• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Jamie's dinner
 Mary and Tuty
 Land in sight
 Papa's grave
 Dressed up
 Launching the ship
 Velma's nap
 Going home
 Crissy's bed
 Warren's pigeons
 Learning to walk
 Nellie's gold dollar
 Ray's drawing
 By moonlight
 The sisters
 Mike's sister
 Ragged Tim
 Plotting
 Pet chickens
 Cranes
 Etta's ride
 Addie's dream
 Lulie and Lizzie
 Philosopher Will
 Pussy's song
 Carlie and the chicken
 Playing school
 The brave sailor
 Daisy's ear-rings
 Butterflies
 The dinner basket
 Watching the bees
 Bessie's pictures
 Birdie and Prince
 The shepherd
 Little runaway
 Fay's lesson
 Carl's birds
 Amy's rose-bush
 Helen's new dress
 The peacock
 Dell and Kitty
 Merry's wreath
 Poor Else
 Nell
 Feeding the cat
 Lazy Lucy's troubles
 Tige and Nig
 Grandpa's darling
 Catching birds
 Bullfinches
 Blossom
 Wild flowers
 Clara and Skip
 Parrots
 Clean hands
 Helping Papa
 The great snowy owl
 Gallant Lolly
 Christmas dreams
 Looking for Papa
 Emilie
 By the river
 Studying
 Advertising
 Back Cover






Group Title: Sunshine for babyland : stories for little ones.
Title: Sunshine for babyland
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00081099/00001
 Material Information
Title: Sunshine for babyland stories for little ones
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 25 cm.
Language: English
Creator: D. Lothrop & Company ( Publisher )
Publisher: D. Lothrop Company
Place of Publication: Boston
Publication Date: c1891
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1891   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1891   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1891   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1891
Genre: Children's stories
Children's poetry
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
General Note: Pages in a double-ruled red border.
General Note: Publisher's advertisements on endpages.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00081099
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002224953
notis - ALG5225
oclc - 191092000

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Advertising
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Half Title
        Page 3
    Frontispiece
        Page 4
    Title Page
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Jamie's dinner
        Page 7
    Mary and Tuty
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Land in sight
        Page 11
    Papa's grave
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Dressed up
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Launching the ship
        Page 18
    Velma's nap
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Going home
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Crissy's bed
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Warren's pigeons
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Learning to walk
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Nellie's gold dollar
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
    Ray's drawing
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
    By moonlight
        Page 40
        Page 41
    The sisters
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
    Mike's sister
        Page 46
        Page 47
    Ragged Tim
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
    Plotting
        Page 52
        Page 53
    Pet chickens
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
    Cranes
        Page 58
        Page 59
    Etta's ride
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
    Addie's dream
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
    Lulie and Lizzie
        Page 66
    Philosopher Will
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
    Pussy's song
        Page 70
        Page 71
    Carlie and the chicken
        Page 72
    Playing school
        Page 73
    The brave sailor
        Page 74
        Page 75
    Daisy's ear-rings
        Page 76
        Page 77
    Butterflies
        Page 78
        Page 79
    The dinner basket
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
    Watching the bees
        Page 84
        Page 85
    Bessie's pictures
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
    Birdie and Prince
        Page 90
        Page 91
    The shepherd
        Page 92
    Little runaway
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
    Fay's lesson
        Page 96
        Page 97
    Carl's birds
        Page 98
    Amy's rose-bush
        Page 99
    Helen's new dress
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
    The peacock
        Page 103
    Dell and Kitty
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
    Merry's wreath
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
    Poor Else
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
    Nell
        Page 115
    Feeding the cat
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
    Lazy Lucy's troubles
        Page 119
        Page 120
    Tige and Nig
        Page 121
    Grandpa's darling
        Page 122
        Page 123
    Catching birds
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
    Bullfinches
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
    Blossom
        Page 131
    Wild flowers
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
    Clara and Skip
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
    Parrots
        Page 139
    Clean hands
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
    Helping Papa
        Page 143
    The great snowy owl
        Page 144
    Gallant Lolly
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
    Christmas dreams
        Page 148
        Page 149
    Looking for Papa
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
    Emilie
        Page 154
        Page 155
    By the river
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
    Studying
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
    Advertising
        Page 163
        Page 164
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
Full Text




























































































































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The waysof amusing baby are numberless; but the
best of them all is the old one-mother-talk.
What shall she talk about? The pictures andstories
of Babyland. Look at these pictures, for instance.
They have got to be explained, of course; but-that is
what they are for, to give the mother something to
talk about.
But, remember, baby hasn't got used to the pace of
this quick world. Give him time. He couldn't find
out for himself what a story there is in one of these
simple pictures. There is the mother cat in her rock-
ing-chair with her steaming cup of tea and the kitten&
playing blind-fold. How happy they are .
Send five cents to D. Lothrcp Company, Boston1
for a copy of Babyland.








Books by Margaret Sidney.

There is so strong a love of humanity impelling the pen of Margaret Sidney that in whatever she
writes she makes interesting the homeliest and most ordinary aspects of life and imparts to duty the glory of
doing, and to virtue its own reward." Chicago Inter-Ocean.


Our Town.
A story for the home. 12mo, $1.25.
A splendid story of town life, full of stirring incidents, forceful
action and realistic description, of bright and clever things told
in crisp, bright language, and is sure to hold the attention of the
readers to the end.- Book News.
The Pettibone Name.
12mo, $1.25.
Samantha Scarritt, the dressmaker, and her mother, the widow,
are as life-like as the very best of Mrs. Stowe's or Mrs. Whitney's
pictures of New England life."- The Churckman, N. Y.
Tom and Dorothy.
How They Made and Kept a Christian Home.
I2mo, 75 cents.
One longs to give a copy of it to every young bride, that she
may learn the art of making and keeping such a home."-Home
Guardian.
How They went to Europe.
12mo, illustrated, 75 cents.
A new and entirely practicable plan for interesting the young
in profitable and stimulating mental culture."--.Presbyterian.
St. George and the Dragon.
Also, Kensington, Jr. 12mo, illustrated, $1.oo.
"Excellent portraits of bright, honest and sturdy lads." -
Boston A dvertiser.
Who Told it to Me.
Square 8vo, illustrated, boards, $1.25; cloth, $1.75.
Neighbor boys and girls growing up together in the old New
England.
The Golden West.
As seen by the Ridgway Club. 8vo, illustrated,
boards, $1.75 ; cloth, $2.25.
"The record of the journey is delightfully written and to the
young reader almost as instructive as the real journey itself."-
Pacific Rural Press, San Francisco.
Two Modern Little Princes.
And other Stories. 12mo, illustrated, boards, $I.oo.
It is just the book for a gift to a boy or girl of nine or ten." -
Detroit A dvertiser.
Polly and the Childreri.
Square 8vo, boards, 12 full-page pictures by Mar-
garet Johnson, 35 cents.
The story of a funny parrot and two charming children.
Dilly and the Captain.
Illustrated by F. Childe Hassam. I2mo, $r.oo.
A little boy and girl set out for a place where they can find out
things without asking older people.
On Easter Day.
Ribbon-tied, 24mo, 10 illustrations, 25 cents.
A heart poem for young girls.


