fx 38-322594


--- ------------------------------------------------------------------------
For private party use only Commercial advertising is not eligible 2 ads per month












-- -- - ----- -- -------- ---------------- ..


Your Name-----
Your Name


Address City- State Zip
Home Phone Daytime Phone

Mail or Fax Coupon to the Hometown News Office Nearest You!
Deadline for Free Ads is Monday at 5:00 pm


- EMPLOYMENT


ARE YOU THE ONE?


Looking for a sales professional to join our great

team in our South Daytona Office

Servicing Edgewater and

New Smyrna

Outside advertising sales for the #1

Community paper in the nation.....

Prefer someone with outside sales

experience and the ability to close the

sale! Good customer service skills a

must! Our customers deserve the best!

We provide protected territories, weekly base salary, gas and
phone allowance plus a top commission plan. You provide the
desire and the ability to get the job done!

Benefits include health, dental, 401K, paid vacation.

For an interview, please forward a resume to

yaney@HometownNewsOL.com

Or fax 386-322-5901


INDEPENDENT Beauty
Consultants. L'Bel a
luxury French skin care
company is currently
seeking Independent
Beauty Consultants to
expand its direct selling
business. Great 2nd in-
come opportunity. Call
1-877-511-1618 or www.
Lbel.com/pennysaver


REAL ESTATE apprais-
ers. Exp desk reviewers.
Certified/ FHA only.
Goodwriting/ strong ana-
lyticals. email send re-
sume w/ education & 3
samples to Recruiting@
live.com


FREE TO travel? Are you
free to travel? 18 or old-
er? Travel sale jobs! No
experience Necessaryl
Commission Weekly.
Daily Cash Bonuses. Call
Today, Start Today Ms
Cooper 1-888-384-8021



Photos say it all!
Photos with your ad,
High Definition Slide
Shows and more
VISIT OUR
ONLINE SITE
www.HometownNewsOL.com
386-322-5949


Outside Sales

ADVERTISING
ACCOUNT
CONSULTANT
We are looking for an
exceptional sales pro-
fessional with a proven
track record of success
& experience in work-
ing with small and
mid-sized businesses,
in the New Smyrna
Beach and Edgewater
area. Applicants should
possess exceptional
communication & pre-
sentation skills.
Position Includes
base salary, commis-
sion, allowances, bene-
fits & opportunity for
advancement. The
Hometown News has
been voted the #1 com-
munity newspaper in
the country for three
consecutive years.
If you are willing to put
forth the effort to be
successful, we would
like to meet with youl
To join our team,
please fax resume
attn: Kim Yaney
386-322-5901 or email
yaney@
HometownNewsOL.com
eoe,we drug test
Affordable & Effective
Hometown News
386-322-5949


REAL ESTATE SALES
Now hiring licensed real-
tors. We are now in the-
Port Orange area. This is
your chance to see how
Weichert Realtors works.
Candice 386-679-4613
SALES! Travel USA!
$500 Sign-on, No Experi-
ence Necessary! Join our
young-minded, Rock-n-
Roll, Hip Hop, Blue Jean
Environment, Skate-
boarders, x/y gen, Music
lovers Start Today! Jan
1-888-361-1526
SALES! TRAVEL USA!
$500 SIGN ON, No ex-
perience necessary! Join
Our Young- Minded,
Hip-Hop, Rock n Roll,
Blue jean Environment,
skateboarders, X/Y gen,
Music Lovers Welcome!
Start Today! Call Wanda
1-866-386-5621.


DRIVERS- Miles &
Freight! Positions availa-
ble ASAP! CDL-A with
tanker required. Top pay
& Premium benefits &
much morel Call 1-
877-484-3042 or visit:
oakleytransport.com
TRUCK DRIVERS Want-
ed- Best Pay & Home
Timel Apply Online To-
day over 750 Companies!
One Application, Hun-
dreds of offers! http://
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Training &
Education


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Diploma at home fast!
Nationally accredited
$399. Easy payment
plan. Free brochure
www.diplomaathome
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qualified Housing avail-
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1-888-349-5387
ATTEND COLLEGE On-
line from Home. *Medical
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mputers,*Criminal Jus-
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ATTEND College Online
from home. Medical,
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Please Tell Them...
I Saw It In
HOMETOWN NEWS
CLASSIFIEDS!
386-322-5949


