• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 List of Illustrations
 The three young travelers
 Down the bay
 Budd as a cockney
 From London to Paris
 Guy undertakes to write about the...
 Venice not to be left out
 Vienna
 Down the Danube to Buda-pesth
 On the Bulgarian side of the...
 Through Turkey by rail
 Three days on the Black sea
 Major S-'s hospitality
 The transcaspian railway
 Diplomacy and travel
 "Ava" found at last
 The voyage to Suez
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: A run around the world, or, The adventures of three young Americans : the descriptive and humorous narrative of a trip from New York to India and back, in 1885-86, embracing the Atlantic voyage, England, France, the Rhine, Switzerland, northern Italy, Austria, Servia, Bulgaria and eastern Roumelia at the time of the late war, Turkey, the Black Sea, the Caucasus, The Caspian Sea, The Russian Trans-caspian region with its new railroad, Persia, Afghanistan, India, the Suez Canal route, Egypt, the H
Title: A run around the world, or, The adventures of three young Americans
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00081196/00001
 Material Information
Title: A run around the world, or, The adventures of three young Americans the descriptive and humorous narrative of a trip from New York to India and back, in 1885-86, embracing the Atlantic voyage, England, France, the Rhine, Switzerland, northern Italy, Austria, Servia, Bulgaria and eastern Roumelia at the time of the late war, Turkey, the Black Sea, the Caucasus, The Caspian Sea, The Russian Trans-caspian region with its new railroad, Persia, Afghanistan, India, the Suez Canal route, Egypt, the Holy Land, the Mediterranean ports, etc.
Physical Description: vii, 312 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 25 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Pipkin, Samuel J
Dadd, Frank, 1851-1929 ( Illustrator )
Hildibrand, Henri Théophile ( Engraver )
DeWolfe, Fiske & Co. (Boston, Mass.) ( Publisher )
Publisher: De Wolfe, Fiske and Company
Place of Publication: Boston
Publication Date: c1891
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Natural history -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Adventure and adventurers -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Voyages around the world -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Sailing -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Friendship -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Sick -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Islands -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Storytelling -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Diplomacy -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Birds -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Travelogue storybooks -- 1891   ( local )
Bldn -- 1891
Genre: Travelogue storybooks   ( local )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: illustrated with three hundred engravings.
General Note: Illustrations engraved by Hildibrand after F. Dadd.
General Note: Frontispiece printed in colors.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00081196
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002224613
notis - ALG4879
oclc - 79310454

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
        Page iv
        Page v
    List of Illustrations
        Page vi
        Page vii
        Page viii
    The three young travelers
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Down the bay
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Budd as a cockney
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
    From London to Paris
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
    Guy undertakes to write about the Rhine and Switzerland
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
    Venice not to be left out
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
    Vienna
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
    Down the Danube to Buda-pesth
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
    On the Bulgarian side of the Balkans
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
    Through Turkey by rail
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
    Three days on the Black sea
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
    Major S-'s hospitality
        Page 201
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
        Page 206
        Page 207
        Page 208
        Page 209
        Page 210
        Page 211
        Page 212
        Page 213
        Page 214
        Page 215
        Page 216
        Page 217
        Page 218
    The transcaspian railway
        Page 219
        Page 220
        Page 221
        Page 222
        Page 223
        Page 224
        Page 225
        Page 226
        Page 227
        Page 228
        Page 229
        Page 230
        Page 231
        Page 232
    Diplomacy and travel
        Page 233
        Page 234
        Page 235
        Page 236
        Page 237
        Page 238
        Page 239
        Page 240
        Page 241
        Page 242
        Page 243
        Page 244
        Page 245
        Page 246
        Page 247
        Page 248
        Page 249
        Page 250
        Page 251
        Page 252
        Page 253
        Page 254
        Page 255
        Page 256
        Page 257
    "Ava" found at last
        Page 258
        Page 259
        Page 260
        Page 261
        Page 262
        Page 263
        Page 264
        Page 265
        Page 266
        Page 267
        Page 268
        Page 269
        Page 270
        Page 271
        Page 272
        Page 273
        Page 274
        Page 275
        Page 276
        Page 277
        Page 278
        Page 279
        Page 280
        Page 281
        Page 282
        Page 283
        Page 284
    The voyage to Suez
        Page 285
        Page 286
        Page 287
        Page 288
        Page 289
        Page 290
        Page 291
        Page 292
        Page 293
        Page 294
        Page 295
        Page 296
        Page 297
        Page 298
        Page 299
        Page 300
        Page 301
        Page 302
        Page 303
        Page 304
        Page 305
        Page 306
        Page 307
        Page 308
        Page 309
        Page 310
        Page 311
        Page 312
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text








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VI., VZ'A


111, ro I I'lul








A RUN R oND THE WloRD

OR


The dVentures of Three Young American$


THE DESCRIPTIVE AND HUMOROUS NARRATIVE OF A TRIP FROM NEW YORK TO
INDIA AND BACK, IN 1885-86, EMBRACING THE ATLANTIC VOYAGE, ENGLAND,
FRANCE, THE RHINE, SWITZERLAND, NORTHERN ITALY, AUSTRIA,
SERVIA, BULGARIA AND EASTERN ROUMELIA AT THE TIME OF
THE LATE WAR, TURKEY, THE BLACK SEA, THE CAUCASUS,
THE CASPIAN SEA, THE RUSSIAN TRANS-CASPIAN
REGION WITH ITS NEW RAILROAD, PERSIA,
AFGHANISTAN, INDIA, THE SUEZ CANAL
ROUTE, EGYPT, THE HOLY LAND,
THE MEDITERRANEAN
PORTS, ETC.


effustafi a )xitt lv 3unbrtb Gngracings







BOSTON
DE WOLFE, FISKE AND COMPANY
361 AND 365 WASHINGTON STREET















































Copxl (,l l;1-, 18ol, ix
I)EI \VOLI 1, 1 SKE' &- Co.


























CONTENTS.

CHAPTER I.
'HE THREE YOUNG TRAVELERS.- HOW TIE EXPEDITION W\AS PLAtNED.-A ROMANTIC FAM hL
HISTORY.- THI LOST SISTER.- THE ROUTE TO INDIA AND BACK.--CAPTAIN STARBUCK'S
ADVICE.- HOW TO TRAVEL.-THE DAY OF DEPARTURE.- GOOD- BY 1- THE STEAMER
SAILS.-THE JOURNEY IS BEGUN -

CHAPTER II.
DOWN THE BAY.-LIBERTY'S PEDESTAL.-LAST GLIMPSE OF CONEY ISLAND.-BUDD IS SEA-
SICK.- TRANQUIL DAYS.- DIVERSIONS ON SHIPBOARD.- SHUFFLEBOARD.- SEA- YARNS.-EN-
TERTAINMENT IN THE SALOON.-" LAND IN SIGHT I"- QUEENSTOWN.- LANDED AT LIVER-
POOL 1

CHAPTER III.
BUDD AS A COCKNEY.--ON TO "LUNNON."--IN A FOG.- REUNION AT THE LANGHAM.- OUT
SIGHITSEEING- THE PROFESSOR AGAIN.-ODD FACTS ABOUT LONDON.-VISIT TO THE TOWER.
WESTMINSTER ABBEY.- THE HOUSES OF PARLIAMENT.-A GLIMPSE OF QUEEN VICTORIA.
-THE PRINCE AND PRINCESS OF WALES.--LONDON SIGHTS AND EXCURSIONS.-OFF FOR
THE CONTINENT 4

CHAPTER IV.
FROM LONDON TO PARIS.-FIRST IMPRESSIONS OF THE FRENCH CAPITAL.-THE BOULEVARDS.-
THE TUILERIES.-PLACE DE LA CONCORDE.-BUDD GOES A-FISHING.-BREAKFAST AT THE
PALAIS ROYAL.-TIHE CHA MPS ELYSEES.- THE ARC DE TRIOMPHE.- NOTE DAME.--THE
PANTHEON AND THE LATIN QUARTER.- TIIE CATACO.MIS.- NAPOLEON'S TOMB.- VER-
SAILLES.-THE NATIONAL FETE.-PRESIDENT GREIVY.-AU REVOIR PARIS 3

CHAPTER V.
GUY UNDERTAKES TO WRITE ABOUT TIIE RIIINE AND SWITZERLAND.--THE JOURNEY TO COLOGNE.
-FUMIGATION.-COLOGNE CATHEDRAL.-ON TILE RUII;E STEAMER.--SPECIMEN TOURISTS.-
DRACHENFELS.-THE STATUE OF GERMANIA."-ZUnRICH.- GENEVA.- FIRST VIEW OF THE
ALPS.-ExcuRSION TO CHILLON.--To CIIAMOUNI BY DILIGENCE.-MONT BLAINC.-AMERIIlCAN
CLIMBERS.-TiHE MlER DE GLACE, AND OTHER REGULATION SIGHTS.-GUY GOES BOTANIZ-
ING.- ECCENTRIC ALPINE TOURISTS.--BACK TO GENEVA, Vid IIARTIGNY 55

CHAPTER VI.
"VENICE NOT TO BF LEFT OUT.--JOURNEY INTO ITALY cVi' MONT CENIS TUNNE,.--TURIN, MILAN,
VERONA, AND OTHER STATIONS.-THE GLORIOUS CITY IN TIErr SEA.--FIRST IMPRESSIONS.-
RAY READS AND TALKS HISTOIY.--ExcuRSIONS.- THE LIDO.- ST. MARK'S AND TIHE PIA.ZZA.
-TouRISTS AND TIEIR 3MANNERS.-IA REGATTA.-VENETIAN REPASTS.-TIHE ISLAND SUB-
URBS.-FACING NOR'-NOR'EAST AGAIN -








COv O TEiTS.

CHAPTER VII.
VIENNA-STADT AND SUBURiB.-THE RINGSTRASSE.- ST. STEPHEN'S PLATZ AND CATHEDRAL.-A
VIEW OF THE CITY, AND A REVIEW OF POINTS OF ITS HISTORY.--THE STOCK-IM-EISEN.-
THE GRABEN.--THE VOTTV-KCInn.-A WONDERFUL CAFE.- THE DEAF MUTES OF VIENNA.
-A STRAUSS CONCERT AT TIE VOLKSGARTEN.-MR. DIGBY DE RIGBY.-A VISIT TO SCHON-
BRUNN, AND A GLIMPSE OF TIE EM[PRESS.-REMINISCENCES OF NAPOLEON II.-RAY UN-
PIACKS HIS CAMIERA.-A DOWNFALL IN TIE PRATER.--MATTIIAS AND HIS MUSIC-LESSONS.-
EXTENSION OF THE PLEASANT STAY AT VIENNA.- OFF AT LAST 90

CHAPTER VIII.
DOWN TIE DANUBE TO BUDA-PESTII.-INTERESTING PEOPLE, SCENERY, INCIDENTS AND ANEC-
DOTES.-BUDA-PESTH AND VICINITY.-HUNGARIAN CHILD-LIFE.-TIIROUGII THE IRON GATES.
-BELGRADE.-MR. DIGBY DE RIGBY ON HAND.-VISIT TO TIE FORTRESS.-SIGNS OF WAR.
-A JOURNEY ACROSS THE KINGDOM OF SERVIA.-ALEXINATz.-OLD BATTLE-GROUNDS.- SOL-
DIERS AND PRIESTS.--MOURNING AND FESTIVITY.-A NIGHT AT NISCII-M-R. DIGBY DE
RIGBY BECOMES TUTOR AND GUARDIAN.-- UDD ASTONISHES THE SERVIAN CAMP.- OVER TIE
BALKANS BY DILIGENCE 111

CHAPTER IX.
ON THE BULGARIAN SIDE OF THE BALKANS.--THE "TUTOR" TALKS AND RELATES ANECDOTES.-
SOFIA, CAPITAL OF BULGARIA.--EATING SUPPER AFTER THE TURKISH FASHION.--SETTLING
DOWN IN SOFIA.-PRINCE ALEXANDER. -BEGINNING OF THE WAR. THE SERVIANS
THREATEN TO TAKE TIIE CAPITAL.-TIHE TABLES TURNED AT SLIVNITZA.-KING MIILAN'S
COLLAPSE.-GOOD-BY TO MR. DIGBY DE RIGBY.-JOURNEY TO PIIILIPPOPOLIS.-GLIMPSES OF
EASTERN ROUM~ELIA AND TURKEY PROPER- 133

CHAPTER X.
THnOUGII TURKEY BY RAIL.-GLIMPSES OF TIE ARMY.-MILLIKEN BEY.-ADRIANOPLE.- CON-
STANTINOPLE AT TWILIGHT.- SUSPICIONS OF A TURKISH BUNCO-GAME.- UNDERGROUND RAIL-
WAY TO PERA.-LETTERS FROM HOMIE.-TIDINGS OF AVA.-SETTING UP FOR TIHE WINTER.
-PECULIARITIES OF TURKISH MONEY.- SIGIT-SEEING AT HAP-HIAZARD.---TS OF HISTORY.-
SULTAN ABDUL IAMID.--PALACES AND MOSQUES.-FIRES AND FIREMEN.--SCENES, CIARAC-
TERS AND CUSTOMIS.--THE APPROACH OF SPRING.-COMPLETING THE ASIAN OUTFIT.--E-
BARKING ON TIE BLACK SEA 156

CHIIPTER XI.
THREE DAYS ON THE BLACK SEA.-TOUCIIING AT PORTS OF ASIA 3MINOR.-A RUSSIAN "POP-
OFFKA."- M. MYNDOFF AND MI. SHIRLEY ENGAGE IN A NAVAL DISCUSSION.-BATOUM.-
THE CAUCASUS RAILWAY.- TIFLIS.- SIGHTS AND ANECDOTES.-MiOUNT ARARAT.- ANOTHER
JOAN OF ARC.-BAKU AND THE CASPIAN SEA.-RESIIT.-No RAILROADS.-A LONG WAGON-
RIDE TO TEHERAN -- - 184

CHAPTER XII.
MAJOR S-'S IIOSPITALITY.-FEATURES OF TEHERAN.- COSTUMES AND CIIARACTERS.-A PARSEE
CEMETERY.--ILGRIMS TO THE SHRINE OF SIHAII ZADEII ABDUL.- BUDD RAISES A RIOT, AND
IS ARRESTED.-TIHE RESCUE.-A TALK ABOUT TITE PERSIAN POETS.--NUSR ED DEEN, AND
THE ROYAL FAMILY.--ROBBERS, AND THEIR PUNISIIIENT.- ON THE ROAD AGAIN 201'

CHAPTER XIII.
THE TRANSCASPIAN RAILWAY.-KIZIL-ARVAT, AND A NEW VARIETY OF DERVISHES.- THE MARCH
OF RUSSIAN EMPIRE.-ASKABAD.-THE TURKOMANS.- GOOD-BY TO RAILROAD TRAVEL.-IN
PERSIA AGAIN.-THEn TURKOMAN RAIDING GROUNDS.- MESHED.-A SWEET RECEPTION.-
DOUBTS AND DIFFICULTIES.-A COURIER TO TIE BOUNDARY COMMISSION CAMIP.-PASSING
r.' TIwB -A CAMrB- RACE.- STUDIES OF PERSIAN CHARACTER 21







CONTENTS. V

CHAPTER XIV.
DIPLOMACY AND TRVEL.--THE MEEV CARAVAN.-"DoiNG FOR ONESELF. --BUDD CHOOSES A
HoRSEi.- SLEEPlG IN A CAMEL-CADLE.- THE HERI-RUD RIVE.- SARAKHS.-A PLEASANT
CAMP.-il URIED DEPARTURE, AND AFGHLAN LIGHTNING EXPRESS TO KUSAN.-NEW FRIEND.
-BERAT FROM A DISTANCE.- CANDIAHIAR.- QUETTAH AND THE BOLAN PASS.- RAY'S TER-
RIFIC AD VE TURI.-1 CIILZATION AGAIN.-TaROUGH THE GATES OF INDIA -

CHAPTER XV.
SAVA" FOND AT LAST.-AT HOME IN AJMERE.- IMPRESSIONS OF IlDIA.- A HUNTING TRIP
AMONG THE HtLLs.--LNDIAN SPORT.-TIIE CASP.--REPTILES ASD SAVAGE BEASTS.--KILL-
ING A TIGER--BUDD'S GREAT ANGLO-INDIAN BASEAi, MATCH AT AJMERE.- A TOUR
DOWN THE GANGS AND BACK.-FAMOUS INDIAN CITIES.-AG.RA, DELa, LUCKNOW, CAWN-
PORE. ALLAHABAD AND BENARES.--PREPARATIONS FOR DEPARTURE.-BOMBAY.- THE SEC-
ONID CITY OF INDIA," AND ITS ENVIRONS.--GOOD-BY I-WESTWARD HO I- .',

CHAPTER XVI.
THE VOYAa0 TO SuEZ.-ANTIQUE EGYPT.--CAIRO AND ALiXANDRIA.- ON THE MEDITEnRANEAN.-
JAFFA, TEE PORT OF THE HOLY LAND.--JERUSALEM AND RS SACRED PLACES.- O-TsrIE TiEt
WALLs.-THE DEAD SEA AND THE JORDAN.-TURNING HIOMEWARD.- SAILING ON SUrMMRa
SAS. Ta STEAMER CITY O lOME.''- Firs .- l. I





















ILLUSTRATIONS.


PAGE
"Good-by !"-Leaving Home in New YDr T.... 10
Last Adieux in the Cabin of the Steamer...... 14
The Pedestal of Bartholdi's Statue............ 16
Farewell View of Coney Island ................ 17
Dinner under Difficulties ...................... 19
A Game of Shuffleboard on Deck ............. 20
Sea-yarns................. .................. 21
The Flying Dutchman...................... 22
The Great Fire of London, 1666.............. 25
The Tower of London ....................... 27
Gateway of the Bloody Tower................ 28
A Beef-cater....................... ........ 28
House of Commons after the Dynamite Explo-
sion .................................. 29
Interior of Westminster Hall.................. 30
On the Thames, at Twickenham.............. 31
Pope's Villa .................................. 31
Bust of Longfellow, in Westminster Abbey.... 31
The Houses of Parliament ................... 32
Queen Victoria Reviewing the Soudan Camel
Corps .................................. 33
The Prince and Princess of Wales............ 34
Sea-bathing at Calais. ..................... .. 37
Norman Horses............................. 37
On the Boulevards ........................... 38
Fishing in the Seine. ......................... 39
Breakfast for One Franc Twenty-five Centimes 40
Concert in the Champs Elysees................ 41
Interior of an Omnibus ...................... 41
The Are de Triomphe .......................... 43
The Cathedral of Notre Dame.................. 44
The Panthl6on .............................. 44
The Hotel des Invalides ..................... 45
The Statue of Charlemagne................... 4
The Catacombs of Paris...................... 47
Statue of the French Republic ................ 48
The Grand Opera House ...................... 49
Grand Gallery of the Palace of Versailles...... 50
Illumination of the Park of Verailles......... 51
The French National Fete...................... 51
Fireworks at the Pont du Jour ................... 52
Jules Gr6vy, President of the French Republic 53


Difficulty with the Quarantine Officers........
Fumigation. ...............................
Spire of Cologne Cathedral...................
Cologne Cathedral. ......................
On a Rhine Steamer. .......................
Some of the Passengers ......................
Statue of Germania," in the Niederwald......
View of the Statue from Opposite Bank.......
C oblenz .....................................
Bridge over the Rhine at Mayence............
The Rhine and the Hudson Compared.........
Zurich's W aters..............................
The Castle of Chillon. ......................
Alpine Flowers..............................
One Way of Enjoying a Summer Holiday.....
The Vale of Chamouni. ......................
The Knowing Tourist .................. ....
Railway over the Alps........................
Meeting of Workmen in Mont Cenis Tunnel...
Southern End of the Tunnel..................
A Venetian Kitchen Door ....................
The Omnibus-gondola .......................
Gondola Entrance, Victoria Hotel.............
Interior of a Gondola ........................
Steamboats on the Grand Canal................
On the R ialto................................
The Marriage with the Adriatic ...............
A Venetian Feud.............................
A Venetian Fish-market......................
Victor Emanuel and Franz-Josef ...............
A Regatta on the Grand Canal................
The City of Vienna .........................
The Aspern Bridge.........................
A Viennese Municipal Officer ................
A Summer Storm .......................
The Imperial Family and the King of Italy....
The Goose Fountain.........................
Caf6 for the Deaf and Dumb ................
Concert in the Kursalon....................
Johann Strauss, the "Waltz-King.". ..........
The Empress of Austria at a Hunting Party ....
The Son of Napoleon I.....................








ILL US TRA TIONS.


