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The hundred riddles of the fairy Bellaria
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00081181/00001
 Material Information
Title: The hundred riddles of the fairy Bellaria
Cover title: Book of one hundred riddles of the fairy Bellaria
Spine title: 100 riddles of the fairy Bellaria
Physical Description: xii, 149, 1 p. : ill. ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Leland, Charles Godfrey, 1824-1903
Unwin, T. Fisher ( Thomas Fisher ), 1848-1935 ( Publisher )
Gresham Press ( Printer )
Unwin Brothers (Firm) ( Printer )
Publisher: T. Fisher Unwin
Place of Publication: London
Manufacturer: Gresham Press ; Unwin Brothers
Publication Date: 1892
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Kings and rulers -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Fairies -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Love -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Contests -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Riddles -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Fantasy literature -- 1892   ( rbgenr )
Riddles -- 1892   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1892
Genre: Fantasy literature   ( rbgenr )
Riddles   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
England -- Chilworth
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Charles Godfrey Leland.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002232925
notis - ALH3323
oclc - 00378642
lccn - 34010502
System ID: UF00081181:00001

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THE HUNDRED RIDDLES OF THE
FAIRY BELLARIA






















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LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

AND OF RIDDLES.




PAGE
THE SNOW .. 4
THE STATUE .. 5
THE APPLE-TREE. 6
THE MOLE AND EARTH WORM 8
A TAPER. 9
A RIVER IO
MY EYES 12
INK. . 13
AN ARROW 14
BLOOD 15
A HORN 17
A BIRD WITH AN ACORN 8I
AN APPLE . 20
A CLOUD, RAIN, AND WATER. 21
WHITE AND GREEN 23
A PICTURE-BOOK 25
CAT, SHEEP, AND BEAR MUSIC-STRINGS 26
THE FINGERS .. 28
A KITE . 29
APPLE AND PINE CONE 31












x LIST OF ILLUSTRA TIONS.
PAGE
CATERPILLAR, BUTTERFLY, AND THE KING .32
A BOW 34
GOLD, SILVER, COPPER, LEAD 35
THE BLACKBERRY .. 37
THE THIEF AND THE LAMB 38
POWER 39
A MILL 41
FOOTPRINTS 42
A FLY ON A KING 43
THE DWARF AND GIANT 45
A BRIDGE 46
TWO MEN FORMING A BRIDGE BY JOINING HANDS 47
AN EAGLE, A SHIP, A KISS, AND A SERPENT 48
THE TRUTH IN A HORN 50
A LAMP 51
A SOUL AND THE WAVES 52
DEATH BY THE SWORD 53
THE THREE THREES 55
AN EAGLE AND A FISH 56
THE HORSESHOES AND SWORD 58
MAN DROWNING 60
A LANTERN 61
A CHESTNUT TREE 63
BIRDS AND WATER 65
GIFTS . 66
SHIP WITH OARS AND SAILS 68
A MIRROR 70
AN OVEN 71
THE SUN 73
LOVERS PARTING 74
A TOPER AND HIS GLASS 75













LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. xi
PAGE
SEA-HORSES, COBWEBS, PIG-PENS, PUDDING-STONE, DIS-
TAVES, AND BACHELORS' BUTTONS .77
THE SEVEN COLOURS 78
A BUTTON-HOLE 80
AN OX 8.
A SHELL 82
ECHO 84
A KEY 86
SCISSORS AND NEEDLE 88
THE BEE AND THE FLOWERS 89
RINGS 91
STREAM IN SUMMER AND IN WINTER 92
AN OSTRICH 94
A SPINNING-WHEEL .. 96
A BY-PATH OVER HILL AND DALE 97
THE GOLDEN GIRDLE OF THE QUEEN 99
A PAIR OF SHOES WITH STRINGS. ICO
BARLEY AND ALE 102
ROSES IN BLOOM IO
A MASK 104
A PICTURE OF A SAINT ON A GOLD GROUND 105
A SWORD 107
A HEAD OF HAIR. HAIRS CHANGE TO SERPENTS 108
A NAKED MAN AND A BEAR 109
A GREY WOLF AND A SHEEP .III
THIRST. A MAN DRINKING 112
A GOOSE, A SHEEP, A BEE, AND A PARCHMENT SEALED
AND SIGNED 113
WATERFALL AND STREAM 115
A LARK 16
THE DAISY I118













xii LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS..
PAGE
A DIAMOND 119
A MULE 120
AN OSTRICH EGG HOLDING A NEST WITH SEVEN STARLINGS 122
SILVER AND COAL 123
A SHIP ON SHORE AND ONE AT SEA 124
A HOUSE AND AN APPLE-TREE CARVED ON A PANEL 126
AN EGG 127
A CAT 128
A GOOSE 130
A ROCK IN A DRY RIVER-BED 131
A NUT 133
LEAD, COPPER, AND BRONZE. A BRONZE BALL AND SWORD 134
A VINE ABOUT A TREE, WITH GRAPES 135
A TAMBOURINE 137
LINEN HANGING IN A HIGH WIND 138
PIGS FLYING THROUGH THE AIR 140
A TREE GROWING HALF WAY UP A MOUNTAIN-SIDE 142
A LEATHER BALL 144
SNAILS ON A TREE-TOP 145
TIHE DYING MOTHER, THE KING, AND THE FAIRY 147














THE HUNDRED RIDDLES OF THE
FAIRY BELLARIA.


ONCE there was a fairy who was very wise and knew
all things. She fell in love with a king and would
marry him. This king had a wonderful garden, which
was full of all kinds of fruit ; and if any one entered it
without leave he was beheaded. One morning the
fairy, whose name was Bellaria, entered the garden
and began to eat the fruit. There the King caught
her, and, thinking she was a woman, said that she must
die, unless she answered the question which he should
put her.
She said, Put it before your council, that I may be
fairly judged."
So he called together all his wise men and asked-
How many hairs have I on my head ?"
And she answered, "Just so many as I have on
mine, which is thirty thousand, lacking one. And if











thou doubtest it, pull out a hair, and I will pull out
one of mine, and so on till all are gone."
But the King would not do this, and a very wise
man who was present said-
0, King, the maiden is not far from the truth,
for it is said that in a full head there are thirty thou-
sand hairs."
So the King, seeing that the maiden was wise,
married her, but said to her-
When I was born a very wise witch declared that
my life would be lucky, except in one thing, which was
that a time would come when I should lose what I
loved most, yet keep what I liked best, or what was
best for me and mine, or for my people."
Then the Queen replied, "I will give an answer to
this in due time; but it would be ill for thee.should it
be answered now."
So they lived together happily for many years, and
had a son who was beautiful as the sun, moon, and stars,
and his hair was like falling water.
Now, there was another king-a cruel, evil man-
who was far more powerful than this one ; and he
came with a great army and would take from him his
kingdom. But, loving wisdom and cleverness above
all things, and having once sworn an oath that he











never would harm any one who could outwit him, he,
hearing that the Queen was so clever, said that if she
could answer the hundred riddles which he would put
her, he would do her husband no harm, and would
depart in peace; but that, if she could not answer
them, she and her husband should die.
To which she answered-" Life for life-thine against
mine-for naught else will I answer thy riddles."
Then the King was angry, but being certain that no
one living could guess his riddles, he consented. So
there was a great meeting, and all the wise men present,
to remember what should be said.
Then the King, whose name was Ruggero, said-
"By thy head, O Queen! answer me this riddle :
What hast thou often seen fall, but never rise ? "
And she, answering, sang-

The snow which falls iuon the plain,
As snow doth never rise again."