Hester.
And other New England Stories. I2mo, $1.25.
As studies of New England life these stories are noticeable for
the faithfulness of their local color and the naturalness of their
narration." Christian Union.
So As By Fire.
12mo, illustrated, $1.25.
"The title indicates the teaching of this entertaining story.
The characters are very interesting, showing how much love in its
depth and simplicity can do." -Presbyterian Journal.
A New Departure for Girls.
I2mo, illustrated, cloth, 75 cents.
It opens up a new field for women.
When such books appear from the press, we are justified in
clapping our hands for joy." Gospel Banner, Augusta.
Five Little Peppers
And How They Grew. 12mo, illustrated, $1.5o0
4to, illustrated, boards, 25 cents.
Of all books for juvenile readers not one possesses more .e
peculiar qualities which go to make up a perfect story."-. -
Transcript.
Half Year at Bronckton.
I2mo, illustrated, $1.25.
A story of the haps and mishaps of life at a boy's boarding
school.
The Little Red Shop.
I2mo, illustrated, cloth, $1.oo.
"One of the brightest and breeziest stories for boys and girls
that has been published for many a month." -Boston Transcriit.
What the Seven Did.
Or, the Doings of the Wordsworth Club. Square
8vo, illustrated, boards, $1.75; cloth, $2.25.
"Charming entertainment for the young folks."- Christian
Observer, Louisville.
The Minute Man.
Square I2mo, illustrated by Sandham, $1.25; fancy
leather, $i. 50.
A stirring ballad of the fight that gave birth to the American
Nation, and of "the shot heard round the world," in unique and
beautiful setting.
Ballad of the Lost Hare.
4to, outline illustrations, boards, 50 cents.
"A bright little story is here wrought into one of the loveliest
picture books we have met with."- ChiKlren's New Church
Magazine.
Old Concord:
Her Highways and Byways. Illustrations from
photographs by A. W. Hosmer of Concord, and by
L. J. Bridgman. 8vo, cloth, $2.00.
"Both a practical guide-book to this historic locality and an
agreeable fireside itinerary." The Nation.


At the Bookstores, or sent postpaid, by The Publishers.


D. LOTHROP COMPANY, BOSTON.


- -
























SUNSHINE FOR


BABYLAND.


: --


- ---I










SUNSHINE FOR BABYLAND


STORIES


FOR LITTLE


ONES


BOSTON
D LOTHROP COMPANY
WASHINGTON STREET OPPOSITE BROMFIELD


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i 'COPYRIGHT, I891,
'{' "BY

i ~D. Loa-THROP COMPANI










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JAMIE'S DINNER.
MAMMA, more dinner!" exclaimed little
Jamie as he sat in his high chair at the
table,
Haven't you had enough, Jamie ?"
No; me want more. Dinner good !"
Mamma gave him some more bread and
milk in his mug, and it tasted so good
that he laughed as he ate it.
He is always happy and merry.


-- I_: I




a I


MARY AND TUTY.


" COME,


Tuty, and I'll hear


you


read,"


Mary


Porter to


her little


sister.


"Oh,
mouse


yes,


I'll read about the little


which the


pussy-cat


caught


then ate up."
Tuty brought' her book, and with Mary's


help read the


story


very well


for a little


girl not quite five years old.'


" Now


hear


me spell."


Tuty


always


says this after
I( Spell cat.'


any one has heard


" C-a-t cat, d-o-g dog.


her read.


Now give


me a


new one,


Mary.


You are a girl,
how to spell girl."


so you ought


to know


" Is th
"No,


at


a hard word ?"


it's most as easy as cat and dog.


"What is the first'letter,
" G comes first."


" G-o -


Mary ?"


What comes next ?"


said


and


1-1


tL -




t-


MARY AND TUTY.


" That ain't right.


G-i-r-1


After trying a few times


spells girl."
Tuty spelled


it very


well.


Then Mary


said,


" Now


spell your name.
Oh, I can't spell Tuty.
"Tuty isn't your name.


your nickname.


You must


You-"
That's only
spell Lucy."


"I want to spell Tuty,
,the best."


too.


I like that


" Well,
" That


learn


Lucy first."


ain't all


my name.


It's Lucy


Porter.


first name is enough now.
Now try it, Tuty."


L-u-c-y,


Your
Lucy.


Oh, dear, that's too


long,


guess.
No,


that is easy.


L-u-c-y.


Now try it


again.
Tuty could soon spell her own name;


but when that was learned she was tired


of


1Jssons, so she ran out to play.


" You can't spell long words yet.


" L-y -

























LAND IN SIGHT.


HERE


are two real


sailors,


not make-


believe


ones.


been on quite
has just sung


George


and Porter have


a long voyage.
out that land is


and they are looking


earnestly


Some one
in sight;


to


see all


the strange sights of a foreign port.
They will be glad to see land once more,
with its green grass and waving trees.


_








PAPA'S GRAVE.

LORA'S papa was a soldier. He was
wounded in battle. He came home hop-
ing to get well; but, like so many of our
brave soldiers, he gave his life for his
country.
After he died, Lora kept fresh flowers
on his grave for a long time. And now
every May she goes with mamma and
many others, not only to lay flowers on his
grave, but on the graves of all the soldiers.
Perhaps some of the little girls who read
this have done the same. I hope none of
them will forget our brave soldiers on Dec-
oration Day, but will select the loveliest
and best flowers to make into wreaths,
crosses and bouquets. Even little girls
can gather flowers for this purpose.
I love to see the flowers and small flags
upon the soldiers' graves. It helps us to
remember how much they have done for us.


S I -


L




r


DRESSED UP.


EDIE


is dressed


up very nicely, yet


not look


pleased.


What


can the


trouble


After mamma has


taken so


much


pains


to make this


the pretty pink


nice white


ribbons


dress, and to


to go


with


it,


ought to look happier.
Shall I tell you what troubles her.?


wants to go
the dog. S


out and play in the yard with


he has


been


playing there all


the morning with


thinks it


is best


him, and
to stay in


now mamma


the house


while.


She has


toys


many little girls


of all kinds,


have, and


more


than


she should be


contented and happy with them.


But some


little children


are never


pleasant


unless


they can have their own way.
I think Edie must be one of these; don't


you ?


does


be?


she


buy
she


She


I -- I

































It is her birth-day,


to-day.


She is


five years old.
in white. M


This is why she is dressed


imma has


invited


all Edie's


little


cousins


to spend the


afternoon with


V .1i .,---.,


just


'C
I -'--- --







DRESSED UP.


her; and she wants her to look clean and
nice when they come.
By-and-by, however, when they all get
there, she will let them go out and have a


good run and play in the hay-field,
wish.


if they


All will


enjoy


that, for the hay-field


one of the best play-grounds in the world.
It is such fun to toss the sweet, fragrant
hay about, and half bury some one in it.