AVIATION Maintenance
/Avionics graduate in 14
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Job placement assis-
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BODYGUARDS Coun-
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and sell that boat!
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HOMETOWN NEWS
386-322-5949


HIGH SCHOOL Diplo-
ma!!! Fast, Affordable,
Accredited. Free Bro-
chure. Call Now!
1-888-820-9985 www.
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Looking to earn
more income?
Average income
$38K/yea'r with
incomes over $100k
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1-888-924-0004
for recorded message
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CLASSIFIEDSI
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B8 Daytona Beach/Holly Hill


Hometown News


Friday, January 9, 2009


-- REAL ESTATE FOR SALE


SUNDAY JAN 11
Carriage Cove Daytona
67 Twin Coach Ct. 1 to 4
PM. 56' Mobile $9,000
386-767-2034



NSB Waterfront, Home-
stead, 3/2, deep H20
Canal, tile, sunroom. Ap-
praised at $595K Bring
ALL offers $540K Must
see! 407-474-0696


FORECLOSED HOME
Auction, Florida State-
wide Auction starts Feb
7th, 1000 Homes must
be sold! Free Brochure.
1-800-678-0517 REDC
USHomeAuction.com


DAYTONA/ HOLLY HILL
2-br/1-ba, very nice.
Concrete block with
C/H/A. 158 Edwards St.
For sale by owner/realtor.
$69,000 386-295-6294

VISIT OUR
ONLINE SITE
www.HometownNewsOL.com
Photos with your ad,
High Definition Slide
Shows and more
386-322-5949
www.HometownNewsOL.com


OAK HILL- 4/10 mile to
Indian River. Well main-
tlained 3/2/2 + bonus rm
14 x 22.5 & fireplace on
.9 acres, fenced yd
$269K 386-345-0113
PORT ORANGE 3/2/2
ool home on 2/3 acre.
265K. Fireplace, home
100% renovated, close to
1-95 & schools. Must See
386-756-0435



NORTH CAROLINA
MOUNTAINS
Easy to finish new log
cabin shell on 1.7 acres,
$89,900. 2acre-5acre wa-
terfront homesites from
$99,900. Easy access
mountain homesites
$29,900-$89,900.
828-247-9966 (Code19)




DAYTONA BEACH 55+
Colonial Colony So 2/2
Glass enclosed FL Rm.
2-pools, water, cable
trash, lawncare $4,500
910-987-2936
DAYTONA Colonial Col-
ony So Furn dw 2/2, up-
dated kit, new hot water
htr, Ig shed' with W/D.
Roof resealed $19,900
obo 386- 304-7059


EDGEWATER 55+ split
plan furnished 1/1, open
R & kitchen. Screen
room, laundry workshop,
roofover. Central A/C,
heat. $7000 terms.
386-424-1890
MELBOURNE MOBILE
Homes. 2BR from $2500
to $18,000 **Broadview
55+, Post Road. ** Tan-
tara, All family. Near
schools and shopping.
Office 321-259-3522
Park mgr 407-283-5277
NEW SMYRNA BEACH
55+ Singlewide. Large
screened patio & carport,
3-br/1.5-ba, C/H/A, Newly
renovated, Brand new
berber carpet throughout!
Close to everything.
$13,900 386-416-9189
386-427-9888
ORMOND BEACH Falls
Health issues forces
widow to sell exceptional
1376sqft plus. 12x16 FL
room' & 10x10 storage.
Tastefully decorated.
Move In cond.. Priced
below value $49,500/obo
386-671-3046
ORMOND BEACH- 55+
community, Best Priced
Homes & Lowest Rents
28 years of business with
you. $3500 Doll house all
furn. lbr/lba. 5 more -
great buys $5500-$8000
386-672-1276 / 451-4018


* Volusia County (4 papers)
(Port Orange/New Smyrna/South Dayton
Daytona Beach/Ormond Beach)

Brevard County (5 papers)
(Palm Bay/Melbourne;
Beaches/Suntree/Viera/Rockledge;
- Cocoa/ Merritt Isl./Cocoa Bch/Cape;
Titusville/PSJ/Mims)

Indian River County (2 papers)
(Vero Beach/Sebastian)

-- St. Lucie County (2 papers)
(Ft. Pierce/Port St. Lucie)

