• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Introduction
 All around the clock
 The fairy in the pink
 The six doves
 A sail in a tub
 Charlie's ride in the park
 Dollie's party
 Dorothy's walk
 Adventures of a doll told...
 Scamp's surprise
 How a cat came out of a loaf of...
 How the goose came out of...
 How the geese went walk-ing
 Shadow pictures
 In miceland
 A Santa Claus story
 A good monkey - Lulu's pets
 Un-cle Dick's boy
 What happened to the black...
 Hi! Diddle diddle!
 Blowing bubbles
 The old woman in a basket
 Riding to Boston
 The bad little ant - Sir Donke...
 Charlie's hobby
 Our chanticleer
 The clerk of the weather
 A day at Lincoln Park
 The tables turned
 The three cats
 The elephant
 The chicken
 The mouse
 The cat
 The dog
 The owl
 Telephoning
 One, two - buckle my shoe
 What a big man am I
 A hotel for dogs
 Baby Bo-Peep and Little Jack...
 How Tommy tended the baby
 Nep and the baby
 Baby Bun as driver
 Two little milkmaids
 Back Cover






Group Title: Tot, Tom and Toby : story, picture and rhyme for the merry little folks that brighten our homes and sweeten our lives
Title: Tot, Tom and Toby
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00081098/00001
 Material Information
Title: Tot, Tom and Toby story, picture and rhyme for the merry little folks that brighten our homes and sweeten our lives
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ill. (some col.) ; 26 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Fowler, E. E ( Copyright holder )
H.J. Smith & Co ( Publisher )
Publisher: H.J. Smith & Co.
Place of Publication: Philadelphia ;
Chicago ;
Oakland Cal
Publication Date: c1891
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Pets -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1891   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1891   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1891
Genre: Children's stories
Children's poetry
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
United States -- Illinois -- Chicago
United States -- California -- Oakland
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: with special illustrations designed by our own artists.
General Note: "Copyrighted 1891 by E.E. Fowler."
General Note: Frontispiece printed in colors.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00081098
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002225050
notis - ALG5322
oclc - 191092002

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Introduction
        Page 3
    All around the clock
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    The fairy in the pink
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    The six doves
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    A sail in a tub
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Charlie's ride in the park
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Dollie's party
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Dorothy's walk
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Adventures of a doll told by herself
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Scamp's surprise
        Page 33
    How a cat came out of a loaf of bread
        Page 34
    How the goose came out of an egg
        Page 35
    How the geese went walk-ing
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
    Shadow pictures
        Page 39
    In miceland
        Page 40
    A Santa Claus story
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
    A good monkey - Lulu's pets
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
    Un-cle Dick's boy
        Page 47
    What happened to the black horse
        Page 48
        Page 49
    Hi! Diddle diddle!
        Page 50
        Page 51
    Blowing bubbles
        Page 52
        Page 53
    The old woman in a basket
        Page 54
    Riding to Boston
        Page 55
    The bad little ant - Sir Donkey
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
    Charlie's hobby
        Page 60
    Our chanticleer
        Page 61
    The clerk of the weather
        Page 62
        Page 63
    A day at Lincoln Park
        Page 64
        Page 65
    The tables turned
        Page 66
        Page 67
    The three cats
        Page 68
        Page 69
    The elephant
        Page 70
    The chicken
        Page 71
    The mouse
        Page 72
    The cat
        Page 73
    The dog
        Page 74
    The owl
        Page 75
    Telephoning
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
    One, two - buckle my shoe
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
    What a big man am I
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
    A hotel for dogs
        Page 85
    Baby Bo-Peep and Little Jack Horner
        Page 86
    How Tommy tended the baby
        Page 87
    Nep and the baby
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
    Baby Bun as driver
        Page 91
    Two little milkmaids
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
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TOT, TOM AND TOBY

STORY, PICTURE AND RHYME

For the Merry Little Folks that Brighten our Homes and Sweeten our Lives




















WITH SPECIAL ILLUSTRATIONS DESIGNED BY OUR OWN ARTISTS

Copyrighted 1891 by E. E. Fowler
H. J. SMITH & CO.,
PHILADELPHIA. CrI-OAGO, OAKLAND, CAT..





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nt Introduction.


1TERE are Tot, Tom and Toby:
-F*U There are lots of things to see;
There are dogs and cats and horses and goats,
As happy as they can be.

Turn the leaves gently. The dogs and the cats,
And the little children, too,
Will be hurt if you tear them. How would you feel
If any one tore up you?






ALL AROUND THE CLOCK.


,One wee little woman,
Only one year old;
Blue eyes bright and merry,
Curly locks 'of gold.
Everybody's princess,
Everybody's pet;
For a throne so co'sey
On a pillow set.


Sister brings her playthings'
Brother brings her books;
Mother saves to please her
All her sweetest looks.
Love and hugs and kisses
More than can be told
Has this little woman
Only one year old.


















































TOT AND HER PETS.







ALL AROUND THE CLOCK.


Two tiny tubs
With suds a-brim;
Two washerwomen
Neat and trim.
One dips and rinses,
Rubs and wrings,
And as she washes
Gayly sings.


But what has lazy
Dinah done ?
Her morning work
Is not begun!
Two tubs a-brim
With foam and froth;
One little maid
To use them both.


;r ,l I--ILLY


S- -








THE FAIRY IN THE PINK.



The Fairy in the Pink.