Then it
seek in.


is a fine


place


to play hide-and-


Shouldn't you


think Edie would look


happy, thinking of the


many


pleasant


things which mamma has planned for her?


That


is the way to


be cheerful


happy, little girls; think of the


pleasant


things.
Don't keep thinking of the many dresses,
books and toys which some of your play-
mates have, but think of the poor little
girls who go ragged all the time.


and




















LAUNCHING THE SHIP.


HERE is the ship which Jack


see launched.


wished


to


See the people upon it wav-


ing their handkerchiefs.


It is just


gliding


into the


water,


flags flying, and people upon and around
it shouting, and, apparently, making all the
noise they can.


If Jack was


here


he might fall into the


water.


He is


so small he would wish


stand in


front;


and, with


such


a crowd


near, there is


great


danger


of


some


being


pushed off the'wharf.


with


to


I rj r_ I
.1 -


-
I P _
































VELMA'S


NAP.


WELL, Puss, you've had a nice nap un-
der the tree; haven't you ?" said Velma's
papa, as he came from the field.


Velma was lying
under the apple-tree.


upon the green


grass


She had just opened


her eyes, but was hardly awake yet.


" Say,


Velma1;1,


what did


you


dream


r


- --- 4


",
b:`
i-
.;" .-.






VELMA 'S NAP.


about ?"


asked papa, as he stooped to lift


his little girl in his arms.


"I haven't been


'sleep,


have


I, papa ?"


and Velma laid her head on his shoulder.


"I haven't


seen you stir for


hour.


" Perhaps


I was


thinking," said Velma,


half asleep even now.
Papa laughed as he said,


"Your thoughts


were in dreamland then, I guess,


for


you


are nearly there now."
Where's that, papa ?"
"Oh, where folks travel when- they are
asleep."


*' I don't


go anywhere, papa.


right in my crib all night long," said Velma.


"You


don't ?


Who dreamt last Inight


that she was playing with Cousin
the woods ? "
"I did, papa."


" Well, that's


Rebie in


the kind of traveling I


meant.


- ,-


half


an


stay


I 1. I








GOING


HOME.


"( COME home early," said


Susie Warner's


mother


to her one


afternoon,


just


as she


was starting away to visit one of her school-


mates.


" Yes,


answered
over the


mother,


I'll


cheerfully.


light


start


And


snow which


real early," she


away she


ran


had fallen the


night


before.


Susie meant to do as her mother wished,


but she


play that


became so


she


much


forgot


interested in


all about home


mother and


mother's words.


The short winter day was rapidly draw-


ing to a close, when
of her long walk h


she suddenly thought


ome, and


that she was


to start


early.


She hurriedly put


on her things,


bid her


schoolmate


yard.


good-by,


and


The sun had just


not afraid, yet


she felt


ran out of


set.


the


She was


sorry that she had


her
and


__








GOING HOME.


forgotten so soon what her mother said.
There was a shorter path through the
woods, which she had often taken in sum-
mer, and she wondered if she could go
that way now.


I. r I I L IL---~--~u~h~


-- ---- -a




II


CRISSY'S BED.
i4 1 -. -


WHAT


a funny


bed little


Crissy


chosen,


hasn't she ?


Instead of her clean,


white bed


at home,


cool, green grass.


she is lying
It is so warm


upon the
that she


needs no


covering,


save the shadow of


tall bushes drooping near.


And it is so
she will fall asl
that of the brig
with the rustling


tops.
But why is


quiet
eep, ]


in the woods


hearing


;ht-winged
of leaves


she here


no song


that
but


birds, mingled


upon the


all alone ?


tree-


She


left the garden where her mother told her


to play, and


wandered


into the woods


that she lost the path.


Now she must


stay here until her father


or brothers find her.


They will


soon miss


Crissy, however, and then they will


all around for-the little lost


girl.


(


search
She has


been in the


woods


before, so


I think


will look here first.


m j


has


the


so


they



























WARREN'S


PIGEONS.


( COME,


Sadie, come out and


see my


pigeons," said W;
Me go, too!"


arren to his sister.
cried little Eddie.


" Well, come along then,


They were


very


said Warren.


tame, and when the


children came in sight they flocked around
them, greatly to Eddie's delight.


" Me want


to tiss


one, Warnie,


F -, L _-rII IC


said


-J





WARREN'S PIGEONS.


Eddie, as he


looked at the pretty pigeons


longingly.
You hug them too hard when you take
them."


" Me'll hug easy Eddie tiss one ;


and


the little fat


hands were stretched out for


the pigeons at his feet.


" Here's


a nice white


one, Eddie," said


Sadie, who sat on the ground with


the pig-


eons all about her, come kiss this one.


Eddie loves white
softly, as he pressed his
smooth, white breast.


" Here's some corn,


birdie! "


he said


cheek against the


" said Warren as


he


put a handful in
feed them now."


Eddie's apron,


" you can


He threw a handful


on the ground, and


they came around him so quickly that he


shouted with delight.
soon upon the ground


Warren,


All his corn was
: then he ran to


saying,


" More! more!


Birdies hungry! "


I rJ


F







WARREN 'S PIGEON.


" Why,


Eddie,


you


haven't


thrown


that on the ground ?"


" All gone !


Birdies


eat more!"


Eddie


answered


eagerly.


" Here's


a little


mite.


You mustn't


give them
'twill last


but one kernel


longer," said


at a time,


Warren


then


as he put


about


a dozen


kernels


in Eddie's


apron


again.
Oh!"
heartily to
kernel.


cried


Eddie,


see them all


" You's good


he


said


at last


pigeon, which
the others.


gleefully, laughing
dart after a single


birdie- have
to one timid


seemed


free
little


somewhat


corns,
brown


afraid of


But the moment


he stooped to give


one some, the others came too, so


the little brown one up in his
"Tome to Eddie Eddie'll


that


he took


arms saying,


teep


birdie


safe;


and he held


it until Warren said


was time to go into the house.


all


I-......... .. I__


__
-









LEARNING TO WALK.


BABY


WILLIE is just learning


to walk.


His mamma is holding
him now.


out her hands to


" Come, Willie, come to mamma! "


He stretches out his arms, and his
fat hands almost touch mamma's.


" Come,


my baby boy,


take just


one


step," she says again.
Grandma helps him, yet still he is afraid
to go alone.


At last mamma holds up


a large


apple.


Baby


Willie is so anxious to get


this in his own hands, that he takes one or
two steps all alone; then he crows with
delight as he grasps the apple.
Nowhe must taste it before he can walk
any more, so grandma cuts off a piece and
pares it for him.


After he has


eaten


it,


mamma


" Now, Willie must walk a little more;


little


red


says,




r- -- IL _Y -L L I I


LEARNING TO WALK,


and she stands him


up in one corner uins


time.
Yet he does not care to try again, so he
sits down upon the floor.


I'Y~~~~~~~ ~- I--- ----
















U


NELLIE'S GOLD DOLLAR.

COME, Will, go out with me this after-
noon," said Nellie Stearns to her brother.


"What good will


it do?


Papa


give us our holiday-money till to-morrow.


"Oh, I've got my gold dollar.


ing to spend that.


