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Marjorie and her papa
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00081193/00001
 Material Information
Title: Marjorie and her papa : how they wrote a story and made pictures for it
Physical Description: 66 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Fletcher, Robert Howe, 1850-1936 ( Author, Primary )
Birch, Reginald Bathurst, 1856-1943 ( Illustrator )
Century Company ( Publisher )
De Vinne Press ( Printer )
Publisher: Century Co.
Place of Publication: New York
Manufacturer: De Vinne Press
Publication Date: 1891
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Fathers and daughters -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Storytelling -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Play -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Soldiers -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Family stories -- 1891   ( local )
Baldwin -- 1891
Genre: Family stories   ( local )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Robert Howe Fletcher ; illustrated by R.B. Birch from designs by the author.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002223439
notis - ALG3688
oclc - 191092003
System ID: UF00081193:00001

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MARJORIE AND HER PAPA



HOW THEY WROTE A STORY
AND MADE PICTURES FOR IT



BY
ROBERT HOWE FLETCHER


ILLUSTRATED BY R. B. BIRCH
FROM DESIGNS BY THE AUTHOR


NEW YORK
THE CENTURY CO.
1891

















































Copyright, 1890, 1891, by THE CENTURY CO.



All rights reserved.


THE DEVINNE PRESS


II ,I-~*---- ~ -








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MARJORIE AND HER PAPA




CHAPTER I

HOW THE STORY WAS WRITTEN

MARJORIE is three years and six months old, and
I am her papa-
But you will have to say how old you are, too,
Jack."
"Now wait a moment, Marjorie, or we shall have
this all mixed up. You must let me do the talking."
"Well, all right, go on. Only I want to talk just
sometimes, don't I ? You are sixty-twenty years
old, ain't you ?"
"No, I am thirty years old."
Well, as I said, I am Marjorie's papa. Marjorie
always calls me "Jack," and if the old lady across
3








MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


the way does think it very strange that a little girl
should call her papa by his first name, we do not.
Because, you see, Marjorie has always heard her
mama call me "Jack," and that was the first word
she said when she was a tiny baby. When she
said it, her mama picked her up and kissed her
again and again because it sounded "so cunning!"
,4 Well, one day, not very long ago, Marjorie and I
were looking at one of her books which was all
about a little girl's tea-party.
"Why," says Marjorie, "I have a tea-party 'most
every day."
Yes," I said, I know that you do."
Well," said Marjorie, her eyes filling with tears,
"nobody never made a book about my tea-party!"
I would not cry about it, if they have not," said I.
I ain't," said Marjorie, winking very hard.
"You must not say, 'I ain't,' Marjorie," said her
mama, "you must say, 'I am not.'"
I am not," said Marjorie. Then after a while
she said, How do they make books, Jack?"
"People write them," I replied.
Do they ?" said she. "With a pencil ?"
Well, yes," I said, with a pencil, or pen and
ink."












































































"LET 'S, ME AND YOU, WRITE A TEA-PARTY BOOK, JACK."



I*







MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


Oh-h-h! I tell you!" cried Marjorie, clasping
her hands and opening her eyes very wide.
Well," I said, what is it ?"
"We have a pen and ink," said Marjorie, in a
whisper. "Let's, me and you, write a tea-party
book, Jack."
"Very well," I said, "we will do it, and have it
published."
"And-and-we will make some pictures for it,"
said Marjorie, leaning back and looking at me.
"Of course," said I.
Hey!" shouted Marjorie, jumping down from my
lap and dashing away, "I '11 go and get my pencil
right now."
And that is how Marjorie and I came to write
this story.

























CHAPTER II

THE TEA-PARTY

JACK," said Marjorie, I am going to have a tea-
party. Will you come?"
I shall be delighted," I said. Is this the one
that is to be put in the book ?"
Oh !" said Marjorie. "Oh, I never thought of
that! Why, of course. Mama, we are going to have
a tea-party-may I ? And oh, mama, we are going
to put it in the book!"
7








MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


"That will be nice," said Marjorie's mama.
Have you got anything for a tea-party?" asked
Marjorie, anxiously.
Well, I am afraid that I have not, Marjorie,
but I will see," said mama, going into the next
room. For you must know that just then we were
living in a hotel and had no pantry nor kitchen to
go to.
Here is only one piece of candy and an apple,"
said mama.
Is that all ?" said Marjorie. But you have got
some sugar, ain't you ?-I mean, are n't you ?"
"'Have n't you,'" said mama.
I meant, 'have n't you,'" said Marjorie.
Yes," said mama, I have some sugar, so we can
have tea, at any rate."
Well, I '11 tell you what we will do," said Mar-
jorie. I will take some of my blocks and play that
they was cakes and things."
"Why, certainly," said mama; that is what we
will do. And now get your little table."
All right," said Marjorie, dragging the table out
from the corner. And now the table-cloth."
"There is a clean towel on the rack in the other
room," said mama.








MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


"There!" said Marjorie, spreading the towel on
the table. "Oh, my!" she cried. "The table is
too-too fat for this table-cloth."
I think there is a larger one in there," said mama.
"Now, Jack, what are you laughing at?"
"This one will do," said Marjorie. Now will
you get me my tea-set? Thank you, mama. Now
we must wash them first. There 's the cups. Jack,
you must help, too. There 's the saucers and the
plates; and the milk-pitcher; and the teapot. Let
me fill them. There, now it is ready. Ding-a-ling-a-
ling! Oh, wait. I did n't ask Frankie."
Frankie is Marjorie's dearest friend. She is a
little girl, though her name is like a boy's name.
And not so very little, either, for she is fourteen
years old. Her mama has rooms just across the
hall from us, and so it was not long before Marjorie
came back holding Frankie's hand.
Now," she said, the tea-party is all ready."
So we all sat down to the tea-party.
Now pour out the tea," said mama.
It does not look very strong," said I.
"Well," cried Marjorie, eagerly, "you know it
is only water, Jack, but then you must play that it is
real tea."








MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


"Why, of course," said mama. "Jack is very
stupid."
"Well, but, mama," said Marjorie, "he did n't
know. Will you un-peel the apple, Jack?"
Certainly," I said.
( We will play that it is
pudding," said Marjorie.
I think it is delicious,"
said Frankie. "And this
chicken-salad is very nice."
Sn Is it not?" said mama.
"And this ice-cream, too.
.-2 ~ Marjorie, you must hand
around the ice-cream."
S"Why, it is very rich,"
Said I, as Marjorie gave
us each an alphabet block.
"You have a very good cook, Miss Lang-a-lang."
My name is Miss Johnson," said Marjorie.
Oh, excuse me !" I said. Look out, Miss John-
son, or you will upset the milk-pitcher."
For Marjorie was reaching across the table for
the plate with the one piece of candy on it.
Oh, my !" said Marjorie. And then, looking at
the candy and then at her mother, she said, Mama,







MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


will you have some candy ? There is not very much
here, I guess."
No, thank you, dear," said mama. I don't care
to have any."
Frankie," said Marjorie, "do you want some?"
Oh, no," said Frankie, I have eaten so much
already. I could not possibly eat any more."
"Jack," said Marjorie, "will you have some?"
Thank you," I said, I believe I will. I am very
fond of candy."
So I took the only piece that there was.
Then Marjorie put the empty plate down very
bravely and looked at her mama with her eyes full
of tears.
Oh, Jack," said that lady, how can you ?"
"Why, I don't want it all, sweetheart," I said.
"You can have it all, if you wafit to," said Mar-
jorie, with her little back very straight.
Come, now," I said, you are such a polite little
lady, I will have to make you a present."
And with that I took out of my pocket a big box
of candy.
"Oh, mama, just look what Jack 's got!" cried
Marjorie, clapping her hands and laughing through
her tears.







MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


Well, well!" said mama.
My gracious !" said Frankie, "he is a regular
fairy."
No, Frankie," said Marjorie, shaking her head,
"fairies don't wear coats and trousers."
Soldier fairies do," said Frankie.
"Do they, Jack?" said Marjorie.
Yes, soldier fairies do," I said.
Now we all can have some candy," said mama.
Yes," said Marjorie, opening the box, now we
all can have some candy."
And so we all had candy.
"Now, Miss Johnson," said I, "will you please
excuse me? I have some writing to do."
I think I must go, too," said Frankie. It has
been a lovely tea-party. I hope you will have
another one soon."
I have enjoyed it ever so much," said mama.
A little while afterward Marjorie, having finished
what sugar there was left in the sugar-bowl, brought
her chair to my side, and sitting down began to think.
What is it, little woman ?" said I.
"Jack," she said, "do you think that was a nice
enough tea-party to go in the book?"
"Of course it was," I said.
2







MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


Well, but you know," said Marjorie, they had
really truly cake and-and things, in that other one,
and ours was only blocks."
"Yes," I said, I know. But any one could have
a tea-party with real cakes. Ours was much nicer
because we made-believe."
Yes," said Marjorie. "And then we did have a
whole box of candy."
Yes," I replied, we did indeed."
"All right," said Marjorie; "then we will put it
in the book. Will you make a picture for it?"
SYes," I said, I will."
And here is the picture on page 1.















CHAPTER III

MARJORIE DRAWS A PICTURE

"ALL my books has got po'try in them, Jack,"
said Marjorie, a day or two after the tea-party. Has
the book we are making got any po'try in it?"
Poultry ?" I said. What, chickens ?"
"No-o-o!" said Marjorie, laughing. Po'try, don't
you know ? Like 'I want to be a angel.'"
"Oh," I said, poetry."
"Yes," said Marjorie, "po'try. Will you make
some for my book?"
Well," I said, "I will try. Bring me a pencil and
a piece of paper. There; now let me think."
"Have you thinked yet?" asked Marjorie, after
looking at me anxiously for a little while.
No," I said; "it takes a long time to make poetry.
You go and play, and I will call you when it is
ready."








MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


I '11 make a picture for the book," said Marjorie.
"Shall I ?"
"Yes," I said; "you make a picture."
"All right," said Marjorie.
Marjorie made her picture before I made my
poetry.
Is it lovely?" she said, as she showed it to me.
Yes," I said, "very. Now the poetry is all ready.
It is about:



"THE LITTLE GIRL WHO PLAYED SHE
WAS A FISH.

ONE night a small girl came
down to the rocks
SBy the side of the great, big
sea
And she pulled off her shoes,
and she pulled off her
socks,
And waded in up to her
knee.

An old crab wondered with
all his might
What the little girl's game
could be,
















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MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


And why she was out so late at night;
So he climbed up the rocks to see.

"Said the girl, I 'm a fish in the big, salt sea,
I 'm a fish and I live in the water !'
'That 's odd,' thought the crab, as odd as can be!
I am sure it is Mrs. Brown's daughter!'

Then the girl jumped around and tried to behave
Just as the fishes do,
When suddenly up came a great big wave
Arid soaked her through and through.

The old crab laughed and laughed, till he cried,
As the girl ran dripping away;
He laughed till he got a stitch in his side,
Which served him right, I must say."

Marjorie sat thinking for a little while, and then
she said, But the little girl was not really a fish,
was she, Jack ?"
"Oh, no," I said; "she only played she was a
fish."
I think she was a very silly little girl to play she
was a fish and get all wet." Then, after thinking
about it a little longer, Marjorie said, "Jack, won't
you take me out to the beach to-morrow."
"I will see about it," I said.








MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


But, Jack, I think you might," said Marjorie.
"I want to go such lots."
I won't promise," I said, "because maybe I can't
keep my promise."
Do genelum always keep their promise?" said
Marjorie.
Yes," I said, and ladies too."
And little girls'?" said Marjorie.
Yes," I replied, "if they are good little girls. I
once knew a little .girl who promised her mama
that she would not go in the street. And she went
in the street. I did not think she was a good little
girl, at all."
"Yes, I know," said Marjorie; "but next time I
won't."

















~ PC~Q ~aa~3















CHAPTER IV


ON THE SEA BEACH

NEXT day we all went to the beach in a sail-boat.
And Marjorie ran after the waves and the waves
ran after Marjorie. Then at noon we sat down on
the sand in the shade of some rocks and ate our
luncheon.
"We shall have to wait till the tide goes out
before we can gather any shells," I said.
"Why ?" said Marjorie. Does n't the tide like
you to have them ?"
Frankie laughed at that, but Marjorie did not
see anything to laugh at. Then after a while Frank
and Marjorie went away by themselves and gathered
a great many lovely shells-three handkerchiefs full.
And when they came back Frankie was laughing
again because Marjorie wished to know where the
tide had gone.









MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


-K~-



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"And could you tell
quired.


her,


Miss Frank ?" I in-


"Well," said Frankie, I know that the moon has
something to do with the tide."
"Where does the tide go to, Jack ?" said Marjorie.









MARJORIE AND HER PAPA. 23

"Why," said I, it is this way:


WHERE does the tide go when it goes out?
The Man in the Moon knows pretty well.
In fact, he knows beyond a doubt-
But the Man in the Moon won't tell.

Now when it goes, on tiptoe we
Will search the sands for a lovely shell.
The Man in the Moon will see us, maybe-
But the Man in the Moon won't tell."












ARM!!
:r,_.,T* -
,,5 ~-















CHAPTER V


MARJORIE'S STORY

DON'T think you want to tell me a story,
do you, Jack?" said Marjorie.
It was Marjorie's bedtime, and
Sometimes, as a great treat, I would
tell her a story after her mama had
tucked her in her crib. So I said,
Yes," and told her a little story.
Then Marjorie said she would tell
me a story.
Now," she said, "you listen, and don't you go to
sleep. Are you listening? "
Yes," I said; I am listening."
"Well-l-l," began Marjorie, er, a, once upon a
time there was a, there was a, a a little boy. And
er, a, a-BEAR ate him up/"
My! I said. How dreadful! "








MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


"Yes," said Marjorie; and, and, then he fell off
a house and broke both his legs!"
Dear me! said I; that was very shocking."
Yes," said Marjorie; and then he broke both
his arms!"
Oh!" said I. "What did they do with him?"
"Well," replied Marjorie, shaking her head, I
don't know what they did with him, but I guess they
threw him away; 'cause he ain't any more use then,
you know."
No," I said; I should think not. I don't think
little boys are of much use, anyhow."
Some boys are," said Marjorie.
Well, maybe some are," I said. Now I will tell
you a story, and it is about.a little boy that was not
of any use at all. Only, they did not throw him
away, they made a bird out of him. Then after that
you must go to sleep, and to-morrow we will put
both of our stories in the book, and draw pictures
for them."
Yes; but, Jack," said Marjorie, I can't draw a
picture of a bear. Don't you know, I tried the other
day, and you said it looked like a turnip?"
Did I ?" I asked.
"Yes, you did," said Marjorie.
3







MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


" Well," I said, I will draw it for you."
" No," said Marjorie, I will tell you what let 's


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do. Let's put in the picture I drawed of the torch-
light procession. Won't that do ?"








MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


Well," I replied, I don't know that bears ever
have torchlight processions, but I do not think that
matters. We can write to the publishers and tell
them all about it."
Yes," said Marjorie. "You write and tell them
that I don't know how to make a bear. And now
tell me about the little boy."
This is


"THE STORY OF A LITTLE BOY WHO WAS
TURNED INTO A BIRD.

NCE there was a little boy,
SAnd, for no reason why,
From the day of his birth, nothing else on
earth
Did he do but whine and cry.

He cried so very, very much
That no one would go near him;
The people said, 'It beat the Dutch I
Why, the Man in the Moon could hear him!'

"This boy's home was on the beach
Where the sea-gull's scream is heard,
And if there 's a bird knows how to screech,
The sea-gull is that bird.








MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


"They scream their best when the winds blow high,
And the sky grows dark and hazy;
But let that boy begin to cry,
And he'd drive the sea-gulls crazy.



















"Until, at last, they said, 'Oh, joy !
We must be very dull,
This child 's no use at all as a boy,
But he 'd make a splendid gull!'


"So off they flew and told the king:
They told him not to doubt it;
That this boy's scream beat everything I
That's all there was about it.








MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


J the

C ,5


" The king, he saddled his best curlew;
He flew down the wind like mad!
(I think 't was a funny horse, don't you ?
'T was the only kind he had.)








MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


"And when he heard that little.boy yell
He thought his ears would split,
And so he turned him into a gull,
And nobody cared a bit."


I think his mama must have cared," said Marjo-
rie's mama.
"Yes, Jack," said Marjorie; I guess his mama
cared."
"Well," I said, "perhaps his mama cared."
"And I think that after a while his mama went
and told the 'King of the Gulls' that her little boy
would be good now and not cry any more, and
that then she persuaded the king to change him
back again into a little boy," said Marjorie's mama.
Did she, Jack ?" asked Marjorie.
Well," I said, come to think of it, I don't know
but she did."
















CHAPTER VI


THE RED DOLLY

S ERE is my Red Dolly, Jack," said
SMarjorie; "won't you put her in the
S book?"
Oh, yes, certainly," said I.
"Although there is not much of her
to put in. She looks like the little
boy in your story, who fell from the house and
broke both of his arms and legs, and as if the
bear had almost eaten her up, but had not quite
finished her."
I don't care," said Marjorie, pouting, "she is
very nice, and I love her, I do."
"Well, I did not mean to say anything unkind
about her, Sweetheart," I said. I have no doubt she
is very nice. So if you will ask her to sit up in the







MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


chair there, and tell her not to move while she
is having her picture taken, I will see what I
can do."
Oh, she won't move, Jack," said Marjorie, eagerly.
Jack, she is just the bestest
dolly you ever saw! "
"There," I said, finishing
the picture; "do you like
that ?
Yes," said Marjorie; "that
o is lovely. Now let me draw
her. There! Is n't that love-
ly, too? Now, write some
po'try about her, Jack,-
won't you, please?"
SWell, let me see. I don't know anything that
rhymes with dolly, except Polly. Her name is not
Polly, is it?" said I.
"No," said Marjorie; "her name is not Polly;
it is Red Dolly. 'Cause, don't you know, she had
on a red dress when you bought her for me?"
Oh, yes," I said; of course, I ought to remem-
ber. Well, here is a ballad:









MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


"TO THE RED DOLLY.

" DOLLY dear, last year, when you were new,
You were quite pretty, that is true;
Though now you look so queerly.
Your cheeks were red, and your eyes were blue,
You 'd arms and legs, and feet you had, too.
There were few in the city so pretty as you,
Dolly dear, last year, when you were new;
And Marjorie loved you dearly.
But now your cheek's no longer red;
Your arm is broken, so 's your head;
You 're blind, and bald, and deaf, and lame;
You 're-But Marjorie loves you just the same,
Dolly dear."











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CHAPTER VII


HOW MARJORIE WON THE
WHITE SEA-BIRD

HE night after we took the Red Dolly's
picture, there was a party in the hotel,
Sand Marjorie's mama said that she
might go into the parlor and look on,
for a little while. So Marjorie was
S dressed in her prettiest frock, and
went with her mama, and watched the
people dancing. Then she said that she wished
to dance, too. I asked her if she would dance with
me, but she said no, she wished to dance with Lieu-
tenant Smith. Lieutenant Smith is an army officer
who knows Marjorie very well. So I told him to
ask her. But then Marjorie would not dance
with him because, she said, I had told him to ask
her, and that was not the way people did, at all.







MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


Then Mr. Smith laughed, and said that next time
he would ask her without being told. So he walked
once round the room, and when he came to Mar-
jorie again, he said:
Miss Marjorie, may I have the pleasure of this
waltz with you ?"
And Marjorie said Yes," and got up and
danced with him.
But when he brought her back to her seat,
Marjorie did not look at all pleased.
Then the Lieutenant said: "What is the matter,
Miss Marjorie? Have-I done anything you don't
like ?"
"Yes," said Marjorie, pouting. "All the ladies
and genelum walk round after they dance. And
you did n't."
Oh, I beg pardon; I forgot," said the Lieuten-
ant, laughing once more. "Won't you walk around
with me now?"
So they walked around the room.
Now Marjorie was a little girl, and Mr. Smith
was quite tall, so that he had to lean over when she
took his arm. But being one of those young gentle-
men who like to make fun, he pretended to have to
lean over very far indeed, so that people smiled.











































































MARJORIE WALTZES WITH LIEUTENANT SMITH.








MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


And once he made believe to trip over a pin that
was lying on the carpet, which made some ladies
laugh. Now Marjorie does not like to be laughed
at, and when she came back to her seat I saw that
there were tears in her eyes.
Say Thank you' to Mr. Smith, Marjorie," said
her mama.
So Marjorie said Thank you," but so low that
no one heard it.
I think, Mr. Smith," said Marjorie's mama,
smiling, "that it is getting near my little girl's
sleepy time. Come, Marjorie, say 'Good-night,' and
let us go to bed."
Now I fancy that Marjorie may have believed
that she was being punished for not behaving
prettily, while all the time she thought it was
Lieutenant Smith who had not acted nicely. Then
she did not wish to leave the party ,and go to
bed. And she really was tired and sleepy, and,
although we did not know it, she was not very
well. At any rate, Marjorie began to cry in good
earnest.
So then I took the little girl up in my arms,
and said, I '11 tell you what we will do, dear. You
come with me, and I will take you home. And
4







MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


then I will tell you what Sergeant Quickstep found
to-day, over at the lighthouse."
Marjorie did not stop crying until she was all
ready for the night. And she had to laugh because
I was so very awkward about putting her to bed;
but at last she was safely tucked into her crib.
Then the tears came again, and she said, "Jack,
SI don't like the way Mr. Smith did, a bit."
But, Marjorie," I said, "was it worth while to cry
about it? Mr. Smith was only playing. You are a
little girl, and you must not expect gentlemen to treat
you as if you were a grown-up lady."
But," said Marjorie, you always say I must be
a lady."
Yes, sweetheart, but while you are little I want
you to be a child lady. Then when you get to be as
big as mama and wear long dresses, the gentlemen
will behave toward you as they do toward other
ladies. So now," I said, what do you think it was
that Sergeant Quickstep found to-day over at the
lighthouse ?"
I don't know," said Marjorie.
Well," I said, he found a lovely white sea-bird.
The lighthouse-keeper told him that it flew so hard
against the lantern last night, that it was killed, poor








MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


thing! The sergeant gave it to me. And I thought
that its skin would make a fine collar for my coat;
then I thought it would make a beautiful muff for a
little girl. Now I will tell you what I will do. I
will get a pillow and lay my head down on it, here,
and you lay your head down on your pillow, and
the one who first goes to sleep gets the bird."
Marjorie laughed, and said, All right."
So I brought the pillow, and we laid our heads
down and shut our eyes very tight. Pretty soon I
opened one eye and looked at Marjorie, and I found
that Marjorie had opened one eye and was looking
at me. So we both laughed and shut our eyes again.
Then, after a while, I opened one eye and looked at
Marjorie. But she did not open her eye this time,
because she was asleep.
And so Marjorie won the white sea-bird.














CHAPTER VIII


MARJORIE HAS THE SCARLET FEVER

MARJORIE has been having the scarlet fever.
She wants that to go in Our Book, so there it is.
The day after the party, Marjorie was cross and
fretful. The old lady who lives next door said that
it was badness, and that she ought to be punished.
But grown people do not know everything. So,
instead of punishing her, Marjorie's mama held
her in her arms and rocked her and sang to her.
After a while we found that.Marjorie was ill, and
so we sent for the doctor, and he said she had
scarlet fever.
Well, then they would not let any one come into
the room lest some other little girl should get it.
And Marjorie's mama and papa nursed her for six
weeks, and she had to take a great deal of medicine.
We always "used to taste it first, to see whether it was
nice or not; and if it was not nice, Marjorie got a








MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


present for taking it. One of the presents was a cap
for the Red Dolly, a cap which covered .her head,
so that you could not see where it was broken.


THE DOCTOR PRESCRIBES FOR THE LADY DOLLY.


Marjorie was afraid that the Red Dolly would
take the scarlet fever; but I think she must have
had it.
We played that the Lady Dolly took it. The
4*









MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


MARJORIE GETTING BETTER.


