• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Title Page
 Sun dials, or how mammas tell...
 From five o'clock to five...
 The skating party
 Why I wasn't there
 When there are company
 Thoughtful Rosy
 Hunting the polar bear
 Setting a new fashion
 Making their weather
 War and arbitration
 What Bozzy said to Felix
 The sleep of the just
 Back Cover






Group Title: Sun-dials, or, How mammas tell time : and other poems and stories
Title: Sun-dials, or, How mammas tell time
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00081191/00001
 Material Information
Title: Sun-dials, or, How mammas tell time and other poems and stories
Alternate Title: How mammas tell time
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : col. ill. ; 27 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Daley, C. F ( Charlotte F )
Shepley, Annie B ( Illustrator )
Worthington Company ( Publisher )
J.J. Little & Co ( Printer )
Gast Lith. Co ( Lithographer )
Publisher: Worthington Co.
Place of Publication: New York
Manufacturer: J.J. Little & Co.
Publication Date: 1891
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1891   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1891
Genre: Children's poetry
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by C.F. Daley ; illustrations by Annie B. Shepley.
General Note: On cover: "The Gast Lith. Co., N.Y."
General Note: Title page printed in black and red.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00081191
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002223319
notis - ALG3568
oclc - 11263887

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Sun dials, or how mammas tell time
        Page 3
        Page 4
    From five o'clock to five o'clock
        Page 5
        Page 6
    The skating party
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Why I wasn't there
        Page 9
        Page 10
    When there are company
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Thoughtful Rosy
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Hunting the polar bear
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Setting a new fashion
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Making their weather
        Page 19
        Page 20
    War and arbitration
        Page 21
        Page 22
    What Bozzy said to Felix
        Page 23
        Page 24
    The sleep of the just
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text

















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SUN-DIAL


S


OR

HOW MAMMAS TELL TIME
AND


OTHER POEMS AND STORIES

BY
C. F. DALEY

ILLUSTRATIONS BY ANNIE B. SHEPLEY


NEWV YORK
COPYRIGHT 1Y
WORTHINGTON CO., 747 BROADWAY
1891

























































































Press of J. J. Little & Co.
Astor Place, New York.









SUN DIALS, OR How MAMMAS


TELL TIME

THERE'S many a way of telling time in this blessed world of ours,
From Brie O' and his turnip watch to the chimes of cathedral towers;
There's the cli:: ai, it-elh. the h, Ir-zl.i~, :nd the sun-dial in the sun,
They each can sl" ,i.. il heed. h, l ;i. lc coursee of the day is run.
There's the d.inda.- u v bill. nJ th.it nods in the grass;
But I know .c *L ei tlin il. i the ie of a lad or a lass.






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W HEN kissing-time comes in the morning, I know it as well as can be
By the way these lads and lasses come crowding close round me,
With mouths puckered up like a gentian and eyes overflowing with love,
And faces wreathed in sweetest smiles; all this to my judgment doth prove
That all the clocks in all the world, however so many there be,
Exactly point to kissing-time ; at least for the children and me.
AND when .sleepy-time comes in the evening, I know it as well as can be
By the way these lads and lasses come crowding about my knee,
With eyes that in the morning's prime sparkled with liquid light,
With faces where sweet trust takes up her vigil for the night.
So all the clocks in all the world, however so many there be,
Exactly point to sleepy-time ; at least for the children and me.
CHARLOTTE F. DALEY.







FROM FIVE O'CLOCK TO


FIVE O'CLOCK

FIVE o'clock looks out to see dawn illume the skies;
Six o'clock on summer days sees the sun arise;
Seven o'clock will list to hear all the children waken-
Presently their way will be to the schoolroom taken.
E IGHT o'clock and nine o'clock find the girls and boys
Busy with their books and slates, busy with their toys;
Ten o'clock, oh that's the time baby takes a nap;
Eleven the baby is awake and coos on Mamma's lap.











....

..-' ,. .


TWELVE o'clock. Oh' lhea.r the diJ n llthe Ic l Idl : ut,
For it's dinner-time once more and the school is out;
One, and two, and three o'clock slowly drag away,
Reading, writing, 'rithmetic, not one bit of play.
B UT, oh, blessed four o'clock have you come at last?
Now the hours will quickly go till the day is past.
Sleds go flying down the hill, snowballs fill the air,
Skates go whizzing o'er the pond, fun is everywhere.
THEN comes five o'clock once more, and the winter sun
Softly sinks behind the hills, and the day is done.
Heaven bless the children all, every hour of every day,
Through the coming glad New Year guide them all the way.
CHARLOTTE F. DALEY.