PAGE
Scene in the Prater......................... .. 103
Viennese Maid-of-all-work ................... .104
Vender of Flutes and Baskets................. 105
In the Belvedere Garden ..................... 106
Ray Tries to Photograph a Group............. 107
A Chimney-sweep ............................ 108
Toy-seller and Customer................... .... 109
Mathias's Music-lesson. .................. 110
Steamboat-landing on the Danube ............ 112
Passengers on the Danube Steamer............ 113
A Passenger-raft on the Danube ............... 114
An Incident of the Floods .................. 115
Inhabitants of I-Ierzegovina................... 116
Castle of Durenstein ......................... 117
Bazaar and Schlossberg, Buda-Pesth.......... 118
Magyars ................................... 119
Peasants from the Puszta.................... 121
Child-life in Hungary ........................ 121
Hungarian Robbers. .......................... 122
Foraging on the Puszta. ..................... 123
Servian Pastors and their Flocks.............. 124
The Fortress of Belgrade .................... 125
Decorating a New House in Servia ............ 125
A Servian Railway-station in War-time........ 126
Servian Women Decorating Graves ............ 127
Servian War-songs.- An Agricultural Peasant 128
Soldiers Chanting Hyms. ....................... 129
Milan I., King of Servia ................... 130
Going through Dragoman Pass.............. 134
Bulgarian Types............................ 135
Prince Alexander of Bulgaria.............. .. 136
Palace and Principal Buildings at Sofia........ 137
Mr. Digby de Rigby at the Bulgarian Inn... 137
Consecration of the Banners................... 139
Prince Alexander and his People............. 140
Enrollment of Volunteers .................... 141
Bringing Wounded Soldiers to Sofia.......... 142
Prince Alexander at Slivnitza ............... 143
Retreat of Servians through Dragoman Pass... 144
Sending Presents to a Bulgarian Bride......... 145
Bulgarian Bandits ...... .................... 147
Rayna, the lleroine of Philippopolis ........... 148
View of Philippopolis ....................... 149
Interior of a Third-class Car ................. 151
Public Fountain at Adrianople................ 152
Queen Nathalie in the Hospital................ 153
The Queen of Roumania (" Carmen Syiva")... 155
An Encampment of Turks ................... 157
Turkish Army Discipline ................... 158
A Cossack Lassoing a Turkish Major ......... 159
A Street Scene in Adrianople................. 159
Railway-station in Constantinople................. 160
Constantinople and the Golden Horn............ 11
View of the Bosphorus ................. 162
Fire at the Mosque of Sulimanich .............. 163
The Burning of Pera ......................... 164


PAGE
A Constantinople Fire Company............... 164
Abdul Hamid II., Sultan of Turkey............. 165
One of the By-ways of Constantinople ........ 166
Calling the Faithful to Prayer. .................. 167
Shooting at the Eclipse ....................... 168
Mosque of St. Sophia ........................ 169
The Mosque of Sultan Achmed ............... 171
The Sultan's Palace. ................. ........ 172
The Slaughter of the Janizaries ................. 173
Funeral of a Pasha ........................... 174
A January Thaw in Constantinople. ............... 175
Feeding Pigeons at the Mosque................ 176
Sweetmeats for Little Turks ................. 177
Reading Newspapers in a Caf6 ................ 178
Turkish Stock Exchange...................... 179
The New Stamboul Fire Brigade ............. 180
The Bangle-seller............................ 183
Moslem Pilgrims on the Black Sea Steamer..... 185
The Popoffka Novgorod ".................. 186
A Tartar Mail-carrier......................... 187
The Port of Batoum ........................... 188
Map of Overland Routes to India.............. 189
A Town in Georgia .......................... 190
An Inhospitable Reception. .................... 191
Russian Soldiers at Tiflis. .................... 193
Daily Parade of Prisoners..................... 194
Fatma, the Heroine of Kurdistan ............. 195
Baku, and the Petroleum Wells ............... 197
Persian Method of Churning ..... ........... 198
Playing Chess at a Persian Khana............. 199
View of Teheran ........................... 202
Performing Monkeys........................ 203
A Persian Lady in Street Costume............. 204
Peasant Women.............................. 204
Parsee Musicians Saluting the Rising Sun ...... 205
Parsee Children ............................. 206
Nusr-ed-deen, Shah of Persia ................. 207
Persian Mother, Child and Nurse.............. 209
One of the Shah's Palaces. .................. 210
Pipe-bearer ............ ..................... 2. 11
A Persian Interior ........................ 212
Mohammedan Dervishes.................... 213
A Warning to Robbers ....................... 214
Traveling by Kedshawech ...................... 215
Krasnovodsk................................... 217
On I he Russian Transcaspian Railway......... 220
Singing Dervishes at Kizil-Arvat ............... 221
Russian Mail-post from Khiva ................ 222
IHorse-shoeing, Russo-Turkoman Style ........ 223
3Mud Huts in a Tekk6 Turkonian Village ...... 224
A Turkoman Kibitka...................... 225
A Turkoman Family Going to Market ......... 227
Weighing Baggage on the Persian Frontier. .... 228
Turkoman Raiders, and the Tower of Refuge 229
Camel-race at M eshed....................... 230
Meshed. the IIoly City......................... 231







ILL US TR A TIONS.


Budd's Mount... ......................
A Camp Supper. .................... .....
The Boundary Commissioners at Work ........
An April Snow-storm .....................
Afghan Lightning Express ...................
Traveling with Mules and Yaks ...............
Afghan Horsemen. ......................
Abldurrahmian Khan, Ameer 1f Afg'hanistan....
Thie (itadel of Herat..........................
Forilications of ('andlh;iar...................
Meeting of Four Streets, Candalatr. ..........
The Environs of Candalhar ...................
An Afghan Laundr. .......................
Between C(andahar and Quettah ...............
Afghani D)wellings. .... ............. ......
Fortifications of Queltah ....................
Thle Hlead of Bolan Pass......................
Portable Railroad, in tie( Bolan Pass...........
The EnglMis Iail;way through Bolan Pass...... :
Indian Bullock Vans................. .......
Saved by a Lalniluergeyer................. .
Commissariat Train at Shikarpoor. .............
Indian Servants .............. ... ............ .
Ajmere, and thle Mayo College................ .
One of lle Beasts o, Burden............ ....
The Camp......... ............. .......... .
Turning out a Troullesome Tenant...........
A Shikarree......... ......... ............. .
Hunting with the Cheetah ................... .
Memorial of the Indian 3lutinyi, at Cawnpore... 2
A Mohammedan Mosque at Lucknow........ 2
An Elephant that Killed Seventeen Men........ 2
An Opium Fleet on the Ganges............... 2


The Ganges at Benares ........27.... ...... 271
Indian Lepers at Allahabad ................... 272
On Bhendy Bazaar Road.................... 273
The Bombay Post-of!ice...................... 275
A "Menagerie Race......................... 276
The Cave-temples of Elephanta ................ 277
The Zoological Gardens .............. ........ 279
An Elephantine Tug-of-war ................... 280
Worship of the Goddess Kali .................. 281
A Fe;at of Swordsmanship.................. 283
A Reluctant Passenger........................ 286
On the Red Sea............................ 287
Mrecca Pilgrims on the Suez Canal ............ 288
'ridge and Barracks at Cairo.................. 289
The Mummy of Sesostris ...................... 290
The Temple under the Sphinx................ 91
Tewfik I., Khidive of Egyptt................. 292
The Rebuilding of Alexandria ............... 293
Jaffa, from the South ........................ 294
Jerusalem, from the lount of Olives ........... 295
The Church of the Ioly Sepulchre ............ 297
A Street in Jerusalem. .................. .. 98
Interior of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre.. 299
The Mosque of Omar................... ...... 300
Ancient Scroll of the Pentateuch.............. 301
Mount of Olives by Moonlight ................ 302
The Garden of Gethsemane ..................... 303
Bethlehem .................. .. ........... 305
Bathing-place on the Jordan.................. 306
The Dead Sea.............................. 307
Malta ................ .................... 309
The "City of Rome" entering New York
Bay........ .......................... 11
























CHAPTER I.
Ti- TrITEE YOrNG TRAVELFRS-IOW TiIE EXPEDITION WAS PLANNED-A ROMANTIC FA;Mr;;E
1-HsToIIY-Tl T LOST SISTEIR-THE ROUTE TO INDIA AND BAC -'AI'TAIIN 'ITAIIUCK'S
ADVICE--llo 'To TI'REL--TIIE DAY OF DEPARTURIE--GOOD-BY !-T-l'E STEA.UERo SAILS-
TIE JOURSiNEY iS BIGOUN.

O NE fine ,i 1..... to ward the latter part of May, in the year 1885, Buddleigh
Starbuck, familiarly known as Budd, rushed excitedly from his father's house
in the upper part of New York city, and made for the Harlem River by a short cut.
He went in search of his cousin, Guy Bronson, whom he soon found at one of the
boat-houses.
"Guy," he exclaimed, breathlessly, "have you heard the news?"
"No. What ?"
Why, your brother Ray has gone stark mad."
"Oh, drop your everlasting yarns, and come for a row up to King's Bridge."
"No, Guy, this is straight. Ray is half crazy with delight. There's the '.;.. -
kind of news. You know what the--I mean my father has been talking about so
long ? Well, it's just as good as decided. We're going abroad We're going around
the world in eighty days. We're going to cross the ocean, climb the Alps, sit cross-
legged with the Turks, club dates off the palm -trees, ride camel-back, hunt loyal
Bengal tigers, and-"
"Budd, has Uncle Jack, really and honestly, made up his mind to let us go?"
"Yes. He's talking with Ray about it now. You may drop me off Iligh lBridge if
he don't intend to pack us off on our travels-all three of us-and that right soon."
Great Scott Let's go back to the house."
Guy Bronson was a boy of few words; but his heart beat tremendously with the
excitement of the approaching realization of his fondest dream, as the two walked
back up the hill.
Raymond and Guy Bronson were brothers, and orphans. Their family history was
somewhat peculiar. They were the sons of an English officer, who, while stationed in
India, had wedded an American lady, a romantic religious enthusiast, who had devoted
several years of her life and a considerable portion of her wealth to missionary work
amongst the Hindoos. The first child born to Major Bronson and iis American wife
was a girl, and died before it was a year old. The Indian climate having gradually






AMJUSIXU ADVENTURES


reduced Mrs. Bronson to the condition of an invalid, a change was demanded, and she
reluctantly decided to return to the United States. Her husband, to accompany her,
resigned his commission in the army, engaged in business in New York, and finally
became an American citizen. Two sons-the Raymond and Guy of our narrative-
were born in New York. While the younger was an infant, the mother died; and
two years later the father followed her.
'The boys, with the moderate fortune falling to their inheritance, were left in
charge of Captain Starbuck, their mother's half-brother. Captain Starbuck was said
by every one to be "a character." In his youth he had followed the sea, and its
breeziness and saltiness lingered about him ever afterward. In the War of the Re-
bellion he had gained his title of captain, and he wore it like a true soldier. He had
also been a great traveler, or "globe-trotter," as he expressed it, and loved to talk
over his varied experiences in outlandish quarters of the globe. Prosaic but profitable
pursuits of commerce later occupied his energies, and at fifty years of age he found
himself a wealthy, jovial citizen, with
a family consisting of a promising son



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Budd Starbuck made his startling announcement to his cousin Guy, the captain ter-
minated the feverish impatience of these young gentlemen by summoning them, in
company with Raymond, to the library.
Well, my hearties," he began, bluntly. "do you think you are men enough to
go alone ? Ray is nearly twenty-one, and has just got through college. (hGv is
seventeen, and bent upon being a naturalist; and lie is in no hurry to enter college
until he has made more preparation in his special studies. And Budd -ah, Budd!
I'm afraid you will never be a student. Anyway, you couldn't pass the entrance
examination if you were to try, for which I am sorry to say you show no impatience.
Now, I am for giving you all a year or so of a new kind of schooling, of which
we have talked for some time past. I mean foreign travel. You ought to see
something of the world. It will make men of you. Raymond, you think you can
manage to go to India, and come back with a whole skin ?"
Yes, sir," replied Ray, with determination; for he had already considered and
talked over the matter with his uncle. The younger boys exchanged stares of
amazement. They had thought of London and Pal;s, and possibly Switzerland; but
India had been beyond their wildest hopes and dreams.
"And you think, Raymond, that you can look after your brother and Budd,
besides shouldering the business responsibilities of the trip ?"
"I am ready to try i'. sir."
Then you shall. So much is settled. Now for something in the nature of a
revelation, which will explain why I have fixed upon India as the goal of your
expedition. Twenty-three years ago, before any of you were born, and before the
Major and Mrs. Bronson left India, they lost their first child, as you know. She
was an infant not yet a year old, and had been intrusted to the care of a native
nurse. During the past few months, I have received strange news from correspondents
in Bombay-old friends of Major Bronson, who had long been trying to ascertain his
whereabouts, or that of his family. To make the story short, it appears that the
Indian nurse, on her deathbed, confessed to having practiced a cruel deception, by
substituting the little daughter of the Bronsons for another child of the same ago
and sex, which had died while in her charge, having been intrusted to her by an
English lady to whom she was excessively devoted. So the Bronsons came to America,
mourning their c'-ild as (lead, while little Ava, as they had named her, was reared
!by the English iadv as her own child. She is now a young woman, and is believed
to be still living in India, in total ignorance of her true parentage. So you see,
Raymond and Guy, your journey is to have a romantic and highly important object.
You go to find a long-lost sister, whom you have never seen; and to bring her
back with you to her family and inheritance. As there will be no extraordinary
urgency in the matter, beyond your natural impatience to look for the first time
upon your sister, you will be enabled to make your tour a comprehensive one, full
of interest and instruction; andt it is this consideration which has decided me to
allow my son Biudd to go with you. So now you have your work tmalped out for you
in general terms. Think it all over, and to-morrow we will begin arranging the details."
The boys did not sleep much that night. They talked of the mysterious sister,
of their coming adventures, aind the special pursuits proposed by each during their
travels, Raymond, who was ian e nthusiastic alnatellr photographer, said:
"If you fellows don't give me too much trouble and anxiety, I sliall get a
wonderful lot of negatives."






A J[USING A1D V'ENATURES


"And think of the specimens I shall collect!" exclaimed Guy, to whom every-
thing else in the world had to take a place subordinate to natural history.
"And what chances there will be to have fun everywhere !" was Bndd's enraptured
comment. "I mean to take my ...i,;, along."
Captain Starbuck had, in advance, very carefully thought out and weighed every
detail of the plan of travel which he lhcd presented to his son and nephews in the
ofl-hand, matter-of-fact style peculiar to him. Had it been possible, he would have
liked nothing better than to accompany the boys himself; but his business connections
forbade a long absence. Then the thought of engaging a tutor, or accomplished
mentor of sonic kind, suggested itself; but, besides the diffliclty of finding a suitable
person for this office, the captain did not, at heart, believe in putting what he regarded
as a handicap upon the boys' manly independence. A tutor, he thought, while he
might show his young charges many things, would at the same time prevent them
from seeing other things of equal or greater importance in their education in the
world's ways. He had the utmost confidence in Raymnond's judgment, character, and
general :. for the leadership of the expedition.
Having at last decided to allow his elder nephew to assume this important respon-
sibility, Captain Starbuck gave his suggestions as to the route. The return voyage
from India, it was evident, would have to be made by the regular and easy lines of
travel, if the object of the expedition was attained in the bringing home of Ava.
Any explorations or journeyings of a wild and adventurous nature would, therefore,
have to be included in the outward journey. The overland route, especially in view
of recent political and military events in Afghanistan and Southeastern Europe, was
certain to be full of interest to the young travelers; while the risk would not be
too great, according to the captain's estimate, made in remembrance of his own
adventurous boyhood. The line of the route, accordingly, was drawn through England,
France and Southern Europe with little deviation; from Constantinople, through Persia
and Afghanmistan, to the frontier of India, it became more tortuous; while the home-
ward course, via the Red Sea, Suez Canal, Holy Land, and Mediterranean Sea, taking
in most of the principal ports, but not going out of the limits of conventional
travel, resembled in its zigzaggienss the track of a will-o'-the-wisp.
In the course of his subsequent talks with the boys, while preparations for the
journey were busily going on, Captain Starbuck gave them a large amount of practical
counsel, which, being based upon his own personal experience, was as interesting as
it was valuable.
"The means and conditions of travel," he said, have been so extended and
improved of late years, that the possibilities are actually understated in Jules Verne's
ingenious story, "'Around the World in Eighty Days." It would be quite possible,
under favorable conditions, to circumnavigate the globe inside of seventy days. You
are not going around the world ; but, at a rough estimate, you will traverse 8,000
or 9,000 miles of the distance, and back. You are, however, prepared to pay your
way; and even the wildest portion of your route will be over comparatively beaten
paths. There will be a spice of adventure in your experiences. Possibly at times you
may find them over-spiced. But it may be truly said, in these days, that young men
of good constitution and good sense do not run very great risks in traveling."
How about foreign and barbarous languages?" asked Raylmond.
"'Oh, upon lhat point, you will suffer no serious inconvenience. The English
language is spoken pretty much everywhere nowadays; and you know a good deal of







AFLOAT AND J,JI(JJ7E.


college French. With the aid of what you pick up as you go along, you are sure
to understand and make yourselves understood.
"You will have a letter of credit," continued Uncle Jack, "for an amount of
money which I think will amply cover the entire expenses of your trip. This letter
of credit will be from a New York banking house which has correspondents in the
principal cities and ports of Europe and the East. You will thus be spared the risk
of carrying large sums of currency about your person, and the annoyance of waiting, at
various stages of your journey, for remittances from home. As a matter of precaution,
I think I will provide you with passports. Many people go abroad without these
documents, and never need them; but it is a matter of prudence to be equipped
with one. As the Texan said of his revolver: 'I may not want it at all-probably
sha'n't; but if I do want it, I shall want it awful bad, I tell you.'
"Start out with light hearts and light baggage. As to clothing, two suits and
a good overcoat apiece, with a good supply of undergarments, will be the basis; for
your wardrobe can be replenished at any of the cities through which you will pass.
Only you must have some tough linen, specially made up to resist the terrific ordeal
of the wash. In some parts of the East, for instance, they lay your garments out on
the rocks, and pound them with clubs. Sometimes they fill them with gravel, or put
in a rough stone weighing a pound or two, and then batter them against a log with
the fury of a man killing a boa-constrictor. Even the toughest shirt, under this
treatment, comes to an untimely end in the rag-bag.
"You cannot carry a library with you; but I will select for you a few books
and maps descriptive of the countries which you are to traverse. I predict that Ray
will have many a struggle with his photographic paraphernalia; but if he insists upon
taking it with him, that must be his lookout."
After several talks and councils of war like the above, the boys felt that, so far
as practical knowledge of the art of travel was concerned, they were amply equipped
for a voyage around the world-a self-confidence which was destined to be somewhat
diminished long before they got to the borders of Asia.
Meantime, however, they were great heroes among their young friends and relatives,
who looked upon them as juvenile Stanleys and Livingstones.
At last all preparations were comnlhted, and the day of departure came. It
was a sunny Saturday, early in June. In a carriage with Captain Starbuck they left
the house. Mrs. Starbuck preferred to take leave of her son and nephews there,
because, as she said, the parting on shipboard always seemed to her a heartrending
affair. As the carriage drove off, she stood on the portico, surrounded by her
daughters and their young companions, waving a long adieu until the vehicle was
out of sight.
Passage for the young travelers had been engaged on the Oregon, of the Cunard
Line. The Oregon, which now lies a sunken wreck off the coast of Long Island, was
then the fastest of the transatlantic steamers, and a noble specimen of naval archi-
tecture. Two staterooms had been engaged for the party-one to be occupied by
Guy and Budd; the other by Raymond, with the personal luggage of the three.
The drive to the Cunard dock, on the North River, was not much enlivened by
talk, even Budd being strangely silent; for the partings of friends are always solemn,
particularly when oceans are to roll between.
At the dock, however, the excitement, and hurry, the crowds of passengers,
spectators, carriages, sailors, and stevedores struggling with baggage, interested and










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LAST ADIEUX IN THE CABIN OF THE STEAMIEE
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AFLOAT AND ASHOlRE.


enlivened the boys. They went on board, located their staterooms, and then saw
down in the luxurious cabin-saloon to watch the arrival of their fellow- passengers.
and have a last talk with Captain Starbuck, who had loaded them with sweeticeatl
and fruits for the voyage. The place was full of flowers, and the air was heavy
with perfumes. Good-byes, accompanied with kisses and tears, were everywhere heard
an l seen in the crowds of well-dressed people who sat and stood about.
"I wish they wouldn't!" said Budd, in a choked voice, so tragic that the others
burst into laughter.
The officers, in their best uniforms, stood at the gangway; stewards flow about
with bundles and bags; and the mighty steam-pipes roared with impatience.
"Ring the bell 1" suddenly shouted the first officer.
"Now for the shore! All visitors ashore !" echoed a quartermaster, in stentorian
tones, as, with tremendous energy, he rang a huge dinner-bell.
There was more fervid hand shaking, then a grand rush down the gangplank.
The great funnel emitted black clouds of smoke. The captain and the pilot stood on
the bridge, and the first officer in the bows. The last mail-bags were thrown aboard.
"Let go there !"
Off slip the enormous cables; while the passengers, crowded on the decks, shout
their last words to the friends who stand on the dock, waving handkerchiefs and hats.
"Good-by, father '" Good-by, Uncle Jack !" "Take care of yourself! You'll
be in London in nine days! Be sure and write!" "Don't get seasick !"
These, and a hundred similar admonitions, died on the strong breezes of the
Hudson as the great engines began their vibrations, and the huge bl;ek hulk of
the Oregon moved majestically out into the middle of the rLeur, and headed for the
Narrows. The journey was begun.