And


you


round and see what you want."
Soon the children were walking


along the street.


I'm go-
can look


slowly


It was only a few'days


before


Christmas,


and the


windows


very attractive.
I'll go in


here," said Nellie,


as she


before a large window crowded


with gay toys.
Just as they turn
woman came along


little girl.


to


go in, a poor


leading a sad-looking


As Nellie stopped a moment


to watch'them she heard the child say,
Can't you buy one little doll, ma ? "


can't


stopped


were





I I






NELLIE'S GOLD DOLLAR.


"My


poor


little Hetty,


have


money," her mother answered.
Nellie's kind heart was touched, and


no


she


stepped quickly to the woman, saying,
"Please wait here a moment. I'll be


again


soon ;


and she


ran into the


store and asked for the prettiest doll they


had for a dollar.


fore her.


Several were placed be-


She quickly chose the one she


-liked best, and, placing the


gold dollar on


the counter, hurried out to the woman who
still stood near the window with her child.


" Here is a doll, little girl,"


as she placed


said Nellie,


it in her arms.


The child's large


eyes were


wonder and surprise to Nellie's


she did not speak.


But


lifted in
face, yet


she hugged


the


doll closely to her faded dress, as though
fearing to lose it.


" You


are very


kind,


miss,


said the


woman ;


"Oh,


and tears stood in her eyes.
I have plenty of money."


out


~~111111~-111~1~---~--_11111~11






NELLIE'S GOLD DOLLAR.


"A smaller one would please


as much.


her just


A dollar seems a great deal to


pay for a doll."
"I wanted her to have a real pretty one.


And it didn't cost much,


either,


answered


Nellie, surprised that the woman should
think it did.


" It would


buy many loaves of bread,"


said the woman, somewhat sadly, as she
turned away.


Nellie, for the


how hungry


first time


little Hetty


,now thought
looked. "0


Will, run and ask the woman where she


lives !"


she suddenly cried.


"59


Elm


Henderson,


Street, and her name is


answered Will


as he


Mrs.
came


running back.
I've the nicest plan,


Will.


We'll


mamma to put lots of good things


into a


basket and send it to her, so they can have
a good Christmas dinner."


ask


i


I '-




I -- ---


FIVE little eggs in cozy nest,
Covered warmly with downy breast.

Soon will come from each tiny shell,


A dear, wee bird.


Oh, love them well!


Five little beaks will open wide,
When mamma-bird hops to their side.


Ten bright,


black eyes will peep at you


O'er the nest, should you come in view.


- --I --- -------I




U q


RAY'S DRAWING.

RAY sat very quietly in the corner, with
his slate on his knees. There was no one
else in the room but grandma, and she was
knitting a little and sleeping a good deal.
Every time Ray looked at her, he
thought what a pleasant face she had. A.id,
almost unconsciously at first, he began to
trace the familiar outlines on his'slate.
It was not the first time he had used his
pencil in this way. Every day at school
he took easy lessons in drawing, and he
enjoyed it very much.
Now he became interested as soon as he
saw that he could draw something that
looked like a head. He worked long and
carefully, and he was so pleased with his
work that he laughed aloud.
Well, sonny, what pleases you now ?"
asked grandma, roused from her nap by
Ray's laugh.


- __






RA Y'S DRA WING.


"0 grandma,


slate,"


I've


got


you


here


on my


was his answer.


SYou


have ?


Why,


thought


was in


my chair.
"Oh,"


exclaimed


Ray ,laughing merrily,


"( i


[ meant your picture,
'' You don't say that


grandma.


you


can draw me ?


Now let me see it."


Grandma


laughed


almost


as merrily as


Ray when she took the slate.


' But it


does


look wonderfully like


doesn't


it,


Marion ?"


she said


to Ray's


mother, who came


shoulder.
"Yes, I


in and looked


think there is some resemblance;


but my


boy must keep trying,


if he


makes


a good artist


" I'm


by-and-by.


going to try real hard, mother.


I'll


draw and
'tis fun!


paint


every day,


if I


can.


I'd like to draw and paint


Oh,


great,


pictures when


am a


man, as


father.


I '


me,


over


her


big


tall


as


ii ill I


- ~----


u m I I I I II I I----- --








BY MOONLIGHT.

BERP'S papa was sick, and the doctor
told him that he must go South and spend
the winter.
He wished to be on the water as long
as he could, so he went in a sailing vessel
instead of a steamer.
Berp was too young to feel anxious about
papa, so he enjoyed the voyage very much;
especially when papa and mamma both
were on deck with him.
Young as he was, he will never forget
one evening when they were all on deck.
It was a pleasant, moonlight night. Not
a full moon, but enough to make every-
thing look very beautiful.
It was quite warm, and so calm and still
that scarcely a ripple stirred the water.
And when the sailors began to sing, it
added greatly to Berp's delight. He wished
they could always stay on the water, so he


__~ _
C r


I MENEM==









BY MOONLIGHT.


asked his papa if he would not buy a ship,

and take him and his mamma all over the

world.


---"~ ---- ~~ ~b--"~91C-~--~C~*lsslc~ 1 ~3 19IIF-- IICII I --
I --- I---- ------ --------~----- -


-- ----- --- -- ---I---- ---
; -~- I-








THE


SISTERS.


" LOOK, Ester, and see the flowers Aunt


Louise gave me.


Here is one little bou-


quet she fixed on purpose for you;
have this basket full beside."


"Oh
garden


and I


have you been out in her flower-


to-day ?


How I


wish


I could go


It always looks so pretty in the sum-


" I hope you will


be able to go soon, for


she has some beautiful geraniums now;
and such a splendid bed of the lily of the


valley.


Oh,


it is so fragrant!"


" Yes, that's why


glad Aunt


I like it so well.


Louise put so much in


I am
this lit-


tie bouquet."
I've got plenty more in the basket.


I'll


put away my hat, then we'll arrange them
all."
I think they look better put in ever so


to.


mer.


I -


I __






THE SISTERS.
many little vases, than in one large one;
don't you, Effie?"
"Yes. I'll hunt round and find every
little one I can. Then we'll put them in
every nook and corner of your room."
Effie's things are quickly put away, and
she is sitting by the side of her twin sister,
who can not do much, as she has been sick
a long time. She sits up only part of
the day now.
Let us make two little bouquets just
alike," said Ester, for this pair of tiny
vases.
Yes; you make one and I'll make the
other, and we'll see if we can get them ex-
actly alike. We ought to, for we are just
alike," Effie answered.
Then they'll be our twin bouquets;
won't they? That will be nice. What
shall we take first ?" asked Ester.
After looking the flowers over Effie
picked out several sprigs of mignonette,








saying,
sweet."


" We'll


THE SISTERS.
use these


first, they are so


" Then


this candytuft,


after


a little


green, it is so fine and white.


"And


the lily of


the valley next.


can throw away these large green leaves,
and use something finer," Effie said.
That will be enough, won't it, for these
bits of vases?"


"A great


plenty.


all white and green,


But they are
Ester."


almost


"I think they are little beauties, any-


I like white flowers.