1 Martin County (I paper)
-, "- (Stuart/Jensen/Palm City/
.,- Hobe Sound/Sewalls Pt.)


wk +dep. Incls. util. inter-
net acc. 386-274-2054



DAYTONA 820 State Av
2br,1ba, renovated, 2nd
fir, balcony & back yard
for barbeques. Water,
sewer, garb incid $699. +
dep. call Adam for details
386-547-2357
DAYTONA BCH Ocean
front 16th fir. 2/2 unfurn.
1275sf. kit, dining, 50'
priv balcony. Pool, clbhs,
fitness. $1225. '1st last
sec. yrly. Ocean Ritz
386-316-8050
DAYTONA BEACH -
1-bdrm, 1-ba, $426/mo.
$250 MOVES YOU INI!
Large pets welcome Call
Elaine at Novawood
Apartments, 1220 South
Nova Road, O Daytona
Beach. FL 386-257-1110


HOLLY HILL 55+ 2-br
Large enclosed Florida
rm. C/H/A By Owner
$4995/obo. Financing
avail. 386-898-3941
ORMOND BEACH- New
New Beauty 55+ park
Ready to deal- all the
bells & whistle. $46,900.
6 mos free lot rent.
386-672-1276 / 451-4018
PALM BAY,'05, 2br/2ba/
carport. In Holiday Park.
Close to 1-95, Shopping,
& Restaurants. $67,000.
321-725-0305
PORT ORANGE New
homes in beautiful 55+
community the low $90's
New clbhse & pool. Mod-
el Open 10-4 Daily & Sun
12-4. Call 386-562-6836
or 386-756-8700
MaplewoodEstates.net
PORT ORANGE Newly
remodeled beauty, fully
furn. 50+, 2/2 C/H/A, car-
ort, shed W/D, poss. 3rd
rm. Possible owher finc.
63 Regency Pickwick Vil-
lage. Reduced to
$22,900. 386-547-4175
VERO BEACH: Motivat-
ed Seller, Financing Avail
for Furnished 2br/2ba, FL
room. $62,900 plus op-
tion to rent or buy land.
Take advantage of Go-
vernment First Time
Home Buyers Program.
Up to $7500 can be ap-
plied toward down pay-
ment. 866-605-7255


20+ ACRES post & beam
barn $119,900. New 22x
30 post & beam barn built
on gorgeous 20+ acres in
the country. Potential to
subdivide. Near FL/GA
border- 90 minutes Jack-
sonville Excellent fi-
nancing. Call now
1-800-898-4409, x.2169
GEORGIA Claxton.
Evans County 8.5 acres
on beautiful flowing creek
1/4 mile from river boat
landing, road frontage on
hwy 129 and country road
frontage, large trees, ex-
cellent fishing. $35,000
for quick sale, possible
owner financing.
912-427-7062 or Cell#
912-269-9349

Why not
the best!
HOMETOWN

CLA l EDS
5 Counties
Martin through
East Volusia
Programs
for Businessesl
Special Rates
Private Party I
Give us a call
386-322-5900
1-866-897-5949


AAAHI AFFORDABLE
HOMES, CABINS, LAND
FREE BROCHURE
877-837-2288
EXIT REALTY MVP
MURPHY, NC
www.exitmurphy.com
GEORGIA Southern
Wayne County. 25 Acres.
2 small fish ponds, coun-
ty and private road front-
age, beautiful land, would
make excellent blueberry
farm or small ranch.
$2,500/ac. Poss. owner
financing. 912-427-7062
Cell 912-269-9349

AFFORDABLE
GEORGIA, BEAUTIFUL
tracts in Toombs County
Georgia. County. Road
frontage & private roads,
cleared & ready to build
or put doublewide. Some
lake front tracts. Each
tract is 3 to 5 acres.
$2500/acre CASH. 7 dif-
ferent tracts to choose
from. 912-427-7062
912-269-9349
GEORGIA, WHITE
PLAINS: $287/mo Pay-
ments to Seller! 5 Acres
for sale, owner financing,
(property is part of a larg-
er 650acre plantation al-
so for sale). Located 1hr
from Atlanta & Augusta,
Other parcels range from
$3,950/ac.-$5,950/ac,
www.reedplantatlon.eom,
chrls@reedplantatlon.com
Call 404-354-5872


a REAL ESTATE


FOR SALE!

Line Ad Promotion


Buy 1 Week


Get 3 Weeks FREE!
ADD A PHOTO ON LINE AND IN PAPER!