Then King Ruggero said, "By thy head, 0 Queen
answer me this : In my palace is a lady who is ex-
tremely beautiful, who was never born, and who will
never die. She has eyes, but sees not; ears, yet hears











not ; a nose, but smells not ; and hands as well shaped
and white as thine, yet feels not."


To this the Queen sang to her harp-

Thou hast at home against the wall
A marble statue z thy hall;









5
That which doth thy house adorn
Was ne'er indeed of woman born
She hath no death to fear, and why?
What never lived can never die."


Then there was a cry of admiration in the hall, and
King Ruggero cast up his head approvingly, and said-











Truly I have no fool to deal with in thee But
by thy head, 0 Queen answer me this: Who is she


who puts on all her clothes when it is hot, and goes
naked when it freezes ?"










Then the Queen sang to her harp-

The aJple tree in summer time,
When it is hot, is in her prime,
A garment green she then doth wear,
And many rustling leaflets bear,
But when the wzinter chills the land,
Then she is naked as my hand.
And to thee, King, I must confess
Such riddles are not hard to guess."

Then King Ruggero bit his lip and said, By thy
head, 0 Queen answer me this: Who is he that is
far beneath thee; yea, and often under thy very feet,
yet who pays thee no respect, and heeds thee not, and
owns not thy rule ? "
Then the Queen laughed, and sang to her harp-

"' Neath my feet in mud or clay,
Mole or earthworm makes his way,
Little heed he gives, I ween,
To any king or any queen,
And cares no more our likes to please
Than I for riddles light as these."


































King Ruggero replied, "Praise the day when the
sun sets, and not before. But by thy head, 0 Queen !
answer me this : What is it that grows colder the
more it burns ? "











Then the Queen sang-
Take a taper from thy room
Out into the frost and gloom,


Yet while burning, as we know,
It must ever colder grow.











I grow cooler, on my word,
Thou growest hot with fear, my lord! "


There is a long furrow yet to plough," answered
Ruggero. By thy head, 0 Queen answer me this :











What is ever running away and afar, yet which never
departs from one place ? "
Then the Queen sang-


"A river runs through rocks andplains,
Yet ever in its bed remains,
Even as thy riddles run ;
;i- .: Iam here as Ibegun,
As our life doth come and go,
So the waters onward flow."


King Ruggero replied, Thou hast well said it.
But by thy life, 0 queen answer me this : What is
that which sees everything save itself? "
And the Queen sang-


My eyes I never yet did see,
Yet they behold all things for me.
Th7y mind sees all neathh thy control,
Yet thou didst never see thy soul.
With double riddle thou would'st cheat,
With double answer thou art beat."



































King Ruggero, answered, Never was woman born
who was so crafty as thou. But to a hard knot of wood,
a sharp axe. Answer me this, 0 Queen on thy life:
What tells our secrets, yet never knows them ?"











The Queen sang-
The ink with which we secrets write
Nothing knows what we indite ;


And the pen from which it flows
Of it all as little knows."










The King said, "Answer me this, 0 Queen on thy
life : What is the bird with an iron bill which never
flies until you pull its tail ? "


The Queen sang-
The arrow hath the sharpest bill,
With feathers striped from many a uzll;










Nought to fly doth 't avaz7,
Until we Pull it by the tail.
King, thy shafts are all zin vain,
And thy shooting gives thee pain."


Ruggero replied, My quiver is not as yet empty.
On thy life, 0 Queen answer me this: Where









16
is the Red Sea in which men live yet never
drown? "
The Queen sang-

Blood is the sea inz which we live,
Which unto us our life doth give ;
It hath its ebb, it hath its flow,
It hath its tide as all men know ;
But when the motion ceases, death
Comes unto man and stops his breath,
As all thy waves of riddles, friend,
Brzig thee still nearer to thy end."

The King frowned, and said, On thy life, O Queen !
answer me this: What gave death while it was alive,
and now gives life now that it is dead ?,"
The Queen sang-

While he was alive the horn
By a savage bull was worn;
Now th'e horn, though it be dead,
Filled with ale, or wine, or mead,










When we pass it round about,
Gives life to all who drink thereout.'


The King said : By thy life, 0 Queen answer me











this : Who was the traveller who was pursued by a
murderer, and left a forest behind him ? "
The Queen sang-


" Abzird shot through the air and still
Carried an acorn in his bill ;









19
After the bird a falcon flew ;
He let the acorn drop. Unto
The ground t fell, and there it grew.
So from it others came, and there
Arose in time aforestfair.
Thou droppest acorn-riddles, King,
From which in time great woe will spring."


That woe will be to thee," said Ruggero. By
thy life, O Queen answer me this : Who is it that
never lives till he is hanged, and who dies when he is
cut down ? "
The Queen sang-

SThe apple on a tree was born,
And there he hangs from night to morn;
And there he swings from morn to nzght,
All through the summer, in delight,
Till he is plucked in autumn, when
He is devoured by beasts or men,
And as he falleth from the tree,
Thou, King, ere long wilt fallen be "


































Then Ruggero turned red and white with pride and.
anger, and said," Look to it that thou, too, dost not
swing on a tree and art not thrown to wild beasts to
devour. By thy life, 0 Queen! answer me this:
What is that being which is one while it flies, and










many when it falls-many it kills, and many it serves
in many ways when it becomes one again ? "
The Queen sang-


" The cloud which flies before the sun
While it zs in the air is one,












Falling in raindrops to the ground,
Then it is, changed to many, found,
And by it many a man is drowned,
While many others o'er it row,
And drzink the water as they go.
Thus may this stream of riddles be
My life indeed, and death to thee "


Then there was laughter from all in the hall, so
merrily and boldly the Queen twanged the harp, and
looked so daringly at the King. And he, looking grim
and holding his beard in his hand said, By thy life
O Queen! answer me this : What are the two colours
which fight the most one with another ? "
The Queen sang-

White is the dead man as he lies,
White is the earth when autumn dies.
And high or low, or far or near,
All things turn white with cold or fear.
The fox or ermine in the snow
From winter weather whiter grow.