O UST when the rosy day peeped over the hills,
a lovely .pink bloomed in the garden. Its
sweet breath floated away on the air, and wak-
ened a fairy who was sleeping under a blade of grass.
The little lady sprang up. "0 dear," she sighed;
"it is too late
--- to go home
oto-day."
And she flew
swiftly to the /
pink and nes-
tled in its fra-
grant leaves.
By and by, little Helen came down the
.. garden path, and spied the blushing pink.
She ran to it, and, stooping down, she
cried, You darling pretty flower and
kissed it.
Then the fairy raised her tiny head
Sand kissed little Helen on the lips.
1 Helen did not see her, but her heart
-- : became so glad that she folded her soft
_-_-- -- b hands over the pink, and said: You
have made me so happy that you shall be
.- my only own."
She picked the rosy pink, with the
fairy still nestled in a fragrant corner.







ALL AROUND THE CLnrIK.


Three thirsty thistles
Beside the stone wall,
So tired of waiting
For showers to fall.
Dear little Dicky
Was passing the spot,
And brought, in a hurry,
His watering-pot.


Though it was heavy,
Little cared he;
"I am a shower!"
He shouted in glee.
rhree thirsty thistles,
They feel the cool rain;
"Thanks to you, Dicky,
We are happy again!"









THE FAIRY IN THE PINK.

"Oh, mamma," she cried, as she saw her mother in the garden, "I have
found such a lovely flower, and I've taken it for my only own, and I never
was so happy!"
"Very well, Helen," answered her mother; "see if you can be as sweet all
day long as your lovely carnation. But come now: with me. 1 am going to carry
some oranges and jelly to poor sick Flora. You may bring your pink with you,
and show it to her."
So they went to the room where little Flora lay upon her bed. Her face was
thin, and as white, almost, as the pillow.
She smiled as Helen and her mother came near, and her eyes brightened as she
saw the jelly and the oranges. But when little Helen came to her side, she reached
out her hand for the sweet carnation.
Then Helen held the pink to Flora's hot lips, and the little fairy crept slyly
out and kissed them.
"Keep it," whispered Helen softly; "it makes your eyes look like heaven."
Flora clasped the flower in her fingers, and pressed it again to her lips. Then
a sweet smile swept over her face, as she sighed, How glad it makes me!"
"Yes," replied Helen's mamma; "you look as if you would soon get well
now." And the fairy in the fragrant corner of the pink laughed. Her name was
Heat's Content.
"What a happy day!" said little Helen. C. BELL.







ALL AROUND THE CLOCK.


Four funny fans
Had Maud and May
To cool the air
One summer day:
A palm-leaf broad,
A feather fan,
And one that came
From far Japan;


And for the fourth
May took her hat
And made a fine
Big fan of that.
And then so strong
A breeze had they,
They played it was
A winter day!


__ __









THE SIX DOVES.




The Six Doves.




.- HEN Jimmy was seven years old his father gave him
S six pretty doves for a birthday gift. Jimmy put them
S in a large box in the yard, and sent for all the boys
he knew to come and see them.
For a time the doves had very good care. Jimmy
fed them every day, and they would eat corn from his
.hand. But he soon grew tired of caring for his pets.
*: Winter came on, and he did not like to go out in the
cold to give the doves food and water.
One day he did not go to feed them, because it snowed. The next day he
went to a snowball fight, and did not get home until dark. He ate his supper
and went to bed, thinking he would feed
his doves early the next morning. But
he forgot all about it till nearly noon.
Then the cook said she had no stale
bread to spare for the doves.
Jimmy went to his mother and asked
her for five cents to buy some corn for
them. His mother gave him the money,
and he ran off to buy the corn. But
on his way he passed a candy store, and
the candy looked so nice that he felt that he must have some of it. So he spent
the five cents for gum-drops.
Then he went to play with another boy, and did not get home till dark. He
was afraid his mother would ask him if he had bought the corn. So he went co
bed as soon as he could. The next! morning he got some bread from the cook,







ALL AROUND THE CLOCK.


Five fairy fingers,
All dimpled and white,
Busily plying
The needle so bright.
One wears a thimble,
A cap for his head,
While gayly the others
Pull out the long thread.


Five fairy fingers
Work very fast,
And hold up the treasure
Finished at last.
No matter how crooked
The small stitches are,
She knows the pincushion!
Will please dear papa.


I ~
---










THE SIX DOVES.


and went to feed his doves. He opened the door of the box, but the doves did
not come out. He looked in, and saw two of them lying dead on the floor of the
box. They had starved to death,
S- -and were quite cold and stiff.
The other four doves were too
weak to eat the bread, and they
all died that night.

Oh, how sorry Jimmy was
S that he had spent the five cents
on candy for himself!
.2 His mother sent him to bed
without any supper, that he might
c-r'ie," d. .7 he-t l--e know what ii was to be hungry.
Jimmy cried until he fell asleep. But he learned a good lesson ; for he never
neglected another pet. FLORENCE H. BIRNEY.


9.,.






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ALL AROUND THE CLOCK.


Six silver spoons
All bright and nice;
Six saucers full
Of orange ice.
Six little napkins
White as snow;
Six merry maids
All in a row.


The silver spoons
Make many trips
From heaping plates
To rosy lips.
And when they're empty
As before,
Six maids are ready
For some more!









A SAIL IN A TUB.




A Sail in a Tub.




7s OLLIE and Peggy were two little
girls who lived in a big white
house, beside a pretty river. Pol- -
lie's eyes were brown, like chestnuts; but
Peggy's were as blue as the sky.
One day their mamma went away
to spend the afternoon. The little girls
promised to be very good indeed while
she was gone. They were to have bread
and butter, and baked apples with cream
Sfor their supper, with their own pretty
tea-set to eat from.
It was a beautiful day. The sun shone
and the birds sang ;sweetly. The little
girls did not want to stay in the house.
Let us go to the river and catch --
some fish," said Peggy.
So off they started with their little poles and lines, and bent pins for fish-
hooks. The fish did not bite very well, and by and by the children took off
their stockings and shoes, and waded into the clear, cool water.
"I wish we had a boat," said Pollie. "I would like to have a sail."
Just then Peggy spied a washtub on the bank.
"Oh, Pollie," she cried, "somebody has been washing, and. left a tub here!
That will make a splendid boat."
"Let us get in it right off!" said Pollie, dancing about. "We must have
some oars."
These sticks will do," said Peggy, picking up two almost as big as herself.
They rolled the tub into the river, where it danced about like a cork.
"I will hold it until you get in, Pollie, and then you must keep it steady
with your stick for me," said Peggy.