IHometown News

866-897-5949

386-322-5949


ESTATE FOR RENT


DAYTONA BEACH -
Studio, 1 room, furnish-
ed. Lights, phone & cable
included. *On the Beachl
$600mo. 904-993-2910


DAYTONA BEACH Cen-
tral Manor Apts serving
adults 62+ or mobility
impaired. lbd/1ba Rent
based on income.
386-255-2622 EOH&
Handicap accessible
DAYTONA BEACH
SHORES Beautiful 2br/
2ba, 1500sf. Lrg rooms,
gated w/2 pools, exercise
roomon golf course,W/D,
wood floors. Cable/water
incl. $1125 unfurnished.
$1225furn. 407-310-6991
DAYTONA BEACH- 1/2
bik to Beach! Clean, spa-
cious 900sf 4-plex, new
paint, nice area 2/1 $695
mo. + dep. incld some util
386-235-2561
Affordable & Effective
Hometown News
386-322-5949


DAYTONA BEACHSIDE
1 bedroom, in four-plex
located near Main Street.
Off street parking. Utilit-
ies incl. $600/mo.
Call Bill 914-806-0502

DAYTONA CONDO 1BR
1Ba large living rm walk
in closet, new carpet&
paint, 2nd fir. balcony.
Water/Pest incld. $550
+dep 386-788-9405
DAYTONA STUDIO Apt
condo ocean front, furn.,
pool, fitness center. $200
wk. long term avail. Call
850-527-5085





DAYTONA/ORMOND
BCH beautiful 2/2, com-
pletely upgraded, all
stainless steel apple, new
w/d, hdwd. firs, spanish
tile, gated comm. Avail.
now. Pets ok. Amazing
$785mo 386-214-0085


"Copyrighted Material *


S SyndicatedContent ,


Available from Commercial News ProvidersI

V2


HOLLY HILL, Sq, Beau-
tiful 2br/2ba fresh paint-
new carpet, pool Tennis,
Lndry, no smok. $675,
$325 dep 386-258-5420
HOLLY HILL- Brand New
Marina Grande on the
Halifax River, fully fur-
nished, 2Bed/2Bath, 12th
Floor. Tower 1, great riv-
er view, new weight rm,
$2,500/mo, 1st, Last &
Sec. Bkgrnd chk re-
quired. No Pets allowed.
Call Laurie 386-451-2597
NEW SMYRNA Free
1st Month Rent $595.
moves you in. 2br, lba.
1200sf. $650. 3BR 2BA
1300sf. Bonus office area
$785. $595 dep. Great
location W/D hkup. Huge
closet, C/A/C water incld.
No dogs. 386-689-1243
NEW SMYRNA OCEAN
VIEW Large studio con-
do, directly across street
from ocean. First floor.
beautifully decorated.
Utilities & Cable incl. pool
& laundry facility on
premises. Monthly or
early 386-689-1243
OCEANS TWO River &
Ocean views. Unfurn.
18th fir. 2br/2ba, no pets
Secure building. Sauna,
.gym, pool. Annual lease.
386-679-1399
ORMOND BEACH-26'
Ocean deck, River View,
1200 sf, 2BR/2BA, Furn,
Pool, Prkg, $850 mo.
386-492-7548
ORMOND BEACHSIDE
3-bdrm Bungalow
$850/mo. Central Air,
Fenced Yard, Carport.
Call Bill 914-806-0502


wow
PORT ORANGE 1Br
/1BA studio, Walk to
beach! No pets 1st, last.
security. $575 mo.
386-756-0435




SEBASTIAN-SPACIOUS
& AFFORDABLE- 2/2 &
3/2 apts. $600 Deposit
moves you in w/good
credit, + 2 months Free
Rentl CALL TODAY!!
772-581-4440 *Income
Restrictions Apply


- TRANSPORTATION


1976 PLYMOUTH VOL-
ARE Roadrunner. Re-
stomod., custom paint.
performance upgrades,
garage kept, $9800. of-
fers. Jim evens.
386-673-9077
NEED TO HIRE?
CALL CLASSIFIED
386-322-5949


HONDA CIVIC LX 2004
Blue 78000 mi 32 mpg
runs like a top new tires
$8200 obo 386-437-4503
386-451-3513
pics online ad# 35172
ometownnewsol.com
NEED TO HIRE?
CALL CLASSIFIED
386-322-5949


MUSTANG,Convertible
Red, 2000, very low mi
leather inter. loaded,17"
TR whis, upgraded ster-
eo sys. 386-788-2563
PONTIAC Grand Prix
93, 83,000 mi, runs
ood, cold air, good paint
750, 386-672-2089,after
5:00 p.m.