THE SKATING PARTY



THIS is a skating party and we're going home to dine;
We've been out all the morning ever since half-past nine,
And now we hear the dinner bell, so, hungry as can be,
We're rushing home to Mamma, with our faces full of glee.


MY hadn't we a lovely time on the ice so smooth and hard-
The pond's out in the meadow beyond Timothy's back yard.
But your Tom had a dreadful fall, and he didn't cry a tear,
And no big folks were standing by to say to Tom, "Poor dear."


Ii."


SO I just s:.i. it ; :nd at that Tom grew first red, then white,
And looked .s it he'd like to I'.dl gaini, just out oi spit ;
But he didn't, and instead of that he came close up to me
And whispered, "You're the'nicest girl that ever I did see."


N OW if you ask Tom's opinion about what's best to play,
He'll surely say it's skating though you fall down every day;
At least that's what he told to me, for you see Tom has no fear,
And if he should fall when I am by, I'll always say, "Poor dear."
CHARLOTTE F. DALEY.









WHY I W


WASN'T


THERE


T HESE children gave a party, and politely sent for me;
So I thanked them very kindly and accepted, but you see
My chair and plate are empty in the picture, so I'll tell
The reason for this circumstance ; I am not very well.


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FOR when it's Christmas, tho' a boy tries hardest to be good,
Sometimes he will forget himself, and eat more than he should;
And I had been at grandpa's-all the grandpas I have known,
Have always lots and lots of things that boys don't get at home.


W E had goose and duck and turkey, and a chicken fricassee,
And after we had eaten them we had a Christmas tree,
With nuts and raisins, plums and dates, and horns of candy too,
Oh I can't tell you all the things, it ended. Oh boo-hoo.

IT ended here! right h-e-r-e in bed!
And here (boo-hoo), I've got to s-t-a-y,
So my plate and chair are empty,
Because I am a-w-a-y.
CHARLOTTE F. DALEY.







WHEN


THREE ARE COMPANY


A LL muffled up in feather and fur
And wool from the back of the sheep,
Away we go through frost and snow,
A Merry Christmas to keep.


THE fox looks out from his woody house,
The owl looks down from her tree,
And the sheep stands by with a smile in his eye,
Our Merry Christmas to see.


SOME people say that "three's a crowd,"
And that "two are company";
I guess they can't be little folks
On their way to a Christmas tree.


HERE are Tom and Timmy and Mary Jane
All snuggled up close in a sleigh,
As away they go through frost and snow
To keep old Christmas Day.
CHARLOTTE F. DALEY.








THOUGHTFUL ROSY



OUR Rosy was tired of frolic and play
At two o'clock in the afternoon,
So down on the sofa to rest she lay,
And to think, perhaps, of the man in the moon;
Or was it the mountains in the moon?
Or the clouds that sail so soft and white?
Whatever she thought of I do not know,
But I do know the old Dream Sprite.

AND there he stood at the Sandman's side,
At two o'clock in the afternoon.
His red umbrella was open wide,
And I said to him, "Why have you come so soon?"
He pointed to Rose, and his quiet face
Was radiant with a gracious smile,
As to my question he replied
"This baby and I will think awhile."










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NOW if ever you're tired of work or play,
Even tho' it's daytime and only two,
Lie down to think as Rosy did,
And the Dream Sprite will come and think with you.
CHARLOTTE F. DALEY.








HUNTING THE POLAR BEAR



ON winter days there's lots of fun, especially when the chores are done,
And all the boys, from everywhere, go off to hunt the Polar Bear.


O'ER hills, far past the steepled town, on our bob-sleds we're whizzing down,
And 'tho Jack Frost may freeze the air, it's warming work to hunt the bear.



A WAY you go to,:.v;rd the wood, and if you're feeling as you should,
You hold your breath, for it will scare most folks to hunt the Polar Bear.



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SH see him crouching in the wold; now, now, if ever, you'll grow cold;
And right straight up will stand each hair, when you attack the Polar Bear.