ALL AROUND THE CLOCK.


Seven shining shells
We gathered on the shore,
And if we could have staid
We might have got some more.
We'd played and played all day
As happy as could be,
And when the sun went down
They called us in to tea.


We made a mound of sand
And put the shells inside;
"Don't touch our pretty things,
You little waves !" we cried.
0 naughty, naughty waves!
We hurried back next day,
And mound and shells and all
Had vanished quite away!


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A SAIL IN A TUB.


Pollie did exactly as Peggy had told her, and soon both were seated in their
funny boat. The river was not deep, but the current was strong, and the tub floated
very well. What fun it was! They could see the white pebbles on the bottom of
the river, and the bright little fish playing hide-and-go-seek.
But by and by the tub floated right on a big rock in the middle of the river,
and the little sailors were upset into the water.
"We shall be drowned!" screamed Pollie, holding on to the rock, the water
streaming off her.
"The fishes will eat us up!" said Peggy, beginning to cry.
Just then a man walking on the bank saw them. He waded out into the river
and carried them safely to land. When the two wet little girls reached home, Nurse
was much frightened, and put them to bed right away. They had only bread and
butter for their supper. Peggy and Pollie think they will never go sailing again.


T & -2






ALL AROUND THE CLOCK.


Eight eager elves
Flew high and far
To catch the sparkle
Of a star.
On butterflies
They rode, or bees,
Or floated softly
On the breeze.


But long before
They reached the sky,
A thunder-cloud
Came sailing by.
And blown with wind,
And wet with rain,
Eight eager elves
Flew down again.























ii ,' I. "




















-A- SU-- .RLY NEHO.





A SURLY NEIGHBOR.







ALL AROUND THE CLOCK.


Nine nodding nosegays,
Fresh and fine;
"Which shall I choose,"
Said Tom, "for mine?"
He looked at roses,
Red and white;
At lilies fair;
At pansies bright.


At last he chose
A fine bouquet,
And proudly bore
His flowers away.
But I have heard-
I guess it is true-
He gave them all
To little Prue!








CHARLIE'S RIDE IN THE PARK.


Charlie's Ride in the Park.


-* A TRU E STORU ....

SHARLIE visited a park with his mother and younger brothers. It was
a pleasant place. There was a high tower, and stands, and pavilions,
and it was well-shaded.
It was just as he was ready to leave the park that he saw a deer. The deer
came towards him. He seemed very tame. He licked Charlie's hands and the
hands of the others. He seemed delighted at being caressed.
But somehow he really seemed to be most pleased with Charlie's attentions.
He rubbed his head against Charlie, as if he wanted to say, "I love you." Some-
times his manner
was a little too
earnest to be quite
agreeable. There A -
was, perhaps, just
the least hint in
the world of bunt-
ing; but Charlie
thought it only
the deer's way of
showing his love.
' 01, nammna,"' he
cried, he loves -I
me better than any
of v.on!' "
Then mamma "-
and the children
walked slowlv to-






ALL AROUND THE CLOCK.


There were ten tin trumpets,
There were ten small boys,
And the ten still houses
Then were full of noise.
How they roused the mothers-
Grandmas, too, perhaps-
From their books and sewing,
From their peaceful naps!.


How they waked the babies!
How they scared the cats!
Howthey shrieked and whistled
Tunes in sharps and flats !
But at last the racket-
Stopped at set of sun;
For the trumpets ten were
Broken, every one!








CHARLIE'S RIDE IN THE PARK.

wards the gateway. Charlie followed, still playing with the deer. She was startled
by a sudden, sharp cry of distress: "Mamma! Mamma! Help me!" All looked.
There was the deer, bounding off at full speed, with Charlie on his back, and
Charlie could not even hold on to the deer's neck, for he was riding backwards.
The deer was frightened, and was making his best jumps. He went like the
wind. No one laughed; for it was a very dangerous ride. In a few seconds Char-
lie was thrown. Over and over he went, and struck on the edge of a muddy pond.
Luckily, he was not badly hurt. But he was very much surprised at his
ride; for he had not expected it at all.
The deer had suddenly bunted under him while he had stood facing him.
As he threw up his head, Charlie was thrown on his back, facing backwards.
And then the ride! The deer was frightened; Charlie was frightened; mamma
and the children were frightened.
But what a laugh, all at Charlie's expense, after it was over!-a laugh that
broke out again and again for hours after. And how many times Charlie's words
were repeated with laughter,-" Mamma, he loves me better than any of you !"
CHAS. T. JEROME.










-~ I



__ ( i ___






ALL AROUND THE CLOCK.

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Eleven elastic eels,
This fisher-boy has caught;
A splendid basketful
To carry home, he thought.
His sister, standing by,
Thinks Johnny very wise,
And watches all he does
With round, admiring eyes.


But when he starts for home
He finds, too late, alas!
That not a single eel
Lies in the long wet grass.
The naughty, squirming things
-The truth is very plain-
Have wriggled to the edge,
And tumbled in again !


-- c








DOLLIE'S PARTY.




Dollie's Party.




LOLLIE, I's dot a party;
... De table's set for free,
And Kitty's 'vited to it,
And only you and me.

Kittie ain't used to eating ' On such a little plate, /.
And 'fore I got her bib on
She 'fought she couldn't wait.

And when I wasn't seeing-
Before you'd hardly 'fink
She put her paw on table,
And took a little drink.