0 0 ** to obl

WANTED JUNK CARS
Running or not $200 &
up. We pay cash 24-hrs.
Call 321-631-0111
CALL CLASSIFIED
and sell that boat!
386-322-5949


wow
VERO BEACH: Call for
specials Great 1br & 2br
from $500. Tile, New
apple. Close to. Beaches,
Parks & Rest.
772-563-0013


DAYTONA BEACH -
Great Home Great Pricel
Remodeled 3bdrm, 1.5ba
tile/hardwood floors, car-
port, family room, patio,
washer & dryer, central
A/C, ceiling fans. Quiet
area. Affordable $890/mo
386-313-6908 ; 569-5944
Daytona Beach
2br, 2ba condo, pool,
near beach, shopping,
dining &morel $850/mo.
Ormond Beach
3br, 2ba, 2cg, mins to
beach, $1200/mo.
Holly Hill 3br, 2ba
house, fresh paint, car-
pet, tile. $850/mo. Call
Select Ormond Homes
386-615-7870 or view
online at www.
selectormondhomes.com
DAYTONA BEACH Pool
home 3/2/lcg. new kit.
fenced yard; pets okay.
Furn or unfurn. Seasonal,
yearly. 386-562-6100
DAYTONA MAINLAND -
Clean 2 Bedroom, 1 bath.
Large Florida Room, ga-
rage, central heat/air,
fenced yard. No pets.
$750/month. First and
Security. 386-252-5738
DAYTONA- HOLLY HILL
Absolute best value.
Almost 2000sf, 3/2/2,
completely updated, lots
of tile, new carpet, ceiling
fans, located off Nova &
3rd St. $925 + util
386-237-1295
GOLF FRONT LPGA -
Brand New Home, Never
lived In. 3bdrm +
study/possible 4th bdrm.
3 baths. 2 car garage.
Modern, open floor plan,
ceramic tile. Fairway
view. $1,750/mo or lease
w/option to buy
407-342-7941
HOLLY HILL- 830 State
Ave, 3/2 w/screened
porch $1150/mo in-
cludes all utilities + dep.
516-359-1120 or
386-492-9000.


5TH WHEEL & pickup
truck 33' CEDAR CREEK
'00 sleeps 4, 2 slide outs
Top of the line. $23,000
for both 772-464-6568
GREAT NEWS AND
CLASSIFIED ADS!
HOMETOWN NEWS
386-322-5949


NEW SMYRNA
Beachside 822 Hope
Ave, 1/1 bonus & sun
room, w/d, .100 yds to
beach, pets negot
$700/mo, 386-316-9834
NEW SMYRNA BEACH
Sugar Mill Golf Course
2/2/2, W/D. gated com-
munity with heated pool
access. $1150/mo FLS
386-441-5824.
ORMOND BEACH- 55+
gated comm. Furn. 2/2,
carport, yard, LakeView!
3 pools,clubhouses,more.
No pets / no smoking.
$900mo. 386-673-2963
ORMOND BEACHSIDE -
2 or 3 bedroom, 1 bath,
1 car garage, New carpet
& paint. $750/mo.
Benchmark Properties.
Call 386-672-8530
ORMOND BEACHSIDE -
2br, lba, kit, living rm,
W/D, Irg scrned porch.
Use of pool, club hse
close to ocean. inclds
lawn care. $700. + sec.
386-672-0711
ORMOND BY THE SEA
2br/2ba,Fla/Rm. ch/a,
gar, patio deck, no pets,
shed, $750/mo
407-423-9707
ORMOND BY THE SEA
- Spacious 3bdrm,lba,
central heat & air, private
fenced yard, W/D, walk to
beach, small pets OK.
$795/mo 310-804-3266