Lady Dolly wears fine clothes and moves her eyes
and cries. When the doctor came, Marjorie con-








MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


suited him about the Lady Dolly, and he said that
a little medicine would not hurt her. And so, every
time that Marjorie took medicine, the Lady Dolly
had to take some, too; and when it was horrid she
rolled up her eyes and cried. But she did not get
any present.
When Marjorie grew better, I told her so many
stories and drew so many pictures, we could not
begin to get them all in Our Book.
"Yes, but, Jack," said Marjorie, "I think you
might put 'Strange Land' in, and-and the 'Little
Girl Who Lost Her Hat."'
Well, I am sure I could not put in the story of
the hat, Marjorie, because I 'd have to make a
noise like the chickens, and the cows, and the
birds, and all the other things that the little girl
met, and I cannot do that with pen and ink, you
know."
Can't you draw the way they went, with a pen-
cil?" suggested Marjorie.
No, I am afraid not," I said.
But," said Marjorie, you can tell about the lit-
tle boy, and the old chair with a break in the seat,
can't you ?"
Oh! yes," I replied:








MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


"Now listen to me well, and I will try to tell
Of a chair that was a sham,
Of a shelf that was tall, a boy that was small,
And a pot of blackberry jam.

Of course the boy with care climbed upon the chair,
His hand just reached to the shelf;
When .suddenly his feet went right through the seat,
Then the boy fell through himself.

Then the shelf so tall came down with a fall
On the chair that was a sham;
And there they all lay, in a mixed-up way,
Spread over with blackberry jam."

I am not sure," I said, that I like that word
'sham,' because I do not think that all the little boys
and girls will know what it means. But then I
cannot think of any better word to rhyme with
'jam.'
"Well," said Marjorie, "I guess they can ask their
papas.
"Yes," I said, "of course. Or their mamas, or
somebody."
Now," said Marjorie, tell about the people who
lived in their hats."
"Well, when I was a little girl-"







MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


"Why, Jack," said Marjorie, opening' her eyes
very wide, you never was a little girl."
"I mean when your mother was a little girl," I
said, "ever so many years ago-"
Now, Jack !" said Marjorie's mama.
"They used to wear big straw hats, and they called
them 'flats.' And now the rooms that people live
in they call flats.' So that is where the funny part
of this poetry comes in:


" There was a lady lived in a flat.
Just think.of that!
She laughed so much she grew quite fat.
Just think of that!









MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


"Though her husband was thin
He could not get in,
So he went and kept house in his hat.
Think of that! "







MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


"Now, 'A, B, C,'" said Marjorie.
Very well," I said:

When little girls say their A, B, C's,
They must be careful not td sneeze,
For if they do, as sure as fate,
They '11 never be able to say them straight."

"And now," said Marjorie, leaning back in her
big chair, "just tell about 'Strange Land,' please,
Jack; and that will be truly all."
So I told her this story:

THE LOST CHILD IN A STRANGE LAND.

ONCE upon a time a little girl found herself walk-
ing along a road in the country. She did not know
where she came from, or where she was going. It
was just as if she had been asleep, and had waked up
in this Strange Land. But she did not feel frightened
or unhappy. She walked along looking at the big
trees and bushes, and wondering what they were
made of, and how all the little leaves were fastened
on to them; and she pulled one off to see. Then
she saw the sky, and thought that it was very pretty,
and that she would like to look at it closer. A long,







MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


long way off she saw where the sky touched the
earth, and she rnade up her mind to walk there and
put her hand on it, and see if it was as soft and
smooth as it looked.
But before she came much nearer to where the
sky touched the earth, the sun, that big, bright ball
which had been over her head all day, began com-
ing down to the same place. The little girl thought
that it was coming down to meet her, and she hur-
ried as fast as she could, so as to be there in time.
But while she was still ever so far off, the sun got
down very near to the earth, and suddenly dropped
out of sight.
Then the little girl stopped running, because she
saw that there must be a big hole between the edge
of the earth and where the sky was, into which the
sun had dropped; and she was afraid that, as it was
getting very dark, she might fall into it, too, and
tumble down on top of the sun. Pretty soon the
stars began to shine. The child was very sorry to
see the stars, because she was sure that the sun must
have fallen down so hard as to break into little
pieces which had splashed all over the sky. She
was very sorry for the sun. At the same time she
thought that perhaps she would better not go any







MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


nearer the end of the earth, just then. So she sat
down to see what would happen next.
While she was waiting, a woman came along,
and said, Why, here is a child. I was looking for
a little girl. Are you anybody's little girl?"
The child said she did n't think so.
"How lucky that is!" said the woman. "I will
call you Katie, and take you home with me."
So the child went home with her, and the woman
gave her a bowl of hot bread-and-milk, and then un-
dressed her and put her to bed. While Katie was
lying there, very happy, she began thinking about
all that she had seen that day. And by and by she
asked the woman if that beautiful sun was really all
broken into little bits.
Why," said the woman, "what on earth is the
child talking about ?"
So Katie tried to tell her.
But the woman said crossly, "Goodness me!
Katie, you must not ask so many questions. Little
children should be seen and not heard."
Now, Katie wanted to know very much indeed
about this sun, and the sky, and the trees. She was
sorry that in this Strange Land children must not
ask questions. But she was a good little girl, and
5