White bones and teeth, since he began,
Were aye the deadest part of man.


And sailors say when water dies,
As snow-white foam it upwards flies.











But when the summer comes again,
She clothes with green the wood and plain ;
Green is the grass and green the trees,
And green the corn waves in the breeze.
With white the green has ever strife,
For life is green and green is life.
Thy lzs, 0 King, are white, Isee,
And thou ere long shalt whiter be ;
For while this game is sport to me,
It will at last be death to thee."
Ruggero said, "By thy life, 0 Queen answer me
this: Where are the birds which never flew, the
flowers which never took root, men who never moved,
women who never loved and never told a secret;
where are all things that ever lived on earth with
all their colours fresh and fair, yet all dead; how
callest thou the place wherein all this is found ?"
The Queen sang-
Birds in a picture never flew,
Buds which were painted never blew;
Men who were drawn by human hand,
Did never live in any land;








MIaids of their kind no one could move,
They never hear a word of love ;





^^^ f^^p.,
i^^} *-/^ JK

'W ~if


For these and everything go look,
And you may find them in a book,










All dead and stillyou'll see them there,
Yet with their colours fresh and fair."


Ruggero said, "By thy life, 0 Queen answer me
this : What animals truly make the sweetest sounds ?"










The Queen sang-

"From the cat, and sheef, ana bear,
Cords are made which everywhere,
Stretched fuon the minstrels harp,
Utter music soft or sharp .
Which do often sweeter sing
Than the nightingale in spring ;
So the squalling cat, in faith,
iMay sing full sweetly after death."

The King said, "Who are the five brothers who
have only one hand among them, yet who do all
things so well with it that they need no more ?"
The Queen sang-

Fingers are the brothersfive,
Well they work and hard they strive /
In this world are none, I say,
Who can do such work as they ,
And yet fall what may befall,
There's but one hand among them all."


































Ruggero said, "By thy life, 0 Queen answer me
this: What is the name of the bird which never flies
away nor soars on high till it is tied fast, and which
when free no longer roams? "











The Queen sang-
The kite in air can never glide,
Until it with a string is tied,


And when the bond is broken
It falleth unto earth again;











For all its wandering is o'er;
Unless 'tis bound it cannot soar.
Even so upon this earth we see,
Men who ne'er think of liberty,
And never rise to thought because
They are not bound by faith or laws.
What makes our spirit soar at last
Is ever that which holds it fast."
Ruggero said, "Lady, thou art indeed wise; but
though the fox run faster than the man, yet he is
caught at last. By thy life, 0 Queen! answer me
this : Who is the best and bravest knight, the one of
most worth, yet with no armour save his shirt, and
that thin ; and who are the worthless men, well clad
and completely covered with the strongest mail ? "
The Queen sang-
Sweetest fruit hath cover thin,
Nothing thicker than its skin,
The afple, who doth take the frize,
The sun and rain and wind defies
While fine-tree seeds, and nuts as well,
Are deeply cased in hardest shell,









31
Yet the time will come arzght
When they too must see the light,


As thou, 0 King, with all thy strength,
Wilt come to certain death at length."









32
The King said nothing, but drank a can of ale, and
then cried, By thy life, O Queen answer me this:


Who were the two who were put to bed to save their
lives, and who ate their covering before they rose ? "










The Queen sang-
The caterpillar, as we know,
To sleep in silken sheet doth go ;
Then as a butterfly so bright,
She eats it through and comes to light.
There was a king, the story goes,
Who once, when flyingfrom his foes,
Was hidden, as if in a bed,
Beneath a pile of winter bread;
And while thus covered, head and limb,
He ate the loaves which sheltered him.
Oh, King, thou eat'st thy loaves full fast,
Thou'lt be uncovered at the last.
For every riddle, every breath,
Is one step nearer to thy death."

Then the King said, By thy life, 0 Queen! answer
me this : Who is the politest and best bred among
arms or weapons ? "
The Queen sang-
Of all the weapons which I know,
The gentlest mannered is the bow,
4











Because with grace he always bend's,
Ere he afar an arrow scinds,


And makes a bow, as we may see,
Ere he attacks his enemy,
As nobles do of high degree."










Then the King said, By thy life, 0 Queen I answer


me this: Who are they who shine in deepest darkness,
yet give no light ? "











The Queen sang-

"Gold and silver, copper, lead,
Deep buried in their earthly bed,
Have their hidden glow, yet none
Can shine unt7l they see the sun.
So 'tis true, and many know it,
That full oft a brilliant foet
Never shines till he can sing
His verses to a mighty king."

"By my life," cried Ruggero ; "that was well
said But by thy life, O Queen answer me this:
What is that white thing which is red while it is
green, and fairest when it is black ? "
The Queen sang-

In the bud a blackberry,
Is white as snow, we all agree
Going onward from a flower,
It is red while green and sour,
But when sweet and fair to see
It is black as black can be."


































Ruggero said, By thy life, 0 Queen answer me
this question : What was that which had four legs
and ran over the land on two, yet which never stirred
a foot ? "











The Queen sang-

A thzef who stole a lamb one day,
Carried it on his back away ;


Upon two feet he did rove,
And yet no limb the lamb did move."











Ruggero said, By thy life, 0 Queen answer me
this : What do all men most fear yet most desire ? '


And the Queen sang-
To that question answers seven
Mzghtfiull easily be given ;









40
7leetly from thy tongue they'd run,
But I'll sum them all in one.
What men seek in every hour,
Most especially, is power,
And 'tis what they mostly fear,
Be it far in God, or near;
But of one thing certain be,
Thy bower wakes no fear in me."


Ruggero replied, We have all the time till sunrise,
and he has not long set. By thy life, 0 Queen !
answer me this-: Who is the giant with two stone
jaws who eats and swallows thy food ere thou canst
taste it ? "
SThe Queen.sang-

A mighty giant is the mill,
Who eats, yet never has his fll;
Between the high and nether stone
He chews upf all that's to him thrown ;
But if he did not chew the corn,
There'd be no bread for any born."



































The King replied, By thy life, 0 Queen answer
me this : What doth every man leave behind him in
this world ? "












The Queen sang-

Not thelr bodies, for 'tis known
Some saints alive to heaven have gone;


Nor is it their earthly fame,
For many never left a name;









43

But all, save those of feet bereft,
Behind them have their footprints left."


King Ruggero said, By thy life, O Queen answer


3L0











me this : Who is it of this earth that when he pleases
sits in judgment on the mightiest king ? "

The Queen sang-


When the king in judgment sits,
Though he uses all his wits,
The fly who lights upon his hair
Sits on him in the judgment there."