CHAPTER TT.
DowN TIE BAY --LIBERTY'S PEDESTAL- LAST GLIMPSE OF CONEY SLTAND-T) TrDD TR SEA-
SICK -Tit'ANQUIL DAYS- DIVERSIONS ON SIIIBOARD- SnUirLEuOARD- SEA-YAIRNS- NTER-
TAINMENT IN TIE SALOON--"LAND IN SIGIIT "- QUEENSTOVx-LANDED AT LIVERPOOL.

T IE Oregon mov d swiftly down New York Harbor. As she passed Bedloc's Island,
where the ,nii;i. .i i pedestal for Bartholdi's colossal statue of "LibertyN Enlighlt-
ening the World" was beginning to loom up imposingly, three cheers were given, and
Ray added:
"May the Statue herself, holding her electric torch, light our return !"
Off Sandy Hook, where the steamship channel leading from the Harbor ends in
soundings of ninety feet, a short stop was made to allow the pilot to disembark ; then
the engines began again, not to stop until the coast cf Ireland should be under the
bows. Whenever the young travelers happened to look into the engine-room, nighr,
or day, the great pistons were working like tireless, superhuman monsters, while half-
naked firemen shoveled coal in the glowing depths.
As flat Coney Island became a faint strip to the westward, and the Navesink
Highlands melted into clouds, the boys observed a Rockeaway excursion steamer, and a
flotilla of garbage-scows, the latter dumping the city's refuse into the dark-green ocean







16 AM U N A A SIv T 7 .E

"The last visible link between us and Now York," said Ray, as they leaned over
the rail.
SA squadron of the United States Navy," observed Guy.
"Don't run down your country. You may be glad enough to get back to it,'
Budd broke in. "'Besides, that navy joke is an old chestnut."
Master Buddleigh was rapidly recovering his spirits; and the vessel was scarcely
nit of sight of land before that youth had made the acquaintance e of a dozen o;


















THE PEDESTAL OF BARTHOLD'S STTUE OF "LIBEETY, ON BEDLOES' ISLN .



more passengers, whom he entertained by singing one of his choice Ethiopian melodies:
to the accompaniment of his banjo :
I heard dis idea from a preacher :
He 'lowed dat dis life was a stream,
An' every one's soul was a steamer
Dat run wid a full head o' steam.
Dat sonic ob 'em's only side-wheelers,
'\hile others am monstrously fine;
An' ce trip am made safest an' c;iickest
By de boats ob de Methodis' line."

Twenty-four hours later, he furnished infinite merriment to his compa'aons by
snrrendering to the demon of seasickness. Poor Budd was really a pitiful object as he
leaned dejectedly over the side of his berth and refused food. Ray and Guy manifested
a great deal of solicitude for him, particularly as they were in momentary fear of an
attack of nausea themselves. On the second day out the wind blew what the captain
called ".half a gale." To the young travelers it seemed a hurricane. The
snapped and whistled, the sea swept over the bows. The steamer, which at the dock
had seemed so massive and immovable, was tossed about like a skiff by waves which, if
not mountains high," rolled up in long, dark ridges sufficiently awe-inspiring to the
land ssen. When the vessel took a plunge into the trough of two of these seas, she
went dowe, down, like a falling mountain, so swiftly that it seemed impossible for her
wvent dew?', dlown, like a falling mountain, so swiftly that it seemed impossible for her














































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AMWTUSING ADVENTURES


ever again to lift herself out of the dark valley; but as she reached the depth, quiver..
ing from stem to stern, a deluge would break upon her, and, like a thing of life,
she vould lift her head and come up to another crest.
It was rare fun to sit at the table during this stormy spell. The comparatively
small number of passengers who braved the ordeal were either old "sea dogs," or else,
like Ray and Guy, came to laugh. It was an acrobatic feat merely to sit in one's
chair; and more than one unskillful passenger was seen to disappear suddenly under
the table, to emerge, perhaps, anointed with streams of soup or wine overturned upon
his devoted head. glasswaree swung in the racks overhead, and the waiters, clinging to
posts and chairs, balanced huge dishes on one hand, with the case of jugglers. And
yet the ship's of!ieers said this was a mere zephyr !
But between May and August, rough weather is the exception, and sunny caln the
rule. This was the case with the Oregon's voyage. Bv the third day the quick intimacy
Ocean travel was generally established amongst the passengers. It was a mixed but
interesting company. There were New York families taking their regular trip abroad;
buyers for the great business houses; a group of opera-singers; some young artists
going to Paris; two schoolmistresses going for a two months' tour in Germany; and a
great number of those amiable but -,,parently aimless people whom one invariably meets
when traveling.
The days passed tranquilly, and there were plenty of diversions. One day the boys
made kites, which would soar delightfully for a few minutes, and then make a fatal
dive into the rigging. Quoits were played with rings made of cordage. The game of
-..!1 1 1, combining exercise and amusement, was also popular, on pleasant after-
noons. A square divided into sections was chalked upon the deck, with semicircles at
!c.h en1d, one marked "10 on," and the other "10 off." The sections were numbered
,ronm to 10, and the object of the game was to slide wooden disks along the deck
with a paddle in such a way that they should fall into the sections without touching
,te divisional lines. Sides were formed-for instance, Guy and Budd against Ray and a
young college professor whose acquaintance they had formed on board. Each side had
four disks, or two for each player. The Professor, having the first play, projects his
disk in "10 off," which diminishes his score by that number; but perhaps Ray can
knock it into the section numbered 9, which is then accredited to their side, unless
their disks are demoralized by the subsequent play of Guy and Budd. The rolling and
pitching of the ship compels great nicety of calculation, and makes the game exceed-
ingly interesting.
Sometimes a low-lying bank of clouds would be mistaken for "Land ho !" or the
discovery of a distant sail would cause a general rush to the side of the ship. Once a
steamer passed within signaling distance, and, by means of little flags run up on the
:.alyards, quite a conversation was carried on between the two vessels. Occasionally a
.aim line of smoke or a phantom-like sail would vaguely appear, and the next moment
ce lost to sight.
"I believe there are ghosts on the sea, as well as on land," said Budd, musingly.
';Think of the number of ships that go out and never return."
There is at least one old reliable sea phantom-the Flying Dutchman," replied Ray.
"Wagner put him in an opera, didn't he ?" asked Guy.
"Yes; in the first important one he composed. Wagner was a young man when
he left his home in Germany, and went to France by sea, in a sailing-vessel; they
encountered the wildest kind of weather, and the young composer's imagination was












.-. ":





4P


y ~ ~


LOUGII WVEATIIEII-DISNEI; ULNil).I I)FI'ICLLTIES


V


Irk qv.


'-''
i'
C--s:1-1--~S
-5,







AMUSING J )VEXT URES


taken with the weird legend of the Flying Dutchman, which he heard for the first t:me
while tossing on the North Sea. It is indeed very striking. According to the tradition,
you know, a Dutch navigator named Vanderdecken, on a homeward voyage from India,
encountered heavy weather which roused all his Dutch courage and bravado. Instead
of putting into port, as he was advised to do, lie swore a very profane oath that lie
world beat around the Cape if it took hin until the Day of Judgment. The super-
natural powers took him in hand, and lie has been heating against head winds ever
since. His sails are in shreds, and his whole ship is white with age. IHe and his crew,
v:th lives supernaturally prolonged, strive in vain to heave to or lower a boat. Sometimes


1n


C.\il WE.ATIER.-A GAME OF SHUFFLEBOARD ON DECK.


grisly eld Captain Vanderdecken hails passing vessels through his trumpet, and implores
them to take letters home for him."
"The Orgoni is a mail steamer-perhaps he may overhaul us," observed Budd.
"I hope not, for the appearance of the phantom ship presages an impending dis-
aster, and paralyzes the sailors with fear."
The Professor, who had listened to the conversation, now joined it, saying:
"Who knows but that there may be islands and ports quite as mysterious as tile
phantom ships, whence the latter come and go on ghostly voyages ? Able writers h, ve\
undertaken to demonstrate that. at a former period of the earth's history, sea and lani.







AFLOAT AN D ASHORE.


'ave changed places; that the continents now separated by the Atlantic Ocean were
one body of land, until rent asunder by an earthquake; and that Atlantis, the great
island which Plato says was the ancient seat of civilization, has been swallowed uu in
u lidocean."
Often in the evening, the boys would assemble in the stateroom of one of the
officers, to whom Captain Starbuck had given them a personal introduction, and listen
to sea-yarns by the hour.
"The ocean is so tame nowadays," Budd complained. "No more pirates, nor sea-
fights, nor mutinies, nor anything. They are even trying to make out that the sea-ser-
pent exists only in imagination. Yes, ocean travel is getting to. be as tame as the
Hoboken Ferry."
"You didn't seem to find it tame the other night," Guy responded, "when you
howled for basins, insisted that the ship was going to the bottom, and believed you were
dying of seasickness."
And the laugh was upon poor Budd.
"There is as much romance and tragedy on the sea as ever," said one of the
officers, as he smoked his short black pipe-"as much as Marryatt and Cooper and
Clark Russell have put into their stories, only perhaps not just in the shape that they
describe it. As to mutinies, there are plenty of them yet. Crews rise against captains,
especially brutal ones, murder them, loot the ships, take them to some little-known
port, and disperse with their plunder, leaving nobody the wiser. Sometimes one vessel
sees another go down in a tempest, and can do nothing to rescue the poor creatures
who wildly appeal for help from the deck of the doomed one. Then, there are the
icebergs; and, worse still, floating wrecks, drifting from one side of the ocean to the
other, dashing suddenly out of the haze and darkness of midnight to startle some
nodding lookout, or, perhaps, to send down into the depths a stanch, laden craft,
whose fate will for ever remain a mystery."
"Three years ago," said another officer, when I was on a British merchant
steamer, we encountered a water- logged Frmnch brigantine in idorealn. It was a
stormy night, and we poured two or three barrels of odI on the boiling waves, to allay
them a little, so that our
ship's boat could approach
tie wreck. Well, we man-
a ed to save all those French- '.
men except the captain and -
his little son, and the first
mate. The two men were
crazy with rum ; and having
locked the poor little lad in
the cabin to prevent his res-
cue, they defied us from the '
deck, and refused to ]i..'.'
for the lifeboat. We spent
over an hour trying to illn-
-uce them to save themselves
and the boy, but it was no- ...
,ise. The gale was blowing
fiercer every minute, and A YARNS.








23 Ij iUI A D VYE SiTU 7R "

1'n:allv we had to return to the steamer and ruesulie our course, leaving them to their
f:teo. As we pulled awav. a 11 i of lightning gave us a last glimpse of the hull slowly
rising on a mighty surge, while the two madmen danced wildly on the deck."


:.GKEND OFi Tl HE'ININ DUTCIHMAN.


Tales like this whiled away the long evening, and sent the young landsnen
shiiddelring to their blerths.
Tolwalrd the end of tho -vovlage, aIn entertainment was given in the saloon for the
benefit ol tle lesttitie plumnbers' assistants of Liverpool, or some other presumnllaly
des'ervinl charity. All the talent on boardd,including Budd with his banjo, volunteered


------~
~-- ~-~~--~-~---~-~ -- --~-


r


r







AFLOAT A4ID ASHORE.


for the occasion. Perhaps the most oni.,.. 11. feature of the programme, however, was
an accidental one-the ignominious collapse of a youth who came forward and sang:

A life on the o-ho-cean wave,
Ak home on the r-r-rolling di-d-

and then surrendered to a sudden overmastering fit of seasickness.
At last, early on a foggy Saturday morning, the announcement of "Land in sight !"
stirred up a wondrous excitement and activity amongst the Oregon's passengers. Our
three young travelers rushed on deck, and with some difficulty discerned the dim out-
lines of a headland of the Irish coast. Had it been night-time, they would have beheld
the gleam of the Fastnet Light, the first to welcome incoming vessels from the west.
For nearly half the day they kept in view the Irish coast, the green turf of which, in
some places, resembled the richest velvet. In the afternoon they reached Queenstown.
The transatlantic voyage is reckoned from Sandy Hook to Kinsale Head, at the entrance
to Queenstown Harbor, and rice versa ; and the Oregon had made it in six days and
sixteen hours. The fastest trip on record was about ten hours quicker.
The mails were landed at Queenstown.
"They will get to London before we get to Liverpool," said Ray, wishing to air the
information he had lately obtained from the Professor.
"How ?" asked Guy and Budd.
"They are taken from here to Dublin on a fast train called the 'Wild Irishman,'
thence across the Irish Channel in a swift boat to Holyhead, and through Wales and
England by another lightning train, the Flying Dutchman,' to London. We shall not
land in Liverpool until to-morrow, about noon; and by that time these mails will all
be distributed in London."
The above programme was carried out, and on the eighth day after leaving New
York the three American boys landed in Liverpool. As seen through a drizzling rain,
it had a dingy, commercial look, much like an American seaport. After a lively episode
with a customs inspector, who mistook Ray's camera for an infernal machine, and Guy's
tin specimen-cases for boxes of dynamite, the boys found themselves comfortably installed
in a hotel at the Lime Street Station, and quite unable, as yet, to realize that they were
in a foreign land. Nevertheless, it was a fact that they had already passed over 3,000
miles of their journey to India, and were not to see the ocean again until many a
month had passed, and many a strange country been traversed.







a A UsI' \ Ai A D VEa T U RE


CHAPTER III.

BUDD AS A COeTC'Y--ON To "LuNNoN"--IN A FOG-REUNION AT TIE LANGIHAM- OUT
SIGHITSEEING- THE PROFESSOR AGAIN-ODD FACTS ABOUT LONDON-VISIT TO TIE TOWER
--WESTMINSTER A3BBEY-TIIE HOUSES OF PARLIAMENT-A GLIMPSE OF QUEEN VICTORIA
-THE PRINCE AND PRINCESS OF WALEs-LONDON SIGHTS AND EXCURSIONS-OFF oFOR
THE CONTINENT.
t" T-I say, look 'ere, you bloomink cove! 'Ave you got the brawsses for the luggage ?
I i We're hoff for Lunnon this harfternoon, at arf past two, don't you know !"
It sounded like Budd's voice, in the corridor of the hotel, the morning after their
arrival; and Budd it was, mimicking the English accent which he heard on every side,
and which seemed like anything but an academic pronunciation of the mother-tongue.
They had decided to leave Liverpool on the day after their arrival, there being few
notable sights there save the vast docks. Accordingly, they left by an afternoon train
on the London and Northwestern Railway. The scenery of the Midland Counties of
England, as viewed through the windows of the railway carriage, was verdant and
interesting: the green hedgerows, stately mansions and parks, and bits of quaint archi-
tecture constantly reminding the young Americans that they were in the mother
country. The large towns passed were mostly devoted to manufacturing industries, and
were wrapped in clouds of mingled smoke and fog.
But _ondon When our three merry voyagers arrived there early in the evening,
after a four or five hours' journey, alighting at the Euston Square Station, they seemed
,o have entered a veritable world of shadows. The London fog-dense, opaque and
jellowish-cnveloped everything, and the street lamps themselves were almost invisible.
"'What a mist-crious place !" exclaimed Budd.
"It certainly is extraordinary," said Ray. "If this is the regular atmosphere holo,
w3 may jeel London, but we shall never bu able to see it."
"I wonder if Dick Whittington, when he came to London with that celebrated cat
of his, landed in such a fog as this ?"
"lie certainly saw his way clearer after a while, or he would never have got to bc
Lord Mayor. But, I say, where's Guy ?"
Why, I thought he was on the other side of you," exclaimed Budd, in alarm. "If
not, then he's lost in these clouds."
"uv oh, Guy they shouted, with no other result than being told to "move







AFLOAT A ND A SHORE.


on," by a policeman who emerged from the fog, close to where they were standing
Finally Ray said:
"Guy is all right. He is certain to turn up at the Langham Hotel, for we had
made up our minds to go there, as Uncle Jack advised us. It is a kind of head-
quarters for Yankees in London."
After looking to the baggage, they hailed a hlnisom cab, of the pattern lately
imported into New York, and were quickly driven to the Langham, in Portland Place,


TILE GREAT FIRE OF LONDON, 1666.


only a short distance from the railway station. Guy was not there; but just as they
were beginning to feel uneasy about him, lie arrived, and at once exclaimed :
"Al, I've found you at last! You two are a constant source of anxiety to me.
How did you contrive to lose yourselves?"
That's cool, when y oi were the lost sheep yourself. Let us try to stick together
her( i I. i ."
The next morning was pleasant and sunny, and tlhe three boys started out in high
spirits to see London. Armed with guide-book and map. they mounted the box-seat of
ai omnibus, in order to get a general view of the city. In this way, by changing







AMUSING ADVENTURES


omnibus several times, they made their first acquaintance with Cheapside, Ludgate Till,
Fleet Street, Pall Mall, Piccadilly, Oxford Street, and other main thoroughfares; passing
many a historic building or locality which they readily recognized from pictures they
had seen. Ray was just pointing out the great dome of St. Paul's Cathedral from
Ludgate Hill, when Budd, who was looking at the thronged sidewalk, exclaimed:
"There's the Professor!"
Sure enough, the young professor whose acquaintance the boys had made on board
the Oregon, was leisurely walking in the direction of the Strand, observing the sights as
he went along. His fellow-voyagers instantly jumped down from the omnibus, and there
was a cordial meeting.
"I am on my way to visit the Tower of London," said the Professor. "If you
have no other engagement, we can make up a party. The Tower, you know, is the
most ancient and celebrated fortress, not only of London, but of all Great Britain. It
would make a most appropriate beginning of your sight-seeing."
The three eagerly accepted the invitation.
"Come along, then.
'This is the way
To Julius Caesar's ill-erected Tower,' "

weplied the Professor, quoting Shakespeare's "Richard II." (ACT V., SCEXE I.)
"Did Julius esar build it ?" asked Guy.
"Tradition says that he began it during the Roman occupation, dating from the
year 54 B. c.; but its records do not go back so far. The most ancient portions of it
now visible were built in A. D. 1078."
On the way to the Tower, the Professor gave them what Budd privately style
'solid chunks of information" about the "Modern Babylon" of to-day.
"Just how large London is," said the Professor, "one cannot say, because there
s no definite boundary-wall or limit. It is a great province, covered with houses and
ti reets, extending about fifteen miles from east to west, and ten miles from north to
south, on both sides of the Thames River. Counting in all the suburbs, and the entire
territory covered by the London police system, the population of Greater London,'
according to the census of 1881, was 4,700,601. The aggregate length of all its streets,
lanes and courts, it is stated, is nearly 30,000 miles; so that very few persons, even life-
long residents, have ever seen all of London. The local divisions of the city are
extremely puzzling. A friend of mine, a Londoner, at whose house I am stopping, said
to me this morning, when I asked him where his house was located: 'The deeds of
my house state at Upper Tooting. The postal authorities say at Balham. The taxing
masters say Clapham. The rating people say Battersea. The local directory says Wirn
bledon and Putney. If I pay my taxes I must go to Clapham. If I pay the gas 1
must go to Bermondsey. If I pay the water-rate I must do so at Kingston-on-Thames.
To pay local rates I must go to Battersea. If I give a vote for a member of Parlia-
ment I must vote in Clapham division. If I look out in front of the house, Wands-
worth Common is two hundred yards in front of me, and Battersea two miles beyond
that. If I look oat at the back of the house, Upper Tooting Park is only fifty yards
from me. If I walk to the end of my road I am then in the parish of Wandsworth
If I go to the other end of the road I am in Streatham. If I cross over the road 1
.in in Battersea. If I get over my garden wall I can sit on a post with a part ot my
body in three or four parishes at the same moment.' Awkward. isn't it ?






AFLOAT AND ASHORE.