"So do


But wouldn't


a little


make it look better ?"


" Oh, please don't spoil them, Effie,


they


are so pretty now!"
"I didn't mean to put it in unless you


wanted it,


Ester.


You couldn't go into the


garden, so we will


fix these just to suit


you.


We


way.


red









MIKE'S SISTER.

"TEACHER, Nora 's coming to school
next time," said little Mike, just as the
scholars were leaving the room one Sab-
bath.
"Who is Nora?" asked Miss Healey.
"She's my little sister. She's real good,
too. Mother said she wouldn't trouble
you; and she wants to come so much," re-
plied the kind brother.
I shall be very glad to have her come,"
said the teacher, greatly to Mike's delight.
His eyes sparkled as he ran down stairs.
Promptly as the teacher herself, came
Mike and his little sister Nora, the next
Sunday morning. When Miss Healeyen-
tered the room the tiny scholar ran to her,
saying, Does you like posies, teacher ? I
bringed these ;" and she handed her a few
violets and dandelions.
"Yes, dear; and I'll give you a kiss for


I
I -` -- ----


I- __
- L__ ___







MIKE'S SISTER.


them," she said, stooping to touch her lips
to the rose-bud mouth.


"She wants to kiss you,


" said Mike, as


Nora lifted her blue eyes to the teacher.
Thank you; that's a very sweet kiss,
said Miss Healey, warmly.


_ II _ I


_ ___ ~





I e I


RAGGED TIM.
-- 06 --


CAN you tell me where Mrs. McCue
-lives? asked a lady of a very ragged little
boy.
Yes, sir; she lives 'n the attic."
But what attic, little boy ?"
I ain't little I'm a big feller. Sam's
a little shaver; and he looked down upon
a bare-headed, bare-footed little child sit-
ting upon the ground.
Please tell me where the attic is ?"
inquired the lady, pleasantly.
"Do you want to see ma?" the boy
asked, instead of answering the lady.
"Is Mrs. McCue your mother?" she
asked, in some surprise.
I'll bet she is! Want to see her ?" he
asked abruptly, while his bold black eyes
suddenly softened.
I came because I heard she was sick."
She's sick abed. Don't know as she'll


- ------








RAGGED TIM.


want strangers up there.
up any to-day."


Never mind that.
for washing. Can't I


She ain't slicked


I came to pay her
see her now ? "


" Yes, go up there, clear to the tip top


~1111111111111111111~111111111~11111


L
- I- I II






RAGGED TIM.


of them stairs; then you'll find her;" and
he pointed up a rough stairway.
Please tell me your name, won't you ?"
said the lady before entering.
"I'm Tim."
Thank you, Tim. I wish to see you
again when I come down;" and taking the
hand of the little girl by her side, she said,
" Come, Grace, we'll go up now."
Tim was unusually quiet after they left
him, for such a noisy little fellow. Instead
of racing up and down the street, he re-
inained near the door of the large tenement
house which he called home, and frequently
looked up the stairway.
Suddenly his face lighted up, for the
lady and the little girl were coming down.
Do you think ma's awful sick?" he
asked as soon as they reached the door.
She's quite sick, Tim, but I think she
will get well, if she has good food and
care.


"NI O


-- -- ~* ----




ui~~a---- --- 11-lll-


RAGGED TIM.


"I'll take care of her; I know how;"
and now his face shone with a really beau-
tiful look.
That is right, Tim, help her all you
can; but I'll come again to-morrow and
bring some broth and other things."
Oh, good! She'll get well now! Sam,
ma'll get well sure, if she can eat;" and he
danced about in his delight.
Here's a cake for you and Sammy," the
lady said, taking two out of her bag.
Oh, my! Ain't them reg'largim-cracks,
Sam ?" exclaimed Tim as he took them.
All at once, however, he handed one to the
lady, saying, I'd rather have coppers."
Why, Tim? she asked, in surprise.
"I can get some tea for ma with them."
Why, my dear boy, you may eat your
cake, and your mother can have tea, also.
I gave her some to-day."
I'm powerful glad," was his only an,
swer, as he quickly swallowed the cake.


*
P
___ ___ ill r ---








PLOTTING.


" HUSH, Lil!


don't make so much noise,


for Emma don't know we've got her cards


here,'
floor.


said Stevie


as he lay upon


" What shall we


do with


them ?" asked


his sister in a loud whisper.


" We'll


look at the pictures first, then


we'll build houses with them.


" And when we get all through we'll pile


them up nice and leave them right


the cricket, to play
down to the water,"


under


with after we've been


proposed Lil.


Thus the


two rogues


plotted


as they


played with the prettily painted
der the table.


cards un-


They thought sister Emma did not hear


them; but she was


listening all the time,


although


she kept


on with


her drawing.


And by-and-by, when Stevie and Lil were
out by the water, she took the cards from


the


___




r --- -- --


PLOTTING.


under the cricket, and laid them on the


table.


When Stevie and Lil came in they


laughed merrily to see them there.


- --- ---- ---
II I~1111 .. -~ _I y




--- I


PET


CHICKENS.


BELL


ran out


to the shed, with a hand-


ful of crumbs, calling,
Peep peep !" ans'


" Chicky! chicky !"
wered the little, soft,


downy things, as they came, half-flying and
half-running, to meet her.


"'Member, now, the


goodest


one can


stand on


my shoulder,


" she said,


sitting


down and watching them, as they hurriedly
picked up the crumbs.
O Puff! ain't you 'shamed to eat every


mite ?"


she cried,


as one ran away


the last piece.
"Spotty is the very bestest chicken in
the whole world; and Bell placed him on
her shoulder.
Puff soon came back, and, without wait-
ing to be asked, hopped upon her head.
This delighted Bell so much that she for-


got which was the


best.


After


playing


1 .1ri


with








PE T CHICKENS.


with them


a while, she thought she would


put them to bed.
Now, chickies, you must be sleepy,"
said Bell, as she carried them into the


- -- -- ~-i


II L Il LI I I _I I I I ~-Bb~L C-L~
I -- -- --------- -






PET CHICKENS.


shed. There was a box there with hay
in the bottom and a piece of woolen cloth
to cover them with.
"Now shut your eyes, Puff," Bell said;
and she put the cloth over them carefully.
She laid her hand on the cloth for a few
moments, then she rose softly, thinking
they were asleep.
But first one little head peeped out, then
the other; and with a flutter of their tiny
wings they hopped out of the box and ran
after Bell.
"Why, Spotty and Puff, you mus'n't
'have so when I put you to bed;" and she
carried them back to the box. After try-
ing a little longer, she concluded they were
not sleepy, so she let them hunt for bugs
while she ran into the house.
Mamma, don't chickens never have
no naps like babies ? asked Bell.
"They often go to sleep during the
day, but they don't sleep very long."


- -


.I























la?
'th


I;
I


" Spotty and


Puff wouldn't sleep a min-


ute after I took my hand off."
They were not sleepy, then, I suppose.


But babies sometimes do just so.


you was a little baby, you


up the moment


When


would wake


laid you down.