50 MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.
tried to do whatever this. woman, who seemed to
know everything, bade her.- And so she asked no
more questions, but lay there thinking it all out for
herself; but before she could quite make up her
mind about it she fell asleep.
Katie must have taken cold during the day while
she was running to the end of the earth, because in
the night she began to cough. The woman, by this
time, had put out the light and was in bed with her,
fast asleep. Katie's coughing woke her up, and that
made her very cross indeed, and she said:
"Oh, dear me! If I had known how much
trouble this child was going to be, I don't think I
should have brought her home.!"
Katie was very sorry to hear the woman say
that, and she cried a little to think that she was not
wanted, and she wished she could go away. But
crying only made her cough more than ever.
Then the woman said: "If you don't stop
coughing I '11 shake you! Do you suppose that I
am going to have you keep me awake all night with
your coughing? Stop it, I say!"
But I can't help it," said Katie.
Don't tell me you can't help it," said the woman.
"I know better. You can if you try."







MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


"I really don't believe I" can," said Katie to her-
self. But she says she.knows." And remembering
that the woman had told h'er only a little while ago
that children should be seen and ndt heard, she made
up her mind to try very hard to stop the next cough.
Pretty soon she felt it coming, and she held her
breath.' Then she began to get hot all over, and
there was a ringing in her ears, and her eyes started
out, until, at last, she thought she would surely have
to cough and be punished, or burst.
Then, suddenly, it seemed to Katie as if she had
broken into ever so many little stars, as the sun had
done. The next moment the child found herself
walking along the road in the country just as on the
day before, only it was morning now. The sky was
soft and blue, and the grass was soft and green, and
the dewdrops sparkled on the flowers, and pretty
soon the glorious sun itself came up in the sky the
other side from where it had gone down the night
before. The child was so glad to see the sun and
the flowers that she began to sing with the birds.
While she was singing, there came by a lady,
dressed so prettily that she looked like a walking
flower.
"Oh," cried the lady, stopping as she saw the







MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


child, "oo sweet littlee tootsey wootsey! Oo must
tur right home with me, and be my littlee tweet dirl."
Now, the child had never heard any one talk in
that way before, but she liked this pretty lady, and
took her hand; and together they walked down the
road to where there was a lovely house. But before
they came to the house, a big red thing, with four
legs and a tail and a head with two sharp sticks on
it, looked over a fence and bellowed at them.
This frightened the child, so that she hid her
face in the lady's dress.
"Why," said the lady, "you silly littlee goosey
poosey! That is only a cow."
Oh," said the child. But, nevertheless, she kept
on the other side of her friend until they had passed
the big thing with its mouth working so, and with the
sharp sticks on its head
Then they walked on a little farther. Suddenly
the lady gave such a shriek that the child jumped
nearly out of her shoes.
"Oh, what is the matter?" she cried, clinging
once more to the lady's dress.
"There! there! Don't you see it?" said the
lady, pointing with her parasol to the road in front
of her.







MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


For a long time the child could not see anything.
At last a tiny gray creature, about as big as a spool
of thread, came running along the road. As it drew
near them the little girl was going to pick it up.
But the lady gave another scream and jumped upon
a log, pulling the child after her.
What is it?" whispered the child. She was not
scared, as she had been at the cow, but she did not
understand.
S'h'h!" cried the lady; "it is a mouse!"
Oh," said the child again.
"Shoo!" cried the lady, shaking her skirts at the
mouse.
Then the mouse sat up on its hind legs'and
slowly winked one eye at the little girl. After which
it turned around and ran away as fast as it could.
When they came to the house, the lady took the
child to her husband, who seemed very glad.
"Well, this is really a nice girl," he said. "Now
the first thing to be done," he continued, "is to begin
her education. One cannot begin a child's educa-
tion too early. Tell me, little girl, what is the
meaning of Pachyderm ?"
I don't know," said the child.
"Ah," said the man, I am sorry to hear that."



















































































"LITTLE GIRL, WHAT IS THE MEANING OF PACHYDERM? "


r


-c~---
---







MARJORIE AND HER PAPA. 55
"But no one ever told me," said the child.
"Then you should have asked," replied the
man. "What is your tongue for if it is not to
ask questions?"
But I was told-," said the little girl.
Don't interrupt me," said the man. Now, here
Sis a list of examination questions which I have pre-
pared for the Primary Grade, and here are the text-
books from which the information can be derived.
Get a pencil and paper, and go to work. How
doth the little busy bee!' Go to work, little child,
go to work."
So the child went to work. But just as she got
to "303. Define the analogy between metacarpus
and kabeas-corpus," her head began to feel very
queer. Then everything whirled round and round
like tops. The next minute she found herself on the
road in the country once more.
Now the child was very glad to see the sky, and
the trees, and the birds again. She thought that it
would be very nice if the big people in Strange
Land would leave her alone out there with the birds,
and not take her to their houses any more. But
when the sun began to go down she grew very
hungry, and was too tired to run to the end of the







MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


earth to meet it. And when at last she came to a
house, she stood at the front gate and looked in.
At that moment a woman came hurrying out to
her, and, picking her up in her arms, hugged and
kissed her, and said:
You precious thing, you! I knew you 'd come
to see me to-day. Come in!"
The child was glad to hear that, and when the
woman took her into the house, and bathed her, and
gave her a nice warm supper, she was very happy.
After supper the woman took her in her lap, and
sang to her, and told her stories. There was an old
lady in the room, who was the woman's mother.
And she kept saying all the time to the woman,
" My dear, you are spoiling that child."
But the woman only laughed, and went on tell-
ing, the child stories. Now, some of these stories
the little girl did not like, although she was too
polite to say so. They were about a Rag-man who
carried little children away in his bag, and Ghosts
who scared little children in the dark, and Giants
who ate little children up. Now, of course, the
grown people in Strange Land only make-believe
that there are ghosts and giants. They know that
there are no such things, and that nobody hurts







MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


little children. But the little girl had seen so many
curious things that she believed that what the woman
told her was all true. So when they put her to bed,
and took away the light, and left -her alone, she was
very much frightened. Pretty soon she heard a
scratching noise at the foot of her bed. This scared
her so that she called out very loud. Then the
woman came in, and the child told her what she had
heard.
"Why," said the woman, "it is only a mouse."
Oh, make it go away," said the little girl.
"Afraid of a mouse!" said the woman, laughing.
"A little, tiny mouse! Why, that would never hurt
you.
Then the little girl did not know what to think.
So she asked if she could not have a light in the
room.
At this the old lady spoke up, and said, No,
no. Little girls must learn to sleep in the dark.
My mother made me sleep in the dark, and I made
my daughter do the same. There is nothing to be
afraid of."
But I want to see that there is nothing to be
afraid of," said the child.
"No, no," said the old lady. "Shut your eyes







MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


tight, and go to sleep; then you won't know whether
it is light or dark."
Now, although the little girl shut her eyes very
tight, she could not go to sleep. So, when they left
her alone again and shut the door, she covered up
her head in the bedclothes, and trembled so hard
that the bed shook and scared the little mouse half
out of his senses. The child kept thinking of all
the dreadful stories the woman had told her about
the Rag-man, the Giant, and the rest of them, until
she was so frightened that she cried. Then sud-
denly she heard a gentle voice, and then -
Why, then the little girl woke up. Woke up
truly; for she had been only dreaming about the
Strange Land all this time, while she was really in
her little crib at home. And the night-lamp was
burning low, and her own mama was leaning over
her.
"I think," said Marjorie's mama, that the little
girl must have been eating too many nuts and
candies."
Had she, Jack ?" said Marjorie.
I don't know," I said, "but I should n't wonder."

















































1/-











CHAPTER IX


WE GO CAMPING

ON the day Marjorie got well, we all went to
the country and lived in a tent. That is, we had a
tent for the bedroom, and another tent for the
dining-room and kitchen, and all out-of-doors for a
parlor. When we had dinner, Marjorie could spill
the milk all over the grass if she wanted to; and
that was fun. And she slept in a hammock, in-
stead of a bed; and that was fun. And one day
she almost saw a snake, so she said. Then the
birds would come, in the early morning, and sing to
us until we got up. Marjorie's mama said that it
would be very funny if the robin-redbreasts should
come into the tent some morning before we woke
and, seeing us lying there, should cover us with
leaves, as they did the Babes in the Wood."
"That did happen once," said I "a long time ago.
The robins found a little girl, named Amaryllis,
asleep by a spring, and they thought she was dead,
and covered her up with leaves."
"Then could n't she get up ?" said Marjorie.









MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.
A. /,


SY' --


Oh, yes," I said. "When she woke up, she
laughed at the robins. A friend of the birds, named
Robert Herrick, heard about it afterwards; I don't
know whether it was the robins or the little girl who
told him. At all events, he put it all in a book.
I will tell you about it to-night, if you like."
So that night, while Marjorie rocked herself in
the hammock, I told her Robert Herrick's story of
Amaryllis and the robins. And she liked it so well
that she said it must go into our book, too.
"And, Jack," said she, "we must make some
pictures for it."
6


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CHAPTER X

THE SERENADE

WHEN we became tired of living in a tent, we
went back to the city. We were all glad to get
home. Marjorie was so glad that, when her mama
put her to bed in her own little crib that night, she
could not go to sleep, but wanted to sing.
So then I said that we would have a little con-
cert to celebrate our coming home, and we would
put that in to end The Book.
And this is what we sang:


A SERENADE--To my little girl.

GOOD-NIGHT, Sweetheart,
The sun has gone to rest;
The evening-star, the night-lamp of the world,
Burns dimly in the west;
Tired day has closed its eyelids
On the blueness of its skies;
Do thou, Sweetheart, close thy lids
On the blueness of thy eyes.
65









MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


The little birdies' heads have sought their wings,
Each little flower has closed its petals bright;
Do thou, Sweetheart, let thy dear head,
With all its little rings of golden hair,
Sink down upon thy pillow white,
Whilst low I whisper in thy ear,
Good-night, Sweetheart, good-night.


THE END.