Baby Bunting's neighbors

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Material Information

Title:
Baby Bunting's neighbors and other stories
Physical Description:
46 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
D. Lothrop & Company ( Publisher )
Publisher:
D. Lothrop Company
Place of Publication:
Boston
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
National characteristics -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1891   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1891   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1891
Genre:
Children's stories
Children's poetry
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
illustrated
General Note:
Color illustrated covers and title vignette.
General Note:
Contains prose and verse.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002222710
notis - ALG2956
oclc - 56109369
System ID:
UF00081105:00001

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Title Page 1
        Title Page 2
    From Greenland
        Page 1
    From Ireland
        Page 2
    From Spain
        Page 3
    From Japan
        Page 4
    From Scotland
        Page 5
    From Holland
        Page 6
    From Turkey
        Page 7
    From Africa
        Page 8
    From China
        Page 9
    From France
        Page 10
    From Switzerland
        Page 11
    From South America
        Page 12
    Baby Emin Pasha
        Page 13
    A little head of a family
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Baby's dream of Spring - Going to grandpa's
        Page 16
    Baby Frank's choice
        Page 17
    What baby did - Two market gardeners
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Baby's troubles
        Page 20
    Baby Alice
        Page 21
    Trump and hero - Baby Bun's ride
        Page 22
    A letter to grandpapa
        Page 23
    Little Hasty-Wasty
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Baby's sad Christmas
        Page 26
        Page 27
    What the twins got - The house that Jack built
        Page 28
        Page 29
    How the geese went walking
        Page 30
    Baby - Edgar the artist
        Page 31
    A scamper
        Page 32
    Not satisfied - A true baby story
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
    Snap the whip!
        Page 36
        Page 37
    Little Ethel
        Page 38
        Page 39
    Baby's letter
        Page 40
        Page 41
    One winter day
        Page 42
        Page 43
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
Full Text




























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._1 The BaldHu Li LbrarY
q3 Umvmnsty

-Rm FloL






BABY BUNTING'S NEIGHBORS




AND OTHER STORIES


K .,~ ___Fi~
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-. :: ILL T A '.I D


BOSTON .
D: LO TH R O P C 0 M' P.A N Y
WA \ INGTON STREET OPPOSITE k- OMF liEI i,










































COPYRIGHT, 1891,
SBY
D. LpTHROP COMPANY.














This is Hans, the Eskimo,
Drest in furs from top to toe;
In a hood of bear-skin white
See his face so jolly-bright.


Hans, the little: Eskimo,
Frolics in the ice and snow,
,And instead of candy sweet
'Strips of fat- He likes to eat.
.1*:


Baby Bunting tastes his food,
Thinks it is not very good,
And she feels a little fear
Of his pointed hunting-spear.


But across the shining ice,
In his doggy-sledge so nice,
Dearly would she love to go
With the little Eskimo.


---
--
-s+ 7~1Serr~












Curly head and big blue eyes
Underneath his high-top hat,
Dimples, freckles, laughter, tan,
This is little Pat.


Like a merry farmer-boy
He can plant and he can dig,
Turn a lively somersault,
Dance an Irish jig.


He can build a little fire,
Boil potatoes in the pot,
And with Baby Bunting's helF
Eat them smoking hot.


Up comes Piggy for a share
Baby Bunting laughs at that
"Sure, Piggy knows it's good!
Says this merry Pat.











Senorita Teresita -
Could a little name be sweeter ?
Has two eyes as black as jet,
Curly ringlets blacker yet.


With her laces, and her graces,
And her little dancing paces,
She is such a dainty maid
Baby Bun is half afraid.


Sweetly singing to the ringing And the airy Spanish fairy
Of her soft guitar, or swinging Is demure and shy and wary;
To and fro her fleecy fan So they sit with bashful cheek
As a Spanish lady can, Which will be the first to speak?











:His- face is very brown,
This funny little man;
He wears a flowery gown
SFrom far Japan,


SHe clicks his wooden shoes
And bows to Baby Bun,
"And many pretty things
SShows, one by one.


Such dainty jars he has,,
Such fans and ,parasols,
Such cunning tiny cups,
And 0 such dolls !


