• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Title Page
 Half Title
 Dedication
 Frontispiece
 Table of Contents
 Baby world
 Back Cover














Group Title: Baby world : stories, rhymes, and pictures for little folks
Title: Baby world
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00081102/00001
 Material Information
Title: Baby world stories, rhymes, and pictures for little folks
Uniform Title: St. Nicholas (New York, N.Y.)
Physical Description: 199 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Dodge, Mary Mapes, 1830-1905 ( Editor )
Century Company ( Publisher )
De Vinne Press ( Printer )
Publisher: Century Co.
Place of Publication: New York
Manufacturer: De Vinne Press
Publication Date: c1891
Edition: New ed.
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Pets -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Natural history -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Manners and customs -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1891   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1891   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1891
Genre: Children's stories
Children's poetry
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: compiled from St. Nicholas by Mary Mapes Dodge.
General Note: Contains verse, fiction and non-fiction.
General Note: Baldwin Library copy lacks p. 25-26.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00081102
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002224624
notis - ALG4890
oclc - 67415574

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page i
        Page ii
    Title Page
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Half Title
        Page v
    Dedication
        Page vi
        Page vii
    Frontispiece
        Page viii
    Table of Contents
        Page ix
        Page x
        Page xi
        Page xii
        Page xiii
        Page xiv
    Baby world
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
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    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text
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BABY WORLD


STORIES, RHYMES, AND PICTURES


FOR LITTLE FOLKS

NEW EDITION



COMPILED FROM ST. NICHOLAS
BY MARY MAPES DODGE



J -
7:-- k=_.:_- r__ --: -


THE CENTURY CO. NEW-YORK




















































Copyright, 1891, by THE CENTURY CO.


The De Vinne Press,
New-York.


















BABY


WOF~LD.


SEbEeTED FFROJVI


ST. JIeJ-lOLjP S.


ci~


41 112.


i~
'I .`'Sl~b~s~:


r...


;.


- Vl







e@ THE BABIES, LARGE AND $MALL;

Q THE CHILDREN, ONE AND yLL.



Baby world is a busy world,- -
Is n't it, children dear ?
Full of si9bts you must see and know,
Full of sounds you must bear,
Full of things that you must not toucb,"
Full of puzzles, botl great and small,
Full of people you love so mucb
And, ob, sucb a pleasant world after all!

That is your Baby world, spicl? and span;
And here is a book. on the self-same plan.
Perhaps you 'll find it alive and plad
As any world you ever bave bad.
There are dogs and horses, Iittens, birds,
And songs and stories. and happy words,
Funny doings to make you laugh;
Sbeep and goat, and tiger and calf,
Reindeer and lion, and marmosets
(Those are queer little household pets);
And other animals, too, you 'II find,-
Some quite cruel, and some rigbt hind.
And skates and booples, sleds and toys;
Merry girls and frolicsome boys,







Flowers and trees, and landscapes fair;-
Wby, you 'I tbinl you are out in tle open air
Well from its pages may sunlight shine,
For Baby world floats in a liglt divine.

Yes, Baby world is full of joy,
Full of merriment, love and li\tt;
And you, my girl I and you, my boy
Can help to beep it fair and bright.
Pleasant speed and a cheerful face,
A willing beart and gentle grace,
A love of God, and a soul that is true,-
These are the light that can shine from you.

Glad Baby world I brgibt Baby world!
With joy like a great blue slky unfurled!
Witb your lumberland, Fairyland, $toryland, all;
Your stars so great, and your clouds so small;
Your torrents of tears that are gone in the sun,
Your mountains of trouble that vanish in fun,-
What could we big fol do without you
We with our sweet loving trouble about you ?
Wby, we could do nothing but cry all day
If Baby world ever should pass away

Then up and around us, ye little foll! Loo !
We 've a map of your world in this beautiful book.
And just as long as you please you may stay;
And whenever you please you may scamper away.


M, M, D.



























































"SUCH A COMICAL WORLD !


















CONTENTS.




PAGE

ALL ABOARD FOR THE MOON Picture, drawn by ...................... ... NV hlig. .............. 79
ALPHABET OF CHILDREN, AN ..................... ..................... Isabel Frances Bellows .. .. 88
"A RAGING, ROARING LION" ............................................. J. G. Francis.............. 34
"AROUND AND AROUND A DUSTY LITTLE ROOM "............... ......... Margaret Johnson ......... I18
ARTHUR AND HIS PONY.................... ............................ F. R. S.................. 75
As GOOD AS A MOTHER. Picture ................... .................. .......................... 185
ASTONISHED ................... .......................................... argaret Johnson ........ 138
BABY-BO .................................................................. Laura E. Richards........ 6
BABY'S JOURNEY ................ .. ................. ................ .Laura E. Richards .... 189
BABY'S SKIES ................ ........................................... M C. Bartlett....... ... 57
BABY'S SUNNY CORNER, THE. Picture, drawn by ......................... Mary Hallock Foote ........ 188
BALLAD OF A RUNAWAY DONKEY, THE .................................Emilie Poulsson .... ..... Io
BEE AND THE BUTTERFLY, THE .................... ................ ................................ 105
BELL-RINGERS, THE.................. ................... ..... ..... ........ M. A f. D ............... 136
SBIG GRAY DOG AND THE BIG GRAY GOAT, THE ................... .... .A. P. Williams ........... 94
BIRDS IN THE RAIN ....... .............................................Celia Thaxter............. 184
BOBBY'S SUPPER....... ............. ................................... B. W................... 159
BOBOLINK AND A CHICKADEE, A ................................... .. Ella Preston ........... 127
B ONNIE BABIE STUART ................ ........... ... ........................................ 51
BOY AND THE TOOT, THE .................. .............................M S ............... ... 73
BROWNIES' SKATING FROLIC, THE ................... .................... J. S...................... 172
BUMBLE-BEE AND THE GRASSHOPPER, THE ................ ............... .......................... 165
BUMBLE-BEE, THE. ............. ...... ............................. .Laura E. Richards......... 61
CAN YOU COUNT Us? Picture, drawn by .............................. F. S. Church............... 104
CAT-AND-DOG MANNERS. Pictures, drawn by........................... Nora Stotghton ............ 31
*CAT AND THE MOUSE, THE. A picture story, drawn by .................... Palmer Cox ............... 161
CAT-PRANKS. Pictures, drawn by ........... ............................ J. G. Francis.... ........ 122
SCHANGING BABIES ............ .......................................... Sydney Dayre ............. 52
CHILDREN OF THE WEEK ................... ...... ......... .. .................... ............. 84
CIRCUS ELEPHANTS HAVING A GOOD TIME. Picture, drawn by ...........J. C. Beard........... .. 180
CIRCUS ELEPHANT'S SATURDAY-NIGHT BATH, THE. Picture, drawn by......J. C. Beard ............. 180









PAGE
CITY CHILD, THE .................................. ...................... Alfred Tennyson........... 192
"COCK-A-DOODLE-DOO! "...... ....................................... ........ .............. ..... 164
COCK AND THE SUN, THE .................. .............................J. P. B................... 16
COULD N'T YOU, MAMMA? ..................................... ...................... ...... ... 178
COUNT BUMPO AND BUFF ................................ ...... ........Joel Stacy................. 166
CRADLE SONG..................... ..................... ......... ..... argaret Johnson ......... 193
DAISY TIME. Picture, drawn by...................... ............... Laura C. Hills ............ 65
DANDELION ............ ............. ................... .............. Nellie M Garabran ....... 109
DEAD DOLL, THE ....... ......... ....................................... A argaret Vandegrift ...... 19o
DIFFERENCE BETWEEN UP AND DOWN, THE. Pictures, drawn by .........H enry Stull............ 03
DING, DONG, BELL! Picture, drawn by ........ ....................... Louis Wain ......... .... 56
DOG THAT DROVE HIS MASTER'S HORSE, THE .... ..................................... ...... 95
DONKEY, THE BALLAD OF A RUNAWAY ..................................... Emilie Poulsson ............
DOWN IN THE MEADOW ............................... ............. .llRuth Hall ............... 192
DOZEN LITTLE DOLLS, A ................................... ........J. S.......... ........ 142
DRUMMING-LESSON, THE .............. ................... .............. J. S ............ ........ 3
" DUDE "......... ... ... ................................................. ....... ...... 23
DUET, A. Picture.................... ... ..... .... ................... ...................... 85
ELEPHANT RINGING THE BELL FOR DINNER. Picture, drawn by ........... J. C. Beard ............... 8
ELF AND THE BUMBLE-BEE, THE .................................. .... Oliver Herford............. 35
ENOUGH FOR TWO. Picture, drawn by.................................. J. C. Beard ............... 77
FAMILY DRIVE, A ................... ................. ............ Stephen Smith ............. 72
FATE OF A GINGER-BREAD MAN, THE .................. ................ Hannah R. Hudson.......... 40
FATHER HUBBARD. Picture, drawn by...... .............. ........... D. C. Peters......... ..... I
FIDDLE-DIDDLE-DEE ......................................... .......... .. E. Af. Davis........... 44
FINGER PLAY, A ................... ............................. .Emma C. Dod ........... 15
FIVE-FINGER FOLK, THE ... ............................................ Olive A. Wadsworth ....... 64
FLOWER FAIRIES. Picture, drawn by ................... .............. Laura C. Hills ............ 67
FLUFFY AND SNUFFY........... ..................... ..... ........ Carrie W. Thompson....... 150
FOUR LITTLE BIRDS. ......... ................... ......... .... ... ............................. 27
FOURTH OF JULY STORY, A ..... ............ .............. ...... Lillian Dynevor Rice...... 56
GETTING ACQUAINTED. Picture, drawn by ................... ......... C. A. Northam ........... ..39
GINGERBREAD BOY, THE.................... .................................................... 96
GIRAFFE EXCURSION, THE ................... .......... ................. J. C. Francis.............. 143
GOING TO THE M OON ......................... ......................... S. T. R................... 78
GOOD BOY BRIGADE, THE. Picture ...................... ............... ........................... 98
G OOD FRIENDS ........................ ............ ...................W F C .................. 129
GRANDMA'S NAP ................... ................................... fI. f. D............. ... .
GRANDMOTHER WHO CAN DRAW, A ............... .................. ..................... 171
GRANDPA'S OLD SLIPPER AND BABY'S NEW SHOE......................... Elwyn Waller...... ..... 170
x