I didn't like to fip her-
She's only free months old;
I fought she'd be'ave herself better
If she was only told.


So I ;aid, Kitty, don't do 'at"-
She didn't seem to care,
But got -r fiskers in the cream,
And the cream went on the chair.


'Fore I had time to stop her
She took the piece of meat;
And now the party's over,
'Cause there ain't no more to et.


JENNIE PATTERSON.







ALL AROUND THE CLOCK.


Twelve twirling tops
As light as air:
Two children gay
With streaming hair.
So many times
The tops they've spun,
To spin themselves
They have begun.


Round go the tops,
A dizzy whirl!
Round go the flying
Boy and girl!
Till who can see
Boy, girl or top ?
I wonder if
They'll ever stop!


N~'V


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SCAMPS' SURPRISE.


A44 Scamp's Surprise. ,


HAD a surprise to-day. When I got up I was surprised, too. It is Christmas, my
master tells me. I expect Christmas means having a good time. Don't it mean that ?
The first thing I saw when I came into the parlor was a big tree, all full of pretty
things. It's funny to see a tree fixed up like that. Then my master said: Scamp, come
here; I have got a surprise for you." What do you think it was ? Why, a big box! It
was marked, To Mr. Scamp." My master told me it came from New York.
Now, my cousin Amy lives in New York. Of course, she is not my cousin,- only
my master's ; but it is all the same. I knew she sent me the surprise.
My master opened the box and took. out the surprise. What do you think it was ?
Why, a blanket for me! It was all trimmed with ribbons, and inside it was all fur. My
master put the surprise on my back, and tied the ribbons. The fur tickled me, and I
laughed. They all thought I barked, but I did not; I was laughing.
My master said I looked so fine he would let me go out on the sidewalk.
When we got out of the house, a boy came along the street, with a tin horn. He
blew it right in my ear, and it scared me so that I fell off the pavement into the snow-
drift. I rolled over and over. I felt myself going down, down, down, and I barked.
My master whistled to me, but I could not get out.
At last he came and lifted me from the snow-bank. You should have seen the
"Surprise." It was all wet, an,. the fur was spoiled.
My master, as he took me into the house, was saying something about '.' Pride get-
ting a fall." My name is not Pride, but Scamp.
JOHN S. SHRIVER.
T & T-3


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HOW A CAT CAME OUT OF A LOAF OF BREAD.


How a Cat came out of a Loaf of Bread.











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HOW THE GOOSE CAME OUT OF AN EGG.



How the Goose came out of an Egg.

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HOW THE GEESE WENT WALKING.


How the



EN lit-tle geese,
STwo lit-tle gan-d(
The snow is go-ing,
We must wan-dei
"Caw!"cried a crow,
"What are you tal
A whole month yet
You can't go wal
"Hiss!" said the gee
You-'re al-ways c


Geese Went Walk-ing.



We see blue sky,
;rs The snow is thaw-ing! "
And thro' they squeezed,
r The crow de-fy-ing;
But the drifts were deep,
k-ing! And flap-ping, fly-ing,
The geese came back,
k-ing The gan-ders af-ter,
se And the crow fell off


The fence with laugh-ter.


:aw-ing !




















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A PERILOUS


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VOYAGE.














































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TIED OF PLAY.








SHADOW PICTURES.



d Shadow Pictures.
---- ---- -^ ..IV ,- ^------

NE night, when Tom had gone to bed, Tot and Toby sat in the parlor
with their papa and mamma. Tot said: Oh, mamma, I saw a goose
to-day with such a long neck! It was as long as your arm."
"Are you sure it was a goose, Tot?" said mamma. "I think it was a
swan. Let us see if we can make its picture." And Tot's mamma put up
her hands as you see them.
"That is just like it, mamma;
that is just like it! cried Tot.
"Yes," said Toby, that looks like
the swan. But you can't make a pict-
ure of the big-nosed man who sat on
the banks watching her."
SMamma tried, but could not get it
right.
"Let me try," said papa; and he
put his hands together as we see them.

That is it," said Toby, hat
and all."
"Yes," said Tot; "but I don't
think the man's nose was quite as
big as papa has made it."
Then Tot and Toby tried to make
the pictures on the wall, but they
could not do as well as their papa -
and mamma, until they had tried
a long time.








IN MICELAND.


In Miceland


"Q OME," said Father Mouse; Y "Yes," said Grandpa Mouse;
"Come," said Mother Mouse, "Yes," said Grandma Mouse;
"We must fill the house." "We'll help fill the house."


With a bag this mouse, and a basket that mouse,
And a barrow t'other mouse, full they filled the house.







A SANTA CLAUS STORY.




3 A Santa. Claus Story.
------ --- '--- :----- .___- t ^





H, E night before Christmas, Baby
SBun's mamma told him a \
strange story about "The Dreadful
Thing Which Might Have Happened, \
and What Prevented It."
One Christmas Eve Santa Claus \
had to wait longer than usual for all /
the children to get to sleep, so that
he could start out to fill the stock-
ings. One of the windows in his room,
had a magic. curtain. As long as there
was a single child awake, this curtain
remained rolled up; but when the last
child had gone to sleep, down dropped \
the curtain, and off started Santa Claus.
Santa Claus sat waiting, waiting, for the curtain to unroll. At last
he began to doze, and was soon sound asleep. When the curtain finally
dropped, Santa Claus did not know it. The reindeer outside pawed and
clattered noisily, but it did not waken him. The moments passed slowly.
Could it be that the stockings would hang empty on Christmas morning?








A SANTA CLAUS STORY.