And then, so very kind
'And so polite is he,
He brings her on a tray
A cup of tea.




",* ;:./ ., ., .' '. ;- *' ; .i _











''This little Scottish laddie He marches like a soldier,

:Lives up among the hills; The chieftain of his clan;
He tends his sheep and .cattle He has a shining bugle

Where run the mountain rills. And blows it like a man.


He wears a cap and tartan He plays upon his bag-pipes

As gaudy as you please, Until the echoes ring,
A petticoat of woolen And teaches Baby Bunting

That reaches to his knees. To dance the Highland Fling.

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Little Katrinka Van Tink,
A rosy Dutch lassie, you see,
Is merry from morning to night
And busy as busy can be.


Skimming the rich yellowcream,
Churning, the butter to make;
When Baby Bunting would try,
0, how her shoulders do ache!


Washing the dishes so clean,
Rubbing up tables and chairs;
Polishing kettles and pans
Bright as the mirrors up-stairs.


" Little Dutch women all work,
That is the reason, I think,
We are so merry and strong,"
Says little Katrinka Van Tink.











Little Mustapha
Sits at his ease
Cross-legged on a cushion,
As grave as you please;


Beside him a tray-full
Of oranges, ripe,
And in his brown fingers
His father's long pipe.


He tells Baby Bunting
The way she may tread.
And balance a pitcher
Upon her bright head;


He gives her a scarf,
All of beautiful work,
That she may remember
Mustapha, the Turk.












: Merry eyes and dancing
S Has this little girl;
'Teeth as white as ivory,
i Hair of closest curl.


On her head a turban
She has put, for fun,
STied it like her mother's
S Big and splendid one.


Joyously she dances,
Gaily sings and, plays;
Baby Bunting likes her
For her merry ways.
-I


" Shall we have some music?"
Loud she drums the pan
Black and blithe and cheery
Little African!
/I :: ~












This is Ching, the Chinaman,
Little fat Ching Lee;
He can help the workmen
Carry home the tea.


Funny little eyes he has,
And a funny queue
Hanging from his pointed, hat
Almost to his shoe.


He and Baby Bun shall have
Something very nice:
Each a pair of little sticks
And a bowl of rice.


Little Ching eats very fast,
H is is gone so soon;
" Deary me!" says Baby Bun,
"I should like a spoon "


.. ..











Bonny little Jeanne,
How her black eyes dance!
Loves the sunny fields
Of her native France.


Loves its deep blue skies,
And its vineyards fair,;
Where the purple grapes
Sweeten all the air.


Skillfully she weaves
Lovely pillow-lace,
Makes her courtesy low
With a modest grace.


So polite is she,
Little black-eyed Jeanne,
Smiling Baby Bun-
Courtesies back again.












Where the mountains rise
Steep' and snowy-clad,
In his cabin lives
Jacques, the Switzer lad.


Like a goat he climbs,
Nimble, swift and strong;
Up and down the hills
Rings his merry song.


With his knife he carves
Toys and trifles fine,
And for Baby Bun
Makes a doll of pine.


"Ho!'Toho!" he cries:
- All the keen air thrills.
Ho! for merry Jacques,
And the Alpine hills !


4



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SRoaring Wind, the Indian,
In his blanket blue,

I Gay with paint and feathers-
Like his father, too,







, .


















He can snap the bowstring,
Aim with careful eye;

Baby Bun isfrightened
When the arrows fly.


SGrave he is and sober,
Till his look she heeds,
Gives him very shyly
From her neck some beads.


Then with motions friendly
Merrily they play,
Till he seeks his wigwam
At the close of day.





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BABY EMIN PASHA.


I I.


Baby Emin Pasha
Wears a bright red cap;
Has a maid to fan him,
When he wants a nap.


Baby Emin Pasha
Wears a funny dress;
Don't wear any stockings,
Turkey's warm, I guess.


N





A LITTLE HEAD OF A FAMILY.


A LITTLE HEAD OF A FAMI-LY.


Little Kate woke up to a
day of cares the morning after


INTRODUCING- THE CHRISTMAS DOLLS.