King Ruggero said, By thy life, 0 Queen answer
me this: How would a dwarf give a riddle to a-
giant ?"

The Queen sang-


As the dwarf is weak and small
As the giant is strong and tall,
Like a slip twixtt lip and cup,
Between them they must give it up."



































The King said, On thy life, 0 Queen answer m-
this : What crosses the water yet never gets across
it ? "











The Queen sang-


" The bridge which goes from shore to shore
Crosses the stream, yet neer gets o'er."









47
The King said, "On thy life, O Queen answer me
this : I once saw a bridge over which many passed,
and then the bridge walked on after them."


The Queen sang-











" Two men joined hands from shore to shore;
Their wives on them passed safely o'er.
One drew his friend to where he stood;
So all got Aast the roaringflood."


The King said, On thy life, 0 Queen i answer me











this: What things leave no mark behind them, yet
are never forgotten ? "

The Queen sang-


O'er all the earth four things Ifind
Which leave no mark or trace behind .
The eagle soaring bold and free,
The shi~ which sails the foaming sea,
The snake as o'er the rock he slihs,
And lover's kiss on maiden liis."


The King said, On thy life; 0 Queen answer me
this: Why is it that no man knows where to find the
Truth ? "

The Queen sang-


When first on earth the Truth was born
She crept into a huntinzg-horn.
The hunter came, the horn was blown,
And where Truth went was never known."

































Ruggero said, "On thy life, Queen! answer me this:
Where is it always dark in the best lighted room ?"
The Queen sang-
Though great and good thou seem'st to be,
There's still some evil spot in thee;









51

And thou may'stfind, zin church or caij,
Tis always dark beneath the lamb."


Ruggero said, "What two things become light and
white and bright, and fly upward as they perish ? "











The Queen replied-
The good man's soul as he doth die,
The breaking wave, while darting hzgh,


Fly toward in a dash of white,
And ere they perish live zz light."










King Ruggero said, What manner of woman thou
may'st be I know not, but thy like I did never yet
meet on earth. And if there were many of thy kind,


God knows that we men would have scant share
therein. But on thy life, 0 Queen answer me this :











I slew a man in battle, and yet 1 slew him not. How
was that ? "
The Queen sang-

"From thee his death did come, my lord,
Yet not by thee, but by thy sword.
Such deference, as I have heard,
Is not in deed, but ti the word.
Howe'er it came, the blood was spilt,
The deed was thine, and thine the guilt;
But if I beat zi riddles, see !
Thou wilt have brought thy death on thee."

King Ruggero looked as if he had received a hard
blow, and many who were in the hall thought that he
was beginning to feel less easy as to his riddling.
However, he kept up his hope, and went on, saying,
"By thy life, 0 Queen answer me this : There were
three on the water, three, under the water, and three
flying in the air, and yet the nine were one ? "
The Queen sang-

Three and three or thirty-three,
However many there may be,











In sunshine or in stormy weather,
Make but one flock while all together."


Ruggero said, I saw an eagle dart onward fast as
an arrow,'yet he did not use his wings; he held in his









56
beak a fish, which he had never caught, and never
seen. By thy life, O Queen answer me that riddle."
The Queen sang-


" The eagle on an ice-floe stood,
Which aarted headlong down the food,











That eagle held in beak or claws
A ravenous fike, between whose jaws
A fish was held, Zuon my word !
Caught by the fike and not the bird,
As thou in the end wilt prove to be
Caught by thyself and not by me ;
From thy own vein there came the bane
With which thou shalt at last be slain."


It seemed in that minute to King Ruggero that the
room grew dark, and that he were a thousand miles
away in a snow-cold, silent land, while a voice within
bade him leave this strife of riddles and retire in time,
and beg mercy of the wonderful woman who laughed
him to scorn. But then his evil spirit rose within him,
and said, There is no victory without danger; go
on So he roused himself, and drank a mighty cup
of wine, and said, By thy life, 0 Queen answer
me this : There was a thing trodden underfoot night
and day by a sorry creature, it was cast out on a
dunghill, it was given as a rare and costly thing
to a king, who prized it highly. What was that
thing ?"











The Queen sang-
A sorry jade its horse-shoes wore,
And when at last its life was o'er,


While on the dunghill as it lay,
There came a weapon-smith one day,










Who look the shoes, and, as I've heard,
From them he made a wondrous sword,
So keen of edge, so apt to strike,
No one had ever seen the like.
Through all the realm its fame did ring,
And so it came unto the king,
Who ever wore it by his side,
And oft its edge in battle tried.
In all of which a lesson lies .
When, true as steel, all men may rise,
Even from vilest earthly things,
To be the przde and joy of kings."

This was so well sung that all present applauded,
and King Ruggero said, I did not know myself that
there was such a good lesson in my riddle. But on
thy life, 0 Queen 1 answer me this: A man once saw
himself where he had never been, but when he came
into that place he never beheld himself more.
The Queen sang-

Looking in a river, he
Did himself reflected see.











By himself he thus was seen,
Where he truly ne'er had been.
Gazing there and looking round,


In he fell, and so was drowned;
So when there, 't's very plain,
He never saw himself again."










The King paused at this as if it had caused in him
deep thought, and then said, By thy life, 0 Queen !


answer me this : Who is the guide that will not
show you the way unless he be carried ?"












The Queen sang-

The lantern guides thee in the dark,
Where'er thou goest the way to mark;
And yet it will not aid a whit,
Unless in hand thou bearest it.
Little thou knowest of the light
Which guides me in this fath aright."

The King said, On thy life, 0 Queen answer me
this : Who is he that when buried in a brown garment
rises again as a giant, and has thousands of children,
who cry aloud when they feel warm ? "
The Queen sang-

To rise again, the chestnut, he
In his brown coat must buried be,
Then, giant-like, from every limb
There fall a thousand like to him,
And all of them, ere they expire,
Burst with a crack when on the fire.
So in this life of woes orjoys
Are many who ne'er make a noise,










Nor raise in honour any dzn
Until they feel the heat within-


The fire on which ambition feeds
Which warms it up to glorious deeds."











Yea," said the King, "ambition, like the sala-
mander, feeds on fire. But answer me this, on thy
life, 0 Queen : What are the two beings, one of
which flies away when it is hot, and settles down
firmly where it is cold, while the other does the
contrary? "
The Queen sang-
The wild bird dreads the winter-time,
And flies unto a warmer clime,
To sunny lands beyond the sea-
Even to Egypt it may be,
Where the grave storks in silence stray,
By ancient ruins far away,
And Norland swallows flit and play;
But water, when it feels the heat,
Makes up aloft.a quick retreat,
Still soaring, bird-like, ever higher
The more 'tis kept upon the fre;
But when 'tis frozen, in a trice
It sinks to earth as heavy ice.
Such differences Nature wears,
So varied are the forms she bears.