"The social centre of London is IIyde Park Corner; the commercial centre, the
Bank of England, in Threadneedle Street; the railway centre, Claphain Junction; and
the cab centre, Charing Cross. Belgravia, May Fair, South Kensington and Tyburma
are the four districts which comprise the fashionable residence portion of London;
Chelsea and Brompton may also be included in this category, though until lately they
were considered as suburban districts. But we are climbing the Tower Hill, and there
is the entrance to the Tower itself."
At the Lions' Gate, a small group of people were waiting to make 'ip a party


THE TOWER OF LONDON


of twelve, which the boys' arrival completed. Each one having paid a shilling, the party
was taken charge of by a "Beef-eater"-one of these medieval-looking old soldiers
Dressed in emblazoned crimson tunics, knee-brccches, and curious round black hatp
decked with ribbons, who act as warders.
The Tower is a very complex affair-in fact, a small fortified city, with a whole
family of minor towers within its inclosure. In walking through its gloomy passages,
antique chambers, walled courts and winding stairs, all packed full of historic relies, the
visitors seemed. transported back to the England of Shakespeare's time and of Shake-
speare's historical plays. Here was the ancient moat, now a garden; there the Traitors
Gate, where once the severed heads of prisoners were stuck upon the palings.
"And look 1" exclaimed Guy, in an awe-stricken voice, as he paused at the archuia







AMUSING AD VENTURES


entrance to a dark, dismal passageway-"' here
is the Bloody Tower-the very place where
the young princes were murdered by order of
hunchbacked King Richard III."
The White Tower, built by William the
Conqueror in 1078, and now filled with arms
and armor, antique and modern, was closed to
the sightseers.
"You know some misguided anarchist
tried to blow up the place with dynamite last
January," said the Professor. "The damage
has just been repaired. and the authorities are
very suspicious of strangerss"
"They have a sharp eye on us all the
time," whispered tiudd, "to see that we don't
slip an infernal machine under one of the
towerr"


GATEWAY OF 'ITE BiOOa)Y TOWEIR.


The prisons of Anne Boleyn, Lady
Jane Grey, Sir Walter Raleigh, and
other famous personages; the Council
Chamber of the Kings of England,
where great scenes of history were once
enacted; and St. Peter's Church, where
many celebrated Tower victims are
buried, were seen. The Crown jewels
and regalia were not on exhibition in
the Wakefield Tower as formerly; but
the banners, weapons, arms and armor
of all periods of English, and all the
famous wars, possessed a much more
thrilling interest for our young Amer-
iCIL S.
ict's.
Later, the party visited Westmin-
s'er Abbey and the Houses of Par-
liament. The Abbey, with its beautiful
(Gothic towers, its :- i [. -;. and vener-
able nave, its tombs and monuments,
and atmosphere of antiquity, impressed
them with more charm of the mother
country's noble historic associations
than anything else t:hov saw in England.
"1This fascination of antiquity,"
remarked the Prof ,ssor, "is something


A a I '-EI TEA.






AFLOAT AN D ASHORE.


which our own dear country lacks, and must wait for. It will come with time, Out
cannot be bought with money nor manufactured to order."
In the Poets' Corner, in the south transept, amidst tombs and monuments inscribed
with great names of all ages, from Chaucer to Dickens, the Americans paused with
pride and reverence before the marble bust of our own poet Longfellow.
Close by the Abbey, between it and the Thames, stand the noble Houses of Parlia-
ment, sometimes called the New Palace at Westminster, because erected on the site of
the old Royal Palace at Westminster, burnt down in 1834.
"That must be the highest tower in the world!" exclaimed Guy, gazing with


in 4 I' -I
,. .,:~cdhZ- .
rip _-_








INTERIOR OF TIE IOUSE OF COIMMONS AFTER TUE DYNAMITE EXPLOSION, JANUAtRY 2-IT, 1885.


enthusiastic admiration at the stupendous Victoria Tower, as the party approached from
the Abbey.
"Let's see," said Ray, consulting that scarlet-clad guide, philosopher and friend,
known as Murray's guide-book. "It is just 340 feet high-though the vail of white
mist that hangs over it and all the rest of London makes it look at least five hundred.
That central spire is 300 feet high; and yonder, at the end opposite the Victoria
Tower, is the Clock Tower, 320 feet high. Those dials are 22 feet in diameter-and
look here, what the guide-book says: 'The winding-up of the clock itself takes only ten






AMiUSING ADVENTURES


I ,,


~f F


ITEO OF ESTMINSTE ALL, HOUSES OF PALIMET

ThTEIlTOR1 OF WESTMINSSTER1 31&LL~, I1OT'SV.S flF P lEL.JAMENT


*'* ,' I


"~I~~






AFLOAT AND ASHORE.


i" i 'M "i 'i -- ... \"M l \"I"







"~~-, -_-





_an nickel-platd watch







e" im Bndd, who had h -
!inlte.; buctme 1110Ved A illwi-, the vg1laries of
ig parts tal o ]thoC irict, nu Yena his in-
lias to bne done twice a. week -..
milesIt seems to toequie the sost aansd -





gaine nearl hours nd

haroub to mplainedha tibe nse thiee oing






a little Amcri did nicot put on exiw a
It," rs a Satnl rday, o and, bthe-

Houses of theParliament being open iforl-

ii ~ :" .You expected too much o}f Ilhot
watchch" ]Ray 'epli-d, haghill. "\\Ve
publie inspection between thee thoursa
BUST OF LONGFELLOe t EST STE the 10 friend d 11

] have complained l:hecise thait p;(o(l

speed and keep ulp with thiIs ga i 1,
Swithouu oven anl occasional re-setting."
It wats a Satur d ay; and, the
Houses of Par'liamnent being open for
public inspection between the hours
BUST OF LONGFELLOW. IN "WESTMINXSTER ABBEY Of 10 and 4, our friends passed ill






AMlUSING AD VENTURES


through the Palace Yard entrance to the Octagon Iall, and thence to the House of
Commons on the left. It was a handsome apartment, not over seventy feet long, but lofty
and imposing, with several galleries, and with stained glass windows and oak carvings.
It is deserted now," explained the Profes'or, '"save for its stirring memories."
How many members are there in all ?" asked Ray.
Six hundred and seventy, under the redistribution of seats which has just taken












































new Parliament. Forty members are suf..cient to make 'a house."
with dynamite a few months ago. That would have been a very serious split indeed,"












I The infernal machine used on that occasion was placed on the steps of St. Stephon's
Afi











-f-
,_ _-,



SI T S 01 I -- -- I P ITY _
















ijew Parnliament. Forty members arc stflicient to make 'a ho.se."'
It is fortunate that the House was not ii session when the place was shattered
with dvniamitc a few months ago. That would hiaie been a very serious split indeed,"

C. l;le infernal machine used on that occasion was placcd on the steps of St. Ste-hen's







AFLOAT AiD ASHORE.


Crypt, which we will see after looking in at the House of Lords, where the Upper IIouse
of the British Parliament meets."
"Of what is the House of Lords composed ?"
"Of the lords, spiritual and temporal. The former are the archbishops and bishops
of England, who are only lords of Parliament, and not peers. The lords temporal are:
firstly, the peers of England, of Great Britain, and of the United Kingdom, of whom
there are at present 6 princes of the royal blood, 21 dukes, 20 marquises, 181 earls, 25
viscounts, and something over 250 barons; secondly, 10 representatives chosen from their
own body by the peers of Scotland for each Parliament; and thirdly, 28 representatives
of the Irish peerage, elected for life."
The carved, frescoed, and lavishly decorated hall of the Peers, where each detail


S"--" L I '"'


QUEEI:N VICTORIA REVIEWING TIIHE SOiDAN C(AMEI CORPS.

beautiful and intricate in itself, bore due part in the harmonicous nmagnificei of the
whole, is one of the richest legislative chambers in the world; and it impressed our
visitors as such.
"Not long ago," said Ray, "before the dynamite explosions had spurred the vigil-
ance of the warders of this place, a worthy countryman of ours strayed in here alone.
A party of distinguished people, arriving shortly afterward, were astounded and horrified
to see him seated cross-legged upon the throne, and in the act of taking a newspaper
out of his pocket to read !"
"'That is a specimen English story," observed the Proiessor, smiling; though it is
unfortunately a fact that some Americans come abroad without having ever learned how
to behave at home."







AMUSING ADVENTURES


"Is that really a throne ?" asked Guy, interested in seeing for the first time that
article of royal upholstery.
"Yes, and Queen Victoria, clad in her robes of state, sits upon it when she comes
here to open Parliament."
"I'd like to get a glimpse of a real live queen that could talk," murmured Budd,
wistfully.
"Well, you may possibly have that pleasure during your journey across Europe, for
there are still quite a large number of royal personages extant. As for Queen Victoria,
ahe is not at present in London, and probably would not be visible to us if she were. But,



,






-7
.'-- -, _. ~^-~-




T,,















TE PRiNCE AN- PfRTKC-E OF WA7FA AT T-RTIT COLLEGE, DUBLN.

by the fortunate chance of being acquainted with British army officers at present occn-
pying a distinguished position, I was enabled, last Monday, to see the Queen in person,
though at a distance. It was at Osborne House, her residence on the Isle of Wight, and
the occasion was her reception of the Soudan Camel Corps, who have just returned from
Egypt. She was dressed quite plainly, in black, and carried a parasol. I doubt if any.
body, even one of her own subjects, would have recognized the Queen in that stout,
matronly figure and somewhat reddish face. She is now sixty-six years old, and ascended
t'i throne of England when she was eighteen; consequently, two years from now, in
1387, she will colbrate the fiftieth year of her reign. Of late years, the Queen has led
i&87, she will elelbrate thle fiftieth year of her- reign. Of late years, the Queen has ]ed







AFLOAT AND ASHORE.


a very secluded life, rarely appearing in public except on state occasions. The principal
palaces of the Queen are: Buckingham Palace, St. James's Palace, and Kensington
Palace, in London; Windsor Castle, ten miles from London; Balmoral Castle, in the
Highlands of Scotland; and Osborne House, by the sea, on the Isle of Wight. The
Prince of Wales, heir-apparent to the throne, was born in 1841, and has not imitated
'his royal mother in her sombre and retiring mode of life. He is handsome and genial,
and will, perhaps, one day, make a popular King of England. The Princess of Wales,
as you know, is one of the beauties of the realm, though she has two grown-up sons,
and two tall, handsome daughters. She is just concluding her tour with the Prince in
Ireland, where she has quite won the gallant Irish heart by her 'wearing of the green.'"
"That reminds me," said Ray, carefully taking something from the breast-pocket of
his tweed traveling-jacket. "Look I a photograph of the Princess of Wales at Trinity
College, Dublin, where the Chancellor conferred the honorary degree of iMus. Doe. upon
her. I'm going to send this home, and I'm sure all the girls will say the Princess is
'just too sweet' in the collegiate cap and gown. The Prince sits by, rigged out in
similar fashion, looking somewhat bored, perhaps; but then, that sort of thing s his
regular occupation."
Two weeks of London life slipped away, with some dreamy days of sunshine, and
more or less rain and mist. They made one excursion to Seven Dials -the Five Points
of London-and came away saddened at the sight of the squalid and vicious population
which swarmed there like ants. Pleasanter were the jaunts to the suburbs-to Windsor,
Richmond, Twickenham, and Barnes, around by Clapham, Dulwich, Norwood, and the
Crystal Palace; and especially along the Thames, whose lovely windings, with frequent
villages and luxuriant meadows, always green with a vivid greenness which no climate
but that of the British Isles can boast of. The great oaks and willows sheltered the
most delightful nooks for Summer picnics; while the picturesque old barges, trim
racing-boats, and flocks of pleasure-skiffs and canoes gave animation to the scene.
And they glanced at ever so many more of the sights of London--the museums,
the picture-galleries, the wax-works, and the Thames Embankments, where the mate to
New York's Egyptian obelisk stands guarded by two sphinxes. But, as Ray said, they
wore only passing through London, not really seeing and studying and learning it.
When, at the end of their fortnight, they took their departure by the London, Chatham
and Dover Railway, a gentle feeling of regret tempered their eager anticipation of the
iolights of la h1l1e France and Paris the Gay: for one learns first to like London, and
en to grow foLd of her--fond of the fog itself.







aI M USI U AD V EA I'U i REu


CHAPTER IV.

RAY'S LETTER TO UNCLE JACK.
PAmIS, July 15th, 1885
FROM LONDON TO PARIS-FIRST IMPRESSIONS OF THE FRENCI CAPITAL-TIIE BOULEVARDS-
THE TUTLERIES-PLACE DE LA CONCORDE-BUDD GOES A-FISIIING -BREAFAST AT THE
PALAIS POYAL-THE CHAMPS ELYStES-THE ARC DE TRIOIMPHE-NOTRE DAME-TIHE PAN-
TIEON AND TIHE LATIN QUARTER-THE CATACOMBS-NAPOLEON'S TOMB--VERSAILLES -THE
NATIONAL FETE-PRESIDENT GREVY-AU REVOIR PARIS.

I)EAR UNCLE JACK.-Bonjour! We are Parisians. Two weeks here have quite
Frenchified us. Hereafter, we shall never pass a pond without casting wistful
and hungry eyes upon the frogs.
The journey here from London is only eleven hours long; yet the difference between
the two cities is so great, that we seem to have entered not merely a new country, but
a new planet. Everything here is sunny, bright-colored, full of gayety and style.
Yesterday was the great national fte -
But let me begin at the '. ,;I. i-,, and come to the flte in its proper order.
We came via Dover and Calais. The last we saw of old England was Dover Castle
defying the sea, and the chalk-white rock they call Shakespeare's Cliff looking majestic-
ally across the beautiful blue-green water toward the distant, cloud-like line, a little
darker than the sky, which we were told was France. The Channel was smilingly
deceptive. Before we got half-way across, the wind was blowing great guns, and the
littlee packet boat was frisky enough for any of us-too much so for poor Budd, who had
an hour or so of horrible seasickness. He thanked his stars that the remainder of our
journey to India was to be by land; otherwise, he wanted to proceed no further.
When we landed at Calais, there was a great deal of scrambling, and chattering in
all the modern European tongues. The officials were in uniform-also in good temper
so that we got our '. .. through all right. Instead of going through on the crowded
Paris train, we made up our minds to stay over in Calais until the next morning-
which our tickets gave us the privilege of doing. The town itself looked new, wooden,
and ui interesting; but it was such a hot, dusty day, and the bathing-beach looked so
tempting, that we couldn't resist the temptation of stopping for a dip in the salt water.
It was great fun. They use bathing-machines there-little bathing-houses on wheels,







AFLOAT AND ASHORE. 37








.-..-.-...-...--- i--
-- l.












THIE FIRST DAY IN FRANCE-SEA-BATHING AT CALAIS.

which are backed down into the water, with you inside ; and then dragged out again
by horses when you have finished dressing.
In the evening we went down to the quays to watch the shipment of a lot of
In the evening w\e went dowvn to the quay~s to watch thle shipment of ,z lof+ of


SHIPPING NORMAN HORSES AT CALAIS.






A Jf USIX/ A D VTXT UR _E,1S


superb Norman draught-horses for England. It was something like Rosa Bonheur's
picture of The Horse Fair," only more exciting. What with the flaring torch-lights,
the confusion and general uproar, it was impossible to get the majority of the restive
animals on board the boat without blindfolding them.
The distance from Calais to Paris is 321 kilometres-as they reckon distance here-
which I have figured out to be 200 miles. I didn't think it was so far. The country
was flat, but pretty-lots of poplar-trees, market-gardens, thatched cottages, peasants in
blue blouses, and women working in the fields. We had glimpses of the historic cities
of Arras and Amiens, and a good many smaller towns, and got our cars somewhat
accustomed to the native accent of the French language.


ON TILE BOTTLTEVARDD,, PARIS.


Paris! Iow strange it seemed to hear the conductor call out that inme. (He
called it Puree, by-the-way.) A Parisian yare, or railway station, is very little like the
Grand Central Depot at New York. There is no noise, no rush, no confusion. A
customs officer puzzled over our 1.. ,.-, but a five-franc piece instantly convinced him
that it was all right, and off we flew to the Grand Continental Hotel for dinner. We
did not propose to take our first impressions of Paris on an empty stomach.
At dusk we strolled out upon the Boulevards. They are beautiful, wide streets,
which, the gnide-book says, Louis XIV. laid out on the lines of the old fortifications.
You are constantly meeting with traces of that Grand Monarqne everywhere in Paris,
and these traces are almost always something magnificent. All Paris is on parade on
these Boulevards, especially in the evening. They are thronged with carriages and
pedestrians, and if ever "night is turned into day." it is here. The throngs of loungers,







AFLOAT AND ASHORE.


t;he gay groups seated at little tables on the sidewalk outside the cafes, the kiosks, or
little stands where newspapers and fancy articles are sold ; the lofty houses, the number
ous theatres, and the brilliant lights, make up a scene that is novel and fascinating
to us.
The window of our sitting-room at the hotel looks out upon the gardens of til
Tuileries. The palace itself is a ruin-one of the few still left in Paris to recall the
destructive work of the Communists in 1871; but the gardens are as beautiful as they


; II
I I

'' I:



.1



I., j*'
/,'


----- _- -


ii' -


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~;~~-~ 3,, ~~r


FTISTING TX TnE SEtNE.


must have been when the place was the Paris residence of the Kings and Queens of
France. It was a perfect glow of color-dazzling, ribbon-like borders of the most vivi
flowers surrounding the beds, and turf and shrubbery of the brightest green. Conqet
tish-looking nurses with caps, children dressed like the children in picture-books, an'i
soldiers in baggy red trousers promenaded in the garden walks where Marie Antoinette
and Louis XVI. and their children walked in the cool of the evenings a hundred years
ago. That is one delight of these European cities-every spot has some interestmg
association.
We were wild to get out of doors. Taking our simple cup of chocolate and roll,






AMUSING ADVENTURES






SI I' ,' i '





', I i' I

Si '' 1111
"- I I I '

' ''^ ,"' ,--, ':,i' ,' r ^ '


PFEAKFAST FoR ONE FRANC TWENTY-FIVE CENTEIES.


I, I


I







AFLOAT AND ASHORE.


OPEN-Ailt COMCLRT IA TIlE CHAMPS ELY61ES.


After the French style of staving off the pangs of hunger at early morn, we bought a
igh;t cane apiece, and sallied forth on the Rue de Rivoli. Close by, we came upon the
Place de la Concorde, the most celebrated and magnificent pace, or public square, in


INTERIOR OF AN OMNIBUS.





AMUSING AD VEN TURES


Paris. The Egyptian obelisk of Luxor stands on the spot where the guillotine was
erected in January, 1793, for the execution of Louis XVI. Betwcin May, 1793, and
June, 1794 (the Reign of Terror), 1,235 persons were beheaded here. Amongst them
were Queen Marie Antoinette, her cousin Louis Philippe Egalit6, Madame Elisabeth, the
sister of the King, Madame Roland, and many other royal and noble personages. You
see, Uncle Jack, that I have at least looked into the books which you made us bring
along.
While we were standing here, talking of the streams of human blood which once
ran down these banks and reddened the Seine, Guy and I suddenly discovered that Budd
was missing. It was no use going in search of him; but we felt somewhat uneasy,
nntil, about one o'clock, we discovered him, quite by accident. Guess where ? You
know those crowds of idle men and boys, with fish-poles and lines and baskets, who are
always to be seen on the banks of the Seine, between the Pont-Neuf and the Pont dos
Arts, or underneath the arches of these great bridges ? Well, there we found Budd,
covered with mnd, in the midst of a crowd of French vagabonds. IHe said lie had been
wanting to go a-fishing ever since he left home, and thought this was as good a chance
as he would get. We asked him if he had caught anything ?
"Of course not," he replied. "I have only been here half a day. Some of those
fellows have fished here every day for years, and not caught anything."
"Did anybody ever catch any fish in these polluted waters ?"
Well, an Englishman di wn there under the bridge told me a carp was once
caught there, two or three hundied years ago, and ever since then, fishermen have been
hoping to take another. Ii tile time when Napoleon I. was Emperor, a fellow who was
fishing here had a bite, anl pl,!ed up a big, shiinig fish; but it fell back into the
water again. The man was so disappointed that he threw himself into the river after
his lost fish. And, do you know, this very morning somebody caught a minnow two
inches long. That was what the excitement was about just as you came along."
We persuaded Budd to give up his piscatorial hopes, and started oil" for a late
breakfast. The French, you know, call the midday repast the d(f, iilecr a la fourcheTeIe,
or breakfast, because it is the first square meal of the day, with them. We seldom or
never took our breakfast at the hotel; being always out and about, it was more con-
vonient, and more interesting as well, to attend to the inner man wherever we might
chance to find ourselves at noon. Paris is full of restaurants. Turning out of the Rue
do Rivoli, into the Place Rue Royale, we struck the famous Palais Roy al-built by the
Cardinal Richelien, occupied successively by royalty, by Napoleon's Tribunate, and by
Louis Philippo; wrecked by the mob in the revolution of 1848, turned into the Palais
National by Napoleon Ill., partly burned by the Commu nists in 1871, and finally re-
stored by the Government to its present condition. The name Palais Royal is given to
tihe entire square of buildings surrounding the garden of the palace itself. These build-
ings are occupied by jewelry-stores, bric-ti-brao shops, flower-stands, restaurants, etc.,
forming altogether one of the liveliest and most frequented places in Paris; just the
locality in which to get a breakfast, at any price we cared to pay I discovered a sign,
"Dejeuzner p2rii fixe, vin compris, 1 f. 25 c." Breakfast, including wine, one franc
twenty-five centimes-not quite twenty-five cents! We had heard a great deal about.
the excellent cheap repasts of Paris, and concluded that here was our chance to try one.
We bought a breakfast ticket apiece of a young woman who sat at the door, knitting.
This admitted us to a large diining-room, fitted up in better style than the average
New York "Beanery" of the same class. The names of French dishes on the mewnl.