But the dreadful thing which might have happened did not happen,
and it was the White Kitten which prevented it: She saw the curtain
drop, and knew it was time for Santa Claus to start. So she rubbed
against her master, and mewed her very loudest. She jumped upon the
shelf, and knocked down a tin pan. But even that did not wake him.
Then the White Kitten grew anxious and
desperate.
"Santa Claus must be wakened, and there
is no one but me to do it. It is my duty."
So saying, she gave a spring and caught her-'
claws in his snow-white beard, giving /"
it a quick jerk. '/ J ?'
Ow, ow!" shrieked Santa, jump- ,, "
ing up. "What's the matter?" l ') "
No one answered. The White Kit-
ten sat demurely washing her face.
"I must have been asleep, and dreamed that some one pulled my
beard," said Santa. "But it actually hurts still Why! Why!! The
curtain is down! I must be off!" And in less than a wink Santa was
in his sleigh, speeding away over the housetops.














































MOSES IN TIJE BULLRUSHES.








A GOOD MONKEY-LULULU'S PETS.


A Good Monkey.


HIS is Master Jocko, a good
monkey. He is not a rogue,

as most monkeys are. He likes

to make friends. He pets little

dogs and kittens, and shares his

meals with them. I have seen

Master Jocko slap a big boy with

his strong paw because he was

teasing his pet dog. Once he

took four little dogs in his arms

to keep them from a bad boy

that came in the yard.


I! ii. ii I


Y kitty is Mal
7j A very fine c
She rocks in a
And wears a

I dress her in


Lulu's Pe


tese,
:at;
cradle,
cravat.

bonnets,


In shawls, lace and cap;
She rides on my handsleigh,
My wonderful cat.


Sts.


I call my puss Tabby,
And I wish you could see
Her spring on my elephant
And ride after me.

Sometimes she is naughty,
And scratches me so,
I open the back door,
And tell her to go.







LULU'S PETS.


My dog's name is Nero-
A fine Newfoundland;
He leads me from room to room
By holding my hand.

As I'm only five years old,
When I stand by his side,
He's almost as tall as I,
But I'm not as wide.

He's only a puppy -
Six months old or so;
His hair's black and curly
And shiny, you know.

It was papa who bought him
And gave him to me,
And that's why I love him
And keep him, you see.

My doll's name is Susie;
She sits near the cupboard,
And looks very tidy
In her red Mother Hubbard.

My poor little dollie,
Her neck has a crack;
But she has a rouche on
Which quite covers that.

She has a red cradle,
With pillow and spread,
A table and dishes,
And makes lovely bread.


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Ii~
i


Her servant is rubber-
Poor thing! she's quite old;
Her face is all wrinkled
From catching a cold.

And oh! I must tell you,
She looks like a fright -
But I'm awful sleepy;
So I'll bid you good night.

We have two little ponies,
Named Dollie and Jim-
But the weather's so stormy
We have to stay in.

But when it's summer,
And the snow's gone away,
I think we shall use them
The first pleasant day.

If you will just print this,
I may write again,
And tell you a story
About an old hen.

The old hen is yellow -
Aunt Winnie's, you see;
Now, Winnie's my auntie,
Two years older than me.

I feel very happy, 'cause
Papa's come in;
So I'll stop my writing,
And read this to him.
JENNIE PATTERSON





































































LITTLE BOY BLUE.


I


0:1 ,

i I







UNCLE DICK'S BOY.


SUn-cle Dick's 'oy.,i
1--- -u


? HE boy that lives at Un-cle Dick's has a great deal of laugh-
S ] ing to do when Jack-y and Joe are at the farm.
"Fun-ni-est lit-tie fel-lows you ev-er saw! says the boy. A-pick-
ing out the big-gest straw-ber-ries for each oth-er, and a-giv-ing up to
each oth-er, and a-sit-ting down to-geth-er on the door-step to hold the
cat, her head on Joe's knee, and her tail and hind paws on Jack's knee
- and yes-ter-day they took their dog to ride, in-stead of his draw-
ing the cart his-self. Lov-in'-est lit-tie fel-lows you ev-er saw! Di-clare,
I'd like some broth-ers like 'em my-self!"








WHAT HAPPENED TO THE BLACK HORSE.


U'


'A'


;


A'


What Happened to the Black Horse.


ABY BUN was taking his nap. He had been a very naughty boy that morning.
He would not mind his nurse when she called him to come into the house, and he
would not put away his new horse with which he had been playing. So while Baby
Bun was asleep the new horse stood out on the lawn. He was a big black horse, and his
name was Dobbin. As he stood there who should come along but Dono, the big puppy.
When Dono spied the horse, he thought he had found a playfellow. So he went up
to Dobbin and sniffed at him. Dobbin did not stir. Dono then put up a paw and hit
Dobbin, but the black horse never even turned his head. Then Dono thought this the
strangest animal he had ever seen. He began to play more roughly with it. He bit the
shiny harness, took Dobbin's head into his mouth, jumped on him, rolled him over and
over, pulled out his tail, and bit a great hole in his side.
Just then his master called, Dono! and Dono ran away.
After dinner Baby Bun went out to play again; but oh! what a pitiful-looking horse
he found! Poor Dobbin was so scratched and torn and bitten that he could never be
mended. Oh, how sorry Baby Bun was that he had not minded Nurse!
Dobbin was not fit to play with any more; but Nurse put him up in the toy closet,
and whenever Bun fretted about having to put his playthings away, she needed to point
just once to poor Dobbin.


'-~is~q~
1





































THE LOST MOUSE.







HI! DIDDLE, DIDDLE!


The Cat


Hi!

Diddle,

Diddle!

and the


The Cow jumped




4


Fiddle!


over the


The Little Dog laughed to see such sport,


And the Dish

-_ with

the


ran away


Spoon.


Moon.


..








































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BABY'S FIRST PRESENT.


. "








BLOWING BUBBLES.


Blowing 'Bubbles.
....... .


RIGHT and ready, little Eddy,
On a stool sits blowing bubbles;
Round his mouth his laughter runs,
Like the ripples over stones,-
For he is a merry fellow,
Very free from baby troubles.