REDUCED
ORMOND BY THE SEA
Remodeled 2/1 all tile,
Living Room, Dining
Room & Family Room,
fireplace, 11x24 screened
In porch. Private fenced
In yard. New Roof & A/C.
$750/mo + Security.
Walk to shopping and
B e a c h
piperno@eartbhlink.net
Call 386-677-3999
ORMOND BY THE SEA-
,Great beachside neigh
borhoodl 3/2/2, LR, DR,
FR, oak floors. Walk to
beach., $1100/mo.
305-394-0212
PORT ORANGE Availa-
ble Jan 1st, small 2BR
screened porch, private
rd, fenced in yard, alum.
shed, 1st/ last month req.
$900mo. NO PETS.
386-316-7330 'til 8pm


SIZZIN' RV SAVMGS
Factory lcenuvs,
Manfacturer Cmosoutsm
Warn Discouets. as
Card Allowances
FRESH TRADES
PRICED TO SELL
62753A-03
WE 2-SUDE DESB.
$20,000.00 OFL UST
6XOI97A-91 PACE ARROW
35V M5-$14,900.00
88 TERRY RESORT 27'
Tr--$2.500.00 AS-S
Trade anwinh o ofl ate
OP| SUMNDY



:1/2Ml ato 19.Ei 7


REDUCED
GEORGIA Wayne Cty.
Private 42ac. 18yr old
Eines, 150yr Oak Trees,
ess than 30min. from St.
Simons Island. $160,000
Make Offer 912-223-7559
GEORGIA, WHITE
PLAINS: $287/mo Pay-
ments to Seller! 5 Acres
for sale, owner financing,
(property is part of a larg-
er 650acre plantation al-
so for sale). Located 1hr
from Atlanta & Augusta,
Other parcels range from
$3,950/ac.-$5,950/ac,
www.reedplantatlon.com,
chrls@reedplantation.com
Call 404-354-5872
HUGE TENNESSEE
LAND SALE 5 to 5,000
Acres w/Beautiful Hard-
wood Timber & Rolling
Pasture. Great Private
Getaway or Excellent In-
vestment. Utilities Availa-
ble. Starting $1599/acre.
931-946-5263
LAND IS STILL THE
BEST INVESTMENT -
Stop losing money in the
stock market!
TEXAS & OLD MEXICO
Affordable Hunting &
Fishing Property.
10OAcres for $79,000
w/10% down & no credit
check. All sizes available
up to 20,000 acres.
1-877-77-BIGLAND
(877-772-4452)


.*.-



3 ppes -$4

S..-


a r -





.
5 ppes*-$6
6 ppes -- 7
7 aper-- 8
8Sppes -$9


PORT ORANGE 3/2/2
Pool home. Near 1-95 &
School. No pets, boats,
RV okay. $1750 mo 1st
last, sec. 386-756-0435
PORT ORANGE- 3bdrm,
1.5ba, 1 car garage.
1200+sqft. Large fenced
backyard w/6ft. privacy
fence. Quiet neighbor-
hood, close to 'shopping
& restaurants. $1400/mo
Available January 31st
386-492-6884
PORT ORANGE- very
clean dblewide spacious
3br/2ba, w/d hk-up in-
side, Ig screened porch,
carport. No smoking/pets
$750/mo. 1 year lease.
Lawn & pest incl. F/US
386-767-0020



DAYTONA TOWNHOME
2br/2ba 913 Willard Ct.
$760 mo. +sec. dep.
Avail now. 386-676-1018,
386-451-0509
EDGEWATER,TH,2
b/2ba, new kitch. wash.
& dryr. $750 mo. 1st
mo+sec,H20+ sewr incl
sm.pet,ok 407-758-4127
NEW SMYRNA Bch 4/3
Townhouse,5mins to
bch,$1100/mo unfurnor
$1950furn. 407-247-7575
vacation rentalhotspots
cornn Prop ID-100982
NEW SMYRNA BEACH
unfurnished Beauty on
the lake. 3/2.5-ba W/D,
Large patio Cedar Dunes
$1100/mo 386-428-7753
ORMOND BEACH The
Trails, 2br/2ba, on lake,
granite counters, like
new, comm. pool. Only
$895mo. 386-569-1811
PORT ORANGE TH, 2br
1,5ba, fully remodeled.
Dishwsher, W/D Fenced
ardw/pool $895.mo Call
ana 386-763-5475
SOUTH DAYTONA -
Rlverbreeze Townhomes.
2 bedrooms, 2 baths,
completely remodeled.
Tiles floors, new kitchen
cabinets, 1100sqft. From
$650 $750/mo. Pets
under 20lbs welcome.
386-566-8379
TRAILS LAKEVIEW TH
2/2/1. Newly remodeled.
$900mo $895.mo if pd by
1st. 1/2 off 1st mo. rent
$1000 sec. 386-334-2247