PAGE

HALLOA, OLD SCUTTLE! ................................................. D ............. 26
HAND-SHADOWS................ ............................................................. ............ 197
HAPPY NEW YEAR, A. Picture, drawn by .............................J. G. Francis ............. 72
HARK! HARK! ......................... .... .......................... M. 1.D ................. 29
HELLO! ..................... ............................................... H. ............... 132
HERE'S YOUR SLIPPER! Picture, drawn by .......... ................. H. P. Share ............. 138
H ER NAME ............. ......................... .......... ........... .. rs. L. P. W heeler ....... 112
His LORDSHIP'S BED-TIME. Picture, drawn by ............................E. H. Blashfield ........... 37
HOME-MADE SCARE, A................................... ............. Margaret Eytinge .......... 85
How ROB COUNTED THE STARS ......................................... W.B .................... 102
How SPORT SAVED THE KITTENS ......... ....... .................De Wilt C. Lockwood ..... 59
,How THEY CAME TO HAVE THE PICNIC .............................. Alargaret Eytinge ....... .. 114
H URLY-BURLY ...................... ....... ........ ... .... ............... Emma M ortimer Thite ..... 83
INVITATION, AN ..... ...... ........................ ............ ...... ............ ........57
Is N'T IT ABOUT TIME TO GET OUT OF THE WAY? Picture, drawn by.. Walter Bobbelt .... ....... 162
JAPANESE MAMMA AND HER BABY, THE ................ ............. V. E. E. Gris ............. 78
JEMIMA BROWN .................................. .......... ............. Laura Richards... ..... 139
JINGLING RHYME, A .................................... ........... Emily S. Oakey ......... 10
K ING DRINKS, THE. Picture .. ... ...... ................... ...... .................. ...... 187
KITTY AND DODO ................ .......... ......................... .. .... S. Holt................ 27
K ITTY-CAT'S CRIB ................................................... .................. ... 7
KNICKERBOCKER BOY, THE ....................... ..... ..... ............ Caroline S. King ......... 55
KNIT, DOROTHY, KNIT .................. .......................... .... Aargaret Johnson ........... 54
LA M AIN .......................... ..... ... ... ........................ ................... 194
LAND OF NODDY, THE ................ ......... ........... .......... Rossiter Johnson ........... 191
LAZY PUSSY, THE .................. ................... ................Palmer Cox ............. 17
LEFT OUT IN THE RAIN. Picture, drawn by .............................. Jessie Curtis Shepherd .. .. 21
LEOPARDESS AND HER CHILDREN, A. Picture ........... .......................... ............ 173
LETTER FROM A DOLL, A..................... ................." Lucy" ...................... 68
LETTER FROM A LITTLE BOY, A ........... .. ... ...... ........... ."Ralph" ................. 22
SLION, THE .................................... ......... .............. John Lewees............. 86
/ LITTLE BERTIE ................... .................................. ... 1. D .................
LITTLE BOY BLUE. Picture .............................................. ................ 145
LITTLE BROOK .......... .... ...... ..................... .............. .L F. B ............... .. 167
LITTLE CHICK THAT TRIED, THE ......................................... JohnLewees ............... 49
LITTLE GRETCHEN .... ... ..... .. .................... ..... ......................... ............. 43
LITTLE JOHNNY AND THE MOSQUITO. A story in pictures .................................. ... 156
LITTLE LIGHTFOOT ............. ..................................... L.G. V .............. 105
LITTLE MAUD'S STORY ..................................... .............. M Gow ............. 182
SLITTLE MISCHIEF ............................. ...................... D ........... ..... 18
XI









PAGE
LITTLE PERI-W INKLE ................... ..... ................... ................ I07
LITTLE RED HEN ........................................................ Edora S. Bumnstead ....... 70
LITTLE SOLDIERS. Picture, from a painting by ................. ............ douard Fr2re. ............. 33
"LITTLE TOMMY TUCKER! SING FOR YOUR SUPPER".................... ..E. M. S. Scannell......... 61
" LOOK OUT, THERE Picture, from a carving by ........................ Joseph Lauber ............. 177
LULLABY, A. Picture, drawn by ........................................... iMary A. Lathbuzty......... 112
MAMA'S PETS. From a painting by Ludwig Knaus ................................................... 58
M ARMOSETS .................. ....................... ....... ............ .J. S ..................... 144
MIDNIGHT EXPRESS, THE. Picture, drawn by ............................. Culmer Barnes ............ 98
Miss LILYWHITE'S PARTY ................................................ George Cooper ............. 2L
MISUNDERSTANDING, A ................. .............................. .largaret Johnson ......... 66
MORNING-GLORY SEED, THE STORY OF THE ........................... .Margaret Eytinge ......... 32
MR. ELEPHANT RINGING THE BELL FOR DINNER. Picture, drawn by...... J. C. Beard .................. 8
MRS. GRIMALKIN AND THE LITTLE GRIMALKINS. Picture. .................................... ...... 121
MY LADY IS EATING HER MUSH ..........................................M. F. Butts.............. 127
NOT HANDSOME, PERHAPS, BUT VERY STYLISH! Picture, drawn by. .......F. Bellew ................ 29
Now SHE 'S OFF! Picture, drawn by..................................... W. P. Bodfish ............. 20
" Now You CAN FLY AWAY." Picture .............. .................. ............. ... ... .. 151
NUMBER ONE .. .............. ......................... ....... ........ Charles R. Talbot .... .... 5
"OH, I'M MY MAMMA'S LADY-GIRL! "...................... .............. M. D................. 74-
" OH, LOOK AT THIS GREAT BIG TIGER Picture......... .................... ............... 158
OLD MAN BY THE GATE, THE ........................ ................. Thomas S. Collier.......... 82
"ONE DAY AN ANT WENT TO VISIT HER NEIGHBOR ................................................ 102
ONE OF HIS NAMES ................................. ..................... ... Josephine Pollard.......... 83
ONE, TWO, THREE ........................... ........ . ........... Margaret Johnson .......... 119
ON THE ICE. Picture, drawn by.............. ........... ........... L. F. Hopkins .............. 99;
OUR POLLY ...................... ........ ....................... ..... .H ......... ......... 148
OWL, THE EEL, AND THE WARMING-PAN, THE ............................ Laura E. Richards......... 107
PAIR OF BROTHERS, A. Picture ........... ... ..................................... ................ 157
PAIR OF RABBITS, A. Picture ............ ................ ............................ ........... 16
PET FAWN, THE. Picture, drawn by ..................... .............. Mary Hallock Foote ........ 9
PIN-WHEEL TIME. Picture, drawn by .. ........... .......... ........... T.Peters .............. II
POMPEY AND THE FLY .... .................. ............. .......... L......... ............ 146
PRACTICING SONG .. .................................. .... .............. Laura E. Richards ......... 163
PROBLEM IN THREES, A................................ .. ..... ..... .Eudora S. Bumstead ....... 55
PUNKYDOODLE AND JOLLAPIN ........................................... LauraB E. Richards ....... 107
PUPS. Picture, from painting by .................................... .J. G. Brown .............. 108
PUSSIES' COATS, THE ...................................... ..... .............................. 109
PUSSY AND HER ELEPHANT .................................... .. .. Hannah More Johnson .... 52
QUEER HORSE-CAR, A..... .......................... ............. .......... 68









PAGE

QUITE A HISTORY ..................... .. .. .. .........................Arlo Bates ............... 176
RACE IN THE AIR, A. Picture.................................... ....... ...................... 176
RATHER CROWDED .......... ..... ................. ....... .............. C. P ................... 149
READY TO GROW. Picture, drawn by ............................ .....J. .Dol/ .... facing page I
SRED-TOP SEEING THE WORLD ...................................... ..... Aunt Fann .... ........ 16
REMINDING THI HEN........... .......................... .......... ... Bessie Chandler. ....... 104
RHYME OF THE WEEI, A .......................................... ... William lWye Smith ........ 126
RIDING ON THE RAIL .. ..................... ........ .. .... i. i g ............... 99
RIME FOR LITTLE FOLKS, A ................ ....... ........ ..... Ka-te Af. Clear. ............ 34
RINKTUM ................... ............. ... ........... .......... .. Laura E. ichards ......... 4
ROLLER SKATES, THE SONG OF THE ................... .................. A. C............. ........ II3
RoY's SUGAR GOAT-CARRIAGE. Picture. ............. ............ ... .. ....... ....... ....... 14
ROY'S VISIT.... ........... ..... .. ............................. ........... E F.......... ....... 30
RUNAWAY, A. Picture, drawn by ......................................... F. Bellew. ................ 41
RUNAWAY DONKEY, THE BALLAD OF A ................... ... ..... .. .Emilie Ponlsson ............ no
SEED, THE ...... ..... ............................................... .. F. B ............. ... 179
SEE-SAW, THREE KINDS OF ............ .... ......................... ....................... ... 38
SHAKER BONNET, THE .................. ................................... l arlgaret JohnsonZ ... ..... I38
"SHE DOES N'T SEEM TO KNOW THAT SHE 'S ME! Picture, drawn by.... .Aary Wyman Wallace... 179
SHORTENING THE BABY ................. ........... ........ ........... J. Eastzood ............ 12
SING-A-SING ............ ...... ......... ................................. S. C. Stone ............... 26
SING, SING! WHAT SHALL WE SING? Picture, drawn by .............. J. G. Francis .............. 122
SLATE PICTURES ..................... ........ . ... ... .......... ............... .. 195, 196
SNOW-BIRDS' CHRISTMAS-TREE, THE. ........... ...... ............... iWlabel Jones. ............... 12
SOME FUN WITH A TOY SPIDER. Picture, drawn by................... .J. G. Francis ....... ... 123
SOMETHING BETWEEN A GOOSE AND A PEACOCK. Picture ................................ .... 165
SONG OF THE BROOK, THE ................ ................... ........ ...A s. A t F. Buts ..... .... 449
SONG OF THE ROLLER SKATES, THE ..................................... A. C ..................... 113
Sow, SEW, AND SO ...... ................... ....... ............... Rosa Graham .............. 7
STRANGER CAT, THE ............ ........................ ............. P. Babcock ........... 62
TAME BIRD, THE. Picture, drawn by ........................ .......... ..Adolard Frlrz ............. 2
TEN LITTLE GENTLEMEN........ .. ............................ ........... Joel Stacy .............. 109
T ERRIBLE T IGER, A ..................................................... J S .. .... .. ..... 187
"THERE WAS A SMALL SERVANT CALLED KATE ". ...... ........... E. L. Sv/vester ............ 118
"THEY DIDN'T HAVE A PENNY. .................. .................. .. G. Francis............... 142
THIS IS THE WAY MY GRANDMAMA DANCED. From a painting by ......... J. E. Millais. ............. 36
THREE K INDS OF SEE-SAW ...................... .................................................. 38
THREE LITTLE SISTERS. From a painting by. .......................... Wlilliam Page ..... ....... 128
THREE SMART LITTLE FOXES... ........ ................. ......................... ........... 140
TICK, TOCK! TICK, TOCK .. ........................................ Grant .................. 162
XIII









PAGE
TILTING ........... ................................ ... .... ............. A de F. L .............. 189
TIMID KITTENS, THE .................... ........... ........ .... S. B. Ricor. ............. 123
TOAD AND THE FIREWORKS, THE............................... ... ...... argaret Eytinge......... .133
TONY, THE D OCTOR'S PET ...... .......................... ........... L .................... 147
TRAY AND M ISS PUSS ......... ........ .......... .......................... .... ..... .. 186
TRIO, THE ............. .... ...................... ......... .... ....... lM ary A. Lathbury ........ 167
U P IN A BALLOON .. ..... ... ... ...................... ......... ... Bessie H ill ........... ... 181
W AS HE CAUGHT? ........ ...................................... .. ... essie Hill ............... 124
W EE LITTLE H OUSE ............. ............................................ .......... 126
W EE, PRETTY H OUSE, A ........ ...... .......................... ............ .. .. ........ 186
" WHAT DOES THIS MEAN, SIR?" Picture. ................. .. .............. ............. 175
WHAT MIGHT HAPPEN. Picture, drawn by.............................. Frank Beard ........ 157
WHAT ONE YEAR MAKES OF A LITTLE KITTEN ........... ............AuntFanny..j ......... ... 48
W HAT ROBBY SAW ........... .. ... .................... .. ............. Joel Stacy ................ 174
WHAT THE COLT SAYS. Picture, drawn by ........... ....... ..... ..F. Belle-v .......... ..... 8
WHERE Do ALL THE TOYS COME FROM ?..... . .... .............................. ..... 42
WHICH OF THESE LITTLE BOYS LIVES IN YOUR HOUSE? Silhouette pic-
tures, draw n by .......................................
WHICH OF THESE LITTLE GIRLS LIVES IN YOUR HOUSE? Silhouette pic- E e 25
tures, drawn by .... Elise ............... 25
W HO CAN READ THIS? .......................... ............. .......................... 194
WHO CAN TELL? .............. .................... ................... AnnieL. Hannah ..... .... 120
W HY CORALIE W AS ILL ........ ............................ ............. Laura E. Richards ......... Ioo
WINTER AND SUMMER........... ........ .......................... O. A0j owulton ... .... 159
W ISDOM IN THE W ELL ......... ... .......................... ........... Phil O'Gels ......... .... 145
WONDERFUL GIRL, A ....... .................................... Hattie S. Russell .......... 67
W ORDS INCLINED TO JINGLE.................... ....... ............. ....Annie E. DeFriese ......... 5
YOUNG LIFE. Frontispiece of Volume.