Like a tattered rainbow, scattered
On a globe as thin as air is,
The bright colors glide and swim
Round the glowing bubble's rim,
Till it seems a wee world peopled
With gay troops of dancing fairies.

Hoity-toities how his bright eyes
Laugh to see it-" Tee it, muzzer !"
("See it, mother,"- the words trip
Sweet as kisses on his lip),
Then, at that world's sudden bursting,
... Laughs he, "I tan make anuzzer."

5_1 I Ever ready, darling Eddie
Blows again his broken bubbles,
Never wasting any tears
When a bright one disappears,
But as happy in their breaking
As the making, blows "anuzzer,"
And laughs down his baby troubles.
WHAT BABY DOES. GEORGE S. BURLEIGH.



































I-

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A BRAVE LITTLE


SOLDIER.


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moon broom.;
Where she was going I couldn't but ask it,
For in her hand she held a long broom.
Old woman, old woman, old woman," says
Where are 'you going, you're flying so high ?"
To sweep all the cobwebs out of
the sky,
And 111 be .back again
by-and-by."


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THE OLD WOMAN IN A BASKET.


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THE BAD LITTLE ANT- SIR DONKEY.



The Bad Little Ant.



'' RS. Solomon Ant/
Each day goes by,
Leading her son,
A tear in her eye.


For if sent to school. "-
He runs away -
This small, bad ant
: So full of play! -




^ Sir Donkey.
--- .........



/ [HIS is Sir Donkey;
S" He stands in the sun,
And his voice goes off
Like a sudden gun.

/ Then he waves his ears,
And closes his eyes,
'- ". '/ "/ And tries to imagine
The children's surprise.


















































THE INVITATION.


THE RECEPTION.


MONKEY VISITORS.
























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CHARLIE'S HOBBY.


Charlie's Hobby.




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OUR CHANTICLEER.


Our Chanticleer.
(-^=- ------'I \ --- -










THE CLERK OF THE WEATHER.


"ALL WEARY AND CROSS IN THE RAIN.'


The Clerk of the Weather.
* -^-~--- ^ ,.. V-


2 IH, please can you tell us
the way
>v To the Clerk of the
Weather? They say
He can stop all this rain, if he will,
And drive off the mists from the
hill,
And make the sky sunny and blue,
And let out the butterflies, too.
We're so tired of staying in-doors.
While all day it pours and pours.


Alas! but the journey was long,
And folk kept directing us wrong;
Our naughty shoes somehow would
stray
Wherever the worst puddles lay;
So here we are back once again,
All weary and cross in the rain;
For what little boys or girls, pray,
Could be good on such a wet day ?
We'll peep in the school-house-
oh, dear!


Why, the Clerk of the Weather's
been here,
And breathed on the glass, I declare,
And made it go up towards fair."
Come on-there's the' sun smiling
out,
And a butterfly sailing about:
Good Clerk of the Weather-he
knew,
All the time, without us,
what to do!


















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A DAY AT LINCOLN PARK.


A Day at Lincoln Park.
c'~^' k <~- -^.- > "'^l



NE bright day last June, Roy and his papa went to Lincoln Park to see
the many sights to be found there. Roy had long wanted to see the ani-
mals, and as soon as they reached the park, he went, first of all, to
the lion house.
Here were the lions, tigers, leopards, hyenas and monkeys. The crowds of people
were so great that there was little pleasure there, yet Roy spent some time in
watching the wild beasts pace to and fro in their iron cages.
The monkeys filled him with delight. There were eight of them in the cage,
and their pranks and antics made all the people laugh. A gentleman was stand-
ing near the cage, and, as he turned to speak to a friend, one of the monkeys
reached through the bars and slyly pulled the man's ear. This tickled Roy so
much that he gave the monkey some pop-corn.
Then they went to see the wolves, and Roy pointed to the largest one and
asked his papa if that was the kind of a wolf that tried to eat Little Red Riding-
hood. His papa thought that a wolf no larger than that could not eat even a little girl.
They saw the buffalos, the deer, the badgers, the wild-cats, the sea-lions, the prai-
rie dogs and the elephants, and then went to the bear-pit. A great many people had
gathered there to see the keeper feed the bears. As the keeper came up with the food
for the bears, they began to growl and strike one another. The keeper threw the stale
bread and raw meat into the pit, and Roy thought it great fun to see the bears eat.
Each one seemed to be afraid that he would not get his share, and they all ate very fast,
like boys at a picnic. After the bears had eaten their supper, they seemed to feel much
better and began to play. Two of them rolled and tumbled on the ground like pup-
pies, while others climbed the posts in the pit.
While Roy was leaning over the railing, watching the bears at play, his hat fell off
and went to the bottom of the pit. One of the bears quickly seized it, and taking
it in his large paws, hugged it until it was a shapeless mass. Roy felt badly to see
his new hat spoiled, but it could not be helped. He had to go home bare-headed:
but he told his papa that he had a very pleasant day at the park.


~












zzo r
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A VISIT


TO THE BEAR-PIT.


T & T-5


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THE TABLES TURNED.


y The Tables Turned.
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ON TO THE


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=~~C~iS=C~3--i--i----


BATTLE!











THE THREE CATS.











-' -


























TIheir little frolic minds intent on play ;

Grimalkin Gray, and Tag, and Tom-To-Tee,
Smart little cats were they I knew all three.


They had their faults: Grimalkin liked to brag;
The jokes and pranks were always planned by Tag,-







THE THREE CATS.


These two did all the mischief that was done,
And Tom-To-Tee looked on and saw the fun.


"I'll be the first cat up this mighty oak! "
Of course, it was Grimalkin Gray that spoke;
And scrambling up the tree they went, all three,-
Grimalkin Gray, then Tag, then Tom-To-Tee.