FORD 2001 F-250 4x4,
7.3 v8 Diesel loaded lar-
ait leather package, 4 dr.
ext. cab, 6 in. lift cust.
whls 35" in. tires, 5" exh,
a new trans,warren, Rhi-
no liner, super chip, exc.
cond. $13,700, 386
295-8584.
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
IN A HURRY
TO SELL??
Call the
BEST
classified
section
on the east
coast!
HOMETOWN NEWS
CLASSIFIEDSI
386-322-5949
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$


N.C.- 136acres w/new
6300sf mansion.
Beautiful rolling hills
$1.6m. Near Kerr Lake;
Also, 208ac farm $599K;
10ac lot $59K.
WE'LL FLY YOU HERE!
Pica: 919-693-8984;
owner@newbranch.com

WOW
NC: Smoky Mountains
Log Cabin, Furn 2br/2ba,
Porch, Hot tub, Fireplace,
Vacation home or Daily
Rental Prog. Must Sell.
321-432-1557 $145,000
NORTH CAROLINA
MOUNTAINS
New log cabin shell on
1.7 acres, $89,900.
2acre-5acre waterfront
homesites from $99,900.
Easy access mountain
homesites
$29,900-$89,900.
828-247-9966 (Code 41)
NORTH FLORIDA LAND
1,955acs in Jefferson Co.
Timberland, mixed w/
hardwood bottoms & cut-
over, grt hunting, rd front-
age, Reduced $1900/ac.I
Southern Pine Planta-
tions 352-867-8018
OCALA FL 40+/- acres,
2 miles W of 1-75 on Hwy
326, 1300 ft frontage on
Hwy 326, specialized
Commercial district. By
owner. $1,100,000.
561-307-3539
Panama, Chiriqui Prov-
Ince Prime Building lots
$35,000/ea. SW Pacific
Coast. Beautiful views.
239-220-4502
dicnjuli@comcast.net


IN A HURRY
TO SELL??
Call the
BEST
classified
section
on the east
coast!
HOMETOWN
NEWS
CLASSIFIEDS!
386-322-5949
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$


DAYTONA BEACH Ab-
solute best value! Over
1000sf of living, 2/2, just
remodeled, conveniently
located off Nova & 3rd St.
$675/mo. + utilities
.386-237-1295
DAYTONA BEACH
Mainland 2 bedroom
Duplex. Central Air,
Porch, $650/mo.
Call Bill 914-806-0502
DAYTONA DUPLEX 2br,
1 bath apt. Quiet Street.
$625 plus security dep.
386-676-1018
EDGEWATER, 2b/2b,
duplex, 1100 sf cul-de-
sac, wd, tl, crpt, firs. 1/cg,
fcd.yd, no pets, no smkg,
$850 mo, 386-679-8658
ORMOND BEACHSIDE-
furn lbr/lba duplex apt.
Outstanding location,
can see ocean & walk to
everything. All new mod-
ern furniture, carpet, tv,
dishwasher, florida room,
beautiful landscaped
large fenced maintained
yard. Must see!
$950/mo. short term
leases avail, some pets
welcome 386-677-3844


Colonial Colony So. Lrg
dblewde 2/2 unfurn. 2
pools, water, cable, trash,
lawncare. No smk/no pet,
$850mo. + sec. 1294
Bunker Hill Daytona Bch
386-383-4685



PORT ORANGE 500sf
retail office $575 mo. 1st,
last, security. On US Hwy
1. High visibility.
386-756-0435


SOUTH CAROLINA
ACREAGE 5 Acres.
Beautiful Homesite only
30 minutes from Colum-
bia. East Access off 1-26.
Only $37,500.
Owner financing.
Call 1-803-505-2161

9 SEGlIS ....
SOUTH GEORGIA
RIVERFRONT
292 AC $2,475/AC
River, creek, lake,
sandy beaches,
hardwood, planted
pine, & more.
stregispaper.com
478-987-9700
St. Regis Paper Co.
TENNESSEE LAND
RUSHI 1+acre to 2acre
homesites, wood, views.
Starting at $59,900. Tenn
River & Nick-a-Jack view
tracts now available! Re-
tirement guide rates this
area #2 is U.S. places to
retire. Low cost of living,
no impact fee.
1-330-699-2741
or 1-866-550-5263,
Ask About Mini Vacation!