Christmas. ." I shall prob'ly
be in the play-room all the
morning," she said to her
mother at breakfast. "You
know I have a new family."
Kate was a pattern-child for
order and politeness, and she
minded all her "politeness-
rules" in her play. She care-
fully introduced her new
family." She led the young-
est up to the others. This


is Miss Rose," she, said to
them. "Rose, this is Miss
Violet, your elderest sister.
This gentleman is Mr. Ko
Kum Ho, who will be your
escort when you go out. This'
cat is not a cat, but the Prin-
cess Ermine, an -Enchanted
Princess. I will leave you to
get acquainted now, as I have
new clothes to make for each
one of you."
She cut out four suits of
clothes that morning, and her
mother, passing the door, heard










her say, "I guess my mamma's
glad she has only me!"






ROBBIE GOING TO SPEND CHRISTMAS.


Robbie is waiting for the sleigh. He is going to spend
Christmas Day with his little cousins in the city. He has a
sprig of mistletoe in one hand and a bag of toys in the other. If
ne only had some long white whiskers, like grandpapa's, he
vould make a splendid Santa Claus.





BABY'S DREAM OF SPRING. --GOING TO GRANDPA S.

BABY'S DREAM OF SPRING.

The Baby woke from her little nap
And ran to climb in her mamma's lap.
"I have had a pretty dream," she said;
"All by myself in my crib-sy bed.
Our flowers all came back to their stalks
:' Right up and down by the garden walks,
And I heard our birds and heard our bees,
SAnd all the apples were on the trees,!"
S"And it will come true!" the mamma said
. BABY TELLS HER DREAM.
As she kissed the Baby's wondering head.


GOING TO GRANDPA'S.
We are driving along
By the railroad track -
See the wheels go over "
Arnd ver and back !
To grandpa's we're going
To visit all day,
And our wheels keep rolling
And rolling away!
Toot!-toot! there's the whistle .
Hear the flag-man cry !
;' We must stop while the train
SGoes thundering by! DANGER AHEAD


.-; "




BABY FRANK S CHOICE.


IT WAS A HARD THING FOR ANNA TO DO.


BABY FRANK'S CHOICE.


Baby Frank said he would
be "(good boy and go down
stairs to Nurse, if Sister Anna
would let him do just one thing
--the thing he chose. Sister
Anna said she would. But she
did not dream what it was
Frank'would choose to do. It
.was to braid Seraphina's hair!
The golden hair of Seraphina,
the great French wax baby, as
/ '


big and life-like as Frank him-
self! Frank looked at Anna
out of one naughty blue eye
and did not believe she would
do it! But Anna had prom-
ised, and she lifted Frank up
and -held him and he braided,
the soft hair.
Was not Anna a good' sis-
ter ? And was not Frank a lit-
tie rogue ?




WHAT BABY DID.--TWO MARKET GAREDNERS.


WHAT BABY DID.

The ginger-jar stood snugly hid,
And this is what the Baby did:
He climbed to where the dainties are,
And, reaching for that hidden jar,
He thrust his naughty fingers in it!
But he repented it next minute.
A little mouse had just then come;
He thought it was a sweetmeat crumb-
And fell to nibbling Baby's thumb:
Tweak! sqieak!
Skriek! shriek "HE BIT MY THUMB1"




,TWO MARKET GARDENERS.

Said Joey to Neddy,
"Let's get the ground ready;
With our rakes and our hoes,
We'll cultivate rows
Of peas and of beans
And posies and greens,
5 To get us a penny-
WELL EARN A PENNY. Fornow we've not any
For now we ve not any























































































MY LITTLE VALENTINE.





BABY S TROUBLES.


BABY'S TROUBLES.


> There once was a Baby
Who wanted to play,
But Kitty and Doggy
Had both run away.
His blocks tumbled over,
His lamb wouldn't squeak,
And out-of his dolly
The sawdust would leak.

SHis drum had a hole in,
His soldiers would fall,
He'd broken his wagon,
And lost his nice ball;
His "Jumbo" was stupid,
S His gun wouldn't shoot,
His reins were all tangled,
His horn wouldn't "toot !