BABY WORLD.



LITTLE BERTIE.

ONE day little Bertie Green came running in from the
garden. She held something in her apron, but no one could
see what it was. Oh, Mamma," she said, "let 's play
three wishes. Play you 're a poor woman and I 'm a
be-yoo-tiful fairy. Will you, Mamma ? "
Mamma laughed, and said she would try.
Very well," said Bertie, you '11 see what a splendid
game it is. Now, shut your eyes tight, we 're going to
begin! I'm a fairy, and I '11 grant you three wishes.
There's something in my apron, you know, Mamma, but
it 's a secret. Now, WISH!"
Well," said mamma, closing her eyes, let me think."
That's right, Mamma; wish for something real nice-
a rose, or a cherry, or anything!"
I wish for a rose," said her mamma, very slowly.
Here it is! cried Bertie, laughing with joy, and hand-
ing her mamma a lovely rose. "Nowwish again, Mamma."







Let-me-think," said mamma again; now what
SHALL I wish for?" Something to eat! the fairy hinted.
Oh, yes, something to eat!" mamma said; "well, I
wish-I wish for two nice cherries! "
"Good! good!" shouted Bertie, giving mamma a bright
little red bunch. How DID you know? Are they sweet ?"
"Yes, indeed," said mamma, "and I thank you very much,
good fairy! But I can have another wish, you know!"
"Y-e-s!" said Bertie, looking troubled, and letting go of
the little empty apron; "only, I don't know how to play
any more wishes."
"I do! said mamma; "I wish for a kiss!" Then you
should have seen the happy fairy climb up, throw her little
arms around mamma's neck and kiss her again and again!
That was the very best wish of all," said mamma.


THE TAME BIRD.
-n-Hir- ..*


BIPPO KNOWS THAT THE CHILDREN WILL NOT HARM HIM.
2







THE DRUMMING-LESSON.


THIS little boy lives in France. His name is Auguste,
and he is learning how to drum in the right way. He
does not think it I'"" .- '""
is nice to go aboutit 11'111 bli II I.
the house m ak- ll ,I .... .
ing only a great j.0
racket ; so his
brother is showing II.." I I
him how the little i l
drummer boys [-,
play, rub-a-dub-


du ./-sometimes
softly, sometimes
loudly, but always
in good time.
Auguste hopes to
be a real drummer- ___
boy himself as soon __ _
as he can make ALPHONSE GIVES AUGUSTE A DRUMMING-LESSON.
Froin a picture by Edouard FIrire.
good drum music, and then he can march with his brother
and the other boys up and down the Village street. His
brother Alphonse will play the fife, and another boy will
play the trumpet, while little Auguste drums.
3












'1I



St


IN the Land of Rinktum


Thl
Cu:


Ha
rw


I



In
Le



I a
'Ha



:


(Riddle, riddle, rink),
1ll the happy people-weeple
Never stop to think.
rough the streets they laughing go,
rtseying to high and low,
With a nod, and a wink,
With a jig, and a jink.
ppy land of Rinktum Rink!
'ill go there, too, I think.

In the land of Rinktum
(Riddle, riddle, rink),
Every little noisy-boysy
Lemonade can drink.
the street, all a-row,
mon fountains fall and flow,
With a splash, and a dash,
With a gold and silver flash.
ppy land of Rinktum Rink !
ill go there, too, I think.

In the Land of Rinktum
(Riddle, riddle, rink),
Every bud 's a rosy-posy,
Every weed 's a pink.
Candy shops, lollipops,
Barking dogs and humming-tops.
Happy land of Rinktum Rink!
I will go there, too, I think.


K_









WORDS INCLINED TO JINGLE.


s~eP$. ~ i ;t cp 2. .';r-
- p I 'I .- I ,


-- _n ^ .. ..- ^
S "- ""

.1_3 lii ii .i ^ *- *.
t-' ir ^ '' I -


'^l Sil "'' '.''.'. -t .' "'"- lii


dk A.

ll. 1 ;-


FI I
^A ^ '-:.


PQNJE'~~


Ai A


7 -- -^


NUMBER ONE.

" I TELL you," said Robbie, eating his peach,
And giving his sister none,
" I believe% the good old saying that each
Should lok out for Number One."

" Why, yes," answered Katie, wise little elf,
" But the counting should be begun
With the other one, instead of yourself, -
And he should be Number One."


, '.* 61 .1









BABY-BO.


!i '- 1.... : '*y



, ,* _,-
^ :-^


sz ,
'ii- a -: j

V.. ..~


How many toes has the tootsy foot?
One, two, three, four, five!
Shut them all up in the little red sock,
Snugger than bees in a hive.


How many fingers has little wee hand?
Four, and a little wee thumb !
Shut them up under the bed-clothes tight,
For fear Jack Frost should come.


How many eyes has the Baby Bo?
Two, so shining and bright!
Shut them up under the little white lids,
And kiss them a loving good-night.


t ;:. '. .~'~'
i.~
.~i~i
.- ; i. "':':.
"'~`

...r








SOW, SEW, AND SO.

BY ROSA GRAHAM.


Sow, sow, sow,
So the farmers sow!
Busy, busy, all the day,
While the children are at play,
Stowing, stowing close away
Baby wheat and rye in bed,
So the children may be fed,
So, so, so.


Sew, sew, sew,
So the mothers sew!
Busy, busy all the day,
While the children are at play,
Sewing, sewing fast away,
So the children may have frocks,
Trowsers, coats, and pretty socks,
So, so, so.


Sow, sew, so,
So they sow and sew;
S, and 0, and W,
This is what the farmers do;
Put an E in place of O,
This is how the mothers sew,-
So they sow and sew for you,
So without the W,
So, so, so.


GRANDPAPA'S new slipper,
Lying on the rug;
Little saucy kitty-cat
Thinks it wondrous snug.


Humpy little gray back,
Arched above the toes;
Does she think she's out of sight
If she hides her nose?














































































THIS LITTLE COLT SAYS:"WHY, MA! I'M ALMOST AS TALL AS YOU ARE!"
8
































S r- -



I. I







































THE PET FAWN.
DRAWN BY MARY IIALLOCK FOOTE.








A JINaLING RHYME.

There was a Dog, and he barked and barked and
barked so loud, they say,
That he frightened all the rats and mice a hun-
dredi mile- .::ay.:


There was a Cat all sleek and iat.
and she had naught to do
But softly purr and smooth her fur
and sit and look at you T


-e
iii-,
!e _
-
-


Y',
..-;. ~r;l










































FATHER HUBBARD.


PIN-WHEEL TIME.

II








SHORTENING THE BABY.


OUR baby now is four months old,
A bonnie boy, with hair like gold;
And his long clothes are put away-
For Mother shortened him to-day.

He has the loveliest of frocks,
All trimmed with lace, and two pink socks
That Father bought, the best by far
And prettiest in the whole bazaar.

And now the rogue can kick about;
His little feet go in and out
As though they could not rest, and he
Is just as happy as can be.


Besides, he feels quite proud to-day
With all his long clothes put away,
And dressed so fine! And then, you know,
We praise the boy, and love him so !

His grandmama must see him soon;
We all will go this afternoon,
And take the pet, and stay for tea,-
And what a riot there will be!

At first, perhaps, she may not know
The baby, he has dwindled so;
But let her guess, and do not say
That Mother shortened him to-day!


THE SNOW-BIRDS' CHRISTMAS-TREE.

BY MABEL JONES.

YES, the snow-birds had a Christ-mas-tree at our house last year-a
re-al tree, just big e-nough for the dear lit-tle things. I '11 tell you a-bout it.
We were as hap-py as we could be a-round our own beau-ti-ful tree,
when all at once Roy gave a shout, and point-ed to the win-dow. (Roy is.
my lit-tlest broth-er. He has love-ly brown hair, and it's banged in front
and hangs down be-hind. Mam-ma says he is the pet of the house, or
that Lulu and he are the pets of the house. For Lulu looks ver-y much
like Roy, and has the same kind of love-ly hair, and it's banged in front
and long be-hind, just like Roy's. Only Lulu is old-er than Roy.)
Well, when Roy point-ed to the win-dow that morn-ing we thought at
first that some-thing had hap-pened to the lit-tle toy goat car-riage that.
12








had been giv-en to him at East-er. He oft-en put it up-on the broad
win-dow-shelf, be-cause he could gent-ly pull it up and down there be-
fore the win-dow.-It was a very queer lit-tle car-riage, made of a sug-ar
egg-shell, with a lit-tle sug-ar rab-bit, up-on the seat, driv-ing a ti-ny goat.
But .-, T ,. -ria e :
R oy, \\',-, : I-i-]'it: Su t- 1 "ce_
thl ay m\ n a Kis-nia; tr,--.




/ \






/
-.- \



i. . ..-,:.. ,' ;.,. :. .'.


too 1 .\nd 1 all l,:,:ke-,
a-roun, and-- \\Iia dC. %,0
think ? ihcre on theC in-dow -sill Teru fuulr
love-ly lit-tie snow-birds, look-ing in at our tree! And they would peck,
peck, at the pane, as if they want-ed us to o-pen the win-dow.
Let them in! Let them in!" shout-ed Lulu, and she ran to raise the
win-dow. Then the poor lit-tle birds were a-fraid of her, and flew a-way.
13







They did not fly ver-y far a-way on-ly to a big tree out in the yard.
And we o-pened the win-dow and called, Bird-ie Bird-ie !" a-gain and
a-gain, and tried to coax them to come in. But just then it be-gan to
snow hard, and the lit-tle birds flew down into a lit-tle, low ev-er-green, and
a-way into the cen-ter of it, where the snow could n't fall on them at all.
But the best thing is to come yet. Lulu thought of it. Just when
we said the poor lit-tle birds would have a very dull Christ-mas-day, Lulu
said: Oh, I know We '11 make them a Christ-mas-tree of their own and
take it out and give it to them."
And then Lulu and Mam-ma cut off a lit-tle bough from our Christ-mas-
tree, and they stood it up in a strong pa-per box, and packed the box tight-ly
with pret-ty blue pa-per, so that the bougJ, would stand up straight in it.
And then she hung the lit-tle tree all o-ver with bread-crumbs, and made it
a per-fect lit-tle Snow-birds' Christ-mas-tree !
Then Lulu and Roy put on their new red caps, with a big round but-ton
at the top, and their warm coats, and took the lit-tle Christ-mas-tree out
in-to the yard, and set the lit-tle box and the lit-tle tree very near the ever-
green, where it stood up straight. And if you '11 be-lieve it those
birds nev-er flew a-way at all, but looked just as if they had ex-pect-ed it
all a-long! And Lulu and Roy went a few steps off, and turned a-round
and stood per-fect-ly still, and in a min-ute all four of those lit-tle birds flew
down, and helped them-selves from their pret-ty lit-tle Christ-mas-tree, and
were just as hap-py o-ver it as we were o-ver ours. Lulu and Roy stood
out there in the snow and watched them ev-er so long. And we could see
them from the win-dow, too.
We hope the same lit-tle snow-birds will come back this win-ter; and if
they do, we're go-ing to give them an-oth-er and a fin-er Christ-mas-tree.