AFLOAT ANVD ASHORE.


F,;_ I. I' I!III 1* __



LI.


._ 7 _:'--- :; ; ---- --

VIEW OF TTIE ARC DE TETOM-PITI, LOOKING TOWARD MOXT VA.LEIIEN.

puzzled us a little. Budd and Guy were for ordering, hit-or-miss, and taking our
chances; but I told them the story of the Englishman who, under similar circum
stances, gave his order in the best French he knew, and got a salt-cellar, an almanac,
an umbrella-stand, some matches, and a dictionary. So we decided to ask the advice of
a very polite young Parisian who sat at the opposite side of the table. To the profound
awe of Guy and Budd, I mustered out my school-French, and asked, with a desperate.
struggle for the true Parisian accent:
"Qu'est-ce qu'on doit prendre ?" meaning, "What would it be best to take ?"


-V .


~-VL






AMUSING ADVENTUREI,


He understood me. and I had
difficulty in making out his reply:


little The b(ifeck was tolerable, and could
not have been cut from an old omnibus-
horse, as Budd insisted it was. The salad
and other things were really good; and
even the wine, though first-cousin to vine-
gar, was made quite refreshing by a plenty.
ful addition of ice. Altogether, our twenty-
five cent Parisian breakfast was a success
S which could not have been achieved any-
where else at a similar outlay.
Another time, we tested, with satisfac-
tory results, the "Duval system" of dining.
S Duval was a butcher who conceived the
idea of selling, at cheap rates, good bouil
S Ion to workmen. The scheme prospered.
Soon there were "Duvals" scattered all
about Paris. The idea seemed so successful
that it was determined to push it a little
further. There were to be varieties of re-
freshment. Something else was to be offered
S than bread and broth. The success was im-
mediate. The menus kept lengthening and
houses multiplying, but the principle always
remained the same. It was this -to give
very small portions of the very best food at
the very lowest prices. The dearest dish
you can get at any of the present Duvals-


TIIH (ATIIHEDIIAL OF NOTRE DAMIE.


"If you want good value for your
money, you can't do better than to follow
my example. You have a choice of one
'tors d'vuvre "
"Does le say horse?" whispered Budd,
in a horrified tone.
"No," I said, with dignity. "lHors
d'ucere means a side-dish."
"One hours d'oeuvre," continued the
young Parisian, "two plals, and one
dessert. Now, monsieur, suppose you take
a sardine with bread-and-buttcr for the
side-dish; then, biftecrk (beefsteak !) with
potatoes for the first p/al, and salad for
Ihe second. You will get enough salad for
half-a-dozen persons, and can dress it your.
self from the cruet. Then finish off with
the strawberries."


THE PANTHEON.







AFL 0 A T AND A S OR E.


a Chateaubriand steak -costs a franc. Everything is charged except service, and the
prices are extremely moderate. A mutton chop is twelve cents, a salad eight cents,
'potatoes five cents, salmon twelve cents, soup five cents, pudding eight cuts, a small
bottle of a6rated water three cents, wine eight cents, and so on. These are matters of
detail. Maison Duval used to have rather a poor sound. Now three of the establish-
ments-those near the Palais.Royal; opposite the Madeleine, on the Boulevard; and at
the corner of the Rue de Rivoli, near the statue of Joan of Arc-rank among the most
frequented of Paris restaurants.
That afternoon we listened to an open-air concert in the gay Champs Elys6es,
which, according to the name, are the Parisians' idea of elysian fields. Just beyond
stands the Arc de Triomphe, said to be the largest triumphal arch in the world. Its
construction was begun in 1806, by Napoleon I., to commemorate the victories of the
French armies, and completed by Louis Philippe in 1836. There are sculptured alle-
gorical figures, and bass-reliefs representing
famous battles. The arch is very imposing,

of the towers of the Brooklyn Bridge-to
use a homely comparison. It is situated on -
rather high ground, commanding a fine view --
of Paris; and a dozen splendid streets- -- -
including the Avenue Victor Hugo, where
the poet lived-radiate from it like spokes -
from the hub of a wheel. -
We did not go to see Victor Hugo's house; -
but the next morning we visited his tomb in -
the Pantheon (formerly the Church of Sainte --
Genevieve). On our way thither, we crossed --
the Seine by the Pont Notre Dame, the most' -_ --
ancient bridge of Paris. This bridge leads to ';:3 '
the island of La Cit6, upon which the Gallic !
tribe of the Parisii built the hamlet of Lu- : --
tetia, nearly two thousand years ago. On this --
island stand several important municipal --
buildings, and the noble, historic Gothic ca- TIE IOTEL DES INVA.IDES.
thedral of Notre Dame. It is over seven
hundred years old, and occupies the site of an old pagan temple. Its great, square
towers, rising high above the surrounding buildings, are full of suggestions to the
student of history. One's recollections of Victor Hugo's fascinating novel, "The
,Hunchback of Notre Dame," give the place an unusual interest, particularly as every-
thing is just as he describes it, including the sculptured portals, the great belfries,
the windows of colored glass, and the grotesque gargoyles on the cornices and roof. In
the court in front of the cathedral stands a colossal equestrian statue of Charlemagne,
or Charles the Great, King of the Franks 768-814 D., and Roman Emperor 800-814
A. D. On either side stand two Gallic warriors, holding the bridle of the Emperor's horse,
the whole forming a very picturesque and heroic group.
Passing on to the south side of the Seine, we found ourselves in the Latin Quarter,
where the chief institutions connected with the University of France, and with education
generally, are still situated. This district is inhabited by thousands of students, about.







46 2AMIUSING"- ADVENTURES

whose life of gayety and freedom so much has been written. This was not noticeable,
of course, in merely passing through the Boulevard S'. Michel; but later we saw more
,' the French students, on the National Fite Day, which I shall speak of presently.


THE STATUE OF CHARLEMATNAGN


We found the Pantheon a great Italian church, in appearance, and covered with a
dome whlch is a conspicuous object from all parts of Paris. Some of the wreaths
heaped upon Victor Hugo's bier at the grand funeral (June 2d) were still ly-rz
about, and Guy secured a bunch of immortelles for a relic.


--i~




















I'


~b~ii


TEL CA'IAOOA r~ Or FJAiL.


* ,: ,-


~C~C~tz~4`-~I -~
r I / '
IB






48 AMUSING ADVENTURES
Our object in coming over this way was to hunt up your business correspondent,
.M. Dubois, to whose care you kindly commended us during our stay in Paris. We had
got along so well alone that we were in no special hurry to deliver our letter, particu-
lar.y as M. Dubois lives away on the outskirts of Paris, in the Rue Stanislas-a plamc






I--





Ilk




-____ ___ __-- W -p"
















experience wth the Parisian tran.way, or horse-railroad. One good thing about it is
. .






e .4





AILEGORTCAL STATUE OF TTE FRENCH -REPUBLIC.
next to impossible to find. We /(bd find it, however; and in getting there had ov" firs'.
experience with the Parisian tramway, or horse-railroad. One good thing about it is
that every passenger has a seat, and there is not "always room for one more" after the
car is full, as in New York. When we stood on the curbstone and made frantic signs
to the driver and conductor, wl-o simply gazed ot us and kept calmly on their way







AFLOAT AND ASHORE.


with their tram nearly empty, it was hard to see where the advantages of the system
came in; but later we learned that before mounting the vehicle, it is necessary to pro-
vide oneself with a ticket at the bureau. Then, there are the omnibuses. Paris is full
of them. They are two-storied affairs, and decidedly more interesting than the old
stages at home. It costs 30 centimes (six cents) to ride inside, and half that sum out-
side. If you are a 30-centime passenger, your ticket enables you to change omnibuses
and go to any part of the city, without paying another fare. As we climbed up the
little staircase to ride a l'imperiale, or on top of the 'bus, we glanced inside, and found
that it contained a regular menagerie of Parisian types-priest, tourist, dude, a lady
going shopping, and a fat market-woman who was struggling with both hands to quiet a
live lobster in a huge basket which she carried on her lap. She reminded me of those












0 -

:t -- E I
Vii ,, -- 7
= -- ,,.









TIE GiAND OP'ETI HOUSE.
savage fishwomen who crowded around the guillotine, with jeers and laughter and ribald
talk, to see heads chopped off during the Reign of Terror,
Well, we found M. Dubois at last. He was extremely courteous, and at once devoted
himself to our guidance and entertainment. Although he speaks English quite fairly,
he encourages us to converse in French continually, for the sake of acquiring fluency in
the language. He says that with French and English we can travel over the whole
civilized world without inconvenience in the matter of communication with our fellow-
creatures. We are fortunate in the fact that our native language is spoken by nearly
one hundred millions of the earth's inhabitants.
At M. Dubois's pressing invitation, we took up our abode in the Rue Stanislas for
the remainder of our stay in Paris. The first sight which he showed us was the Cata-
combs, which happen to be in that neighborhood. Much of the southern portion of
Pris is built over beds of limestone, which have been quarried for hundreds of years
d_----_ 2 -. : -. ._- v- --- --_ -: U






hisl.oor.udneadenetimn..lhuh.espasEgih.ut ary

the languag._ Ile. say that -- w--t.h Frnc an nls ecntrvloe hl
civilized ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ world witou inoneiec i... t.-mtero2cmmncain"_,urfllw
craue.W r otnt nte atta u aielnug ssoe yhal






Au USING AD VENTURES


past, so that now they are honeycombed with vast caverns, covered with a crust of rock
and earth. In many places this crust is scarcely strong enough to support the houses
above; and the Government has spent no end of money in propping it up. It was
in 1784 that these quarries were first converted into catacombs, in which are deposited
the bones of the dead, collected from the ancient cemeteries of Paris. The bodies of
some of the victims of the Revolution were also placed here. The skulls and bones
have, for the most part, been built into chapels, altars, archways, etc., forming an
intricate labyrinth. People used to wander in and get lost in the gruesome alleys, and
finally the place was closed to the public. M. Dubois obtained permission for our party
to accompany the surveyors on one of their regular tours of inspection, and that was
now we happened to get in. We entered from a street profanely but appropriately


G:AIND (AI.,LEI: Y OF TIHE PA&ACE OF VERSAILLES.


named the lRue d'Enfer, or Gateway to the Infernal Regions. We carried in our hands
big candles, which dropped tallow in a most alarming manner. Budd said that if we
lost our way, we could get out by following the grease-spots. Guy offered one of the
workmen a franc for a skull, and actually got it. Those old bones were terribly mixed
up, and I suppose a skull or two won't be missed. When we asked Guy what he wanted
of such a ghastly, grinning relic, he replied that "two heads were better than one !"
The next day we went to the Jardin des Plantes. Not pretty, but very interesting,
especially to Guy, our naturalist. Since he first became acquainted with the place, we
have found it almost impossible to keep him away from it. Half the animals know
him by sight, and he has got them all down in his diary.
We left Guy interviewing the ostriches, while we took a boat-ride down the Seine








AFLOAT .AND ASHORE.


'' ,
g~B~ba* t. .el' aL


ILLUMIINATION OF THE PARK OF VERSAILLES.

in one of the little steamers which start from the Pont Royal. Seeing the golden dome
of the IIOtel des Invalides sparkling in the sun, we yielded to a strong desire to visit
this home of old soldiers, and mie tomb of the great Napoleon. It happened to be
Thursday, the visiting-day for strangers. As we entered by the grand court, we met a
great many war-scarred veterans, some in invalid-carriages, others stumping about on
wooden legs. There were two or three who looked old enough to have been at Waterloo.
The entrance to Napoleon's tomb, under the great dome, is exceedingly impressive. Two


TIE FRENCH NATIONAL FETE (JTLY 14TH).







52 AMUSING ADVENTURES

winding marble staircases lead down into the vault, which is closed by two bronze gates,
flanked by colossal statues. Over the entrance is the inscription:
"JE DESIRE QUE IES CENDRES REPOSENT SUR LES BOARDS DE LA SEINE,
AU MILIEU DE CE I'EUPLE FRANqAIS QUE J'AI TANT AIMED "

These words are said to be from the Emperor's will. I translate them thus: "I
desire that my ashes repose by the banks of the Seine, amongst the French people
whom I have so loved."
The remains were brought from St. Helena in 1840, carried in procession under the
Arch of Triumph, and deposited where they now lie, in a magnificent sarcophagus
carved from a single block of Russian granite weighing thirteen tons.
All this makes one feel strongly the magic of a mighty name.
After we had spent a week-and thoroughly enjoyed ourselves-going about merely as











_-- '- __--~--i :- -.-. :- -__ -
._ ,= _--- .- = ___: .-



-3.---
,. ---_ --
-N








FIREWORKS AT THE PONT DU JOUR.

fancy suggested, M. Dubois recommended the laying out of systematized tours of sight-
seeing for each day. We found this a first-rate plan-in fact, it is the only way to see
a great city thoroughly. We "took m" a great deal more than by our old method, and
had quite as good a time. We devoted two days to the art-galleries of the Louvre, and
one to the Luxembourg. We spent a day on the river, and saw a regatta at Asnieres.
(I am afraid this was on a Sunday. You know the Parisians are terrible Sabbath-
breakers, and arrange all kinds of amusements on that day, when the working people
take their weekly frolic.)
We went to the Opera, too. The new Grand Opera House, near the Boulevard des
Capucines, opposite the Rue de la Paix, which Napoleon III. began in 1861-in the
palmy days of the Second Empire-was not completed until 1875, the work being sus-
pended during the war with Germany, and the political upheaval which followed. But
when its doors were finally thrown open, they revealed the most magnificent theatre in







AFLOAT AXD ASHORE.


the world. Over $5,000,000 had been lavished upon it by these amusement-loving
people. It is filled with frescoes by Paul Baudry and other great artists; and statues,
mirrors, and gorgeous gilding give it the sumptuousness of a royal palace. Such a
temple of music could not be maintained in America; nor could it here, if the Govern-
ment did not help the managers with a yearly allowance, or subvention, of about $175,000.
The managers, on their part are obliged to maintain an efficient staff, to open their
theatre four times a week, and to bring out new works by native composers. The
expenses of the house are so great that, notwithstanding the help the managers receive
from the Government, they often lose money on the season. We heard and saw Meyer-
beer's opera, "L'Africaine" sung by a first-class troupe, though the stage setting rather
fell behind what I have seen at the
Academy of Music and the Metropol-
itan Opera House in New York.
One of our most delightful days .,
was that which we spent at Versailles.
The town itself is a dull, modern
place of perhaps 50,000 inhabitants; ,
but the royal palaces-like most of
the other former abodes of French
Kings and Queens-have been con-
verted into magnificent museums of
history and art. We wandered .
through what had once been the '-. "
private apartments of Louis XIV.
and his successors, and stood in the
famous halls of state, where so many .
historic scenes of splendor and of '-:..
terror had been enacted. Take, for ,
instance, the Grande Galerie de Louis.
XIV., which occupies the centre of
the palace. It is one of the most
magnificent rooms in the world,
being 239 feet long, by 33 wide and
23 high. Seventeen windows look TJLES GIIVY, PRESIDENT OF THE FHENCII HEP il'I.C.
into the gardens, and on the walls
opposite are seventeen immense mirrors to correspond. The Grand Monarque took
great pride in this apartment, and used to have his throne transported hither
on great occasions. In May, 1789, the Revolution had its beginning here, in the meet-
ing of the States-general. Louis Philippe, in our century, transformed the room,
in common with the rest of the palace, into a museum. When the victorious German
army invested Paris, in the latter part of 1870, Versailles became the centre of its
operations; and on the 18th of January, 1871, King William was proclaimed Emperor
of Germany in the grand hall of Louis XIV. Under the French Republican Govern-
ment, as well as during the Imperial reign of Napoleon III., the Versailles palace has
frequently been tlie scene of grand balls, receptions, and other festivities which revived
the ancient glories of the place. On such occasions, the sumptuous apartments are
filled with glittering uniforms and splendid toilets; while the gardens, with their
wonderful fountains, are illuminated by electric lights. These fountai:;s. with their






AMUSING ADVENTURES


nymphs, Tritons, sea-monsters, unicorns, cupids, and other ornamental statuary, together
with the long avenues of tiees, and velvet carpets of turf, are, to my mind, the most
beautiful sight we have yet seen in pleasant France.
Yesterday (July 14th) we ourselves participated in a fete, though not at Versailles.
It was the national F6te de la Rgpublique, commemorating the fall of the Bastille, in
1789. The preparations had been going on for a week before. The quays and boule-
vards were decorated, and thousands of little lanterns arranged upon the bridges over
the Seine, in such a manner as to trace the outlines in fire. The monogram R. F.
(R6publique Fran9aise) was displayed in every available place. Crowds of people from
the provinces flocked into the city, and tout Paris enjoyed the holiday as only Parisians
can. There were all kinds of processions, meetings, balls, and private festivities. We
were greatly interested in a noisy crowd of students who marched from the Latin
Quarter to the Place de la R6publique, to decorate with crowns and garlands the statue
of the Republic. They sang the Marseillaise Hymn with tremendous energy, and two or
three of them made speeches like young Gambettas. They are very clannish, but
evidently fine fellows. There were several American boys amongst them. The French
and Yankee characters are evidently sympathetic, and go well together. M. Dubois says
the reputation of these dwellers in the Latin Quarter is much worse than they deserve,
being inherited from their harum-scarum predecessors of half a century ago.
In the evening the trees of the Champs Elys6es and the Bois de Boulogne glowed
with their strange fruit of clustered lanterns. The Seine was like a stream of fire, and
the sky, lurid with fireworks, rained golden sparks. The Pont du Jour sent np rockets
like a volcano. The red glare fell upon a crowd so great that it seemed as if the whole
French nation had assembled along the Seine, on the Champ de Mars, and about the
illuminated palace of the Trocadero. It was a gay and jovial, bat very orderly and
polite, crowd. The French know how to enjoy a good time.
Our stay in Paris is drawing to a close. It has kept us in a whirl of excitement
that tires almost like hard work; but I am sure I never before spent time at once so
pleasantly and so profitably. We expect to go from here to Cologne, and sail up the
Rhine. So good-by for the present, dear Uncle Jack; and pardon the repetition, in
this long, rambling letter, of so much that you know a great deal better than
Your nephew,
RAYIOND BRONSON.

P. S.-I am almost certain that we saw President Gr6vy in a carriage, yesterday
afternoon. He was a dignified, rather provincial-looking old gentleman of seventy or
so-M- Gr6vy, I believe, is seventy-two. His seven years' term as President of the
French Republic will soon reach its close; but M. Dubois says he will in all prob.
ability be re-elected. M. Gr6vy is a calm, thorough-going kind of President, s-d
enjoys the full confidence of his people, who would not willingly run the risk of a
change at present.







4J'LOAT A.ND A SHORE.


CHAPTER V.
GUT UNDERTAKES TO WRITE ABOUT TIE RHINE AND SWITZERLAND-TIIE JOURNEY TO COLOGNE-
FUMIGATION-COLOGNE CATHEDRAL-ON TIE RHINE STEAMER-SPECIMEN TOURISTS-DRACIE-
ENFELS-THE STATUE OF GERMANIA "-ZURICII-GENEVA-FIRST VIEW OF TIE ALPs-Ex-
CURSION TO CIILLON-TO CIIAMOUNI BY DILIGENCE-M-ONT BLANC-AMERICAN CLIMBERS-
THE MER DE GLACE, AND OTHER REGULATION SIrHITS-GUY GOES BOTANIZING-ECCENTRIC
ALPINE TOURISTS-BACK TO GENEVA, vid MARTIGNY.
GENEVA, August 15th, 1885.
D EAR UNCLE JACK.-Ray wrote you the descriptive letter covering our stay in
Paris, since which we have sent off no correspondence save that relating to
private matters. I tell him that perhaps you would be glad to have us confine our
epistolary efforts to business and personalities, without going over much-beaten tracks of
description. But he says that no two people see the same things in the same manner;
and that, moreover, it would be a pity if, amongst us all, we did not put down in
black and white some continuous record of our wanderings. He generously gives me
the Rhine and Switzerland for my letter. Well, dear Uncle Jack, I will "tackle" the
subject, and give you some notes, at least. It would take a volume to describe fully all
we have seen and done and thought and learned since we left Paris.
We journeyed from Paris to Cologne by rail, leaving the French capital at half-past
seven in the morning, and arriving in the German city on the Rhine at the same hour
in the evening. The distance was 301 miles-less than the distance across New York
State lengthwise; but in making it we traversed Northern France, Belgium, and a small
portion of the German Empire. We passed through the well-cultivated champagne wine
district, and through three of Belgium's large towns-Liege, Charleroi and Namur-all
bustling manufacturing and mining centres.
But the sensation of the day was reserved for us at Verviers, the frontier station.
We were fumigated !
Whew we have been surrounded with a very strong atmosphere of disinfectants
ever since.
There is cholera in France, you know. Germany is determined to boycott the
cholera, and keep it out of the empire altogether; so that French passengers crossing
the frontier are severely fumigated, together with their baggage, beyond all possibility of






AMUSING ADVENTURES


smuggling in the dreaded contagion. We were "arrested" and locked up for five
minutes in a room whose atmosphere of carbolic acid and chloride of lime almost
suffocated us. But there is always a kind of consolation in seeing some one else in a
worse predicament than oneself; and we thought it immensely funny to behold an unfor-
tunate fellow-traveler, who had come from Marseilles, shut up in a fumigating sweat-
oox, with only his unhappy-looking head sticking out at the top. Not far away an old
;aay screamed and scolded in vain while the health officers maliciously drenched her
baggage with some vile mixture which they squirted from huge syringes. It was great


A LITTLE DIFFICULTY WITH THE QUARANTINE OFFICERS.


fun, but rough on clothes and baggage. Budd said he knew now how it felt to be a
Dutch smoked herring.
As we approached Cologne, we could see the spires of the wondrous cathedral
looming up far above the rest of the city. The Rhine here is a broad, majestic stream,
spanned by a fine iron bridge, and with a sweeping current enters the level country.