65
Even so we see the poet's soul,
Warmed by success, escape control,
Hzgh soaring in prosperity,


But frozen by adversity.
'Tis the same moral, on my word !
Drawn from a chestnut or a bird.









66

That, too, was well dawn out," said the King.
"But on thy life, Queen answer me this : Who are
the five in one who are welcomed everywhere all over


the world, who make their way freely to all lords and
kings, who cause wars and weddings, great sin, and
great joy ?"











The Queen sang-

G and I and F and T,
Joined to S,five sisters be,
Szizce in language, it is said,
Every letter is a maid.
GIFTS, above all earthly things,
Make their way to lords and kings.
Gifts lend to war its carriage ;
Gifts cause full many a marriage
Gifts oft lead to greatest sin,
Yet with them much joy we wzin.
Get what we may by work or thrift,
Nothing glads us like a gift."

The King said, On thy life, 0 Queen answer me
this : Who runs faster the more clothes he puts on,
and the greater the burden he carries ? "
The Queen sang-

The shi flies faster in the gale,
The more it spreads or carries sail.











Sails are its clothing, as we know ;
Without them it could never go,


And ever, as thou'st seen, the more
It has of men who pull the oar,









69

The faster it will sail the sea,
However great the load may be.
Its speed is in the clothes it wears,
And in the burden which it bears."

"Yea," quoth the King, "even so it seems to me
that the more I heap my riddles on thee, the more
trippingly dost thou answer them. But on thy life,
answer me this, O Queen! Who is the sorcerer who
shows to every man who meets him his equal, however
brave he may be, and to every woman her match in
beauty?"

The Queen sang-

"In a mirror we behold
Iron for iron, gold for gold;
However fair we seem or see,
Yet in that our equals be.
No special figure doth it wear,
But every other's likeness bear,
As parrots give all voices known,
Yet have no language of their own."

































The King said, On thy life, 0 Queen answer me
this : Who gives more victuals to the world than all
the charitable people in it put together, and wastes all
her substance in so doing, yet who never yet got any
thanks for it ? "











The Queen sang-
By the oven all the meat,
Or bread, is baked whzch mortals eat;


Much wood for food doth she require,
So wastes her life in burningfire.









72
We were indeed in sorry case
Without the oven and her grace ;
But none are left in this our day
Who ever to the oven pray,
Or render thanks to fire n rhyme,
As others did in the olden time."

The King said, On thy life, 0 Queen answer me
this : Who is the traveller that never rests on his
journey, and yet finds time to enter every house? "
The Queen sang-

The golden sun, who shines on high,
Is ever travelling in the sky ,
Never a-weary, never worn,
He presses on to night from morn,
Yet he, while hurrying on his ways,
Through every door and window strays,
And lingers long zn every home
Wherever he may chance to come ;
,Even as a king should show his face
Unto all men with gentle grace,











zhat all may think with joy thereon,
As if they had beheld the sun."


The King said, On thy life, 0 Queen I answer me
this : Who were the four who kissed, the four who
wept, the four who embraced, when two lovers
parted ?"











The Queen'sang-

"Every time when two are parted,
If the pair be tender-hearted,


Their four eyes are weerizg blhizdly,
Their four lips are kissing kzindly,











And four arms wzth prcsszizgfaces,
Giving rapturous embraces."


The King said, On thy life, 0 Queen answer me
this : Who are the two, one dead and the other alive,
who treat one another every time they drink wine,
drop for drop, never gaining and never losing ? "











The Queen sang-

With a toper and his glass
This must ever come to pass.
He makes the glass with liquor swim;
The glass then gives it unto him.
Thus it is between them they
Give glass for glass the livelong day."

Good that cried the King ; it just reminds me
of something--" Here he drank a full goblet of red
wine, and sighed soundly, and then said : Upon thy
life, Queen, answer me this: Where are the horses
which will never be ridden, the lights that can never
be numbered, the webs which will never be woven
by woman's hand, the pens which never write, the
puddings which can never be eaten, the staff with
which no man ever walks yet which many women
bear, and the button which never held a garment?
The Queen sang-

Sea-horses ne'er by man were mounted,
The stars in heaven never counted,









77
Cobwebsfor weaving are too lzghzt,
With fig-pens none can ever write,









o -.


Plum-pudding ston2 no man can eat,
SWith distaves men we never meet,










Bachelor's buttons, bright as gold,
Did never any garment hold."


The King said, Seven at a blow But on thy life,
Queen, answer me this: Who are the seven sisters










who are in all things, and without whom nothing can
be seen and nothing imagined ? "

The Queen sang-

One or all of colours seven
Are in all thzigs under heaven ;
Nothing comes zito our mind
In which we no colour fnd ;
For when all their flight have ta'en,
White or black must still remain.
So when the rainbow flies away
What then remazis is nzght or day."

The King said, By thy life, 0 Queen answer me
this: What is that which is nothing and void, yet
which holds fast and firm ? "

The Queen sang-

A button-hole is truly naught,
Yet when 'tis by the button caught
It holds a garment fast and tzght,
If I have read thy riddle right."


































The King said, On thy life, 0 Queen answer me
this: What is the one animal from which every man
has had food, drink, and clothing ? "











The Queen sang-


" That must be the ox, I think.
From his horns do all men drink,


Of his flesh do all men eat,
And his leather clothes our feet."










Ruggero said, On thy life, 0 Queen answer me
this: What was that thing which thou hast often seen,


which first gave shelter, then food, then joy, and then
light ? "











The Queen sang-
That was a shell, it seems to me,
Which housed a creature in the sea.
A man there came who ate it up,
And used the shell as drinking-czfp
For ale or wine ; then, after all,
It hung as lamp in cattle-stall.
Yet thou thyself, 0 King, confess;
Couldst ne'er before thzs riddle guess?"
Ruggero looked hard and grim, and then said, It
is true, for I never did yet understand what the light
meant. Hadst thou turned it full on me I must have
lost my life. But unless thou art thyself some evil
spirit or witch, I know not how thou couldst tell what
I knew or did not know. But on thy life, 0 Queen !
answer me this : Who is she that has no tongue, yet
talks distinctly, repeats everything which is told to
her, and yet is no gossip, and is the more admired the
louder she cries ? "
The Queen sang-
"Echo has no tongue, but she
Oftenmtalks so perfectly











That the travellers who stray
In lonely places far away,


'Mlid ancient walls and caverned rocks,
Full often deem her one who mocks;









85

And in the silent twilight hour,
When elfin creatures use their power,
When they hear strange echoes rziging,
Think they hear the fairies singing,
Or when some lovzizg nightingale
Is singing sweetly in a vale,
And the music to the plain
Thus redoubled comes again-
T '.: echo seems revealed to thee
In her sweetest mystery.
All that she hears she tells again,
And yet she is no gossip vain
And the clearer is her voice,
The more to hear it all rejoice ;
And she truly is like me,
Since I only answer thee."