ROY'S SUGAR GOAT-CARRIAGE.
14








A FINGER PLAY.


TURN the small hands palm side up,
Lock the fingers stiff as storks;
And, now, what shall we call them, pet?
Why, these are mama's knives and forks!


Now turn them over, ;cep them tight,
And drop the wrists, my little Mabel;
Ah, now we have a surface flat,
Which surely must be papa's table!


Now point the two forefingers,- so!
And join the thumbs, my little lass;
What shall we call this oval shape?
I think 't is grandma's looking-glass!


II


Now point the little fingers, too,
And let the hands rock to and fro;
Ah, here 's a cradle all complete
In which to put our Baby Bo?


I -


'~J""
,r


s.t !,g







;cr tree out in the yard.
TH-E COCK AND THEBird-ie!" a-gain and

By J. P. B. then it be-gan to
---er-green, and
< t all.




... .' //./



















A COCK sees the sun as he climbs up the east;
Good-morning, Sir Sun, it 's high time you appear;
I 've been calling you up for an hour at least;
I 'm ashamed of your slowness at this time of year!"

The sun, as he quietly rose into view,
Looked down on the cock with a show of fine scorn;
"You may not be aware, my young friend, but it's true,
That I rose once or twice before you, sir, were born "

Was the proud fowl abashed ? Not a bit; for you see
He was all the more silly because he was vain;
" Cock-a-doo he exclaimed. Do you dare dazzle ME?
"Cock-a-doo-dle/ Now don't let tl is happen again !"
i6








THE LAZY PUSSY.
BY PALMER COX.

THERE lives a good-for-nothing cat,
So lazy, it appears,
That chirping birds can safely come
And light upon her ears.
The rats and mice can venture out
To nibble at her toes,
Or climb around and pull her tail,
And boldly scratch her nose.
Fine servants brush her silken coat
And give her cream for tea;-
Yet she 's a good-for-nothing cat,
As all the world may see.







LITTLE MISCHIEF.

ONCE there was a little boy named Leslie. He lived in New York,
quite near the Central Park. He would have been a good boy if he had not
been so full of mischief. One day at the breakfast table, he upset his bowl
of milk to make his papa laugh. And when his papa did not laugh, Leslie




















breakfast, and he thought he never
would upset his bowl again. On the next day his nurse was going to the
Central Park with him and a little boy named Vic, who was coming to
spend the afternoon with him, so Leslie soon became very happy, and he
talked a good deal about the Park, and all he was going to show Vic there.
I 'll show him the ammamuls," said Leslie (for he had not yet learned
to say animals plainly), "and the Olbisct that great high stone thing
with writing' on it; and I 'm going' to take him to see the sheep and the lambs
-i




















all jumping' and playing' like everything. Can't I, Mamma ? "
5-~



breakfast, and he thought he never





Oh, yes,"et his bowl again. On the next day his stonurse thing ing to the Park is




an Obelisk. Can 't you say Obelisk ? "
Central Park with him and a little bofunny twinkle in his bright eyesoming that
spend the afternoon with him, so Leslie soon became very happy, and he
talked a good deal about the Park, and all he was going to show Vic there.




his mamma thought he could say it better if he tried very had not yet learned
to sWell, at last, it was nearly tie for Vic to come. Nurse washed Leslie's
withface and dressed him fand inely to goi to the Park.him to see the she toland him he couldambs
go downstairs and wait till she was ready. Leslie went straight to papa's
Oh, yes," said his mamma; but that high stone thing in the Park is
an Obelisk. Can't you say Obelisk ?"
Olbisct," said Leslie, with such a funny twinkle in his bright eyes that
his mamma thought he could say it better if he tried very hard.
Well, at last, it was nearly time for Vic to come. Nurse washed Leslie's
face and dressed him finely to go to the Park. Then she told him he could
go down-stairs and wait till she was ready. Leslie went straight to papa's







room, but papa had gone up the street. So the little boy threw his
pretty velvet hat on the table, and looked about for something to do.
And now something very bad happened. A pair of scissors lay on
papa's table, and Leslie was up to mischief at once. He took the scissors
and sat down on a bench close to some books and pictures that were lying
on a big chair and oh! what do you think he did? It was dreadful.
He cut two pages of one of the books; and he pulled the pictures to
the floor. Then he began to cut one of the fine pictures!


j 1

/


lut thin pipa came- in. He shoute.:l to: Lcs-
the_-n Ie said he- mI.l t unish his- little, o",, o01,r
Lsliit cri-: v\-rv h -rJd. '.-,r hlie kn'- h- h l ad
as soon as he heard the door-bell ring, he stopped
19








Oh, Papa! there's Vic! I must go now. We are going with nursey
to see the ammamuls and lambs in the Park! I '11 let you punish me
a little when we get back."
But his papa said: No, sir, you can not go to the Park to-day. You
must GO RIGHT TO BED. Then you will remember not to do mis-
chief again." Papa knew that this was a severe punishment.
Leslie cried and cried and cried, but he had to go to bed.
Papa felt very sad, but he told Victor that Leslie could not go out
at all. Then he took Victor to the Park, himself, and showed him the
Obelisk and the lambs, and the seals, and a good many things besides.
That same evening papa carried up Leslie's supper, and talked with him
a while. He told the little boy what harm he had done, and how very
naughty it was to injure books or pictures or anything of value, and
how he hoped that after this he always could trust his little son. Then
Leslie kissed him, and promised never, never, never to do such mischief
again.























_-- J



"NOW SHE 'S OFF!"
20

















'N'



;78~FN


"OH! OH! BRING THE BABY INTO THE HOUSE, RIGHT AWAY!"


MISS LILYWHITE'S PARTY.


" MAY I go to Miss Lilywhite's party? "
But Grandmama shook her head:
"When the birds go to rest,
I think it is best
For mine to go, too," she said.


" Can't I go to Miss Lilywhite's party ? "
Still Grandmama shook her head:
Dear child, tell me how.
You 're half asleep now;
Don't ask such a thing," she said.


Then that little one's laughter grew hearty:
Why, Granny," she said,
" Going to Miss Lilywhite's party
Means going to bed "
21





















































I AM a litt
two pets. Oi
and goes in ti
Old Jim is a


A LETTER FROM A LITTLE BOY.

.,-nan t l b.. ,'.
n e is e. ,,. s a lt, ia o ,' '-, 'v e
.. -"- *' -. -


y .7

S-, ,,, '

































:le boy. And I want to tell you, little boys and girls, about
ie is a hen. She lives all alone, and leaves her coop every nig
ie barn, and flies up on old Jim's back, and sleeps there all nig
horse. Old Jim has a blanket for cold nights. It is an
22
-=-















"2 c" ','--- "


my
,ht,
ht.
old








one, and there is a hole in it on the top, and the old hen walks all around till
she finds that hole, and puts her feet in there where it is warm, and there we
find her every morning.
My other funny pet is an old cat, named Catharine. She has only three
feet, but I liked her just as well as I ever did, till last summer, when one morn-
ing we found the bird-cage door pushed in, and the bird was gone. We
have another cat. We don't know but the bird flew away; but.who pushed
the door in ? I don't like any cats so well now. Your friend,
RALPH.



---? -- -S -"- "-- "














name is "Dude." He wears a fine col-




They do not like him, and when he walks
out on the street they run up to him and
scratch his smooth coat, and spoil his clean
collar, and pull his long ears out of curl,
and tease him, and push him about; and
then they run away before he can catch
". So "Dude" hates cats, and will not
near them any more. How funny he
s! I do believe he sees a cat now! How wide open his eyes are!
does not like to run away, but I think he will run if it is a cat
he sees. Don't you ?
/ 23
Cl
f















/
/~


-I


WHICH of these little boys lives in your house?


^i


I-~








FOUR LITTLE BIRDS.


FOUR little birds all flew from their nest,-
Flew north, flew south, to the east and the west;
They could think of nothing so good to do,
So they spread their wings and away they flew.
And I don't know whither they went. Do you?
Perhaps they all will return next spring,
As light of heart, and fleet of wing.





KITTY AND DODO.

BY W. S. H.


OHi! Kitty and Sir Dodo
Went out to take a ride;
And Dodo sat upon the seat,
With Kitty by his side.
Now, Kitty had a bonnet on,
All trimmed with ostrich feathers;
And Dodo had pink ribbons hung
Upon the bridle leathers.


And Kitty wore a blue silk dress
With ninety-seven bows;
And Dodo's coat had buttons fine
Sewed on in double rows.
And Kitty had a parasol
Of yellow, white, and red;
And Dodo wore a jaunty cap
Upon his curly head.































































WHICH of these little boys lives in your house?
24








FOUR LITTLE BIRDS.


FOUR little birds all flew from their nest,-
Flew north, flew south, to the east and the west;
They could think of nothing so good to do,
So they spread their wings and away they flew.
And I don't know whither they went. Do you?
Perhaps they all will return next spring,
As light of heart, and fleet of wing.





KITTY AND DODO.

BY W. S. H.


OI-! Kitty and Sir Dodo
Went out to take a ride;
And Dodo sat upon the seat,
With Kitty by his side.
Now, Kitty had a bonnet on,
All trimmed with ostrich feathers;
And Dodo had pink ribbons hung
Upon the bridle leathers.


And Kitty wore a blue silk dress
With ninety-seven bows;
And Dodo's coat had buttons fine
Sewed on in double rows.
And Kitty had a parasol
Of yellow, white, and red;
And Dodo wore a jaunty cap
Upon his curly head.








Says Dodo to Miss Kitty:
"Where shall we drive to-day ?"
"Just where you please," says Kitty;
"I 'm sure you know the way."
Now Dodo had a famous whip,
That glistened in the sun,
And when he cracked the silken lash
It made the horses run.
"Oh, my "said timid Kitty,
SI fear they '11 run away."
"Don't be afraid," said Dodo,
"I can hold them any day."
Sweet flowers were blooming all
around,
The birds sang soft and low,
While, in the west, the setting sun
Set all the sky aglow.
Says Dodo to Miss Kitty:
"You are my pet and pride.
I love to go a-driving,
With Kitty by my side."
And then says happy Dodo:


I.;


- II


- i


" I know a lovely street
Where we can get some good ice-
cream
And strawberries to eat."
" How charming !" says Miss Kitty;
"I 'm sure I 'm fond of cream,
But of eating ice and strawberries,
I never yet did dream."
With that he smoothed the lap-robe
up,-
'T was made of leopard's skin,-
And put his arm around the seat
And tucked Miss Kitty in,
And said, "I hope, Miss Kitty,
Your pretty feet are warm ? "
Oh, thank you !" said Miss Kitty;
"I think they '11 take no harm."
Thus Dodo and Miss Kitty
Enjoyed their pleasant ride,
Likewise the cream and straw-
berries;
And came home side by side.


C, r








-. J
* ,:':- -1,j ?


'z I,, 1 i
"~ '' -;i-- K


3:-_- -~: 1~~





























... t, .. "' .: bI 1
.. -.. -- -' ' v ,, ". . -
I~e r- c; 9 IeLE~I"~'~r rl


NOT HANDSOME, PERHAPS, BUT VERY STYLISH!







ROY'S VIS-IT.

THESE two lit-tle boys lived next door to each oth-er, but there was
a high board fence be-tween the two gar-dens. One day Roy felt ver-y
lone-ly, and, when he looked to-ward
How-ard's house, he saw a st-,l:-lad-
der lean-ing a-gainst the high Il:c.ard
fence. Roy ran to it, and climbE,-d tup
to the top step, and looked o-v ,. : '
first thing he saw was How-are. -it-ti.ng
on a lit-tle grass mound; and juIt tih.n
How-ard looked up and sa, R..
"Hal-lo said How-ard; i clant \i I
come and play with me ? .