"The river Rhine, as well 'tis known,
Doth wash the city of Cologne;
But tell me, nymphs, what power divine
Shall henceforth wash the river Rhine ?"

These lines are still quoted against the city; and despite the manufacture of great(
quantities of the celebrated perfumed water bearing its name, Cologne has not yet out-
lived its reputation for crooked, dirty and foul-smelling streets. I think it is much
slandered in this respect, though most of the old streets are indeed labyrinthine alleys.







AFLOAT AYD ASHORE.


The cathedral is the one great sight
at Cologne. It is a European land-
mark. It was begun so long ago that
the date is uncertain, and the name of
hie architect (who, according to the
popular legend, had the assistance of
the Devil in preparing his plans) is -__- '
forgotten. Its first stones were laid I- -
some time about the middle of the thir- I
teenth century, but the noble structure
rose very slowly. For three or four I
centuries the work upon it was al- I
together suspended, and what had I
already been built was not kept in
repair. It was only at the beginning i I
of the present century its unrivaled i i
beauties re-awakened enthusiasm in i l
'Germany and throughout Europe, and I
funds were supplied for its completion.
On the 14th of August, 1880, the cap- I'
stone of the southern spire was laid "
amidst great ceremony and rejoicing, ,. ---. ,
and one of the most magnificent spe- _i_- -. 'r .'-. _
cimens of the Gothic architecture in -
the world was finished. By the color
of the stones, one can trace the work of
the different centuries. Sermons in FUIIGATION.
stones I History in mellowed blocks of
marble I The towers are over five hundred feet high-the loftiest structures vet reared
by human hands, with the single exception of the Washington Monumenit ihey com-
mand a view of a hundred miles of the Rhine's silvery course.
After several visits to this awe-inspiring pile, and various wandt.ings through the
picturesque streets of the city, during our twenty-four hours' stay, we embarked on
the wide and winding Rhine." Before we went on board the steamer, I had equipped
myself with a clear idea of the whole course of the river-which came in handily in a
subsequent dispute with Ray as to the comparative beauties of the Rhine and our own
Hudson. The Rhine has its sources in the mountains of Switzerland, and flows 850
miles in a northwesterly direction, to fall into the German Ocean. It has no less than
12,000 feeders, or small streams whose waters it finally receives. The navigation is
continuous from the cataract of Schaffhausen, in Northern Switzerland, to the ocean.
Between here and Cologne, it passes the cities of Basel, Breisach, Strasburg, Spires,
Manuheim, Worms, Mayence, Bingen, Coblenz, and Bonn. This middle part of its
course, which is full of bends and islands, with castle crowned heights and vineyards
on either side, is the picturesque portion of which Byron and other poets have sung.
A Rhine steamer is a kind of Noah's ark, carrrymg a wonderful assortment of
mixed human freight. There were cold and staring English; polite and talkative French-
men; dramatic Spaniards; gushing Italians; phlegmatic Germans, with lunch-baskets
and flasks of kirschwasser; Australians, who talked of sheep-ranches all the way; and











68 AMUSING ADVENTURES




open-eyed Yankees, like ourselves. And of course there were "spoons"-I mean newly


married couples. The husbands quoted Byron, and the brides leaned their heads on the


husbands' shoulders. Everybody carried tourist glasses, and I am sure not an inch of


-

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C('NOlI.II'ION OF SPIRE! OF C)llANKO CATHEDRAL, AUGUST 14TIr, 1880.


ground on either side the river escaped inspection. Not a castle, ruin, rock or island,


but was instantly detected. Each person was "dressed to kill," in his or her private

notion of a swell tourist-suit; and amongst so many fantastic costumes we felt no


hesitation about wearing the jaunty Tam o' Shanter caps which we had bought in London,







AFLOAT AND ASHORE.


The country between Cologne and Bonn is as flat as a floor, and has only old houses
and a windmill or two for sightseers. Bonn woke up from a sound sleep when our boat
(the Lorelei) touched at the primitive old landing. A great crowd of tourists swarmed


-111(11 ...... 7:4NE 1 'ILI IIE .1
COLOWNES CATHEDRAL.


on board here. Why ? because by coming from Cologne by rail, the knowing ones save
time, and avoid the "flats" of the river.
The "castled crag of Drachenfels" rises directly opposite Bonn; and in the middle
of the river is the island of Nonnenwcrth, whose poetic legend the German poet Schiller






AMUSING ADVENTURTJES


has immortalized. It tolls of a Knight Crusader, named Roland, whose sweetheart,
believing him dead, entered the convent on the little island, and took the vows for life.
The adventurous knight finally returned, safe and sound, only to find his betrothed


i --~ ---- -------;---
---_ 11---
ON A RII-NE STEAMER.

dead to him; whereupon he built a tower, on the top of the Drachenfels, and called it
Rolandseck. IHe wasted the remainder of his life looking down upon the island to catch
glimpses of his lady, as she moved about the convent-grounds with the other Sisters.
"How did it all end ?" Budd asked me. That was something the guide-book hadn't







AFLOAT AND ASHORE.


mentioned, and I was going to tell Budd not to be always asking irrelevant questions,
when Ray came to my assistance.
"One day," Ray went on, "the convent bell tolled;
'And then he, watching from his castle high,
Saw dimly through the valley far beneath
The form of her he loved so well pass by,
Her faithful heart stilled evermore in death.
And as the train of mourners slowly passed,
He dropped his head, and joined his bride at last.'"

"Is that Schiller, or Byron ?" asked one of the Australians.
"Neither. The lines are from an American poet-D. E. Hervey."
The Australian apologized for his ignorance, and at the next landing-place offered
to treat us to a glass of goat's-milk.
This Nonnenwerth story is a specimen Rhine-legend, of which there are no end. It
is in this respect that the Rhine has the advantage over the Hudson. We have no
castles in our country, and Washington Irving and Joseph Rodman Drake are about the
only writers who have done anything with the legendary of our beautiful American river.
Near Bingen-on-the-Rhine (which recalled memories of the time when we used to
spout "pieces" at school), we saw the great national memorial statue of "Germania," on
the heights of theNiederwald, opposite. It is a beauty, occupies a splendid site, and com-
memorates an important event of history-the German victory over France in the war
of 1871. But as a colossus
it is simply nowhere in
comparison with Barthol-
di's statue of Liberty,
now in New York Har-
bor.' The German statue
is 110 feet high, inclusive
of the pedestal; while
France's gift to America,
measured in the same
way, is over 300 feet.
Taking these statues
as a starting-point, I com-
pared the Rhine and the
Hudson in detail-
scenery, volume, com-
merce, and strategical
importance in times of
war, and I did not stop
until I had compelled
Ray, Budd and the Aus-
tralians to give the palm
to the American stream.
We had a scramble
for a rather poor meal
at the table d'h6te, and SOME OF THE iPASSENGERS.







A MUSING AD VENTURES


g ;.. K-

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STATUE OF GEIRMAN1A." IN TIIE NIEDERWALD.

wished we had brought a lunch along. This gave me a postscript to add to my argument
upon the superiority of river-travel at home. We passed a great many flotillas of lazy
canal-boats in tow, like those of the Hudson. As the shades of evening began to fall,
we came in sight of the iron bridge, the quaint roofs and spires of Mayence. Here we
ceased to avail ourselves of the navigation of the Rhine, and put up for the night at a






A FL OA 7 A AD A SHOR 0AE. 63



-1








--- '- "- -. ,S _1 -. -.-4





VIEW OF TE STATUE'SA OF "GERMANIA" FROM TIE OPPOSITE BANK OF THE RIIINE.

H6tel de Iollande, where it seemed that all the modern European languages were spoken
-by the guests.
Another day's travel, by rail, brought us to Zurich-our first Swiss stopping-place,
*nd a very pretty one. We enjoyed a sail on "Zurich's waters," one of the bluest lakes


COBLENz.






AMUSING ADVENTURES


'(li~i~~


in the world. Zurich is
a manufacturing place
of about 25,000 inhab-
itants, and has a fine
university. The natu-
ralist Gesner was born
here.
The next day we
came on to Geneva,
which we have made
our headquarters ever
since.
When we arrived
at Geneva, it seemed a
hot, stony, unhistoric-
looking place; but after
we had put up at the
"Grand IHotel de Rus-
sie and Anglo-American
Hotel," close by the
lake, and commanding
a view of the glorious
Alps, we altered our
opinion for the better.
SThe lake, with its me-
mories of Calvin, Rous-
seau, Gibbon, Voltaire,
5 Madame de Stael, and
Byron, is the great na-
tural feature of the
Swiss metropolis. It
looks like an arm of
the sea, and is navi-
gated by steamers, and
great boats with felucca
sails. The RhLine River,
which enters the lake
at its upper end, more
than fifty miles away,
leaves it here, swift as
an arrow, and of a
deep blue tint. On
calm days, Mont Blanc,
sixty miles distant, is
actually reflected in the
mirror-like waters of'
the Lake Geneva. But
the morning after we







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and the Palisade Hotel. 4. A Spur of the Palisades, near Plermont. 5. The Mary Powell" passing through the High
lands. 6 The Statue of Liberty in New York Harbor 7. Monument at West Point. 8. A Kiosk on Cruger's Island.
THE HIINE AND TIE HUDSON COMPARED.


r -


, ,, ti .






AMiUSING AD VENTURES


arrived here there was a storm, and the waters were so high as to remind Budd of that
favored domain of seasickness-the Englisn Channel. The clamus garnered and burst,
pouring out a deluge of rain and lightning for over an hour. Then the fresh breeze
swept the sky, and the sun burst forth, making a fairyland suectacle of the lake and
mountains.
Here was the chance for an excursion i So we took the steamboat to Vev.y, a
lovely village on the terraced borders of rne take, and from there went by carriage to




-__ _< - - _


ZURICIIS WATERS.


the Castle of Chillon. I won't quote Byron's famous poem, "The Prisoner of Chillon,"
for everybody who has heretofore mentioned the place has done so, and it is about
familiar enough. But the old castle, with its whitish-yellow walls. pointed towers, and
" torture- chamber," is as mediaeval-looking and picturesque as ever. It stands close by,
or rather in, the lake. You might jump off its battlements into water hundreds of feet
deep. The castle is now used as a magazine for military stores, and a railroad passes
within a stone's throw of its walls. Some sentimental tourists think this latter destroys
the romance of the place ; but we found it very convenient to take the -rain back to
Geneva in time for supper.







AFL 0AT' ANAD A SORE. 67

The next day, full of impatience to get beneath the shadow of the Alps, we set out
for Chamouni. No railroading here! We had to travel by the old-fashioned diligence,
or stage-coach; and it took us all day. The ride was delightful, and we only wished
there had been more of it. As we bowled along the country roads, little girls would
throw bunches of wild flowers into the diligence, and then run along beside it until we
threw them a few sous. At other places, in the romantic little hamlets, there would be
women and girls selling tiny Swiss ci/ilets, or mountain cottages, and other articles
carved in wood. At every precipitous place, we were certain to find a man with an
Alpine horn five or six feet long, who wanted to waken the echoes for us, at a cost of
twenty-five centimes. It would have been difficult to throw, at random, one of my

























THE CASTLE OF CTILLO'N, ON LAKE GENEVA.

geological specimens, without hitting a Swiss in waiting to do something for which he
:-- --- D -- -- __- ------ ----- -










wished us to pay.
At St. Martin, the half-way station, where we stopped for dinner, we had a stupen-
dous view of Mont Blanc, from the bridge over the Arve River. The glittering white
summit, surrounded on all sides by a host of aiguilles, or minor peaks, but easily over-
topping all, and piercing the blue sky at a height which we had no difficulty in realizing
to be 15,871 feet, was all that imagination had painted it. Well did it vindicate tlh
poet's description:
"Mont Blanc is the monarch of mountains;
They crowned lirn long ago,
On a throne of rocks, in a robe of clouds,
With a diadem of snow."
On our arrival at the hItel de Londres, in Chamouni, we found the bustling,
modern aspect of the place and the company in strange contrast to the sublimity and







AMUSING ADVENTURES


awe of the wonderful vale in which the town lies, like a grain of sand at the foot of
the Pyramids.
The human mind could scarcely conceive anything more lofty or colossal than the
Alps, as they appear to a person standing in one of their deep valleys. And yet, com-
pared with the size of the whole earth, the Alps are not even perceptible ridges on the
surface of the terrestrial globe, as the following calculations will show:
Taking the greatest depth of the ocean at five miles, and the height of Mount
Everest, in the Himalayas (the highest mountain in the world) as five miles above the
level of the sea, and then remembering that the diameter of the earth is 8,000 miles,
the insignificance of the greatest inequalities of its surface is apparent. The proportion
is still better seen if we take a circle sixty-six feet in diameter, having on its surface a
depression of one inch; or a globe one foot in diameter, with a groove on its surface
one-sixtieth of an inch in depth, which would represent on a true scale the greatest
inequality of mountain height and ocean depth on th. surface of the earth.
Next year, the 8th of August, 1886, will be the one hundredth anniversary of the
first successful ascent of Mont Blanc, after many failures during the preceding forty-five
years. Jacques Balmat, a chamois hunter, succeeded in June, 1786, in reaching the
"Grand Plateau," 12,000 feet above the level of the sea, the highest point reached up
to that time in Europe. He spent the night there, going through unparalleled exertions
to save himself from being frozen. Next morning, although he was compelled to aban-
don the attempt to climb higher, he ascertained, as he considered, how it might be
made successfully, and on the following 8th of August, accompanied by Dr. Paccard, Bal-
mat realized his expectations. The news that Mont Blanc had been scaled created great
excitement. Next year, the celebrated Horace Benedict Saussure took the matter up in
the interest of science, and after some disappointments reached the summit of the
mighty mountain on August 2, 1787, an event which led to a most important series of
discoveries in almost every branch of physics. I suppose to the rapid exploration of the
Swiss highlands which followed is mainly owing the great impetus of travel in Switzer-
land and of mountaineering in general, which has been one of the features of this
century.
Well, we did not undertake the ascent of Mont Blanc. In the first place, it costs
from 150 to 200 francs for guides, etc. (Sometimes it costs the climber's life.) More-
over, our countrymen have already won a fair share of the glory accruing from that sort
of thing. As early as 1819, they say, Dr. Jeremiah Van Rensselaer, of New York, and
Mr. William Howard, of Baltimore, reached the top of the Monarch. Mr. Frederick
Clissold followed them in 1822. Another American, Mr. I. II. Jackson, was the first
person who frankly confessed that he made the ascent from no scientific motives, but
merely from foolhardiness. He wrote: "From a love of hardy enterprise natural to,
and I trust excusable in, a young man, I had determined to ascend Mont Blanc-chiefly
because the attempt was one of acknowledged difficulty and danger, and the succeeding
in it would be rewarded with that pleasing recollection which always attends successful
boldness."
Only last Summer, an American named Van Rensselaer (possibly a descendant of the
climber of 1819) made a clean sweep of Mont Blanc and all the most difficult peaks
around Chamouni. He did it in quite a matter-of-fact way, too; and in his account
of the exploit there are none of the usual harrowing accounts of the farewells between
the guides and their wives, who never expected to see them again alive. The only
difficulty was to choose amongst the crowd of hardy mountaineers who were anxious to go








AFLOAT AND ASHORE.


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AMUSING ADVENTURES


We contented ourselves, and had a delightful time, in taking little climbs and going
on the regulation excursions. Our first was to Montanvert, the Aler de Glace, and the
source of the Arveiron River. A two hours' ride on mule-back brought us to the edge


I,,,


ONE WAY OF ENJOYING A SUMMER HOLIDAY IN SWITZERLAND.

of our first glacier-the famous Mer de Glace (Sea of Ice), which has been described to
death, but is none the less interesting the first time one sees it. These glaciers are a
kind of slow-very slow-avalanche, being solid masses of ice sliding down the mountains
from the regions of eternal snow. Sometimes it takes them half a century to move down


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THE VALE OF CIHA2IOUNL







AMUSING AD VENTURES


the side of a mountain, so the people have plenty of time to get out of the way. Tlhr
M3lr de Glace is more than 3,000 feet above the valley, and 6,300 feet above the level of
the sea. It is a very rough and broken waste of molting ice, but not at all dangerous.
At the time of our visit, the peasants were actually conducting a drove of heifers acrcss
it, to pasture them for the tSummer on the grassy slopes under the Aiguille du Drn.
The men had to precede the animals, and cut patls with their hatchets in the wost
places. It was picturesque, but made the Mer de Glace look awfully tame.
AVe also went to see the Jardin-a glassy rock, forming a seven-acre garden, in .he
midst of the ice; and in visiting the source of the Arvoiron, we saw how Alpine riears
tre born. This cold, clear affluent of the Arve issues from beneath a cave of ice, where
the lter do lacee and the Glacier des Bois end abruptly, at the edge of the pino folist.
The icy vault is black in its depths, but of a beautiful azure where .i, i. of transmitted
light strike it. There is ays some risk about entering it, and three persons were
once crushed there. Nevertheless, we went in a little way, and came out shivering into
the hlulv sun, with a never-to-be-forgotten impression of what is passing in the frozen
heart of the Alps. The scenery around is charmingly wild and Alpine, with glittering
obelisks and pyramids overtopping grand bits of rook and wood, and the whole picture
framed by the pines in the foreground.
We stopped overnight at a little inn at Montanvert, where our mountain appetites
enabled us to eat, and even to relish, such trifles as curdled milk, maize porridge, goat
ham, and what passes for bread in those regions-thin brown disks, baked about twice
a year, and kept till they are as hard as a stone, requiring a hammer to break them.
The next day Ray and Budd went up into the Col dun Gant-a magnificent pass
through the heart of the Mont Blanc chain-and saw the great ice-fall there. I went
off botanizing in the direction of the Flgore and the Br6vent. This latter is a con-
siderable mountain, being over 8,000 feet high. It is popular with lady travelers, on
account of having good paths, and commanding superb views. It was great fun to
watch the antics of the tourists here. One party, consisting of two gentlemen, two
ladies and a guide, surpassed a traveling circus. An eccentric old gentleman, in whose
mountain costume a high hat and a pair of spectacles figured prominently, showed a
nervous dread of precipices, and insisted upon being lifted bodily up the steepest places.
His daughter and her male escort, who by no means relished this labor, would seize him
by the collar and drag him up the rocks in the most unceremonious manner, while the
guide -_ .1 at one of his legs. Iis wife, a very stout lady, puffed along behind, flour-
ishing a formidable umbrella. What that old gentleman saw of Switzerland through his
spectacles must have cost him dearly in bodily bruises and damaged clothing, to say
nothing of the wear and tear of his nervous system.
I found it very interesting botanizing on the Br6vent, as it is everywhere amongst
the Alps. The flora of Switzerland is said to contain over 2,000 phanerogamous or
flower-bearing plants, of which 120 species are found only in the Swiss Alps. I have
collected over 50 varieties myself, and bought as many more, ready pressed. They are
tihe best flowers in the world for drying. Those which grow high upon the mountains-
the famous deolweiss, for example-have usually a covering of woolly hairs, while their
stems are partly or altogether woody. The flowers are of brilliant colors, and in some
instances very odoriferous. There are no end of gentians, saxifrages, rhododendrons,
daisies, primroses, ferns anl mosses, on the grassy slopes. IHigher up, the speedwell,
rock scorpion-grass, azalea, Iioosdbe Il',rnsis, and Alpine forget-me-not are common,
together with the edelvlwss ; though it is a scientific fact that the latter flower may be,







AFLOAT IAD ASJIORLE.


with proper care, cultivated in lowland gardens as well as upon the bleak Alpine heights.
The Swiss flowers illustrate the poet's lines:
"No place so wild and drear, no place so fair,
But God's sweet messengers, tlie lowers, are there";

but they are so much sought by the army of Summer tourists, that there is less truth
than poetry in the assertion tlat:
"Close to cold glacier-fields their lives are spent,
L iCicen by morttls."