SELL/RENT YOUR
Timeshare Now!! Mainte-
nance fees too high?
Need Cash? Sell your
unused timeshare today.
No commissions or brok-
er fees. Free consulta-
tion. www.sellatimesharer
.com 1-888-310-0115
TIMESHARE RESALES:
Save 60-80% off retail!
Best Resorts & Seasons.
For Free Timeshare Mag-
azine 1-800-780-3158
HolidayGroup.com/IFPA




*****
PORT ORANGE Multi
tenant investment 3700sf
US Hwy 1 Good parking
frt&rear Totally renovate-
d. Huge garg area $657K
386-756-0435

VISIT OUR
ONLINE SITE
www.HometownNewsOL.com
Photos with your ad,
High Definition Slide
Shows and more
386-322-5949


DAYTONA BCH Office
Space 1000sf on busy
Ridgewood Ave. $1000.
mo. incld water, & trash
call Rich, 386-334-3529

SOUTH DAYTONA
Wow! Contemporary
Plaza 800 sq ft office on
2nd fl. Now only $400/mo
386-677-3741 P




ORMOND BEACH
HOUSE- For sale or rent
to buy. This is absolutely
.a steal. Rebuilt 2/2, fire-
place, w/d, modern kitch-
en, florida room, back
patio, front porch, ga-
rage, huge back fenced
yard, new sprinkler &
pump system. For more
details, call Maria
386-677-3844 Priced
rock bottom $220K incl
closing costs! Financing
available. Can own
w/$9K down.
S. DAYTONA 2br/1.5ba
/lcg, scr. porch, w/d. No
smokers/ pets. $750/mo.
Rent to own opt. 1st, last
386-788-2128




ORMOND BEACH- Best
prices we've done the
comps north US1, w/ of-
fice &bath 1,000sf over-
head door $495 mo. sim-
ilar savings on 1250 sf.
Lease bonus talk to us.
386-451-4018/672-1276


Vacation &
-* Travel


MARATHON. LUXURY
1-6 bedroom vacation
homes. Beautiful ocean-
front properties. Heated
pools, hot tub, docks.
Weekly & long weekend
rates. Call now for last
minute special rates
1-888-564-5800
American-Paradise.com


ST. AUGUSTINE BCH
Oceanview Condo fr $99
nite, or Oceanfront house
fr. $199nite/$1399wk,
Oceanfront wedding $359
or Historic District from
$129nite Discount Cruise
from $259. 904-825-1911
www.sunstatevacation.com


34' TRAILER,enclosed,
gooseneck, drop rear MOPED, KINETIC, TFR,
gate, 5' bender window& 50cc 2 stoke, complete
side door, $2500, 14' w/basket,owner's/shop
landscaped trailer, drop manual, runs good
tail gate dbl. axle, $250 $350abo, 386-316-9708
386-852-0242 $5o,38-197

Boats s -eft
-"" atIcat


15' PONTOON BOAT,
'98 Crest, 25hp Suzuki
motor & trailer, Excellent
Condition. ONLY $65001
315-723-5603
34' CRUISERS- 334
Espirit Cruise or Live-
A-Board. Air/heat, stove,
micro, refrigerator, full
enclosure, color TV, AM/
FM/CD, VHF, plus more.
Sleeps 6. Halifax Harbor
obo 407-310-2678 (c),
386-424-3220 (work)
Photos ad #34476 www.
HometownNewsOL.com


34' WELLCRAFT Scarab
II, 1985. Twin 454's,
clean fast cigarette boat,
fully equipped, ready to
run, full canvas, sleeps 3,
dry stored Brevard Coun-
ty. $19,500/OBO. e-mail
for photos & details at
SBCruiser@aol.com or
call 407-422-6095
Outboard Motorboat,14",
20hp elec. start. Yamaha
w/trailer, nice,$2500obo
386-345-3065or
607-222-1286


GET IT SOLD FAST in the HometownNews

CARS! TRUCKS! BOATS!

Buy 1 week, BEST VALUE ALL ZONES
Get 3 we ek From Martin County
Get 3 w : eks through Ormond Beach

F EER : Add a photo for only $5 per zone

Si e! Online photos available
*Private Party Only ,


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