"Hum that is truth without-fact," said Ruggero.
" Now, Queen, on thy life! answer me this: Who
enters a room without going in, or goes in without
entering, opens the door, yet is no porter or servant,
and has a beard in one country, but in none other ? "











The Queen sang-


" The key whichfits into the lock
Goes further than the men who knock.









87

'Tis on the edge of every hall,
Yet hardly in the place at all.
It opes the door to you, 0 King,
And yet it is no lvinzg thing
And its wards zin the German tongue
Are called a beard when said or sung."

"Well exclaimed Ruggero ;. if you are not a
learned woman, you are certainly learning to be one,
and will not miss the mark. On thy life, 0 Queen !
answer me this : There are two sisters, who have a
friend who is often in their company. The two are
divided, yet firmly united. Whatever comes in their
way they wound sore and cut in twain, but their
friend heals the wounds."
The Queen sang-

"Scissors are the sisters two,
Who never part, whatever they do/
Both united to one end,
And the needle is their friend.
However they may cut their foes,
What they wound the needle sews."

































Ruggero said,' On thy life, 0 Queen! answer me
this : Who is the fierce thief who, armed with a
poisoned dagger, steals only from the fairest what is
sweetest, and is himself robbed of all that he steals,
yet, robber though he be, there is not a church in the
land to which he has not given candles ? "











The Queen sang-

"The fairest creatures are the flowers,
And from them zn summer hours


The bee, that little busy thing,
Arm&d with his poisoned sting,











Steals their honey when he can,
And is robbed in turn by man,
But offers, for the church's sake,
The wax from which men tapers make.
That as a lesson men may see
The light which comes from industry."


"A good lesson," said Ruggero. "On thy life,
Queen answer me this: There are a hundred who
have no beginning or end, and they are all in one,
who is endless as they are. They are bound every
one to his next, and when unbound and free they bind
others for life."

The Queen sang-

Rings have no end, in them we see
The emblem of eternity.
When made of gold, all in a chain,
It still a circle doth remain ;
And with but one, you will agree,
A loving pai may wedded be."



































The King said, On thy life, 0 Queen answer me
this: Who is he that when he sinks down in his bed
does great harm, but far more when he rises from
it?"











The Queen sang-


"Dried in summer by the sun,
Then the stream no more can run.









93
With the water gone or low,
Over it afoot we go.
Much we miss its golden gleam,
Much the cattle need their stream.
Wagons pass where once the boat
With its crew was wont to float,
And the swallows chirp or nest
Where the fishes used to rest.
But 'tis worse in thawing Spring,
When the crow on early wing
Sees the floods, from ice set free,
Rushing wildly to the sea;
Then madly up the river leaps,
As depths are added to his deeps,
And, like a wolf before the hounds,
In rage o'er all the country bounds.
Thus, if he rise or zf he fall,
He brings great sorrow to us all.
So zi life do all things go :
What flies too high oft sinks too low.
Then pray to God thy destiny
May never too unequal be."











"Well sung and sermoned to a small text," said
Ruggero. But upon thy life, 0 Queen answer me


this : What goes from a tail to a head-yea, to royal









95
heads-and how does that which lived in disgrace
confer honour ? "

The Queen sang-


The ostrich zi its tail may wear
The splendid plume, so bright and fai',
Which proudly waves wherever seen,
And gives a glory to a queen /


The King said, By thy life, O Queen answer me
this : What is that which runs all day yet never stirs,
which sings all the time yet never utters a word, and
has the longest tail of any creature on earth ? "

The Queen sang-


The spinninmg-wheel, which ever whirrs,
And runs all day yet never stirs,
And bears an endless tail of thread,
Is she of whom these things are said."



































King Ruggero said, On thy life, 0 Queen answer
me this : What is that which runs all the time from









97
one house to another, and from village to village;


by means of it all news is carried, and yet it is no
gossip ?"











The Queen sang-


A by-path runs o'er hill and dale;
On it is carried many a tale;
But for it, and it alone,
Scant news, I ween, would e'er be known.
By means of it all gosszi's heard,
And yet it never speaks a word."


King Ruggero said, On thy life, 0 Queen answer
me this : Who is it that embraces my wife tightly and
far oftener than I, yet of whom I am not jealous ? "

The Queen sang-


"Thy queen's small waist is circled round,
And by a golden girdle bound.
He holds her fast the livelong day ;
With him she doth in public play /
And.while awake, from first to last,
The girdle always holds her fast."


































The King said, On tihy-ife, 0 Queen answer me.
this : What are the only'creatures which are truly
attached to me and bound to me for life, the only ones









100


who suit and adapt themselves to my ways, yet on
whom I ever trample as in scorn ? "
The Queen sang-


" Thy shoes do most exactly suit
Themselves by use unto thy foot;









IOI
They too are bound to thee, by strings,
As are no other earthly things;
For all their work they naught require,
And yet thou tread'st them zin the mire."

The King said, On thy life, 0 Queen answer me
this question : There was one who was buried alive,
yet he rose again ; once more he was slain with a
blade, yet would not die; again his inner being was
beaten with rods out of his body, yet he lived ; then
was he burned and boiled, yet after all he was stronger
than ever, full of life, and giving life unto men ?"

The Queen sang-

The barley buried in the ground
Grew up, and multiplied was found.
Cut with a sickle, 'tis not dead,
For still its soul is in its head ;
Thrashed with a flail, it doth survive,
And boiled and brewed, 'tis still alive,
Though first as ale it shows its spirit,
Such i its power and its merit."









102


The King said, On thy life, Queen! answer me
this : What holds even a king or a queen by the nose,
yet gives them no offence ? "










The Queen sang-


"When the roses are in bloom,
Their enrapturing perfume


Holds thee by the nose, and yet
Thou art not annoyed by it."









104
The King said," On thy life, O Queen answer me
this : What is that which is deprived of its eyes that
we may see ? "


The Queen sang-
"That is the mask which hides thy face,
And covers it in every place,









105

All save the eyes, which cannot be,
For had it eyes thou couldst not see."


Ruggero said, "On thy life, Queen! answer me this:










Who are the poorest men in the world, yet who always
lie on gold ? "

The Queen sang-


In the pictures artists paint
Many an image of a saint,
Poor indeed, yet always found
In a shining golden ground.


The King said, On thy life, Queen! answer me
this : Who is the true companion who always comes
in dire need stark naked to aid his master ? "

The. Queen sang-


li hour of need the bravest lord
Is always aided by his sword;
Leather, wood, or ~ion he wears,
And oft a golden helmet bears,
But his coat is stripped away
When he comes bare into the fray."


