A H now he's rolling on the ground; you list to hear him roar, no sound
Comes through the silence anywhere: Alas! 'twas not a Polar Bear.


IN spite of this, there's lots of fun, on winter days when chores are done,
And all the boys, from everywhere, go off to hunt the Polar Bear.
CHARLOTTE F. DALEY.


V %_








SETTING


A NEW FASHION


W E have but one single pair of skates,
And really, you know, we would like three,
So we each take turns in using them,
We're Mary Jane, Tom and Timothy.


yOU will see by the picture on next page
That when we skate we all sit down;
But not because we can't stand up-
We're setting the fashion for our town.


-~- -~.


'LL tell you a secret, I'll whisper it
So everybody cannot hear,
Come close, and, 'cause you're big and tall,
Bend down, so I can reach your ear.


F through life you've but one pair of skates,
When really, you know, you would like three,
Just set the fashion for the world,
Like Mary Jane, Tom and Timothy.
CHARLOTTE F. DALEY.


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MAKING THEIR



THO' the bumble-bee and the "flutterby,"
And the clover they love to kiss,
Have gole with the birds and the summer sky,
These children will never miss
Aught that they were at their beauteous prime, JSAr
Tho' winter is here with its frost and rime.
That
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NO matter what "Probabilities say,
Or the weather prophets may tell,
How to scatter the cold and clouds away
These philosophers know full well;
They will discount all the winter's Lloom
'Gainst the warmth and light .-i last blessed .une.









M,












DO look at the picture on next page,
Take a good look and I'll engage
You'll conclude with me, that the winter hours


WEATHER






look at the picture on next page,
id there I'm sure you'll see
the real true weather don't depend
n sunshine nor bird nor bee;
wise little folks have the secret found
king their weather the whole year round.


Need miss no summer sun nor flowers,
If only our lives we will keep in tune
With the benediction and bliss of June.
CHARLOTTE F. DALEY.








W\ AR AND ARBITRATION


W E had a war outside our gate, Tom and his brother Jack and I;
Our balls were big, and made of snow, and oh! how they did fly.


W EE built a frort \ here Timothy made believe
But %Ve three bols jiust Iuuted him; my!


he was the garrison,
wasn't it great fun.


I MEAN at first, for pretty soon I got real mad, I'll tell you why;
Tim threw a ball and hit my face, and most put out my eye.


WA ELL, then we all got hold of Tim, and tumbled him with all our might,
Till he looked like a real snow man, from head to foot all white.


THEN we took sides, for wasn'tt fair for three to be againstt one, you know,
So Jack stood out with Timothy, and Tom took me, and so

W E beat, for Tom's the bravest boy there is in all creation-
I mean we would have beat, but Jack called out for arbitration;


AND that means that folks mustn't fight, with snowballs, nor with swords,
But sit down still in Father's barn, and settle it by words.
CHARLOTTE F. DALEY.









WHAT BoZZY


SAID TO


FELIX


O UT of dreamland three children have come, as a fresh new day is dawning,
So sleepy baby must wake up too, for it is Christmas morning;
Here are Lucy and Jack and Fred and Felix, but Felix will lie abed.



NO, no," says Bozzy, the shaggy dog, as he barks at his little master,
"Just look at the nursery clock, my dear, the minutes go fast and faster,
And presently the sun will rise, and mount to very noon in the skies.


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" OUT in the parlour, when breakfast is done, you'll find a heap of things
That have come down the chimney, so Pussy Cat says, for'Santa Claus has wings-
She saw him as on the hearth she sat; I wish I were just as wise as a cat."



NOW, oh! how quickly is Felix dressed in the clothes that Lucy brought-
Hair brushed, face washed, shoes blacked and tied-you never would have thought
That he could lazily lie abed; was it all because of what Bozzy said?
CHARLOTTE F. DALEY.


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T HE SLEEP OF THE JUST





THE gates of Dreamland stood ajar
And through them our lamb went singing,
To a slumberous poppy flower, his hand
Tenaciously was clinging;
And to his own sweet lullabies
The baby softly shut his eyes.


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N OW warm and safe in his snow-white bed
Our little lamb lies sleeping,
His Angel that looks on the Father's face
A faithful watch is keeping,
And his baby cares all left in trust,
The darling is sleeping the sleep of the just.

CHARLOTTE F. DALEY.




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