\. I &nai c,.m-iiig now,"
A. -sai d R. s\ iad ihe su ed down
_roei thi la-- d ts r. anid went
.Ith L I th C fro t -.tes in-to
tythe othe-r -arJ. Thi-n the boys
sat 1d; n h :. mound,
and talk,-d ani, .-1 for an
,h,:,_r. Bt th-, v re ver-y
kini an p- -lit t A ,.._:h oth-er,
ans th, ha I l.-py time.
r 1r6' nu1.r e ,.IM it know
[I. \\Icr: I ha, .I n, an, : looked
e..-lir-' i-vh,:r, I:r h11. and, an t
la t. -h climl:.ld up-' the step-
HOW ARD. lad-der, and saw the two lit-tle
boys. Roy was just bid-ding How-ard good-bye, and tell-ing him what
a pleas-ant vis-it he had had. "Sakes a-live!" said the nurse to her-
self. How po-lite these lit-tle fel-lows are! A great ma-ny boys, when
they vis-it each oth-er, act just like cats and dogs! "
30








CAT-AND-DOG MANNERS.


Pon-to, a so-cia-ble dog, de-
cides to go and see Miss Puss.


'-,


/


Thil- V\i-it.







THE STORY OF THE MORNING-GLORY SEED.


LITTLE girl one day in the month of May dropped a morn-
ing-glory seed into a small hole in the ground and said:
"Now, Morning-glory Seed, hurry and grow, grow, grow
A until you are a tall vine covered with pretty green leaves
and lovely trumpet-flowers." But the earth was very dry,
for there had been no rain for a long time, and the poor
wee seed could not grow at all. So, after lying patiently
in the small hole for nine long days and nine long nights, it said to the
ground around it: O Ground, please give me a few drops of water to
soften my hard brown coat, so that it may burst open and set free my two
green seed-leaves, and then I can begin to be a vine !" But the ground said:
"That you must ask of the rain."
So the seed called to the rain: "O Rain, please come down and wet the
ground around me so that it may give me a few drops of water. Then will
my hard brown coat grow softer and softer until at last it can burst open
and set free my two green seed-leaves and I can begin to be a vine !" But
the rain said : I can not unless the clouds hang lower."
So the seed called to the clouds: O Clouds, please hang lower and
let the rain come down and wet the ground' around me, so that it may give
me a few drops of water. Then will my hard brown coat grow softer and
softer until at last it can burst open and set free my two green seed-leaves
and I can begin to be a vine !" But the clouds said: "The sun must hide,
first."
So the seed called to the sun : O Sun, please hide for a little while so
that the clouds may hang lower, and the rain come down and wet the ground
around me. Then will the ground give me a few drops of water and my
hard brown coat grow softer and softer until at last it can burst open and
set free my two green seed-leaves and I can begin to be a vine !" "I will,"
said the sun; and he was gone in a flash.
Then the clouds began to hang lower and lower, and the rain began to
fall faster and faster, and the ground began to get wetter and wetter, and
the seed-coat began to grow softer and softer until at last open it burst !-
and out came two bright green seed-leaves and the Morning-glory Seed
began to be a Vine !


























I,.-.
It'tg


LITTLE SOLDIERS."
AFTER A PAINTING iV EDOUARD FRRER, (BY PERMISSION OF GOUPI.L & CO.)


.r..i






































A RIME FOR LITTLE FOLKS.


OH, I '11 tell you a story that nobody
knows,
Of ten little fingers and ten little toes,
Of two pretty eyes and one little nose,
And where they all went one day.

Oh, the little round nose smelled
something sweet,
So sweet it must surely be nice to
eat,
And. patter away went two little
feet
Out of the room one day.


Ten little toes climbed up on a chair,
Two eyes peeped over a big shelf
where
Lay a lovely cake, all frosted and fair,
Made by Mama that day.

The mouth grew round and the eyes
grew big
At taste of the sugar, the spice, the
fig;
And ten little fingers went dig, dig,
dig,
Into the cake that day.


-A Rargig,Roaping Ltor2, of a Lankb-dcevoLLci6ng Kindt,
PRforrnmec arzcl led a swVzet, s bnmissive, [ife.
or with face all steepdcl t snil2es
He projoplecl a Lramb for n2Lles, ,.
ARa he wzed a woolly Spinsterr
for a w ife. -:.


.- -" ,.- "



&- -- I -' ---:





S W '- -


- ---- -p- KIM


----- -- -- --


~Ulv~d~


'








And when Mama kissed a curly Oh, Mama, yes," and a laugh of


head,
Cuddling it cosily up in bed;
" I wonder, was there a mouse," she
said,
Out on the shelf to-day ? "


THE ELF


glee
Like fairy bells rang merrily -
" But the little bit of a mouse was
m e,
Out on the shelf to-day !"


AND THE BUMBLE BEE.


\ "I


"OH, Bumble Bee !
Bumble Bee!
Don't fly so near !
Or you will tumble me b'
Over, I fear!"
Oh, funny elf!
Funny elf!
Don't be alarmed!
I 'm looking for honey, elf.
You sha'n't be harmed."
"Then tarry,
Oh, tarry,
.Bee!
Fill up your sack; /
And carry, oh,
carry me
Home on your back!"






































































































THIS IS THE WAY MY GRANDMAMA DANCED.

FROM A PAINTING BY J. E. MILLAIS.

























































































HIS LORDSHIP'S BED-TIME.
DRAWN BY E. H. BLASHFIELD.

37









THREE KINES OF SEE-SAW,

SEE-saw I saw in thE fields one day;
A see-saw you 'll see when thE children play;-
And oh! thE very funniest way


7/. r'U~~


IN THE FIELD.


To see a see-saw, I know you 'll say,
Is whEn at the biggest show in town,
The Elephants seE-saw, up and down.
38














































MARY ANN: "EDDY WHITE, IF YOU DARE TO JUMP OFF, I 'LL NEVER SPEAK TO YOU
AGAIN, THE LONGEST DAY THAT I LIVE! NEVER!"


!


* -*- .'.-'ta'L


TRAINED BABY ELEPHANTS PLAYING SEE-SAW.








THE FATE OF A GINGER-BREAD MAN.

HERE's a nice brown ginger-bread man,
--' Freshly baked in the baker's pan,
Spiced and sugared, and spick and span;
Cloves for his eyes and paste for his tie-
Oh, what a nice sweet man to buy!

Here are Felix and Mary Ann
Looking in at the ginger-bread man
(Spiced and sugared, and spick and span,
Cloves for his eyes and paste for his tie),
j.r Wondering whether the price is high.

Here are Felix and Mary Ann
Going home with the ginger-bread man
That was baked in the baker's pan.
I- "Far too nice to be eaten," they said;
"Keep the man for a dolly, instead."

Here behold the ginger-bread man,
17, 1 That was baked in the baker's pan,
In the doll-house of Mary Ann.
See him stand, with his round, fat face,
S Among the dolls in silk and lace!

Here are Felix and Mary Ann'
Sleeping sound as ever they can,
.. Dreaming about the ginger-bread man
- A Left in the doll-house, set away,
STill they wake in the morn to play.

-I'l See this rat; since the night began
S- He has prowled to get what he can.
Ah, he smells the ginger-bread man!
There's the doll-house under the shelf,
Just where the rat can climb himself!









EVERY rat will get what he can.
Ah, the poor, sweet ginger-bread man!
Wake, O Felix and Mary Ann!
There 's a patter, a jump, a squeak-
Ah, if the ginger-bread man could speak!

See the rat, as quick as he can,
Climbing up for the ginger-bread man
In the doll-house of Mary Ann!
Ah, if the ginger-bread man could run!
Oh, to see what the rat has done!

Here are Felix and Mary Ann
Come to play with the ginger-bread man,
Spiced and sugared, and spick and span.
Ah, behold where he stood before,
Only crumbs on the doll-house floor !


A RUNAWAY.
41


ikk
S~








"WHERE DO ALL THE TOYS COME FROM?"


WHERE do all the toys come from ? thought Jamie, as
he sat by the fire one night last winter, half asleep. And
then he remembered hearing his papa once-say that thousands
of toys came from a queer old city in Germany, where they
were made by poor children and their parents.
42







LITTLE GRETCHEN.


LITTLE Gretchen has a lesson to study, and she knows that
the breakfast-bell soon will be ringing; so she is trying to
study her book and braid her hair at the same time. It is
not a very hard lesson to learn. I hope she will not be late
at school. Don't you hope so, too ?








FIDDLE-DIDDLE-DEE!"

LITTLE DAVIE ran through the garden,-a great slice of bread and butter
in one hand, and his spelling-book in the other. He was going to study
his lesson for to-morrow.


You could not imagine a


/, /,
i' / \,

'', ''




THIS IS THE LITTLE WREN.

baby to sleep. This is the


prettier spot than Davie's "study," as he called
it. It was under a great oak-tree, that
stood at the edge of a small wood. The
little boy sat down on one of the roots
and opened his book.
"But first," thought he, "I '11 finish
my bread and butter."
So he let his book drop, and, as he
ate, he began to sing a little song with
which his mother sometimes put the
way the song began:


" I bought a bird, and my bird pleased me;
I tied my bird behind a tree;
Bird said "


Fiddle-diddle-dee !" sang something, or somebody, behind the oak.
Davie looked a little frightened, for that was just what he was about to
sing in his song. But he jumped up and ran around to the other side
of the tree. And there was a little brown wren, and it had a little golden
thread around its neck, and the thread was tied to a root of the big tree.
"Hello!" said Davie, "was that you?"
Now, of course Davie had not expected the wren to answer him. But
the bird turned her head on one side, and, looking up at Davie, said:
Yes, of course it was me Who
else did you suppose it could be?" i K i .
"Oh yes!" said Davie, very much/
astonished. "Oh yes, of course But
I thought you only did it in the song !" ,/" '
"Well," said the wren, "were not you ,
singing the song, and am not I in the
song, and what else could I do ?" THIS IS THE HEN.-
Yes, I suppose so," said Davie.
"Well, go, then," said the wren, and don't bother me."
Davie felt very queer. He stopped a moment, but soon thought that








he must do as he was bid, and he began
to sing again:

"I bought a hen, and my hen pleased me;
I tied my hen behind a tree;
HI-Hen said -

Shinny-shack shinny-shack! in-
terrupted another voice, so loudly that
THIS IS THE GUINEA-HEN.
HIS IS TE UNA-HN. Davie's heart gave a great thump, as he
turned around. There, behind the wren, stood a little Bantam hen, and
around her neck was a little golden cord that fastened her to the wren's leg.
"I suppose that was you ?" said Davie.
"Yes, indeed," replied the hen. "I know when my time comes in, in
a song. But it was provoking for you to call me away from my chicks."
"I?" cried Davie. I did n't call you!"
Oh, indeed said the Bantam. It was n't you, then, who were sing-
ing 'Tied my hen,' just now Oh no, not you!"
I'm sorry," said Davie. I did n't mean to."
"Well, go on, then," said the little hen, "and don't bother."
Davie was so full of wonder that he did not know what to think of it
all. He went back to his seat, and sang again:

"I had a guinea, and my guinea pleased me;
I tied my guinea behind a tree -

But here he stopped, with his mouth wide open; for up a tiny brown
path that led into the wood, came a little
red man about a foot high, dressed in
green, and leading by a long yellow
string a plump, speckled guinea-hen!
The little old man came whistling along
until he reached the Bantam, when he
fastened the yellow string to her leg,
and went back again down the path, --,THIS I T~ HE DUCK.
and disappeared among the trees.
Davie looked and wondered. Presently, the guinea stretched out her
neck and called to him in a funny voice:
"Why in the world don't you go on? Do you think I want to wait
all day for my turn to come?"
Davie began to sing again: Guinea said-- "
Pot-rack! pot-rack !" instantly squeaked the speckled guinea-hen.