And Nursiewas busy,
And mamma was out--
So there was poor Baby
Almost in a pout,
When in came Big Sister:
"Oh! Baby, just look!
I've brought something for you,
A nice picture book!"

And then little Baby
Had such a good time,
Forgetting his troubles
In picture and rhyme,
And stories that Baby
Could well understand -
For Sister had bought him
A-new BABYLAND"!






BABY ALICE.


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Baby Alice is very proud and happy. She has taken off her

own little shoe and is holding it up for mamma to see. It

was really quite a big thing for chubby Alice to do.' She had to

tug very hard before she got that shoe off. If she had not been

tied -into her chair, she might have had a bad fall.




TRUMP AND HERO.-- BABY BUN S RIDE.


TRUMP AND HERO.

We have two-horses, Hero and Trump -
I think that their names are funny;
My papa bought them; I s'pose he paid
As much as a dollar in money.
Trump is ready to pull so steady
With never a bit of prancing;
But Hero goes on his tip-top-toes
And likes to be always dancing.


BABY


BABY BUN RIDING "LIGHTNING."


Baby Bun rode out to-day on
his new horse Lightning,"


JN'S RIDE.

to see the sights in the great
world. He rode down the
garden-path, ten miles or less,
and home again. And what
did Baby Bun see as he rode
on and on ? Baby Bun saw
the most astonishing things;
he saw two bees in one rose,
three kittens asleep in a heap,
and a little chicken standing
on the mother hen's, back as
she sat in the sun.





A LETTER TO GRANDPAPA.











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DEAR GRANDPAPA :

I have a brown horse.
mane and-tail. He can


Come and see me

He has a white take you to ride.
go like the wind.


some day and I will


JOHNNY.


Johnny doesn't know how to write yet, but I am sure this is

what his great black marks mean.


i,-'..





:LITTLE HASTY-WASTY. --TO LONDON TOWN.i


LITTLE HASTY-WASTY.

Little Hasty-Wastywas not a bad boy-oh, no
Sbut he never could wait to do things at the right
time. He would always meet papa at the door
S-and tell all the nice surprises, and he gave his
Christmas gifts as soon as he bought them,
because he could not wait for Christmas day.
And once,, when it was very warm, he put on his
new fur cap and coat and wore them to school be-
cause he could not wait for a cold day, and all the
children laughed at foolish little Hasty-WVasty. -





^ -.--* -



._' > .- -- ________--

To London Town, to London Town, we now are taking Nah,
And Kit goes down to London Town, and baby too, and Fan;
To London Town, to London Town,
We-children all are journeying down !
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BABY'S SAD CHRISTMAS.


BABY'S SAD CHRISTMAS.

Do you not feel sorry for any one who has a sad Christmas ?
Our Baby had a very sad one last year, and the saddest part
was that it was all her own fault.
J .When Baby first saw her stocking in
i .., the morning, she was so glad that she
jumped up and down for joy, and spatted
-her little hands together; but her joy did
not last long, and I will tell you why-
because her sister Dedie, who is four years
Sold, had such a big, beautiful Santa Claus
doll, with a fur cloak and a Chritsmas Tree in
Shis arms, that when Baby saw it she could
not look at her own presents any more.
And she had so many of them! Four
dolls, a Noah's ark, picture-books, and all
1 sorts of things that she likes. But she
made up her naughty little mind that she
;,. would not play with anything but Dedie's
I Ibig Santa Claus doll in the fur cloak.
Now Dedie is a very kind big sister, and
__ always gives, up to the Baby, but mamma
'i ,,;'--- said Baby could not have the Santa Claus
.E. DOLL doll -she must play with her own. But
EDIE AND HER DOLL. poor Baby wouldn't play with anything






A CHRISTMAS GAME.

all day, and cried and cried and ,
cried for Dedie's Santa Claus doll. -.
But late in the afternoon .Baby
went with them all to a real Christ-
mas Tree at her aunty's house, and
there the first thing that was taken
off the beautiful Tree was a lovely
doll, as large as Dedie's, dressed "BYE, BABY DEAR
like Mrs. Santa Claus, and made of stuff that wouldn't break,
with real hair and a fur bonnet and cloak.
So poor Baby went home happy, hugging Mrs. Santa Claus
in both her little fat arms; and ever since Christmas that doll
has slept in the best cradle, beside Baby's own bed, furs and
all sometimes, and often, long after she ought to be asleep, I
hear Baby all alone in the dark, singing, Bye, baby dear!"