"You're always first," said Tag; no other cat
Can climb or jump like you; we all know that.
I even think that you could jump this brook!"
And Tag gave Tom-To-Tee a funny look.


"Of course, I can," Grimalkin said; look now!"
And springing off the lofty oak-tree bough,
He landed in the water, head-and-ears,
And naughty Tag and Tom gave him three cheers!
G. 0 j. t : '






THE MAGIC PEAR.



K '


I.-The Elephant.


Y little dears, this pear is a Magic Pear. There 13 an elephant
in it. Get a slate and draw it six times, and the elephant
R ii will come out. If he does not, let mamma or papa try.
Draw it once-there is the pear! Twice-a pear with a big flap-ear!
Three times--see !--the elephant's trunk! Four times -it is an elephant
-tusk, tail and two feet! Five times--eye, four feet and howdah-cloth!
Six times--elephant ready for a ride!








THE MAGIC PEAR.


II.-The Chicken.


SH, funny Magic Pear, any child can guess what you hold this time!

You look outside like a fat bird fast asleep. Is there not a downy
Sb^ little chicken inside? Let us see. Come out, chicken! Yes,
here is the head,-here a sign of a wing,-here a little leg! Here is a
hungry bill! Here is the comb, the eyes, here are wing feathers, two legs!
Eye opens! "now wing feathers all the toes Yes, here he is, tail feathers, down
and .all -a darling, cunning little chicken, so wide awake and so hungry!


~_








THE MAGIC PEAR.


Ill.-The Mouse.


HIS is the Magic Pear that has a mouse in it. Where is a slate? We
Swill have him out in a wink! First the pear! Twice here it
4 is again, with curlycues for ears, and quirks for nose and mouth!
Three times -two circles with tails to finish the ears, two odd, round
eyes mousie harks for the cat! Four times whiskers grow! Five
times mousie has paws! Six times here is the big mouse, long
tail and all!







THE MAGIC PEAR.


IV.-The Cat.


3 SLEEPY little animal sits in this Magic Pear. Rub the stem off,
draw the face-line, and you see a ball of fur, as a cat looks when
Asleep. Now draw a criss-cross for nose and mouth,-then the
breast-bone curve. Now carry the face line up into ears, the nose line up into
eyebrows, and make paw lines. Now for whiskers, eyes and claws! A curly-
cue and- whisk! comes kitty's tail. Yes, it is kitty, and as cross as can
be, because she has been roused from her nap.








THE MAGIC PEAR.


V.-The Dog.


|HERE is a nice hunting-dog, curled up, fast asleep, in this Magic Pear.
Now, come out, sir! We will call you just six times and no more.
Draw the pear, rub out the blossom-end and stem. Once draw the
starting line for forehead. Twice then draw the long hanging ears. Three
times finish the ears, draw eye circles and mouth line. Four times -in
come eye-balls and nostrils. Five times (he is waking up!) lip lines,
nose-shading and eyebrows. Six times- hello, doggie!






THE MAGIC PEAR.


VI.-The Owl.
...... J -- ....


.NSIDE this Magic Pear sits a big, wise bird, straight and stiff. You
Scan almost see his form as soon as you rub the stem off the pear.
Let us make some eye shapes, round and wide open, and some
claws. Now, some eye-ball shapes and some wings. Next, a beak and a
tail. Now for the eye-balls a few feathers, too. Then finish his
eyes, his crest, his feathers, and make him a perch. There! Tu-whit
tu-who tu-whit tu-who !







TELEPHONING.


*(f Telephoning.
.* -.,, ....


INNIE MIDGET, on the floor,
Puts the dumb-bell to her ear:
"Hallo, Central! don't you hear?
Give me Forty-Twenty-four!


"Mamma's house; halloo! halloo!
Mamma lives at Rocking Chair.
That you, mamma? Stay right there!
I've a message all for you."


~$O ~~










TELEPHONING.


Mamma answers, far away,
With a big spool at her ear:
"All right, baby! I can hear;
What would Midget like to say?"


" Mamma, are you truly, true,
Hearing every single thing,-
What I think, and say, and sing,-
As if I were close to you? "


"Yes, I hear,, my little one.
Every word's so plain and clear
I might almost think you here,
Speaking with no telephone !"


"Well, you please to tell the doctor
Dolly has the stomach-ache;
Wants some peppermints to take.
All the day I've sat and rocked her.


" And please, mamma, I love you !
All right, baby,'here is one
Doctor sends by telephone,
And a kiss for Midget, too."


"Thank you, mamma; now, I'll try
To get Seventy-One-Two-Nine,-
Aunty's house,- to talk with mine;
All through, mamma dear! Good-by."

































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NEW CRADLE.


K~ITTY'S






ONE, TWO--BUCKLE MY SHOE.


. One, Two-Buckle My Shoe.
~^~ ^^


Three, four,-
Shut the door.


Five, six,-
Pick up sticks.


Seven, eight,-
Lay them straight.


1a DB







ONE, TWO--BUCKLE MY SHOE.


Nine, ten,-
A great, fat hen.


Eleven, twelve,-
Let us delve.


Thirteen, fourteen,-
Maids are courting.


Fifteen, sixteen,-
At work
in the
kitchen.


IL9
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,,`~U~pa "~ 1








ONE, TWO BUCKLE MY SHOE.


Seventeen, eighteen,-

Maids are waiting.


Nineteen, twenty,-

The larder's empty.


I




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SHO~I~3J.


T & T-6








WHAT A BIG MAN AM I.