The King said, On thy life, 0 Queen answer me
this : Who are the thousands of serpents which draw
their life from us, yet whom we cherish with care ?"











The Queen sang-


" Hairs which grow on every head,
Black or golden, brown or red,


II;:: into the water thrown
Change to serpents, as is known;










109

Yet we all, with constant care,
Guard these serpents which we wear."


The King said, On thy life, 0 Queen answer me









IIO
this: What is that which is clothing for many yet
nakedness for others.? "
The Queen sang-


"Near is my shift, more near my skin,
On me 'tzs but a garment thin,
With it alone in dire distress,
We are inz utter nakedness,
But on the bear his skzn and hair
Make heavy clothes for him to wear."

Ruggero said, On thy life, 0 Queen! answer me
this: Who was the thief who stole from me a white
coat for which he repaid me with a grey one ? "
The Queen sang-

"' By nzght, when all are sound asleep,
A grey wolf came and stole thy sheep,
Whose good white skin, as I do ween,
Had else thy winter garment been :
That wolf thou didst pursue and slay,
SAnd took'stfrom him his garment grey."


































Ruggero said, On thy life, 0 Queen answer me
this: Who is the knave who often holds us by the
throat with strong gripe, nor lets us go till we give him
somewhat ? '!










The Queen sang-
Of all the knaves that be, the worst,
Who oftenest comes to us is Thirst;


He holds us by the throat, I think,
Nor goes until we give him drinkk"









II3
"Aye, that is true," quoth Ruggero, and he holds
me even now. Page, bring me a can of ale! On thy


life, 0 Queen answer me this : How was a kingdom
given away by the help of a goose, a sheep, and a
bee ? "










The Queen sang-

From the goose there came the quill
Which made thee en which wrote the will;
The sheep then yielded up his skinz,
Which provided parchment thin ;
And from the bee they next did stea
The wax with which they made a seal.:
Well thou know'st, without the three
No conveyances could be."


Ruggero said," On thy life, 0 Queen! answer me
this : What is that which loses its name when it falls,
and takes it again when it gets up, and runs on ? "
The Queen sang-

The stream, which leaps a precipice
Whzie jumping into the abyss,
Just then by other name we call,
For it becomes a Waterfall;
But when it onwards runs, the same
Again resumes its former name."



































The King said, On thy life, 0 Queen answer me
this : Which bird hath above all others the highest
note ? "











The Queen sang-


" The lark, who, when the morning breaks,
His flght o'er all to heaven takes,











And singzig onward, high and far,
Salutes theparting silver star
Even before the risizg sun
His golden course has well begun
Since all are far below his call,
I deem the highest of them all."



The King said, On thy life, 0 Queen answer me
this : What is the eye which sees no one yet which all
delight to see ? "


The Queen sang-



Theflower which we the Day's Eye call,
Known as the Daisy unto all,
When, dimmed with one fair drop of dew,
Seems sweetly turned with love to you :
Therefore with love that eye we see,
Although it ever blind may be."



































The King said, On thy life, 0 Queen answer me
this : What is like the two clearest things on earth yet
far beyond them? "











The Queen sang-
The diamond i's like ice and glass,
And often might forreither pass,


Yet as a gem of noble birth
Itfar surpasses both in worth;










120

Even so a noble heart we przze
O'er men who're like himi inz our eyes
True faith all things doth go beyond,
And zs the siri't diamond."


The King said, On thy life, 0 Queen answer me









121

this : What is the race which is always in the world
yet which never has children ? "

The Queen sang-


Of animals the mule alone
Hath never offspring of his own.
Lzke men of noble sires begot,
Whose lives, however, end in nought."


The King said, On thy life, 0 Queen answer me
this: I truly saw seven birds hatched from one egg.
How was that ? "

The Queen sang-


A sailorfrom beyond the sea
Once brought an ostrich egg to thee ;
As in thy hall the shell did rest,
Therein a starling made his nest,
And from that curious shelter sprung
In time full seven of his young."


































The King said, On thy life, 0 Queen answer me
this : What is that whitest, brightest thing which yet
leaves black marks, and what the very blackest which
when used becomes white? "











The Queen sang-

Silver's white, and yet, alack /
Draws on parchment lines so black,


While the charcoal, black as night,
Burns to ashes which are white.










Those who are fairest to our eyes
Too often deal zin darkest lies,
While others who are grim to view,
Still utter naught which is not true."


The King said, On thy life, 0 Queen answer me









125
this : There was a man who sailed far over the sea,
then dwelt in a home on the shore, and when he died
was buried in a great coffin, yet he always slept in the
same building, and he is still in it."

The Queen sang-


He who sailed the ocean o'er
Drew his ship up on the shore,
Rarely left it for a minute,
And when dead was buried in it."


The King said, On thy life, 0 Queen answer me
this : There was an oak tree, it became an apple tree,
and by it there stood a house which no man ever
entered."

The Queen sang-


On an oaken panel fair
A house was carved, and standing there,
Beside it, rose an apple tree :
Thus it came to pass, see / "



































The King said, On thy life, 0 Queen answerme
this: Who is cradled in a snow-white coffin yet never
buried ? "










The Queen sang-
The bird or fowl, whatever it be,
Born in a snow-white egg we see,


Which coffin-like dothl hold them well
Until 'tis time to peck the shell;










And when their life hath reached its span
They're eaten up by beast or man."


The King said, On thy life, 0 Queen answer me
this : Who is the grim and fierce watchman who slays
and devours thieves, who dread him more than any











one on earth, yet is dearly loved by every little child,
who fears him not ? "

The Queen sang-

"'Tis the Cat, who zzn a house
Slays and eats both rat and mouse ;
But though to them so fierce and wild,
He's loved by every little child.
Thus to kings I'd have zt come,
Feared abroad, yet loved at home."

The King said, On thy life, 0 Queen answer me
this : Who is it whose name is a byword for folly yet
by whom all wisdom is made known unto man ? "

The Queen sang-

The squallzi)g goose, with flapping wing,
Is always called a foolish thing.
A blundering bird, of little wit,
Yet with its quills all books are writ.
For every word of wisdom still
I written with the grey goose quill."
IO0



































The King said, On thy life, 0 Queen answer me
this : What is that one thing entirely dead, and which
never grew, yet which hides itself in winter and spring
and is seen during the summer and autumn ? "











The Queen sang-
The grey rock standing tin a river,
Wlich hath been there and dead for ever,


When the torrents rushing rise,
Then is hidden from our eyes,












But when the summer heat hath dried
The water up 'tis soon espied.
It ne'er had life, it never grew,
Yet boldly rises then to view.
Even so it is with many men
Whom we do ne'er behold, save when
The sunlight of prosperity
About us shizes. Oh, then we see
Them plainly, but they're lost again
When misery comes like winter razi."