Ho, ho, little boy! are you a rabbit?
SHop, then, hop!
Here's a sugar-plum, hop and grab it!
Hop, now, hop!
SSee, we scatter you Christmas-candy!
Come, now, hop!
Ha, ha! at hopping you are not handy .
SYou may stop!






WHAT THE TWINS GOT.
'Twas all in the brightest of Christmas weather
That two little twins went riding together,
And nursie stepped into the Santa Claus shops
To secretly buy them some musical tops,
When out at the carriage she heard such a clatter
She ran to the door to see what was the matter;
S Four little fists indulging in clinches!
S In bad little blows! in scratches! in pinches!
Then nursie went back, a-shaking her head,
And purchased them two tiny switches instead;
".For 'tis Santa Claus' wish," she said with a nod,
"That a naughty child have no gift but a rod!"



THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT.

S-; Mamma! see me!" Jack's
S: .,,', mamma saw her little boy sit-
S ting in front of a great snowball.
Ci_:_:-i f i "My house! See!" Roundhe
S whirled, and into the big snow-
S:I ball he went, on hands and knees.
S-Then he put out his head like
S' a jolly little dog. Ibuilt it," he
.. AT THE DOOR OF HIS.HOUSE. said, "with my snow-shovel!"
"!5 ,\ ORO HSHUE

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HOW THE GEESE WENT WALK-ING.


Ten lit-tle geese,
Two lit-tie gan-ders!
The snow is go-ing
We must wan-der!
" Caw!" cried a crow,
S What are you talk-ing !
A whole month yet
S You can't go walk-ing-!"
SHiss," said the geese,
:" You-'re al-ways caw-ing!


We see blue sky,
The snow is thaw-ing!"
And thro' they squeezed,
The crow de-fy-ing;
But the drifts were deep,
And flap-ping, fly-ing,
The geese came back,
The gan-ders af-ter,
And the- crow fell off
The fence with laugh-ter.







BA-BY.

Fret-sy lit-tle ba-by, come to mam-ma's lap!
Pet-sy lit-tle ba-by, take a lit-tle nap!
Tod-dling lit-tle ba-by, push-ing chairs a-bout,
Fun-ny lit-tle ba-by, tired all out,
Dar-ling lit-tle ba-by, shut her lit-tle eyes
Lit-tle ba-by-bunt-ing go to sleep-y-byes!



ED-GAR THE AR-TIST.


A lit-tie boy lives, in the
town of Oak-land, in Cal-i-
for-nia, and his name is Ed-
gar. He is al-most five years
old, and he thinks BA-BY-LAND
is ver-y nice in-deed. He oft-
en draws pict-ures on his slate,





ALL THESE SNAKES.I


and
them.


tells us sto-ries a-bout
SHe tells the sto-ries


to pa-pa, and mam-ma, and
Wal-do, his lit-tle broth-er.






ONE SNAKE TRIED TO GET UP.
Wal-do is three years old, he-
can tell ver-y fun-ny sto-ries,
but he can-not draw pict-ures.
When Ed-gar is a man, he
says he shall be an ar-tist and
paint pret-ty pict-ures. Wal-
do says that when he is grown


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' --~-'-





up, he shall be a rags-sacks- so he ran in the house. He
and-bot-tle-man. I will show thought the snakes would get
you two of Ed-gar's pict-ures, him there, so he went on top
and tell you a-bout them. of the house. One snake-tried
to get up, but he could not.
.' This oth-er lit-tle boy,"
Ed-gar says, used to wish he
0\ had horns, and here he is
aJ af-ter the horns grew, and he
AF-TER THE HORNS GREW. is cry-ing a-bout it. You see
This lit-tle boy was play-ing he did not know how dread-
in the grass which you see, ful it would be to have horns
when all these snakes came, on his head."



A SCAM-PER.