" Then I'm just like my chickies." After


a pause she added,


" Babies and chickies


are drefful great troubles; ain't they, mam-
ma ?


" If they are


good when


they grow up,


I think it pays for all the trouble.


I growed


big


enough


to be


good ?"


asked


little Bell, anxiously.


" Yes; you should be a good


" I must tell Puff and


girl, now.


Spotty 'bout it;


and she ran out to the shed.


She found both


chickens


partly under the cloth.


in the box,


She lifted


this a


bit, and in a moment they were on the


ground, their


black eyes wide open, and


shining just as brightly as ever.


1 1


PET CHICKENS.


"Am


ii I 1.
E







CRANES.

DID you ever see as large a bird as this
before ? I don't know how tall this one is,
but some cranes are more than five feet in
length.
They are found in nearly every part of
Europe. And in this country the voice of
the whooping crane is heard, late in the
autumn, as they fly swiftly toward the warm
South, where they spend the winter.
Cranes eat frogs, fish, lizards, and even
snakes. They have such long legs they
can go into quite deep water without wet-
ting their feathers. And their long neck
and bill can be used very well instead of a
line and hook.
The voice of the whooping crane is
very harsh, and when heard at night
it has anything but an agreeable sound.
There are many curious birds, which it
would be interesting to study about.








ETTA'S


RIDE.


ETTA'S


papa took her


one day to


some


strange


looking


animals.


How


queer they looked to the little girl.


was afraid


to go near them at first.


"O papa, what is that ?" asked Etta, as
the man led out a camel. Won't he bite


us ?


"Oh,


no.


The camel


is very gentle.


See, those children are going to take a ride


on his back.


Would


you like to ride so,


once ?"


"Oh,


no, papa!


I'm afraid I should


fall."


There's a nice seat on his back.
we'll go a little nearer."
Etta clung closely to papa's hand


stepped toward the camel.


Come,


as he


Here she found


two of her cousins, Jennie and Dan.


They


were going to ride the next time, and they
wanted Etta to ride with them.


see


She


I _J


6-
,






ETTA 'S RIDE.


I should fall off, I know I should!"
v as all Etta would say.
But when the camel came back, after the
man had led him about the yard, she


thought he looked so gentle, that she
tempted to try.
Dan, hold me on," whispered Etta.


was


"' Yes,


if there's any need of


it.


Come,




r


ETTA'S RIDE.


Jennie and I


are going now.


You can see Etta on the camel's neck.
Dan sits near, to catch her if she falls.
She was so delighted with her first ride,


that she tried


it the second


time.


Then


she ran to her papa, saying,
"Oh, papa, he's real clever! He didn't
hurt me a mite!"
"Who ? the man or the camel ? "


The camel, papa.
little girls, for he didn't


guess


he likes


bite one of us.


I'd


like to come and ride every day.


" Would ?


I think I should prefer our


horse.


" The horse goes too fast.


slow, as I


I like to ride


did on the camel."


" If that's all you want, you can be satis-


fied.


You'd like to ride on the horse, if


I led him, wouldn't you ?"


" Oh, yes,


papa !


Then you may try it every day, if
wish."


you


-----I- __
~__~___ __








ADDIE'S


DREAM.


" O MAMMA, said little Addie one


ing,


morn-


" I saw Jesus last night !"


" Where was he, darling?"


asked


mam-


ma.


" Right


side of the window; and he


smiled when he looked at me.
he's nicer than anybody I


O mamma,
ever saw! I


wanted him to hold my hand, but when I
tried to touch him he was gone. Wasn't
it too bad, mamma ?"
"Where did he go, Addie ?"


" I don't know.


I sat up and


looked


out of


the window, but I couldn't see him.


And it was light, for I


saw the little moon.


Oh, I


felt so sorry!


Shall I


see him


again, mamma ?"


"My


little


Add'ie was


dreaming


night, I suppose; but if


she tries to please


Jesus
time.


she will see him


in Heaven


some


last


___


__ I I







ADDIE'S DREAM.


" When, mamma?"


"I don't


know,


dear.


But when he


wants Addie he will


send the bright angels


to lead her to the beautiful home


Heaven.


" You'll go, too, mamma?"


r _


in


- --
L L_ L L c II -I L, __ L --




I


ADDIE'S DREAM.


" Yes, I hope to go by-and-by."
" And papa, and Perley, and grandma?"


" Yes, I hope we shall all


be there.


Oh, it will be just like home, won't it ?"
and Addie clapped her hands in delight.
We, must try to be good every day, if
we wish to go and live with Jesus."


" I'll try to-day, mamma, and


not be


naughty onct
"If you
do?"


are naughty,


what shall


"I guess, mamma, if I


ry, he'll


tell him I'm sor-


let me try again; won't he ?"


"Yes, Addie, Jesus will let us try many
times, and help us, too, if we ask him."


" I ask him every night to


take care of


me, mamma.
Don't you ask him to take care of little
brother, too ?"


"Oh,


Yes, mamma.


"That is right.


He is pleased


when


little girls and boys tell him all they want.


you


_ -_ _J







LULIE AND LIZZIE.

LULIE and Lizzie bid papa and mamma
good-night, and ran up to their cozy little
room above, for mamma was holding
Robbie'and she could not come then.
By-and-by, when baby brother is laid in
his little crib, mamma will come up and
tuck them snugly into their warm bed.
She will give each one more kiss, and
another pleasant good-night will be spoken.
Then she will leave them to quiet slumbers
and pleasant dreams.
But before they get into the dainty white
bed, they must thank the dear Father
above, who has taken care of them through
the long summer day.
He has given them kind, loving parents,
a dear little brother, and a beautiful home.
Should they not thank him for all these
gifts ?


I

















PHILOSOPHER


WILL.


Brown- was


a philoso-


pher.
He didn't wear spectacles.
He didn't have a bald head.


hair was not white.


no beard at all.
But still he was


He had


He didn't live in a cave.


a philosopher.


If asked


to do anything, if anything was done, if


anything
reason.


happened, he must
He asked "Why ? "


know


the


as often as


other boys whistle-and that, you know,


ILL


I I


__ ___ __ ,, 1
____ ~ ~ I I L~L--- I,




I


PHILOSOPHER WILL.


is from the first "Good-morning" till the
last Good-night."
One day he broke a whole nest-ful of
eggs to find out how they changed to chick-
ens; and the next day he dug up some rare
seeds to find out what made them sprout.
But he was very, very patient, as all
philosophers are. He was never angry
with his pets, do what they might. He
had a goat-team, and goats don't always
think as boys do.
He was driving gayly down the main
street, when his bearded steeds stopped
short, and one lay down as calmly as for a
night's slumber.
Will didn't shout angry commands, or
swing the whip hissingly down on the
creature's back.
He just leaned his chin on his palm and
fell to wondering wky Billy had done such
a strange thing, right there in the street,
where everybody was sure to see, and

1 -I II








PHILOSOPHER WILL.


where the very


horses winked in


derision


as they passed.
Will had finally decided that Billy was


also a


philosopher, and that


traveling dis-


turbed his meditations, when Sir Goat rose


to his feet, and the drive went gayly


on.