Davie jumped up. He was fairly
frightened now. But his courage soon
came back. I'm not afraid," he said
to himself; "I'll see what the end of
this song will be! "-and he began to .
sing again: ,
"I bought a duck, and my duck pleased me;
I tied my duck behind a tree; ,
Duck said-
"Quack! quack!" came from around the oak. But Davie went on:

"I bought a dog, and the dog pleased me;
I tied my dog behind a tree;
Dog said -- "

Bow-wow !" said a little curly dog, as Davie came around the spread-
ing roots of the tree. There stood a little short-legged duck tied to the
guinea's leg, and to the duck's leg was fastened the wisest-looking Scotch
terrier, with spectacles on his nose and a walking-cane in his paw.
The whole group looked up at Davie, who now felt perfectly confident.
He sat down on a stone close by, and continued his song:

I had a horse, and my horse pleased me;
I tied my horse behind a tree."

Davie stopped and looked down the little brown path. Then he clapped
his hands in great delight; for there came the little old man leading by a
golden bridle a snow-white pony, no bigger than Davie's Newfoundland dog.
"Sure enough, it is a boy !" said the pony, as the old man tied his
bridle to the dog's hind leg, and then hurried away. "I thought so!
Boys are always bothering people."
"Who are you, and where did you
all come from ? asked delighted Davie.
S "Why," said the pony, "we belong
to the court of Her Majesty the Queen
Sof the Fairies. But, of course, when
the song in which any of the court
voices are wanted, is sung, they all
have to go."
I 'm sure I 'm very sorry," said Davie. But why have n't I ever seen
you all before ?"
Because," said the pony, you have never sung the song down here








before." And then he added: Don't you think, now that we are all here,
you'd better sing the song right end first, and be done with it?"
"Oh, certainly !" cried Davie, certainly !" beginning to sing.
If you could but have heard that song! As Davie sang, each fowl
or animal took up its part, and sang it, with its own peculiar tone and
manner, until they all joined in.

"I had a horse, and my horse pleased me;
I tied my horse behind a tree.
Horse said, Neigh neigh!'
Dog said, Bow-wow!'
Duck said, Quack quack !'
Guinea said, Pot-rack pot-rack !'
Hen said, Shinny-shack shinny-shack!'
Bird said, Fiddle-diddle-dee !'"

Davie was overjoyed. He thought he would sing it all over again.
But just then he was sure that his mother called him.














"Wait a minute! he said to his companions. "Wait a minute! I'm
coming back! Oh, it's just like a fairy-tale !" he cried to himself, as he
bounded up the gaiden-walk. "I wonder what mother'll think?"
But his mother said she had not called him, and so he ran back as
fast as his legs would carry him.
But they were all gone. His speller lay on the ground, open at the
page of his lesson; a crumb or two of bread was scattered about; but
not a sign of the white pony and the rest of the singers.
Well," said Davie, as he picked up his book, I guess I wont sing it
again, for I bothered them so. But I wish they had stayed a little longer."


47












43d.


-.F


By Mrs. Fanny Barrow.


At first, a ball of fluffy fur,

All black, or gray, or white,

Trying to catch its little tail

With all its little might.

Four pretty little velvet paws,

That leap, and catch, and pat;

But presto! in a year you see

A dignified old cat I


I t-,-









THE SONG OF THE BROOK.

BY MRS. M. F. BUTTS.


KING FROST comes and locks me up,
The sunshine sets me free;
I frolic with the grave old trees,
And sing right cheerily.

I go to see the lady flowers,
And make their diamond spray;
The birds fly down to chat with me,
The children come to play.


I am the blue sky's looking-glass,
I hold the rainbow bars;
The moon comes down to visit me,
And brings the little stars.

Oh, merry, merry is my life
As a gypsy's out of Spain!
Till grim King Frost comes from the North
And locks me up again.


THE LITTLE CHICK THAT TRIED.


THERE was once a big white hen who had twelve little chickens, and
they were all just as good little chickens as ever you saw. Whatever
their mother told them to do, they did.
One day, this old hen took her children down to a small brook. It
was a nice walk for them, and she believed the fresh air from the water
would do them good. When they reached the brook, they walked along
by the bank for a little while, and then the old hen thought that it looked
much prettier on the other side, and that it would be a good thing for
them to cross over. As she saw a large stone in the middle of the
brook, she felt sure that it would be easy to jump on that stone and then


-- 5
"-
----~~
"
---~---
-- -5 ------








to jump to the other side. So she jumped to the stone, and clucked
for her children to follow her. But, for the first time in their lives, she
found that they would not obey her. She clucked and flapped her wings
and cried to them, in hen-talk:
Come here, all of you! Jump on this stone, as I did. Then we
can go to the other side. Come now !"
"Oh, mother, we can't, we can't, we can't!" said all the little chickens.
Yes, you can, if you try," clucked the old hen. "Just flop your wings
as I did, and you can jump over, easy enough."
"I am a-flopping my wings," said one little fellow, named Chippy, who
stood by himself in front, but I can't jump any better than I did before."
I never saw such children," said the old hen. You don't try at all."
We can't try, mother," said the little chicks. We can't jump so far.
Indeed, we can't, we can't, we can't, we can't!" chirped the little chicks.
Well," said the old hen, "I suppose I must give it up"-and so she
jumped back from the stone to the shore, and walked slowly home, fol-
lowed by all her family.
Don't you think mother was rather hard on us ?" said one little chicken
to another, as they were going home.
Yes," said the other little chick. Asking us to jump so far as that,
when we have n't any wing-feathers yet, and scarcely any tails! "
"Well, I tried my best," said Chippy. I flopped as well as I could."
I did n't," said one of the others. It's no use to try to flop when
you've got nothing to flop."
When they reached home, the old hen began to look about for some-
thing to eat, and she soon found, close to the kitchen-door, a nice big
piece of bread. So she clucked, and all the little chickens ran up to her,
and each one of them tried to get a bite at the piece of bread.
No, no !" cried the old hen. "This bread is not for all of you. It is
for the only one of my children who really tried to jump to the stone.
Come, Chippy! you are the only one who flopped. This nice piece of
bread is for you."








BONNIE BABIE STUART.


BONNIE BABIE STUART.


LONG ago, nearly two hundred and fifty years ago, this little child was
born. She was a bright, beautiful baby-Bonnie Babie Stuart the people
called her-and she loved her papa and mamma very much. When you
study the history of England, you will learn about Babie Stuart's father,
King Charles the First of England, and her mother, Queen Henrietta
Maria; and perhaps you will feel like crying over their sorrows. But Babie
Stuart did not cry; for she left this world when she was not full four years
old, and her little life was as happy as that of any baby in England.








PUSSY AND HER ELEPHANT.


BY HANNAH MORE JOHNSON.

HAVE yOU heard of little Pussy, in that country o'er the sea,
How the dogs came out to chase her and she had to climb a tree?
You have n't? Then I '11 tell you how gentle Pussy Gray
Went climbing up, hand over hand, and safely got away.


But then the strangest trouble came The tree began to shake!
A tremendous giant something took Pussy by the neck
And tossed her off! And there again among the dogs was she,
And what could frightened Pussy do, but climb the same old tree?


But then the strange thing came again, and, swinging high in air,
Pounced right on little Pussy, as she sat trembling there;
But when it touched her fur it stopped; as though its owner thought:
" It's nothing but a pussy-cat that trouble here has brought.







S"I '11 let her make herself at home."-
S,. And Pussy, safe once more,
Folded her paws contentedly and
i viewed the country o'er,
S 'And purred a meek apology: "Excuse
S me, friend, I see
I've climbed a broad-backed elephant;
I meant to climb a tree!"

Whatever else she said or sung that
l/ .',1 you would like to hear
She must have whispered coaxingly
into the giant ear;
, ,-* ,' For often afterward, 't is said, Miss Pussy Gray was seen
STo ride the broad-backed elephant as proud as any queen!


53














































Knit, Dorothy, knit,
The sunbeams round thee flit,
So merry the minutes go by, go by,
While fast thy fingers fly, they fly.
Knit, Dorothy, knit.


Sing, Dorothy, sing,
The birds are on the wing,
'T is better to singthan to sigh, to sigh,
While fast thy fingers fly, they fly.
Sing, Dorothy, sing.








A PROBLEM IN THREES.


IF three little houses stood in a
row,
With never a fence to divide,
And if each little house had three
little maids
At play in the garden wide,
And if each little maid had three
little cats
(Three times three times three),
And if each little cat had three little
kits,
How many kits would there be?





THE KNICKERBOCKER BOY


I 'M a knickerbocker boy !
See my coat and breeches!
Cuffs and collar, pocket too-
Made with many stitches!
I must have a watch and chain,
A silk umbrella and a cane.-
No more kilts and skirts for me!
I 'm a big boy-don't you see?

Knickerbockers! Knickerbockers
Give away my other clothes!
Give away my horse with rockers;
I want one that really goes.
Two brisk, prancing goats will do;
But I 'd like a wagon too.
No more chairs hitched up for me!
I 'm a big boy-don't you see?


And if each little maid had three
little friends
With whom she loved to play,
And if each little friend had three
little dolls
In dresses and ribbons gay,
And if friends and dolls and cats
and kits
Were all invited to tea,
And if none of them all should send
regrets,
How many guests would there be?


r.








A FOURTH OF JULY STORY.


1


WAS a wide-awake little boy
Who rose at the break of day;


2 were the minutes he took to dress,
Then he was off and away.


3 were his leaps when he cleared the stairs,
Although they were steep and high;


4 was the number which caused his haste,
Because it was Fourth of July !


05 were the pennies which went to buy
A package of crackers red;


were the matches which touched them off,
And then -he was back in bed.


big plasters he had to wear
To cure his burns so sore;


were the visits the doctor made
Before he was whole once more.


were the tiresome days he spent
In sorrow and pain; but then,


are the seconds he '11 stop to think
Before he does it again.


CHORUS: "D-I-N-G, D-O-N-G, B-E-LL, PUSSY 'S IN THE WELL!"














AN INVITATIu(N.
" I WISH you 'd comrn t .. *- me.
It is n't very far,
The gate is always o.-,n id. .-..
You '11 find the do...r ij.-ir.
"But please come vr'\ ar'. "c. -
The little maiden ,i. i-.
"For when the evening i .iu t 1e Lii
They make me go to beL.




















Mother's eyes and smile together
l'-'i i -


















Make the baby's pleasant weather.

Mother, keep your eyes from tears,
Keep your heart from foolish fears,
Keep your lips from dull complaining
Lest the baby think 't is raining.
57




















ri 1"
"* *\-i
i'fjL


MAMA'S PETS.
ENGRAVED BY G. KRUELL FROM A PICTURE BY KNAUS. (BY PERMISSION OF GOUPIL & CO.)
58


1








HOW SPORT SAVED THE KITTENS.