Run up, run down,
Run in, run out,
Runi through the house,
And round a-bout;
Run down the cel-lar, 9
And up the stairs, l
A-round the ta-ble,
Be-hind. the chairs;
Run into the gar-den, back to the shed,
And nev-er stop 'till you run to bed!






NOT SATISFIED.


I was very fond indeed
Of my red velocipede,
Till the big boys got their
bicycles, you see-
Just two wheels, and how
they fly,
Up so very light and high,
Just two wheels, while my
velocipede has three!
Well, as soon as ever I can,
WHAT HE INTENDS T BI shall try to be a man,
And I'll buy a new one then that's what I'll do !
And this birthday red one maybe
I will give it to the baby!
He's so little he won't know three wheels from two.


A TRUE BA-BY STO-RY.


I know a mer-ry lit-tle girl,
Her name is Ba-by Blue;
She can-not walk,
She can-not talk,
But she can creep and coo.


A pretty shawl was spread,
So soft and warm and gay;
With blocks and ball
And rub-ber doll
We left her there to play.






Some-thing round lies
shawl;
Per-haps 'tis good- to
She goes to see


on the


eat!


What it can be
On both her hands and
feet.


Ba-by tries
She picks a
Stares


1 o


to take it up;
nd pulls a-gain-
in sur-prise


With big blue- eyes,
Then tries- but all in vain!


Ba-by Blue knows what to
do;
With sud-den roll and "pring


O-ver
Up-on
And tries


she goes
her nose,
to bite the thing!


ON MAM-MA'S SHAWL.
A-las, for you, sweet
Blue,


De-ter-mined lit-tie
Don't tug an
Don't kick ar
'Tis noth-ing but


:Bat-byr


soul!
d try!
id cry!
a hole!


Un-buck-le


your skate-straps,


now,
Doff muf-flers and mit-tens!


Pus-sy-Wil-low is


call-ing


out


Her lit-tle gray kit-tens.


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?JER-RV CHRIST.MA.S. BA-BY.




r-.


"NOW HOLD FAST -LILY'S LAST"


SNAP THE WHIPI

BY MRS. EMILY SHAW FORMAN.


OFF we go
In a row,,
Gallant Tom's our leader;
Now hold fast
Lily's last,
Strength and courage speed her!
Lightly skip,
Do not trip;
Snip, snap, goes the whip !

II.

Lily's down!
Do not frown,
Let us all be jolly i
Lend a hand,
She can staid;
Next in turn comes Molly.
Lightly skip,
Do not trip;
Sa'.ti snap. roes the whi '


Jo and Ben,
Little men,
They can foot it faster;
Off they dash,
Like a flash,
Fearing no disaster;
Lightly skip,
SDo not trip,
Snip, snap, goes the whip!

IV.

Try again!
Now and then
Some one gets a tumble;
Never mind,
We shall find
It's to make us humble;
Lightly skip,
Do not trip;,
S',A, snat, -oes the wh',
















































































BABY'S ADMIRERS.






LITTLE ETHEL.

n- ever tires; one is her shadow
.:, on the wall, and the other is
4: : -,' .
S 'i her doll, Prue. To her shadow
S" she talks by the hour. "She
tells it all she hears and all
she sees. And if at meal-time 'I
S she sees it dance on the wall
near her, she slips down from
S the table and takes her bowl
i'i and spoon and stands before- -
the shadow while she eats; :
first she takes a spoonful her-
.self, and then she offers one
to the shadow-child. This
ETHEL MEASURES WITH HER SHADOW.
she does until the dish is
'Ethel was brought to the empty. Does she think the
Infants' Home for care when shape on the wall is a hungry
she was a wee baby, only three little girl like herself? She
weeks old. Now, she is four like to "measure" with the
years old, and she is so full shadow-girl every night.
of pretty ways and bright Ethel's doll, Prue, for the
talk that she is loved by all most part, has, lived a petted
who know her. life, though she is a poor',
There are two joys in her headless object. But to-day .
little life of which Ethel we have been told that Prue
f : ,> '