We spent a week in going the regular Swiss round, so far as the Mont Blanc chain
is concerned; after which we made a two days' trip right across it, by the Tote
Noire Pass and Martigny, and so back to Geneva. We traveled this stage of our journey
on foot, saving tie bother and! expense of guide and mules, and gaining a constant suc-
cession of delights and surprises. We saw the beautiful cascade of Berard, tumbling
down granite rocks; and as we traversed the steep sides of the Buet, I experienced the
novel but not entirely agreeable sensation of being struck on the ear by a genuine
snowball (thrown by Budd, of course), beneath a midsummer sun.
At Martignv we struck modern means of travel again, and taking the cars to ]Bou-
veret, returned, vid the lake, to neat, Frenchified Geneva.
My Rhine and Alpine record may be fragmentary and incomplete; but it is so long
that putting it on paper threatens me with writer's cramp. Ray is writing a letter, and
Budd is pasting into his journal (?) scraps cut bodily from the guide-book; so I anm
sure, dear Uncle Jack, that this is enough for one time from
Your affectionate nephew,
GUY BitoxsoN.





CHAPTER VI.

'EtNICE NOT TO BE LEFT OUT-JOURNEY INTO ITALY via MONT CENTS TUNNEL-TURIN, MILAN,
VERONA, AND OTHER STATIONS-THE GLORIOUS CITY IN TIE SEA-FIRST IMPIIRESIONS-
RAY RvlEAUS AND TALKS HISTORY-EXCURSIONS-TIlE LDO ST. MARK'S AND TIIE PIAZZA-
TOUlRISTS AND T'IIEII- MANNERS-A REGATTA-VENETIAN REPASTS-TIE ISLAND SUBURBS-
FACING NOR'-NOri'EASTr AGAIN.

'" iIOLERA in Italy. Don't go."
J "'All right. But why not Venice ?"
This brief correspondence, between Captain Starbuck and Ray, was by telegraph and
ocean cable, and took place just after the arrival of the young travelers in Geneva.
Two weeks later, upon their return from the Alpine jaunt, they found a letter from
Captain Starbuck. A postscript, to their unbounded satisfaction, answered Ray's inquiry
as follows:
"Your cablegram received at this moment. It would indeed be a disappointment
tor you not to see one Italian city; and as the epidemic has not touched Venice, I
-lunk you may safely spend a week or two there, taking in Turin and Milan on your






AMUSING ADVENTURES


way. But do not go any further south. Upon quitting Venice, you had better take a
beeline (or at least the nearest railway approach to it) to Vienna."

"Hurrah! Venice had almost slipped out of our route, but it's ours notwithstand-
ing!" cried the young travelers, enthusiastically.
"Over the Alps into Italy, like Hannibal and Napoleon-- began Guy.
No; we shall go under
the Alps," said Ray, looking
S., up from his "Continental
1, L Time-tables." "We shall go
i by the Mont Cenis route,
S. right across Northern Italy,
taking in Turin, Milan, Ve-
i' i rona, Vicenza, and Padua,
on the line to Venice. It
S i, wivill be a flying trip, but we
:.' shall live a fortnight in the
i I glorious City in the Sea."
," Leaving Geneva at eight
o'clock in the morning, the
s ~three young travelers crossed
SO the boundary line of Italy
about one o'clock in the
'afternoon.
Se a "W, ho cares for political
boundaries 1" exclaimed Guy.
S'e' A "The Alps are the real
boundary of Italy, and we
have not yet crossed them.
Here we are at Modane. In
Sa few minutes we shall be in
the tunnel."
When they came to it,
the unpretentious entrance
_- made it seem very much like
-- --- --- a tunnel of merely ordinary
S---- pretensions ; but the vast
mountain, 11,000 feet high,
which the tunnel pierced
THIE KNOWING TOUIIST. like a woodchuck's hole, con-
tradicted this impression.
"It looks like a great bore," remarked Budd, as they left the daylight.
When did the first train run through Mont Cenis ?" asked Guy, of a knowing-
looking English tourist with a jaunty Scotch cap, whom the boys had just met in the
hotel at Geneva, and who now chanced to be traveling by the same train.
"'The Mont Cenis tunnel isn't anywhere near Mont Cenis," replied that personage,
gruffly. "It really passes under the Grand Vallon. It was formally opened in Sep-
tcmber, 1871."







AFLOAT AND ASHORE.


"I see by the guide-book," Guy went on, "that it is 7 miles 4i furlongs long, and
the work was begun in 1857. The workmen must have been glad when they saw day-
light on the opposite side of the mountain from that whence they had started, and
knew their drilling and digging was finished."
"They didn't come out at the other end," said the Englishman. Two parties
began work on opposite sides of the mountain, and met in the middle, some time in
the year 1870. If the engineers had made a mistake in their calculations, the two
parties might have gone on working past each other, and never met at all."
"I understand the tunnel cost the French and Italian Governments over fifteen
million dollars."
"It cost three million pounds," said the Englishman, as if correcting a gross mis-
statement.
The boys had long since discovered that their British friend was in reality an














I1
~ -i
',', -,. --













RAILWAY OVER THE ALPS BEFORE THE COMPLETION OF MONTH CENIS TUNNEL.

amiable and well-informed gentleman, and not at all averse to talking, provided ne
might contradict everybody else, and grumble at everything that was not English. Now
that they had got him started, he gave them a great deal of interesting information
about Alpine tunnels in general.
"Besides the so-called Mont Cenis," he growled-in a tone which seemed to imply
that tunneling the mountains was a personal affront to himself-"there are two other
long tunnels entering Italy from Switzerla',.t and the Tyrol. They are the St. Gothard
and the Arlberg. The St. Gothard Tunnel is 94 miles in length, and cost '.-,- ,-,,,,
the diminution in expense being owing principally to the more rapid progress of the work
by improvements in the drilling -machines. The Arlberg Tunnel is shorter than either
that of Mont Cenis or St. Gothard, being only 6" miles. Its cost, with the railway, was
3,480,000. A fourth tunnel, and a most formidable rival to the Mont Cenis and






7R AMIUSIYG( ADVENTURES

it. Gothard Tunnels, will be the Siniplon Tunnel, by which the existing line from Geneva
o Martigny and Brieg will be carried through the mountains to Duomo d'Ossola, and
-i on to Paihunza or Stretza, on the Lago MV i,;,'e. As this tunnel will be commenced





0 .- -- r .

.i _~,-.
















at a mc lower lvel than any of the others, it will necessarily be longer, the rough
estimate being 1 miles, and tlhe probable cost about ,000,000."
I .















kiL_






ITING OF TIIE TWO P PARTIES OF WXORIKMEN IN TIE MII)DDLE OF MONTH CEINI, IUNNIL, 1870.

at a mimli lower level than any of the others, it will necessarily be longer, the rough
estimate being 12" miles, and the probable cost about 4,000,000."
As the train shot forth into daylight at Bardonnche, it became evident, quickly
enough, that the natural as well as the political boundaries of Italy had been passed.







AFLOAT AND ASHORE. 77

The mellow sunlight, the smiling valleys and blue hills, the cypress trees and picturesque
ruins, no less than the lively manners and swarthy complexions of the Piedmontese people,
seemed the embodied ideals of many a picture and poem which had been familiar to our
young travelers from earliest childhood.
Through crumbling Susa, and into bustling, modern Turin-it was only a two or
three hours' ride, which passed with the magic invoked by keen interest and brisk con-
versation. Turin, with its Parisian-looking boulevards, handsome squares, churches,
palaces and statues, fine bridges across the Po and the little Dora stream, together with
the backward view of the Alps, was interesting enough for leisurely tourists, but did not
detain our flying Americans longer than the night which they spent at the Hotei












0 -li
___- -_ -_._ .. --.-_--- -- _-j ^ ; W-I- -.
--- --_-









in their pockets.
"_--_ i-.






SOUTIIERlN END OF TIIE TUNNEI:I.

Trombetta. A good night's rest, and a breakfast washed down with a cup of the ce!-
brated chocolate of Turin, sent them off in high spirits, on the morrow. They nwre
headed for Venice, and a supply of Italian Zirac (the current coin of the country) jingled
in their pockets.
The entire breadth of the Kingdom of Italy, from Turin to the Adriatic, is easily
traversed by rail in ten hours. Leaving Turin at nine o'clock in the morning, our
voyagers reached Milan at noon. There was an hour's stop. The boys walked
through populous, prosperous-looking streets, to where the cathedral's facade of white
Carrara marble rose gleaming above all its surroundings. There it stood, in its delicate
Gothic beauty, with its 106 pinnacles, 4,500 statues, and filigrees of unsurpassable carv-
ings, the most magnificent ecclesiastical structure in Italy, after St. Peter's at Rome.
"Frozen music." was what NMme. de StaEl compared it to, on seeing it by pale moon








AMUSING AD VENTURES


eight. Seen by day, against the deep blue vault of the Italian sky, it is marble spirit-
aalized, or stone inspired to speak, as it were, the poetry of the religious sentiment.


A VENETIAN KITCHEN DOOR.


Brescia, Peschiera, Verona, Vicenza, and Padua are passed-each, as seen throur,
the windows of the railway carriage, looking like a picture painted in glowing colors,
rather than the original of pictures which various mediums of art have scattered over
the civilized world. Toward sunset, Mestre is reached. It is a little village near the
water's edgce.
"Where are the gondolas?" asked Budd.
"In Venice," replies Ray. "We are not there yet. The railroad now runs right


~i2~. WMnEU
r. b


I -


:0:


GOING TO THE HOTEL BY OMNIBU-GONDOLA.
00OIN0 TO THE IIOTEL BY OMINIBfl'-GONDOLA&


a
.,



ill"







AFLOAT AND ASHORE.


across the flooded lagoon, into the
city itself. Formerly, one took a
boat here, and approached it by
water. That must have been pic-L
turesque, though awkward, when
the crowd of travelers was large.
Look we have left the mainland,
and are now railroading over the
lake-like sea !"
Such was the effect of the
view from the windows, as the
train crossed the long causeway.
After a ride of about eight min-
utes over the water, a succession
of pink and yellow walls became '--, ,
visible. Two or three white domes
in the distance glistened like gold
in the rich light of the sunset.
The water was dotted with strange GONDOLA ENTRANCE, VTCTORIA ITOTEL.
black boats, and far to the east
the masts of shipping were visible, outlined against the glowing sky. This was Venice !
Charles Dickens, in his "Pictures from Italy," devotes a chapter to Venice, in
which he describes his visit to that city as a strange dream. It was altogether too
beautiful and too extraordinary to be any part of this everyday world of ours. Other
travelers are very differently impressed, but all of them write their impressions. Venice
has been described to death, in poetry, prose and picture. And yet, no matter how much
you have read about it, you are certain to be surprised.
The first surprise which greeted our young travelers was of an unromantic and dis-


illhsionizina nature.
"I thought one couldn't move anywhere


INTERIOR OF A GONDOLA.


in Venice without taking a gondola," said
Guy, in rather a disappointed tone;
"and now, just look there !"
He pointed to a small steamboat
which lay at the wharf near the railroad
station. A similar craft was visible in
the distance, puffing along the green
waters of the canal.
"The gondolas are the cabs of
Venice, and I suppose these may an-
swer for the elevated railroads," Ray
replied.
"It was about time they introduced
some modern improvements here," broke
in a gruff voice. The boys turned at
the familiar sound, and saw their British
friend of Geneva and the Mont Cenis.
After exchanging greetings, the boys
at once set to work to "draw out" th r






AMUSIGX ADVENTURES


well-informed acquaintance, who knew his Venice well, and whose conversation showed
that he was at home almost anywhere on the continent.
"Steamboats are something new in Venice, are they not?"
"Oh, no. The authorities introduced them three or four years ago, to navigate the
*-rger canals. The gondoliers made a jolly row about it at first-rioted, held mass-meet-
jngs, and all that sort of thing. But the matter has been compromised, for Venice has
a population of over 130,000 people, and you can't keep steam out of a city of that
size, in the nineteenth century, you know. Of course there will always be gondolas a.nd
gondoliers in Venice, if only for show. They are the trade-mark of the place, which ih
pays the Italians to keep up as a show-a kind of battered old curiosity-shop. I d ,i
say you will enjoy it, nevertheless."
The bovs were sure of that, though Budd complained: "It is like being on st
board here. The city is so much at sea, that it makes a fellow almost feel seasick."



1. ',t 1 11 ,

=_,_ I ,' I; __
,- F_- 0--
h 1: 1 ,
....... .... ......,,














The Englishman, upon being applied to for information regarding hotels, unnMit
inglv recommended the Victoria. The gondola which served as omnibus to that estab-
lishment received the travelers at the foot of a flight of slippery stone stairs. There
was no great rush of guests, for tourists, as a rule, give the Italian cities a wide berth
in the hot summertime. For this very reason, however, Venice is, in certain respects
more delightful in August than in April or October.
This is a kind of rock-me-to-sleep-mother affair," observed Budd, as the gondola,
propelled by the pushing strokes of two mahogany-skinned gondoliers, floated off with a
peculiarly graceful and easy motion.
**I believe she would float over any place where there is a heavy dew !" exclaimed
Ray enthusiastically. rg
ingo o know to what Lord Byron likened the Venetianictoria. The gondola?" which served as omnibus to tt estab-
lishmlent received the travelers at the foot of a flight of slippery stone stairs. T'herc,





Englishmant rush of sts, for tourists, as they glided up the broad, S-like Grand Canthe Ital, along which yriads ofberth
lightshe ot summertime. or his very reason, however, Venice is, in certain the duke
more delightful in August taln in April or October.
"Thllis is a kind of rock--me-to-sleep-mother affair," observed Budd, as the gondola,
propelled bY the Imushnyf strokes of two mahogany-skinned gondoliers, floated off with a
peculiarly graceful and easy motion.
I believe she would float over any place where there is a heavy dew !" exclaimed
11av, enthusiastically.
"1,)o yon know to what Lord Byron likened the Venetian gondolaa" asked the
Englishman, as they glided up the broad, S-like Grand Canal, along which Inyriads of
lights began to twinkle, in the dusk.







AFLOAT AND ASHORE.


The boys thought he was going to grow sentimental; but lie merely quoted a sat:r-
ical line from "Beppo," in which the poet says of the gondola that-
"'Tis like a coffin chipp'd in a canoe."

There is some truth in this as a dashing descriptive touch, especially as all the gondolas
are a dismal, funereal black. But their picturesqueness is indisputable ; and on grand
occasions, such as the carnival, or a regatta, or some state reception, they transform the
beautiful sea-paved streets into a spectacle which the world cannot rival.
"The Empress Eugenie, the Emperor Francis Joseph of Austria, and Garibaldi,"


ON THE RIALTO.


said the Englishman, "are amongst the number of illustrious personages who, of late
years, have passed in public triumph up this great water-way. No more splendid occa-
sion can be mentioned amongst the European celebrations of this century, than that cf
the visit of the Emperor of Austria to the late King Victor Emmanuel, in April, 18 ST5
The scene of the Austrian potentate visiting as a guest the city over which lie had at
one time ruled as a sovereign, and sailing with Victor Emmanuel through the Orrand
Canal in the State Barge, was a brilliant historic picture."
By this time the gondola had turned the first grand curve of the canal, and the
majestic arch of the Rialto sprang into view. There was no need of a guide to point
out that world-famous bridge.


I,-
=--=-----~-I-








AMUSING AD VENTURES


"Call up that Red Demon-the
dimensions."
Guy opened the book, and read:


















.--








I *, ".

_- -- .4






,,. ^





-- .- -2 *"" '


guide-book," said Ray, "I want to gAt the

" Span of arch, 91 feet; height above level of


- I


.1 -IA ji j ,






INT~*~~T JIII: J
F ~ LIY


THE MAPnIAE OF THE DOGE OF VENICE WITH TITLE ADRIATIC.

water, 24' feet; width of footway, 72 feet. This is divided into three streets or pass
ages ; and there are 2-1 shops on the bridge."
"Of course, it is the symmetry of the bridge, and its historical associations, which
make it so interesting-not its size," remarked Ray, as he thought of the stupendov
proportions of the Brooklyn Bridge at home.


~I
Q-_


1
-'I
I-..





















) j.3


N -

`1 *

I

t:

o
<] ^


I A


ah.,


L -I
.i:Q ii;
j,

1~1 ~tL
-~


p.'


A VENETIAN FEUD IN TIHE, SIXTEENIITH Ci:NT: Y.- l I (O A 'ANTi\


I
- ~
L







AMUSING AD VENTURES


"The Rialto doesn't claim to be a bridge of size, anyway," remarked Budd.
"Of course not," said the Englishman, failing to observe the pun. "The Bridge
of Sighs is a small, covered affair, crossing a canal called the Rio Palazzo, and con-
necting the Ducal Palace with the city prison. Condemned prisoners were led through
this gloomy gallery to execution. This bridge, like the Rialto, was built by the Vene-
tian architect Antonio da Ponte, about 1588-91. Venice was already in her decline at
that period; and in remembering dates and facts, we have to sacrifice a great deal of
poetic tradition. Ruskin, the great English art-critic, says, in his 'Stones of Venice':
'No prisoner whose name is worth remembering, or whose sorrows deserved sympathy,
ever crossed the Bridge of Sighs, which is the centre of the Byronic ideal of Venice.
No great merchant of Venice ever saw that Rialto, under which the traveler now passes
with breathless interest. "
"And yet," observed Ray, "there are many people who prefer Byron's poetry to
other people's facts, and to whom Shylock and Antonio are as real as the Doges."
"Speaking of Byron, there is the Palazzo Moncenigo, which he occupied during his
stay here in 1818, and where he was visited by Shelley and Tom Moore."
The Englishman pointed to a rather desolate-looking palace of moderate size, near
the Rialto. It had long since reached the stage which the poet was approaching when
he made it his dwelling-place-the stage of decay.
The whole length of the winding canal was lined with palaces, in which the archi-
tecture of different centuries was hopelessly mixed. It is well known that after the year
1423, when the Venetians entered upon the series of costly wars which undermined their
prosperity, no notable buildings in the Venetian style of architecture, properly so-called,
were erected. The native school which flourished with the Republic decayed with it.
In former times, these palaces, or the magnificent buildings which occupied the same
sites, were the warehouses and places of business of the great merchant princes, most of
whom lived on the neighboring islands.
But to our young travelers the illusion was perfect; and as the gondola drew up
at the steps of the Hotel Victoria, within sight of the Square of St. Mark's, the Oriental-
looking Cathedral and the lofty Campanile, they recognized, with boundless enthusiasm,
the Venice of their dreams.
They were just disembarking at the gondola-entrance of the hotel, when their
British friend burst into a fit of loud laughter.
"Bridge of Sighs-bridge of size! IIa, ha, ha! Not bad for the young one, by
Jove i he, he, he !"
Budd's pun at the Rialto had just dawned upon his humorous perception!
In the languid dusk of the evening, after dinner, the young Americans installed
themselves on a balcony overhanging the Grand Canal; and, leaning their elbows on the
broad stone ledge, drank in with eyes and ears the delicious impressions of their first
night in Venice. The waters gleamed in the starlight; gondolas, with little lamps, and
sometimes with colored lanterns, flitted about like fireflies. No sound of trampling feet,
no roar of vehicles, no rushing of cars, to break the stillness. A group of boys, in
bathing-suits, were swimming and splashing about in the canal-a favorite Summer
amusement at high tide in Venice. More than one group of serenaders paused beneath
the windows of the sea-washed palaces, and their music rose sweetly on the night air.
"What a strange romance!" exclaimed Ray, who had been secretly brushing up his
Venetian history. "Over fourteen hundred years ago, when Attila and his Huns were
on the rampage in those beautiful plains and cities we passed through to-day, many of







AFLOAT AND ASHORE.


the ruined inhabitants of Padua, Verona, Vicenza, and otihr towns of the Venetian
province fled in boats and took refuge on these marshy islands. here, they reasoned
rightly, they would be in a position too miserable to provoke the ambition of the con-
querors. Three or four miles of muddy shallows, flooded at high tide, between the
islands and the mainland, practically defended the refugees from invasion in that
quarter; and the long, narrow island of the Lido sheltered them from the fury of the
Adriatic's waves. By-the-way, the Rialto Island was the centre of this early settlement."
"Byron says something about Venice sitting enthroned upon her hundred isles,"
remarked Guy. "'What does your guide-book say about it ?"
"There are between seventy and eighty islands and shoals," replied Ray, disdaining


A VENETIAN FISIt-.MAIRKET.