King Ruggero said, "On thy life, 0 Queen answer
me this : What is born in its coffin, which dies if
taken from it, and cannot rise again unless it be buried
in that coffin ? "
The Queen sang-

The nut which in a shell we see
Doth seem en-coffined unto me,
If once that coffin we should ope
The nut will die beyond all hope,
But buried deeply zi the plaiz,
It rises zito life agaziz."
































King Ruggero said," What is that hard mother who,
wedded to a harder mate, produces a still harder son! "
The Queen sang-

"Lead is hard, I well admit,
Copper harder far than it,









134
But the two together melted,
In the fiery furnace smelted,
Make of bronze a glowing ball


Which is hardest of them all,
Out of which the smith with might
Shapes the sword with which you fight."










King Ruggero said, On thy life,.0 Queen !-answer
me this : What is that serpent which coiled about a


tree often gives to man food and diink \wlikh is for-
bidden to many ? "











The-Queen sang-

The Vize, as every one may see,
Coils serpent-like about a tree,
Giving to many grapes for food,
And wine fermented from their blood,
That drink forbidden to the churl,
Which is the joy of frinzce or earl."


King Ruggero said, On thy life, 0 Queen answer
me this : Where are the people so cruel that they
cannot dance with joy unless some one is beaten and
cries ? "

The Queen sang-


Where the tambourine they beat
Maidens dance with flutterz'ig feet,
To the merry drum they bound,
Which, till 'tis beaten, gives no sound,
And in many things, I wis,
Many men are like to this."



































King Ruggero said, On thy life, Queen answer
me this : Who is the thief who often carries away
clothing, yea, and many other things, yet never took
them home, never used them, and never sold them ? "











The Queen sang-


" When the linen's hung to dry,
And the Wind is roaring hzgh,









139
Oft he steals of maid or man
All the clothing that he can,
Whlrls it merrily on high
To some field, then lets it lie,
Or, as in an elfin joke,
Leaves it swzizging on an oak ;
Out the angry housewife flies,
And to catch the runner tries,
Sees her petticoat one minute
Dance as if an elf were in zt,
Then her husband's lizen breeches
Caperzing as with the witches,
Whize shifts fly ofwith flapping hem,
As if a gobliz were zin them.
These, as we do often find,
Are the robberies of the Wz)id,
Yet though it makes all thzigs fly, it
Never gains a penny by it."

The King said, "On thy life, 0 Queen I answer me
this : When and where did pigs fly through the air
with their tails upwards ? "











The Queen sang-

There was a castle sore beset,
And little food its men could get;


They had among their friends without
One like a giant, strong and stout.









I41
It chanced one day while lurking near,
He saw a drove of swine appear.
No one was izgh. As quick as thought
He one by one the swine it-caught,
And light as urchins throw their balls,
He hurled them o'er the castle walls.
The men besieged were gay as grigs
To see this joyous raziz of pigs.
It was a wondrous sight to see
How the pigs flew so gloriously /
Tails up, they hustled thro' the air,
Tizl not a szi)gle swine was there.
Twas thus it was he served his liege,
And thus it was he broke the siege.
Even so it oft to man befals,
When sin assails our spirit's walls,
Some blessed angel, prompt and kind,
Throws pious thoughts into our mzzd,
And we, e'en inz our worst distress,
Are turned to truth and righteousness."

" By my faith 'tis a good tale and well moralised "










142

quoth Ruggero. On thy life, 0 Queen answer me
this: What is ever rising, ever going up on a mountain
side, yet which never gets nearer to the top ? "


The Queen sang-
A tree upon the mountain side
Grows high and spreads its branches wide :









143
Thus certainly, before our eyes,
UPon the mount the tree doth rise,
Perhaps unto a height sublime,
Still going upward all the time ;
But though it grow, or if it stop,
'Tis never nearer to the top."
Thus many grow, yet all in vain,
For what they seek they ne'er attain.


"Aye," said the King, "I wonder whether I am
really nearer to the top of this hill of riddles than I
was when I began. But now, 0 Queen on thy life
answer me this: What was made only to fly in the
air, yet which hath no wings ? "
The Queen sang-

The leather ball is only made
To fly as birds fly when 'tis played,
Yet it hath neither beak nor wings,
Nor is it like to flying things.
And, having made its flight or bound,
It straightway falleth to the ground `










Even as men of little wit
Try that fr which they are unfit,


And after flight and effort sore,
Fall back unto the earth once more.'











The King said, On thy life, 0 Queen answer me
this : What are the horned cattle which climb trees


and walls, where no goat could go, yet which are
without feet ? "
The Queen sang-









146

Without afoot, without a tazl,
And yet with horns we see the snail,
Browsing and rockzizg at its case,
Upon the tops of lofty trees.
For well we know that sure and slow
Doth often to the highest go."

Then said King Ruggero, Riddles ninety-and-nine
have I asked thee on thy life or mine, and I truly
mean that shouldst thou lose, thou and thine shall
die. Now we have come to the last, and as death for
one of us stands but a few moments off, I would fain
know by what art thou hast answered, so promptly,
riddles over which the shrewdest man living must have
taken time? And for my last question, on thy very
life, O Queen answer me this: What was it that my
mother, when dying, when no one was near, told me
in secret, which secret I have guarded all my life ?"
The Queen said-

"Whhen thy mother died there was another present
iwvisibly, and that was I. She bade thee beware of the
fairy Bellaria, who, unless thou shouldst refrain from
cruel war and oppression, would brove thy bane and









148

death. I am Bellaria, who was made Queen for thy
punishment. And as to answerzizg thy riddles, 0 weak
and wicked King, know that I read them every one in
thv mind before they were uttered."

Then the King rose in mad rage, and drew his
sword, and struck at the Queen-fairy as if he would
have slain her. But a dizziness seized him ; he let
fall his sword, which went to the ground hilt down-
ward, and he fell upon the point, which passed through
his heart. Then there was a great outcry in the hall,
and many coming up raised the King, but he was
dead. And in the tumult the fairy Bellaria had
vanished; nor was she ever seen again after that,
though it is commonly believed that she often ap-
peared to her husband and her son. And this son
grew up into a man of great strength and wonderful
wisdom, who in after days became King over all that
land.

Thus were the hundred riddles made
Which in this book you now have read.
Many may deem them trifling things,
Yet practice in them ever brings










149
Great quickness to the youthful mind,
As all may soon by trial flnd.
Those who soon trace a riddle out
Are quick at solving any doubt;
And many a thing is taught in schools
Not half so goodfor curing fools
As Rzddlnzg is. The thing is true,
As men of yore far better knew.





jFfilif,



































laie ~treTamt Jpre0o,

UNWIN BROTHERS,

CHILWORTH AND LONDON.




I