7 1
_ _


I -
L ii r








PUSSY'S SONG.

Ding dong is the song
Pussy's learned to play.
While she sings, while it rings,
Mice are away.

SDing-dong! Oh, how long
SPussy had to try!
First she'd stop, then she'd hop,
Then wipe her eye.

Ding-dong! In the morn
Pussy 'd ring the bell.
In the night, without light,
She'd swing it well.

Ding -dong! It's not wrong.
Pussy, ring away.
Do it well, guard the bell;
We'll call some day.


1wo




Si.


CARLIE AND THE CHICKEN.
"OH, my little chicky's dead!" cried
Merry, as she saw it lying on its side.
A pair of laughing eyes peeped round the
corner of the house to see what she would do.
Poor little chicky Somebody's tied a
string to your leg. It must be Carlie."
I wanted to make him stand still," said
the owner of the eyes as he approached.


_I r 1-

















PLAYING SCHOOL.


IN a corner of the play-ground
Sits a merry group of four.
Dot, the hat-crowned, is the teacher;
She has tried this game before.

Little Elfie learns her lesson;
Careless Bess thinks more of ease;
Bright-eyed Kate is always laughing;
She'll do nought but turn the leaves.

Little Dot is wise and watchful.
Lessons hard she gives to none;
Plums and nuts she keeps for "merits,
If the tasks they-do not shun.


_ I I


I _








THE BRAVE SAILOR.


I THINK the boys will all say that this
sailor was very brave, when I tell them
what he did.
During a severe storm, the vessel to
which he belonged was wrecked, and the
mother of little Alston, with many of the
passengers and crew, was lost.
Among those who were left, not one
cared for the poor, sickly little boy, but
old Andrew. And when they all crowded
into one small boat, hoping to reach the
shore, this brave sailor remained on the
wreck with the boy.
But he went quickly to work nailing
planks and boards together; and when the
raft was finished, he fastened a large bas-
ket to it, then took Alston and tied him
firmly into the basket.
When all was ready, he took an oar and
tried to reach the shore. The little boat


I



k
k









THE BRA VE SAILOR.


was so crowded that it tipped over and all

in it were drowned, but the brave sailor and

little Alston reached the shore in safety.


II a _. -I-


L I ~__
r -- -------








DAISY'S


EAR-RINGS.


DAISY didn't want the robins to eat all


the cherries, so she asked her


brother to


climb the tree and pick some for her.


stood on the ground, and


when he


found


a very nice or large one, he would throw it


down to Daisy, and


apron.
See,


she caught it


she has her apron full now.


also holding two in her


see two others.


hand.


Can any of


in her


She is


And I can
the bright


eyes, which are looking at this picture, see
them?


Can't you ?


Look sharply now.


What


is that hanging on Daisy's ear ?


" Cherries for ear-rings !


Oh, how fun-


think some little girls will say.


Yes, they are funny ones, but very good


for little girls to wear.
rings, try Daisy's cherr
others.,


If you want ear-
-y-drops before any


She


ny!"


[


i.
I








BUTTERFLIES.


I irow the little girls,.who look
picture, like to see live butterflies


flit from flower to flower.


they are!
But if you happen


at this
as they


How beautiful


to see a caterpillar


you exclaim,


" Oh,


Now, little girls


the ugly thing!"
;, don't despise


ugly things, as you call them; for if


these
there


were no caterpillars
pretty butterflies.


The caterpillar winds


there would


be


something


like silk, all about his body, till it looks


like a long, slim
awhile, and where


egg.


He stays in this


n he next appears he is


changed into a gay butterfly.
I have seen children try'to catch butter-


flies.


But it is very cruel to shut them up


in a box, and you cannot touch them with-


out rubbing off some of
which cover their wings.


the fine feathers


no


soft,


I _~ _


----~ ---
L _~








THE DINNER


BASKET.


" MOTHER,


dinner in ?"


can I


asked


have a


basket


to


Ilda one day


carry
after


she had been to school a few weeks.


"You will not


stay at


noon very often.


" I like to, stormy


days,


for the


teacher


stays then.


We have real good times, too,


when she is there.


" Well, ask


father when he comes home.


Perhaps he can get one this evening.


as her


father came in,


to him


saying,


"I


want


a basket,


father.


Will you get one to-night ?"


"Want a


basket ?


Well,


there's


bushel and half-bushel basket


shed.


out in the


You may take either of them.


"Oh, I don't


want


those!"


exclaimed


Ilda,


laughing gayly.


to carry my dinner in when


"Then you


don't


"I want a little one


go to school."
to eat dinner


intend


with mother and I


any more?"


my


As


soon


she


ran


the


__







THE DINNER BASKE T.


" Oh,


sha'n't


stay


very


often,


father.


Only when it storms.


"Suppose


go


after


you stormy days;


you can come home then.


" But


I like


to stay when


the teacher is


there. -
"Why?"
She tells us stories, and plays with us.


" Then I


must


tell stories


and play, if


want to keep my


little girl at home.


" Shall


you


be lonesome


if I stay, fa-


their "


asked Ilda as she climbed into his


lap.
I always miss my little


Ilda when


is away,


but I'll try to


spare her sometimes


when it is very stormy.


" Will


you


get


the basket


to-night,


father.


" Yes, if I
"The othei


can find what you want.


r


girls


have


covers .on


their


baskets.


" Then you


want one,


suppose.


r_---


she


I'm


c-







THE DINNER BASKET.


going to the store by-and-by.
I can find."


Ilda went to bed


I'll see what


before he came home,


but the next morning she was delighted


see a nice, new basket on the table.


to


She


examined it all over carefully, then ran into
the dining-room saying,


" Thank you, father.


It's just right."


The next thing is to fill it, I suppose.
Will plum-pudding and roast beef be good


enough for that new basket ?"
"Bread and butter is the


Most


best,


father.


all my dinner will be that."


" Most all;


thought you'd want


some-


thing a little better to top off with."


" Cookies


are good,


and


tarts,


Those will be nice to carry in it."
Perhaps mother will make a little pie,
just big enough for your basket."


" Oh, that will be the


best!"


and Ilda


was sorry, for once, to see the sun shine,
for she wanted to use her new basket."


too.


L I I __


.~ -~--- --- -----I ~-~. __ --u g--------~ e _~__ _~ ____ __








WATCHING


THE,


BEES.


ONE


tired of.


thing


That


Azzie


never


seems


to


is watching the bees.


grow
At


first her mother was afraid to


near them, as


have


her go


bees are sometimes so irrita-


ble and


cross


that they will


sting


anyone


who goes near.
But, strange


to


say, they


seem


to take


as great


a fancy to


Azzie


as she does


them.


So day after day she


of the hives and watches


them


sits in front


as they flit


in and


out of the tiny door.


Perhaps


she thinks of


making in their little


cells;


what


they


are


and how good


it will be to eat.


gather


from


Can


you


the flowers,


tell what


and then


they
store


away in the hives ?