Guy's sarcastic allusion to the source of his information. "The water around them,
except in the network of channels, is not deep. At some seasons, in fact, when it falls
three feet at ebb of tide, the plain is almost bare, and Venice appears to be built in
the mud. rather than in the sea."
"While you are at it, tell us about some of the exciting things that have happened
here," Budd requested. "Send -our memory back a dozen or two of centuries, if
you like."
Let me see. In the year 809, when Venice had become a considerable city,
Charlemagne's son, Pepin, King of Italy, invaded it with a squadron of vessels. The
French advanced to the Island of Albiola, when, to their dismay, they found that the








AMUSING ADVENTURES


tide had been ebbing, and they were stack m the rud. The Venetians perceived it
too; and with their swift-moving galleys they fell upon the French squadron, killing
all of the enemy who had escaped drowning."
"What relentless fellows !"
"They had an eye to piety, as well as to commerce and war. In 829 they stole
the bones of St. Mark from Alexandria, brought them to Venice, and enshrined them in
the magnificent church, now known as St. Mark's Cathedral. The Venetians adopted
this saint as their patron, and their war-cry, 'Viva San Marco !' inspired their courage
in many a fight. They were great traders and fighters, and by ihe eleventh century
were rulers of the sea, and had made large acquisitions on land. They took a hand in
the Crusades, but their chief motive seems to have been the extension of their com-
mercial relations, rather than the deliverance of the Holy Sepulchre. Having no land to
speak of, the nobles lavished their wealth upon palaces, pictures, decorations, sumptuous
clothes, and magnificent festivals. You have heard how the Doge used to wed the
Adriatic, proceeding annually in the bucentaur, or state barge, to drop a gold ring into
the sea ? Venice, under such circumstances, could scarcely help developing great artists;
and the names of her painters- Titian, Carpaccio, Paul Veronese, Bellini, Tintoretto,
Giorgione--are the most enduring ones she has beqnuathed to our times. The works of
these artists fill the churches and palaces. Religions subjects largely occupied their
pencils; they also found inspiration in the lives and deeds of the great Doges, such as
Faliero, Polani, Ziani, and the Dandoli."
"But, after a time, Venice came down to-what she is to-day. How did it
happen ?" asked Guy.
"For one thing, her numerous wars finally took a bad turn, which lasted through
the fifteenth century. America was discovered; and when the western nations of Europe
woke up, commercially, the naval superiority of Venice disappeared. The enterprise and
hardihood of the people gradually died out. Then the member: of the governing Council
of Ten took advantage of this weakness, and became tyrants. The nobles were luxurious
and dissipated. To the threatening doom of Venice they seemed blind."
Venetian blinds," suggested Budd.
"Napoleon bagged the city, 'perched like a sea-fowl' on her nest of islands, and
turned her over to Austria in 1796. No love was ever lost between the Venetians and
their Austrian rulers. The city and the territory of Venetia were annexed to the King-
dom of Italy in 1814, but eight years later they were again made over to Austria. The
famous Month's War,' in 1866, won Venice back to the Italians, and the city and terri-
tory were incorporated for good with the Kingdom of united Italy. Vic King Hum-
bert-also pretty Queen Martghari !"
As a gentle hint, possibly, that Ray's historical recital was not brand-new, Budd
distributed a pocketful of large Italian chestnuts; and the boys went to bed.
The weather was hot, next day; and it continued so during the two weeks to which
our travelers' stay in Venice was limited. The only activity compatible with comfort
consisted of gondola-excursions to the neighboring islands, and to the Lido. This long,
sandy strip is the Coney Island of Venice. There are sidewalks, gas-lamps, lodging-
houses, and a theatre--all of which take away the romance of the place in their imme-
diate vicinity. The bathing, however, is delightful. A great deal of the beach is still
wild and beautiful. Byron, when he was in Venice, habitually came here to ride and
swim, and the Italians, who regard an habitual bather with wondering awe, called
him "the English fish." The water is dotted with fishing-boats, the sails of which






AFLOAT AND ASHORE.


in many cases, are painted orange, crimson, and yellow. It was the most delightful
thing imaginable to float back to Venice at sunset, over the lagoon-that "green pave-
ment, which every breeze breaks into new fantasies of rich tessellation."
Enjoying themselves in this way, and having a first-rate excuse in the sultriness of


-- i 'I ,
-- '- *'.' .-.,I,., I




I "1 I ',1 '
till r ',ill ,w,1










Lit


4^ -. _;_ -. .
i

















MEETING OD TrING VICTOR rEYMANUEL AND EMPEROR FRANZ-JOSEF OF AU'TTIIA, TN VPENICE.
the weather, the water-loving New York boys deliberately "cut" the stock tourist-sights
of Venice. Picture-galleries, therefore, had little attraction for them ; and after seeing
St. Mark's thoroughly, lingering about the Piazza evening after evening, they felt that
they could get along without "doing" the other churches to any serious extent.






A.IIUSIXG i DYENYTUP'S


There are 306 public bridges in Venice, and theoretically the city can be traveled
all over on foot.
"That's a delusion and a snare !" declared Guv. My experience is, if you want
to get to any place worth going to, you must either swim or pay a gondolier."
The Piazza, or Square of St. Mark's, is a notable exception. There one may walk
about freely, and see sights which, taken collectively, form half of Venice. The Cathe-
dral, Campanile, the Doges' Palace, the Piazetta with its two columns and winged lions,
the flocks ol pigeons, the cafis, the groups of travelers, merchants and sailors from all
ports of the world-in whose mental picture of the City of the Adriatic do not these
figure most conspicuously ?
In Venice, as in other European cities, every tourist is annoyed by the swarms of


A REGATTA ON THE GRAND CANAL.


other tourists. Ile has, somehow, an idea that he ought to have the place to himself.
Even though it was midsummer, these'sight-seeing, sentimental tramps were quite
numerous. Whole squads of them would march up to St. Mark's, with camp-stools and
guide-books and umbrellas, looking like the Salvation Army storming a rampart. Enter-
ing the glorious old church, they would tramp noisily about in the solemn dusk, or
perhaps plant themselves in front of the altar-rail, to devour the contents of an enor-
mous lunch basket. As a rule, they showed a complete disregard of the spirit of
the place.
"MAost of these people seem to be well-dressed Germans, English, and Americans,"
remarked Guy; "and yet they behave as if they had been brought up in a saw-mill, or
on the steppes of Tartary."







AFLOAT AND ASHI 0 /iE.


"They wouldn't behave so at home," said Ray; and he was right.
It must be confessed, however, that, so far as St. Mark's is concerned, the Venetians
themselves set a very bad example. The doors of the ancient sanctuary are blocked
with peddlers scufling for customers, who do not hesitate to follow you across the
threshold. The whole place, in fact, is turned into a show-booth.
But all this did not trouble Ray, Guy and Budd. They went to and fro, and saw
"all out-doors" in the neighborhood of Venice, if they did keep out of damp old prisons,
stuffy galleries, and gloomy churches.
They hired a gondola, one day, and went to a regatta on the Grand Canal. Populace
and foreigners thronged the bridges, quays, windows, roofs, and every available coigne of
vantage. A very tame boat-race aroused far more enthusiasm than any horse-race ever
trotted at Sheepshead Bay, New York.
The markets were very pleasant lounging-places, and there was an abundance of
good fruit, brought from the mainland.
Everything is brought from the mainland, or the neighboring garden-islands, I
suppose," Guy observed to Ray.
"Pretty much everything, except fish and fresh water. Thee arae artesian wclis in
Venice now, although water is still brought in from the River Sele by means of tubes
laid along the parapet of the railroad-bridge."
In a little restaurant near the fish-market, the boys one day tried a native cheap
lunch. They found that, after fish, polent (Italian for corn -meal mush), formed the
chief article of diet, while baked pumpkin and roasted pumpkin-seeds were regarded as
the proper thing for dessert. It does not take much to make a Venetian happy. Flo-
rian's and the Oalff QOadri were also visited, as an offset to the above. These latter are
the "swell" restaurants of Venice, and would be quite Parisian if they were not daintily
and distinctively Venetian.
Then there were the stores and shops. Venice is strong in the manufacture of
jewelry, artistic bric-A-brac, dainty silk stockings, and other articles of tastc, to say
nothing of the beautiful photographs which every traveler is tempted to buy by the
bushel. In Venice, the tourist's loose change is attracted out of his pockets like iron-
filings by a magnet.
The glass is manufactured at Murano, the largest of the Venetian island suburbs,
which has a population of 5,000. A visit to this place formed an excuse for one of
those water-c xc:sions of which our young friends were so fond. Another day was
given to Torcello, one of the historic parent-islands of Venice, and to Burano, where
the handsome, ragged and impudent fisher-folk live.
At last, Ray said, one day:
"According to dates, we have been here two weeks. It seems almost incredible;
and I don't know what we have done, except to linger on under the spell of the sun-
shine here, and like it more and more. It is harder to say it than it was a week ago,
but-we must be off for Vienna."
SI'm so glad we came," said Guy. And there was no dissenting voice.
That afternoon, from the departing train, they saw Venice sink away in the shining,
golden Adriatic, and then, not without a sigh of regret, turned their faces nor'-nor'-
eastward.







AMI US NYG A.) ViTiURLES


CHAPTER VII.

VINNA-STADT AND SUBURBS-TIE RINGSTRASSE-ST. STEPHEN'S PLATZ AND CATHEDRAL-A
VIEW OF THE CITY, AND A REVIEW OF POINTS OF ITS HISTORY -THE STOCK-IMi-EISEN-THE
GRABEN-THE VOTIV-KIRCII-A WONDERFUL CAFE- THE DEAF MUTES OF VIENNA- -A
STRAUSS CONCERT AT THE VOLKSGARTEN--MR. DIGBY DE RIGBY-A VISIT TO SCHONBRUNN,
AND A GLIIPSE OF THE EMPRESS--REMINISCENCES OF NAPOLEON II.-RAY UNPACKS HIS
CAMEREA-A- DOWNFALL IN TIE PRATER-MAATTHIAS AND HIS MUSIC-LESSONS-EXTENSION OF
THE PLEASANT STAY AT VIENNA-OFF AT LAST.

T ENICE and Vienna-people sometimes get them mixed on account of the similarity
of the names. Of course they are as far apart in appearance and general charac-
teristics as they are in geographical distance. The latter is represented by a railroad
journey of some 425 miles.
"We had better say sixteen hours," said Guy, as the three young travelers were
discussing the matter en route. It is next to impossible to say what mile means in
Europe. I have been looking the matter up, and I find that the Austrian meile is equi-
valent to 4i English miles. A Prussian mile is about the same as the Austrian. A
Dutch mnijl, on the other hand, is a very brief affair, being only 1,093 English yards.
Then there are the Swiss schiweizerstunde, and the Russian verst, to say nothing of the
French metric system, which some countries use, and others don't."
"I mean to reckon by the long Austrian meile when I have to pay fare, and by the
short Dutch mnifl when I travel afoot," declared Budd.
"Then you'll have to square your accounts with old Father Time. An hour is an
hour, all the world over."
It was early evening when they arrived at Pontebba, the frontier station between
Italy and Austria. The farce of overhauling the '.i_,- had already been enacted at
the preceding station, Udine. Now came the problem of sleeping accommodations-for
Vienna would not be reached until seven o'clock the next morning. There was an
American sleeping-ear, with ten berths; but the prices charged for the latter were more
than American, being eight florins (about 84.00) each, in addition to the first-class fare.
Having already paid the latter, the boys unanimously voted against the extra outlay.
Their seats could be turned into tolerably comfortable fauzteuil beds, and this they
determined to do.
The plan worked very well. The travelers dozed sufficiently, waking up from time







APF'LAT AND ASHKIUJ.


to time to gaze out of the .'
windows upon what was ., ',,.
presumably Austrian terri- '. & 1,
tory, though it was shrouded -
in an impenetrable darkness
which made it undistinguish-
able from a section of the '
Mont Cenis Tunnel. "'
Railway passengers from
Venice, cominP to Vienna, ,.:' ---'.- '... i
arrive at the station called 'i'-'
the Stid-Bahnhof. It is in 1 i_:-
the suburbs, outside the i'r ~
line of the city proper, or .4;.'''
Stadt. But a whole caravan B
of omnibuses and cabs is in r,'i :
waiting, and the cabbies are 11 Ly-'. y., !"i'I '
fine fellows-the spoiled pets aP .'
of the Viennese. Their flat- :i '.'1 I
tearing salutation, "Does | ,,i.- "
your Grace desire a car- '
riage ?" is soothing even to ,
the democratic ears of Ame-
rican tourists. It is said that '
these "cabbies" can drive '
around a silver dollar without :' ,
the wheels touching it. Their i
legal tariff, in the daytime, M i' 1 7N.. !'
is one florin for any distance i -'
under an hour, and they Z '
don't usually overcharge to ,
a greater extent than thirty :
or forty kreuzers. .
The three sleepy Ame- '- ,
ricans scrambled into one '. .:1' I., 1
of these cabs (it was funr- l ii
nished like a little room, ';
with curtains, looking-glass, ,' '
etc.), and at a gallop were i '
driven off to the Engliscl/er '
Hof, where they engaged ,'
rooms.
The LohLndiener, o01 I ;
porter, who looked after I'
their luggage and brushed b' -- '
their clothes, at once began I ,-'
their instruction in the local -- i
tongue by teaching thentl .






AOIiUSIIG AD VENTU-lifS


the meaning of the word Irinlkgeld-a "tip," or bit of drink-money" given to
a servant.
"I don't feel sleepy any more," declared Budd, after breakfast. "In Venice, a
fellow feels as if he were walking about in his sleep all the time; but here, there is
something wide-awake in the air. Let's go out for a ramble."
And the three sallied forth.
"Vienna, as I have always heard it described," said Ray, "is a kind of German
Paris. So it is, evidently, for gayety; but what with the admixture of Slavs, Hunga-
rians, Bohemians, Italians, and other lively foreigners, it is far from being a German
city. Even the German language is spoken with a difference."
"Look at this crowd !" exclaimed Guy, as they turned into one of the broad,














thronged Rinstrass. "I should say this was neither Parisian or German, nor any-










thing but just Viennese. I never saw anything like it."
P -- -- 'al--


















The great promenade really presented a wonderful panorama, that fine Summer's
~ ~~~- ; -----: -- ..- --= 7 _-- -

-. I !, u "i r 1:]



morning. It is a handsome boulevard, fully svnty yards wid. It has two sidewalks,














two roadways for equipages, an interior alley for pedestrians and one for promenaders
L I ,- _-i















"They say," Guy remarked, "that the way to see Vienna is to spend nine-tenths o-
TIIE ASPERN BTE)DGE.
thronged Rtimin thasse. "I should say this was neiater Parisian lor German, nor any-
thing but just Viennese. I never saw anything like it."
The great promenade really presented a wonderful panorama, that fine Summer's
scoring. It is a handsome boulevard, fully seventy yards wide. It has two sidewalks,
two roadways for equipages, an interior alley for pedestrians and one for promenaders
on horseback, besides a broad middle roadway for horse-cars, omnibuses and cabs.
"They soy," Guy remarked, "that the way to see Vienna is to spend nine-tenths of
one's time in the streets, the cafes and the Prater Park, and in listening to the music.
The city has few monuments of historical or architectural interest, and there is nothing
striking about its natural situation."
"How about the 'Beautiful Blue Danube'?" asked Budd.
"It flows past the ciy, two or three miles away. That muddy-looking canal that
we crossed a little way back is an arm of the Danube, and the insignificant little stream
that flows inco it near the Asporn Bridge and the Custom-House is the Wien, from
which the city takes its name."







AFLOAT AND ASHORE.


"Let's get lost," suggested Budd. "Those old streets over to the right yonder are
very picturesque, and as crooked as the paths of the Ramble in the Central Park
at home."
Turning southward from Franz Josef's Quai, where they had been walking, they
plunged into that brilliant labyrinth of Old Vienna, known as the S/adt. This old and
inner town, with its intricate, irregular streets, is completely surrounded by a circle of
suburbs, nine in number. Around the Stadt, and separating it from the suburbs, runs


a "ring" of boulevards, collectively
which were leveled in 1858. There
still preserved as the boundary of
the city imposts, and called the
Lines. Unlike most European
cities, the old part of Vienna is
the most fashionable. The Burg,
or Imperial Palace, St. Stephen's
Cathedral, the University, the
Academy of Fine Arts, the muni-
cipal buildings, the Opera and
theatres-in fact almost every im-
portant public building in Vienna,
lies within this ancient and aris-
tocratic circle, which is so limited
in extent that you can walk
through it in a quarter of an
hour. It is in winding through
these labyrinths that one sees on
all sides the ancient buildings and
monuments which look like so
many foundations of the Hapsburg
dynasty, already over a thousand
years old.
"Follow almost any street in
this spider's web, and sooner or
later you will bring up at St. Ste-
phen's," said Ray. "Look yonder
is the great tower, and here we
are emerging into the Platz."


the Pingsrasse, on tbh line of the :.it;! it;..i,.
is also an external ring of ramparts and fosses,


',. I_ ,,I ,! i
hi I I

II'''II


i i iN,'



-- --- ,
=- __._--_~ ~ ~ :---=-=:_


a,' 'II

I '


IA VIENN E -CI OFFICER.
,I ---- T


"Why, I had never heard much about this cathedral, yet surely it is one of the
most magnificent in Europe," exclaimed Guy, enthusiastically. "What does the red
oracle say about it, Ray ?"
"In 1351," began Ray, consulting the guide-book, "work was commenced on the
choir-that was long before Columbus set out to discover America. A century or so later
they thought it was about time to do something about a nave, and accordingly went to
work at that. Probably there were no contractors in those days, and builders took their
time. The great south tower or spire-which was formerly only two-thirds of its
present height-was completed in 1423; but in 1519 an earthquake gave it a shaking-
up from which it never recovered, and finally it had to be taken down. The present
spire was built 1860-64, and is 444 feet high-not quite so high as that of the








AMUSING AD VENTUIREES


'II-


- ~ f~kr
g ;AT


:11


-- -;--


A SUMMER STORM.

Strasbourg Cathedral, but reputed more beautiful. By-the-way, I wonder if we can't
get up there ?"
"Suppose you ask one of those Irish policemen," suggested Budd, pointing to a
municipal officer dressed in green, and wearing a sword.


* -'


* I


THE IMPERIAL FAMILY AND THE KING AND QUEEN OF ITALY AT THE OPERA.










A -FLOAT AND ASBORE.


".1' N~ N


I ''


* I..*


THOE 0008oo FOUTIAI.


*.-^ -.\-^







AMUSING ADVENTURES


The officer was, of course, an Austrian, and he spoke only German. Ray studied a
moment, and evolved this address:
"Zeigen Sie mir den Weg---" here he stuck; but he contrived to make the man
understand by pointing up at the lofty spire, and thus saved himself from the ridicule
of Guy and Budd, who were envious of his linguistic accomplishments.
"Ist hier!" replied the officer, pointing to a small house from which the tower
could be entered.
Three tickets cost ten kreuzers each, and the ascent of the winding stairs a great
deal of climbing.
"The scene is worth that," declared Ray. "What a bird's-eye view Do you see
those dark, cloud-like hills away to the east ? Those are the Carpathian Mountains.
Yonder is the Danube, with its islands; and those plains beyond must be Napoleon's
famous battlefields of Lobau, Wagram, Aspern, and Essling."
"How pleasant the environs of the city look from here !" remarked Guy. "Gardens
and vineyards everywhere; and nature seems to have marked the spot for a city."
"So the ancient Romans thought, when they established their station of Vindobona
here, about the beginning of the Christian era; and Charlemagne made it the capital
of the eastern provinces of his empire. It has had its full share of historical events
during the past few hundred years, while Europe has been gradually falling into the
organization and divisions that exist to-day. The King of Hungary established his court
here in 1484. After his death, in 1490, the Emperor Maximilian I. took possession of
the city, which has ever since been the habitual residence of the princes and
emperors of the House of Hapsburg, to which the present Emperor Franz-Josef belongs.
The Turks besieged Vienna in 1529, and again in 1683. The second siege lasted two
months, when the city was relieved and the Turks were completely routed by the Poles
under the famous John Sobieski. By-the-way, the largest of those bells which we saw
as we climbed up here was made of the 180 pieces of cannon taken from the Turks
after their repulse."
"That bell may some day ring the knell of the Turkish Empire in Europe-which
they say is going to pieces as fast as it can," Guy remarked.
"It would have gone before now, if the other Powers had been able to agree upon a
peaceable division of the plunder. But let me finish my historical remarks. Vienna was
twice occupied by the French under Napoleon-in 1805, after the battle of Austerlitz,
and in 1809, after that of Wagram."
"The second time he came, he was himself captured by an Austrian, was he not '"
Guy asked.
"You mean, I suppose, the Archduchess Maria Louisa, who became Napoleon's
second wife, and the mother of his son, the Duke of Reichstadt, or Napoleon II. This
unfortunate young prince lived and died in Vienna; and when we make our excursion
to SchUnbrunn, the Emperor's former Summer palace, we shall see the rooms in which
the poor boy was kept like a prisoner."
"What about the Treaty of Vienna, that a fellow is constantly stumbling against
when he tries to read up modern European history ?"
Oh, there have been no end of treaties made in Vienna. Its position is so central,
and Austria has been so much mixed up in the wars of modern Europe, that this place
has been selected oftener than any other, unless it be Paris, as the meeting-place of the
representatives of the various Powers. By far the most important of these meetings,
however, was the great Congress of Vienna, from November. 1814, to June, 1815. Czar~,




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