'"-


'has grown to be a bad child, brought poor Prue a new head,
a very bad child, this fact with blue eyes, flaxen hair and
explains the discipline she a sweet mouth that will never
has been undergoing. Poor be known to pucker into a cry
Prue! She was spanked early or a pout, but will smile from
-in the day for being untidy, morn till night. She will see
and she was stood in the the new Prue in a new suit,
corner for being cross and with a hat and feather and
for crying before visitors; a necklace and a pretty coat
later in the day she was shut- with real
up in the closet for losing shoes and
her shoe; and now, she is stockings.
going supperless to bed. O, hap-
"What is wrong with Prue py days to
this time ?" we ask. come, with
"Oh, everything," says Ethel. Prue like
Her has tried my nerves
all day, and I won't stand it
one minute more Perhaps
if her had a head like other
babies her would be gooder."
Dear little mother! To-
morrow morning will bring
her a great surprise. When WHAT ETHEL WILL SEE IN THE MORNING.
she runs to wake her child, "other babies!" A mouth to
she will find that in the kiss! Eyes to see! A face:
night some kind fairy has to wash! And hair to curl!
.:;-^ *. '* *' ',*


:


11


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BABY'S LETTER.


Half a sheet of paper, crumpled, jammed, and torn,
Covered o'er with pencil marks made this morn,
SFunny zigzag scrawling, here and there an "0";
Worthless scrap you call it-mamma 'd tell you, "No!"


BABY HIMSELF.


When she gets that paper, many
miles away,
She will see the picture that I,
have seen to-day;
And she'll read the writing, noth-
ing she will miss,
Zigzag lines mean love for her,
every "0" a kiss.


She will see her baby bending o'er the sheet,
Working hard to make his letter very neat,
Dipping oft his pencil, when he stops to think,
In an empty bottle that once was full of ink.

When mamma reads the letter, she'll pack that very day,
She'll long for baby's dimples till she cannot stay away;
Then homeward she'll come flying o'er miles of railroad track,
And kiss the little hands whose letter made her hurry back.


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ONE W IN-TER DAY.


IT was a grand sLd-ing ev-er-y one.
place." Hard had they toiled girls met at


to get it, too-the Black chil-
dren, the Brown chil-dren, the
Green chil-dren and the White
chil-dren. Please, now, don't
think the lit-tle folks these
col-ors-they were Mr. Brown's
chil-dren, Mr. Green's chil-
dren, and so on.
These chil-dren- the Blacks
Sand the Browns and the Greens
and the Whites-all had had
new sleds at Christ-mas; gai-ly
ipaint-ed, fine-named--the
"Tel-e-phone," and "Gen. But-.
ler," and Hold the Fort," and
so on splen-did run ners,


The boys ahd -
each oth-er's gates .


and bragged; they might have
quar-relled had not lit-tle A-my
Green ob-served that there was
no snow.
No, none; and none came
un-til -next week. "Then there
was a storm. The side hill
was well cov-ered by noon.
'When the storm ceased the
chil-dren came out and fixed
the hill. They trod up and
down and up and down, arid
poured on ev-er so much wa- -
ter to freeze o-ver night.
Next morn-ing the" slid-ing
place" looked grand, though


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-sh. Heo s
e o was, blown o-ver it a the glori-ous hill. He steel
tite;; ;:and the Black chil-dren, swift-ly:- right in-to a ,tree-
fhte Browns,- the Whites and branch which had been blown. ''
reens, in their muf-flers and down and fro-zen 'in 0-ver-
-.'mit-tens, got on their sleds in night. Hold the Fort" ran;,-^
P-breath-less haste. A beau-ti- right o-ver Gen. But-ler," and ''
t i. pro-ces-sion. they were, "Gen. But-ler" drove right- .',




.. .. ..-















wn h a.da brae and the girls screamed, and it
P i( *,- '. *'; 1
















l hoop it was when the steers- was "0. DEAR ME '" gpt
r'i. -:i'. n- -
'b c nd"a r do n I.' *,, S
enEol- n Dc (r:t -e ih "eo 'n r 'i:: :





,. '-.'.
i ;'Green~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~ ~~~" hod-n ont ikrgtovrtefllwi r'-t; + +
+ -Bo.W-ns ."air; ,'d abraxe andthe irls sca~"~Preamed; andit