Do


you


thank the


like honey ?


bees,


for these


If so, you
industrious


must
little


insects work very hard during
to collect it.


the summer


to


_Lt









BESSIE'S


PICTURES.


" DOLPH !"


said little


Bessie


one day,


"me want to play
Play picture!


picture."
I don't know how,


swered her brother.


" Me


does.


Bessie '11


show how;


she began to drag a chair across the room.


She had had her


picture


taken


a few


before,


and she still remembered


standing in a chair.


" Bessie


must


stand


in big


chair," she


as she was abotit to climb into it.


Bessie,


I'll tell


you


a good


way!


Let me move the chair up to the


He helped her


glass.


into it, then stood with


his arms about her.


This
Bessie in


i gooder


Sdelight,


than the


as


man's," cried


the looked into the


glass.
We must keep still," said Dolph.
Oh, me never thinked!" she answered


an-


days


and


said,


" 0


-- r- 11 I- I I I I
-- --- --- -- ---


,,,~
mr*reuluasllslr 111 111 1 1 I 1 I







BESSIE'S PICTURES.


in a low tone.


Then she stood very still


for a few seconds.


" Ain't


we most


tooked ? "


asked in a whisper.
I guess that will
he helped her down.


do," Dolph replied, as


" Now


le's tell mamma;


and hand


hand they ran to mamma's room.


" 0 mamma," cried


Bessie, who always


told her story first, we tooken the bestest
pictures "


"If my little boy and girl
ures, I guess I'll have mine
ma said pleasantly."


can take pict-


taken,


mam-


"0 mamma, come now!"


seized one hand to


and Bessie


lead her to the door.


"In just a moment, dear."
Mamma always tried to amuse her


ones, and soon she was ready to go down,
Bessie holding one hand and Dolph the
other.


-When she


got to the parlor she said,-


she


soon


in


little
14flp
-. -. &o -0







BESSIE'S PIC T URES.


If you are going to take my picture, you
must tell me just what to do."


" Me can tell me can


tell "


was Bes-


sie's eager cry as she ran for the big chair.


" Dolph


must


help


Bessie,


were her


next words, for she was in such a hurry
she could not wait to move the heavy chair
alone.
After it was fixed as before, Bessie said,
" Now, mamma, sit down and look in the
glass straight."
"Shall I put-"


" You mus' n't speaked


a word.


Keep


still 's a mouse,


" whispered Bessie.


That's long
said Dolph.
Suppose we


enough,


take


Bessie,


for


two, then;


mamma put an arm round each of the chil-


dre n.


" Now we'll take Dolph and


Bessie


with mamma.


After this was finished they went into
the play-room to look over their toys.


one,


and


1








BIRDIE AND PRINCE.


BIRDIE and


Prince


are great


friends.


And


he is such a good, faithful dog, that


Birdie's mamma likes to have him with her
little girl all the time when she is playing
out of doors.


One


day she took her sister's old


hat


and wandered off


Prince.
thought


into the woods with


Finding some wild flowers, Birdie


she would


trim


the hat a little


more.


Prince


was lying


down a moment, and


his soft,


shaggy coat


looked


seat, so she sat down upon the
fellow.


After fixing the h
it upon her head a:
big playmate awhile.
trim Prince with h
some around his col
to his curly hair.


like a nice
patient old


at to suit her, she put
gain, and caressed her
At last she began to


er flowers.


She


put


lar, and the rest clung


I


]


__~


'--- ------ --


---


rr I I


:j


J



















If V I'


THE SHEPHERD.


SEE this


kind shepherd holding the little


lamb in his arms.


It is tired


running so


far, so now he lets it rest.


Mamma holds you


have


been


playing


just so,


and are


when you
very tired,


doesn't she ?


The Bible tells us about some one who


is called the


Good


Shepherd.


Ask mam-


ma or papa to tell you about Him.











LITTLE


RUNAWAY.


OLLIE


was running


away.


And


naughty


girl!


she


was running away to the the-
atre.


Grandma


had


been


so


shocked.


" Go to the theatre!


No, child!


Where did


you hear


of such


a place?"
As grandma would not take her, Mollie


stole out at dark
men would show


alone; she knew police-
anybody the way to any


place, and a policeman directed her.


She paid


for a front seat,


and in she


went delighted with her own daring, and


sat down among the ladies


in white


gloves, and white laces, with roses at their


kid


I


__


0 tj






LITTLE RUNAWAY.


throats. When the curtain rose, there on
the stage stood a little girl in a blinding
snow-storm. And she was a runaway girl,
and made her friends no end of trouble.
Mollie was very indignant at her, and one of
the ladies had just lent her an opera-glass
to see into the "robbers' den," where the
little girl had been carried, when a hand
was laid on her own shoulder. It was an
usher; and two men wished to see her.
She went down-stairs, and there was her
policeman, and another. These two blue-
coated men looked at her severely. "Are
you Mollie Burns ?" asked the first one.
"Yes," said she.
"Well, you've killed your grandmother,"
said the other. "She is at the station, cry-
ing her poor old eyes out."
Mollie began to cry, too. She hugged
her grandmother tight when she got to the
station. "O," said she, I am as bad as


_ __


--------~-----------------








LITTLE RUNAWAY.


the wicked


girls


ini any story.


I am just


like them, and I ai
Grandma took her


m afraid of myself."
home, crying all the


way, and the dear old lady was so sick from


her fright that Mollie


never


dared to do


again just as she wished without


permission.


itt -~


r--qr

Ok 7
eff*k


-- i. __I
- -- ----- ---- 7


I- L -1 I








FAY'S


(" COME,
Hawton.


Fay,


LESSON.


I'm ready now," said Mrs.


" es,


mamma;


of complaint,


and without


Fay left her dolls and


a word


seated


herself to take her first lesson in music.


She is quite


young


an instrument, but


to learn


mamma


thin


to play on
cs she can


take easy lessons now, and harder ones by-
and-by.


thinks


mamma


always


right; that no other little girl ever
as good, a teacher as she has.


does


just


had half


Fay has never attended


very


old


or very


teaches her at home.


school.


strong,


She makes


She is


so mamma


the les-


and pleasant


to her little


hope


Fay wi


good a mother.


11 always try to please so
Who has told us to honor


our father and mother ?


I__


Fay


not


very


sons
girl.


easy


---
___,--




























CARL'S BIRDS.


CARL


build


loves to watch the swallows as


their nest under the eaves.


He is


sitting


in his


high chair


ing one of his playmates


about them.


Edgar


does


not


care much


about


birds,


but puss looks as though she did.


they


now,


tell-


the


_ ~ _~ _1























AMY'S


ROSE-BUSH.


AMY is


very fond of


flowers.


a small garden of her own.


She has
Sometimes


her mother gives her house-plants to set in
it. Amy wished very much for one rose-
bush which she thought very beautiful.


Her mother valued it highly;


but Amy


promised to take good care of it, and was
delighted when her mother put it in the
centre of her little garden.

] _, i 11 .... --- .-.-- c ....--


LU


I II i. -;_i-L-:I-I~I~LP-.
- I ___ __




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