ON a large farm, there was an old cat with five little kittens. One
of the kittens was gray, like its mother; another was black, with one white
paw; a third was black all over; while the other two looked just alike.
The mother cat told her kittens to be kind and polite to every one,-
and to be very kind to dogs,-and each night, before going to sleep, she
made them repeat these words: Let dogs delight to bark and bite, but
little kittens never."
One day, a big dog named Sport came to live on the farm. Sport was
full of fun, and he thought that chasing cats was great fun. Near the barn
in which the cat and kittens lived grew five large apple-trees; and when
Sport first saw the cat family, he thought what fun it would be to frighten
the mother into the hay-mow, and chase each one of the five kittens up a tree.
So he gave a loud bark, and sprang in upon the happy brood. To
his great surprise, the kittens, instead of arching their backs up to twice
their size, and hissing in an ill-bred way, all sat quite still, and looked
quietly at the stranger, to see what he was going to do next. Then
there was a long pause, followed by two short paws which the gray kit-
ten put out toward the dog, as though she would like to shake hands with
him if she only knew how. This so amused Sport that he tapped the kitten
very gently on the back, and then the cat, dog, and kittens were soon
rolling and tumbling about the barn floor in a frolic. From that moment,
Sport and the cat family were great friends.
Not many days after this, the five kittens were playing along the bank
of a small river which ran behind the barn, and, spying a piece of board
which lay with one end on the ground and the other in the water, they
all jumped upon it. But they were no sooner upon it than the board broke
loose from the shore, and started down the stream !
The kittens were badly frightened, and cried aloud for help, and though
the old cat hurried out of the barn, she could not do anything for them.
She could only rush up and down the bank, and she was afraid that all
the kittens would be carried down to the mill-pond and over the dam.
But suddenly she heard a well-known bark, and the next moment Sport
-dear old Sport-was at her side! The good dog saw what the trouble
was at once, and the thought came to him that, if he should bark just as
loud as he could, some one might run down to the river to see what was







the matter, and then the kittens would be saved. So Sport began at once.
How he did bark!
In less than two minutes one of the men came running toward them.
It was the farmer himself. He thought from the great noise Sport
was making that the dog must have
found a faiil\ ,_- \i -odchLicks. an.:l i .." --
so whr-n li ci Ll-hr si h t o i" tl- kit-
tens h,- bhr._an t i la ihi.
But tiliin lie took a long: pole, Y .. r











Then, he picked them up in his arms, and carried them toward the barn,
while the old cat and Sport walked on behind.
That night, the old cat asked her kittens what or who had saved their

And we must n't count you ?" said two or three in one breath.
A smile lit up the face of the happy mother as her little ones said this,
but she only said, quietly: No; you need n't count me."
---~ ~ ~~~~- --- -.. -- ---









"Then," said the all-black kitten, it must have been the farmer."
"Or the long p ole," said the kitten which ha one white paw.
t was Sport! cried the little gray kitten.
"We owe a great deal to Sport," said their mother; "but most of all



to the fact that you have always tried to be polite and kind to every
one about you. Sport would never have come to save you if you had
been cross, ugly kittens, and I hope happy mother will always remember tones said this,
but she only said, quietly: No; you need n't count me."
"I will," said the all-one white-pawed black kitten, it must have been the farmer."id the
all-over black kitten. "We will remember," said the kitten which had one white paw.t looked
just alike. "s SportI will re-mem-b," began the little gray kitten, but before
she would finish the sentence she wasport," sound their motherep. but most of all
to the fact that you have always tried to be polite and kind to every
one about you. Sport would never have come to save you if you had
been cross, ugly kittens, and I hope you will always remember the lesson
of this day,-- will you ? "
I will," said the one white-pawed black kitten. "I will," said the
all-over black kitten. "We will remember," said the two that looked
just alike. "I will re-mem-b," began the little gray kitten, but before
she could finish the sentence she was sound asleep.







THE BUMBLE-BEE.

THE bumble-bee, the bumble-bee,
He flew to the top of the tulip-tree,
He flew to the top, but he could not stop,
For he had to get home to his early tea.

The bumble-bee, the bumble-bee,
He flew away from the tulip-tree;
But he made a mistake, and flew into the lake,
And he never got home to his early tea.


LITTLE TOMMY TUCKER SING FOR YOUR SUPPER."
6i











d.. '
4" .
-
C;L P_-=.


A- 7 little girl with golden hair
Was rocking in hergrand-ma's chair,
i l When in there walked, a Stranger Cat_ -
^' .^. u~.~ 7(I'm sure there's nothing strange in that)




f, was a Cat with kinky ears. -
L And very aged for it's years.
/ The little girl remarked Scatf'
(I think there's nothing strange in iiit) -.
: r~w ,/ ________~r^


tut presently with stealthy tread
The cat, which at her word had fled,
Returned with cane, and boots and hat_
(1 fear there's something strange in that.)
i







Excuse me, and the cat bowed low,
S'" hate to trouble you, you know,
SBut tell me, have you seen a rat?"
(I know there something strange in hat)
^ l ,11


little girl was very shy_
'ell really I can't say that I
ave seen one lately, Mr Cat.
m sure there's something strange in that)


) have n't you?'the Cat replied;
"Thanks, I am deeply gratiihed.
I really couldn't eat a rat."
(We all know what to -think of that.)


I nd then the Cat with kinky ears
,/ And so much wisdom for its years
'/ I Retired, with a soft pit-a-pat
nd that was all there was of that).

-" nN.R Babcock.








THE FIVE-FINGER FOLK.

BY OLIVE A. WADSWORTH.

AH what dear little things the five-finger folk are And they live on every little baby-hand.
Can you find them? First, there 's Little Pea, she 's the smallest of all; Tilly Lou stands next;
she is taller than Little Pea. Bess Throstle is of about the same size as Tilly Lou; and Lu
Whistle, who is the tallest of the family, stands between them. Then there 's Tommy Bumble,-
sometimes known as Thumbkin,-what a plump, funny little fellow he is !
Now you shall have a song about them all; so hold out your little fist and we '11 begin:

LITTLE Pea, Little Pea, pray where are you going,
In your little pink hood and your little pink shoe?
I 'm going where she goes, my next bigger sister;
I always go with her-my own Tilly-Lou."

Tilly-Lou, Tilly-Lou, pray where are you going,
With motions as light as the down of a thistle?
I 'm going where she goes, my next bigger sister;
I always go with her-my own Lucy Whistle."

Lu Whistle, Lu Whistle, pray where are you going?-
You're frail to be tossed in the jar and the jostle
I 'm going where she goes, my next little sister;
I always go with her-my own Bessie Throstle."

Bess Throstle, Bess Throstle, pray where are you going ?-
Beware, as you rove, of a trip or a tumble !
I 'm going where he goes, my only big brother;
I always go with him-my own Tommy Bumble."

Tom Bumble, Tom Bumble, pray where are you going,
If you don't think it rude to ask or to guess?
"I 'm going where they go, my four little sisters-
Little Pea, Tilly-Lou, Lu Whistle, and Bess."

Little folk, little folk, where are you all going ?
Going up ?-going down ?-going out ?-going in ?
We're going, we're going, we're going creep-mousing
Right under the dimple in baby's own chin !"



64



































/9


"DAISY TIME."




6 .,


:


-'1
.~..

~~~cbn,
I



















Jiftle Dutch Krl
h little Frenc8r Jeanne
They v,,ent out toeter
@.@ To dine -
Bat t cou ldnA aoree
r wIen0 6e se said Oi
e always would answer her
Nein











A WONDERFUL GIRL.


BY HATTIE S. RUSSELL.


I 'VE read somewhere about a girl
Whose cheeks are rosy red,
While golden tresses, curl to curl,
Bedeck her pretty head.
Her eyes, 1 'm told, are bright and blue,
Her smile is kind and sweet;
The errands she is asked to do
Are done with willing feet.

'T is said that when she goes to school
She 's just the sweetest lass!
So quick to mind the slightest rule,
And prompt in every class.


To girls and boys she 's never rude
When all are at their play;
Her conduct "- be it understood-
Is "perfect" every day.


Where lives this child, I cannot say,
Nor who her parents are,
Although for many a weary day
I 've sought her near and far.
If you should ever see her smile,
As o'er the world you rove,
Just hold her little hand awhile,
And give her my best love.


FLOWER FAIRIES.









A LETTER FROM A DOLL.


"TI-IE NURSERY," February, 1887.
EAR CHILDREN: Don't ever believe a single good
thing you hear about cats. They are cross, ugly things,
;I ,I /and they have no respect for dolls. I am a very nice
doll indeed, and I have a lovely mother named Daisy.
S ,, -She is four years old. She likes me because she is a
good girl, and she likes her ugly cat because she does n't
,- know any better. Sometimes the cat gets mad at me
and shakes me, and I can't shake the cat at all. I am too
weak. I wish my mother had a fierce dog to fight for me.
Don't you think I am good to let the ugly thing alone? We
are both pets, but I am the nicest. This is all I have to
say. I have a pain in my side to-day; and so would you
if your little mother had a pet cat. Your poor friend,
Lucy.





A QUEER HORSE-CAR.

ONCE there was a little boy named Neddie, and he had three cats. One
day he and his pets had so much fun that even when he went to bed he was
still thinking of the pussies. And may be they were thinking of him, for
as soon as he fell asleep they came to him, with several of their cat-friends,
and begged him to get up and have some more fun. Well, almost before
Ned knew what he was doing, he and his visitors were having a grand time!
First they played that they were tigers, and Ned was a big hunter man.
He carried a great pop-gun, and every time he would shoot a tiger the
tiger would fall down and roll about, laughing and mewing at a great rate.
This sport made them tired, and so, by way of resting, they said, Let 's
play horse-cars! "
Oh, yes said Ned. So, in a twinkling, they put the chairs behind his
best hobby-horses, and made a very nice horse-car. Everybody had a seat,
and no one was crowded. There was a dude in the corner, and old Tom
68







had plenty of room
to read his morning
paper, while little
Blackie sat by his
side. Miss Mouser
and Miss Kitty, in
the double chair, kept
talking to each other
all the time. Mother
Puss, in the last seat,
hugged up her baby
kit and would not pay
any fare forhim. Then
the conductor became
so excited that he
rang his bell-punch
four times by mistake,
and never saw old
Marm Tabby, who
rushed after the car
calling, Hey, hey!
Miaw, mee-ow! Stop
that car But the car
went so fast that a
great big cat-police-
man, who was help-
ing a lady across the
street, stopped the
horses, and shout-
ed so loudly at the
driver, that the car
all fell to pieces, the
horses ran away, the
cats jumped into no-
where, and Ned sat
right up in the middle
of his bed, and


WOKE UP!








LIT- TLE RED HEN.


(The Good Olh Stooy of the Little Red Hen and the Grain of flWheat," told in verse.)

By EUDORA M. BUMSTEAD.

LIT-TLE RED HEN looked bus-i-ly round
In search of a bit to eat,
Till, hid in the straw and chaff, she found
SA plump lit-tle grain of wheat.
Now, who will plant this wheat?" she cried.
"Not I!" the goose and the duck re-plied;
Not I!" said the dog and the cat;
Not I said the mouse and the rat.
Oh, I will, then !" said Lit-tle Red Hen,
And scratched with her quick lit-tle feet
Till a hole she dug, and cov-ered it snug,
And so she plant-ed the wheat.

Lit-tle Red Hen gave ten-der care, t
The rain and the shine came down,
And the wheat grew green and tall and fair,
Then turned to a gold-en brown.
Now, who will reap this wheat?" she cried. -_
Not I!" the goose and the duck re-plied;
"Not I!" said the dog and the cat;
" Not I said the mouse and the rat.
Oh, I will, then said Lit-tle Red Hen;
And, brav-ing the mid-sum-mer heat,
She cut it at will with her trim lit-tle bill,
And so she reaped the wheat.

Lit-tle Red Hen peeped sly-ly a-bout
From her snug lit-tle nest in the hay;
SIf only that wheat were all threshed out,
And fit to be stored a-way.
"Now, who will thresh this wheat?" she cried.
.- 7.-: "Not I !" the goose and the duck re-plied;
Not I!" said the dog and the cat;
Not I !" said the mouse and the rat.








S Oh, I will, then!" said Lit-tie Red Hen;
And, hav-ing no flail, she beat
With her wings of red on the grain, in-stead,
And so she threshed the wheat.

... Lit-tle Red Hen had still no rest,
Al-though she had worked so well;
She thought of the chicks in her snug lit-tle nest,
How soon they would peep in the shell.
.. Now, who will go to the
mill? she cried.
Not I!" the goose and -
the duck re-plied;
Not I !" said the dog and the cat;
Not I said the mouse and the rat. -
"Oh, I will, then!" said Lit-tle Red Hen,
And fashioned a sack so neat,
With corn-silk thread and a corn-husk red,
SIn which she car-ried the wheat.

S. -- Lit-tie Red Hen then made some bread
S-That was white and light and sweet,
And, when it was done, she smiled and said,
We '11 see who is will-ing to eat.
Now, who will eat this loaf? she cried.
I will," the goose and the duck re-plied;
I will!" said the dog and the cat;
"I will!" said the mouse and the rat.
"No doubt !" said the hen, "if you get it and then
(How the lazy rogues longed for the treat!)
She clucked to her chicks--she was moth-er of six;
And that was the end of the wheat.


--























Old J3ob, olg e3ob,
Little J3ob oac bi
/rollt 'ob and P[oll[J3 ob
And Foll jobb&'s pig.
..All went for a drive ene dcay
-cA stran e as it -mca Seem
e drove Jix( Ll-Ter acd jb Ck agraliy
4 -nevelr kurt -at team 0








THE BOY


AND THE TOOT.
BY M. S.


wai a ;mall bo_ itG
the nrcihbori all tIhrp-ace:
thk foot -th nrxt dC( ,
filed full of cla ,
Stopped all Ihe toot


- 0~ {oot ,
ned to foot


{oot


IA
I 'II


1-v7bom
]Bu-t
~Yhion?\

wa;c
'Vfki'ck













/"-


iAr
i,. .
iM


----. -



OH! I 'm my mamma's lady-girl,
And I must sit quite still;
It would not do to jump and whirl,
And get my hair all out of curl,
And rumple up my frill.
No, I 'm my mamma's lady-girl,
So I must sit quite still.
74


;~,
d" ~~.I
,

1Si~

~B~F~i~








ARTHUR AND HIS PONY.


ABOUT the middle of the summer, little Arthur, who lived in the country,
went to see his grandmother, whose house was three or four miles away
from Arthur's home. He staid there a week, and when he came home
and had been welcomed by all the family, his father took him out on the
front piazza and said to him:
Now, Arthur, if you are not tired, how would you like to take a ride ?"
"Oh I 'm not tired," said Arthur. I 'd like a ride ever so much.
Will you take me ? "
No," said his father. "I meant for you to take a ride by yourself."
But I can't drive," said little Arthur.
"I know that," his father said, with a smile, but I think we can
manage it. Here, Joseph !" he called out to the hired man, "hurry and
bring Arthur's horse."
Oh, papa!" cried Arthur, I don't want my horse. I can't take a
real ride on him. He's wooden, and I was tired of him long ago. I
thought you meant for me to take a real ride," and the little fellow's eyes
filled with tears.
So I do, my son," said his father,-" and here comes the horse on
which you are to take it. Is that animal real enough for you, sir?"
Around the corner came Joseph, leading a plump little black pony,
with a long tail and mane, and a saddle, and bridle, and stirrups.
Arthur was so astonished and delighted that at first he could not speak.
Well, what do you think of him ?" said his father.
"Is that my horse ? said Arthur.
Yes, all your own."
Arthur did not go to look at his pony. He turned and ran into the
house, screaming at the top of his voice:
Mother! mother! I've got a pony! Come quick! I've got a pony
-a real pony! Aunt Rachel! I 've got a pony. Laura! Laura! come,
I 've got a pony !"
When he came out again, his father said: "Come now, get on and try
your new horse. He has been waiting here long enough."
But Arthur was so excited and delighted, and wanted so much to run
around his pony and look at him on all sides, and kept on telling his
father how glad he was to get it, and how ever so much obliged he was
to him for it, and what a good man he was, and what a lovely pony the







pony was, that his father could hardly get
saddle.
However, he quieted down after a while,
pony's back, and shortened the stirrups so


him still enough to sit in the

and his father put him on the
that they should be the right


I-
~*-:- :-.- ---



.-.-






length fr him, and put the reins in his hands. Now he was all ready
for a ride, and Arthur wanted to gallop away.
"No, no !" said his father, "you cannot do that. You do not know
how to ride yet. At first your pony must walk."
So Arthur's father took hold of the pony's bridle and led him along
the carriage-way in front, of the. house, and as the little boy rode off,
sitting up straight in the saddle, and holding proudly to the reins, his
mother and his aunt and his sister Laura clapped their hands, and cheered
him; and this made Arthur feel prouder than ever.
76








He had a fine ride, up and down, and the next day his father took him
out again, and taught him how to sit and how to guide his pony.
In a week or two Arthur could ride by himself, even when the pony
was trotting gently; and before long he rode all over the grounds, trot-
ting or cantering or walking, just as he pleased.
Arthur rode that pony until he became a big boy. Then he gave
the good little animal to a young cousin.
But he never.liked any horse so much as this pony, which was his
own, real horse, when he was such a little boy.










-- -

-9,

: <, ---. ,' '














.l" I ._ I m It. -



ENOUGH FOR TWO.
77







THE JAPANESE MAMMA AND BABY.


THIS is the way they carry the baby in Japan. The
mother, or older sister, or nurse, holds him on her back, or
ties him on with straps. They call him "ko," which means


r.
K ~ i
7


child or baby. Is n't he fat ?
Almost all the Japanese babies
are fat and rosy. Somebody
has called Japan the Paradise
of Babies. Do you see how
his hair is cut ? His little head
is shaved in front, except one
wide lock, which is "banged."
S His eyes are looking right at
you. He seems to think
." Why, what a funny-looking
baby you are! You 're not a
.-. Japanese ko,' are you ?"


GOING TO THE MOON.

IT is very easy to go to Japan, but what would you think
of any one who proposed to go to the moon ? Once there
was a man who wished to go, and he thought and thought
and thought about it, till at last he dreamed that he was
going! His dream was very pleasant indeed, but just as he
was climbing up the long stairs of the moon-station with all
the other passengers, he woke up, and that was the end of
his wonderful voyage.


VC





























-4"
_ __"' "


L j-ti


"ALL ABOARD FOR THE MOON!"
79


Rt .
omII


-~i-


s1


I


a~i








GRANDMA'S NAP.


By M. M. D.

ONE day, Grand-ma went to sleep in her chair, and it near-ly turned the
town up-side down. It was only a lit-tle bit of a nap, but oh how much
trou-ble it made!
You see, be-sides the nap, there was a lit-tle boy in the house. This
lit-tle boy's name was Rob, and Rob
was so hard to watch that when his
Mam-ma went out she used to say:
Grand-ma, do you think you can
watch Rob while I go to mar-ket?"
Then Grand-ma would give a lit-tle
jump and say:
0 of course I can."
So this day Mam-ma went to mar-
ket, and Grand-ma watched Rob as
hard as she could till the NAP came !
As soon as Rob saw the nap, he knew he was free; and off he ran.
In a mo-ment Grand-ma woke up and
saw the emp-ty room.
"Sake's a-live !" she cried, as she ran
out in-to the hall. Where is that child ?"
He was not in the hall, nor in the yard,
nor any-where a-bout the house. Oh! !
oh oh where could he be !
The poor old la-dy was sure she nev-er
would see the dear boy a-gain. In her
fright she looked -
in the beds, un-der
the beds, in the pan-try, in the coal-scut-tle, in the
ice-pitch-er, and even in the crack-er-box. Then
she ran out to a po-lice-man, and told him all
a-bout it.
Mad-am," said the po-lice-man, "it is not like-ly
he can be found. I think he is gone for good; but
we'll send a cri-er all over the town."
So the cri-er went all over the town with a big
bell, scream-ing:






Hear hear Boy lost, named Rob,-black eyes, pug nose. Boy lost I
boy lost!" (Ding, dong.) "Boy lost, three years old!" (Ding, dong.)
The cri-er made such a noise that if Rob had screamed
out "Here I am!" right un-der his nose, he would not
have heard it; or if all the men on the street had called,
Stop that bell-here's Rob, safe and sound," it would
have been just the same. He would have gone on
ring-ing the bell and scream-ing at the top of his
voice, Boy lost! boy lost !"
But Rob was not un-der
the boy's nose at all. Where
was he?
Poor Grand-ma was al-most cra-zy by this
time. She ran in-to the yard with a kind man
and looked down the well.
"Rob-by! Rob-by, my dar-ling! are you
there? Come to Grand-ma, my pet. Oh! oh !" 1
Then she ran back in-to the street, and there
he was with an or-gan man!
Grand-ma was sure it was Rob, from the way he hopped a-bout. But no.
When she put on her glass-es it was not Rob
at all-only a mon-key.
By this time near-ly the whole town knew
that Rob was lost. Such a time you nev-er
heard. All the grand-mas cried and said it
was very wrong to take a nap when you
were watch-ing a child like that; and all the
lit-tle boys thought how nice it would be to
live with Rob's grand-
ma. The pa-pas went f//J
to the sta-tion-house to in-quire; the mam-mas ran o
to mar-ket to tell Rob's mam-ma; and the news-boys jOS.
ran all o-ver town with ex-tras," cry-ing, Boy lost! i I
boy lost!"
When Rob's mam-ma heard the bad news, she r,an
home as fast as she could go.
"Rob-by Rob-by !" she called, up and down the
house. "Rob-by! Rob-by !" But no one an-swered.
Then she turned pale, and Grand-ma said, Don't
faint; that's a good child," when all at once the poor
1 81








Mam-ma clasped


N


her hands and said: He must be killed! If he were
a-live he would hear me. I know he must be dead,
or else-or else-he is eat-ing jam! "
6 She flew to the cel-lar where all the good things
were kept. Grand-ma hob-bled after her, quite
tired out; then fol-lowed the po-lice-man, the cri-er,
and the cook; and there, down in the cel-lar, just
) as hap-py as he could be, sat Rob-eat-ing jam.
He was so hap-py that he did not know that his
Grand-ma was a-wake; and Grand-ma was so glad
that she went up-stairs and took the nicest lit-tie
nap she ev-er had in all her life.


THE OLD MAN BY THE


GATE.








HURLY- BURLY.
(A Nonsense Rhyme.)


WHEN the Mother Goose cow jumped over the moon,
And the little dog laughed to see,
The horse hurrahed and tossed up his hat,
And "whistled an air, did he."
The camel danced the Highland fling,
And the elephant put on skates,
While the cat went into the butcher trade
And charged the highest rates.
The mackerel rode a circus colt;
The whale leaped over the trees;
While the catfish rode on a bicycle,
That ran itself with ease.
The tiger went to bed in his boots;
The lion shot at a mark;
The eagle banged his hair in front,
And offered himself to a park.
The horned owl laughed till he almost cried,
Then cried till his eyes were dim;
But the wisest of all was a wise old hen
Who taught herself to swim.


fte 2
fr

f









CHILDREN OF THE WEEK.


THE child that is born on the
Sabbath day
Is blithe and bonny, and good
and gay;
Monday's child is fair of face;
Tuesday's child is full of grace;
Wednesday's child is merry and
glad;
Thursday's child is sour and sad;
-.Friday's child is loving and giv-
ing;
And Saturday's child must work
for its living.

,/ "- OLD R/I














"t




84




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