What a Big Man am I.
~-'- **^- -'5;,


T l11MY STILES lived on a farm, and went to the dis-
/ trict school. He was a bright boy, and always learned
his lessons well. But he liked best to hear the older
children recite. He was fond
of history. He liked to hear
S of wars and of the brave
deeds of soldiers.
1 One fine June day, Tom-
\,., r my thought he would play
soldier himself, and go to war. He
Sput on an old red vest which his
father wore in the brass band. His mother made
.'a. i: him a paper soldier-cap, with plumes. He had a
wooden gun, a tin sword and a small drum.
S- ^ There was no other boy there to play with him,
and so he "made believe" he was the whole army.
He was Captain Thomas, and Tommy the drum-
mer-boy, and Tom the soldier -and all three were the army. Then Captain Thomas
said, "Forward march!" and waved his sword. Tom shouldered his gun. Tommy
beat the drum,--but this was not easy, for Tom's gun and Captain Thomas's sword
were in the way. Then the army marched to the field behind the barn.
Up and down it filed,- back and forth,-now quick, now slow. Indeed, now
and then it hopped. Captain Thomas had to call out to Tom pretty often to keep
step. But there was no fault to find with Tommy. He drummed so hard that he
scared the hens and sheep. All went well only for one thing. Once Tom ran so
fast that he tumbled down, and bumped the army's nose against a stone. Then
Captain Thomas was angry, and scolded poor Tom well, I can tell you.









WHAT A BIG 1MAN AM I.


At last a grand charge was made! The army raced after Spot, the calf, and
thumped the drum, and shook the sword, and threw stones (this was firing the
gun). Poor Spot was put to flight. He ran up the hill with his heels and tail
flying wildly in the air.
Then the army marched
back to the garden fence,
and Captain Thomas made a
speech.
Soldiers, said he, "we
have whipped the whole
world, and it has run
away. I did it with my
sword. Now I must be
the king! "
Just then, Trix, the
gray goose, stretched her neck
through the fence, and bit
Tommy on the leg. The
captain, the drummer and the whole army raised a loud yell, while Trix hissed
fiercely. Then down went the drum, and the gun, and the sword. The army
limped off as fast as it could to the kitchen. Had you seen Captain Thomas,
soon after, sobbing on his mother's lap, you would not have dreamed he was the
little man who had just whipped the whole world."

NOTIcE.- Do not boast of what you have not done. Some old gray goose
may hear you. KHAM.
KHAM.


CLEAR THE TRACK


















































































DOG'S HOTEL.


~







A HOTEL FOR DOGS.


A Hotel for Dogs.



9 VERY kind lady went from Boston to live in a little town in
Nebraska. It is very cold there in winter. The lady felt very
sorry for all the cats and dogs that had to sleep out of doors.
When she saw a stray one about her yard at night, she would call it
in, and give it a nice, warm bed behind the kitchen stove. On some
cold nights she would have half-a-dozen lying asleep. So her lodging-
house came to be very well known and barked about.
One bitter cold night, while they were having a blizzard, the lady
and her son Louis sat by their cheery parlor fire. All at once they heard
a loud scratching at the door. Louis opened it, and there stood "Rowdy,"
a dog which had lodged there before. With him were two dog friends, whom
he tried to introduce. He said, as well as he could, Please give my friends
shelter. It is a bitter night, and they have no place to sleep."
Rowdy did not try to come in, but looked first at the dogs and then at
Louis in a pitiful way. The boy asked his mother what he should do. The
lady came to the door, and, looking at the dogs, said to Rowdy:
"No, Rowdy; your friends have warm, shaggy coats on, and our beds
are about full. They must go to some other hotel. But your hair is very
short and thin, and you are very cold. You may come in and go to bed."
Rowdy turned around, and seemed to explain to his friends how it all
was. They quietly walked off the piazza, while Rowdy came in and went
to bed, where he lay tucked up in birlaps till morning.









BABY BO-PEEP AND LITTLE JACK HORNER.


Baby 1Bo-Peep


and Little Jack Horner.


----:--- -








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HOW TOMMY TENDED THE BABY.



How Tommy Tended the Baby.
s ------------=^ -^----
~....,


OM71-1 TEALE was just six years
7 -_ ., (c' ,i: 1o. It was his birthday; but instead


a grand event, he had to
Stake care of the baby. His
mother went out to do some
errands, and left him alone
with his little sister. Tommy felt very bad about it. Little Nellie cried a good
deal. Tommy did not know what to do with her. He loved her very much, but
did not like to take care of her when she was very cross.
As he stood at the window, Ned Brown came out to play on the sidewalk.
Come out, Tommy," he shouted.
"I can't," Tommy shouted back; "I've got to tend the baby."
Shut the door tight, and she can't get out," Ned said.
Tommy thought it over. He knew more about babies than Ned Brown did.
Nellie might burn herself on the stove, or' pull the cover off the table, or break
the lamp. An idea came into Tommy's head. He ran to the closet for the tacks
and hammer. He drove four tacks through her dress, and fastened her down to the
floor. When this was done, he ran out of doors as fast as his legs would carry him.
In about an hour, Tommy's mother came home. He had not shut the door
tight, because he was in such a hurry. Right on the top step she found the baby.
But her little fat neck and arms were bare. She had no dress on. Her mother
carried her into the sitting-room. There was the dress nailed to the floor. The baby
had torn it all off trying to get away, and it had to go into the rag-bag.
Tommy came in a few minutes after. He was very much surprised to hear
what his mother told him.
"I never did see such a baby!" he said. "I -
thought you only wanted me to keep her out of ..'
mischief, and I guessed the nails
would do it sure." _- I.. -
CAROLINE B. LE Row.







NEP AND THE BABY.


N /Nep and the Baby.








dog. He is half Saint

Bernard, and is eight

years old. Some one -

gave him to the doctor a few months ago, and he soon made himself

at home.

The butcher comes three times a week with meat, and Nep found

out about this in a very few days. When meat day comes, he trots down

to the corner of the road and waits for the butcher. Other days he

stays at home.

He is very fond of the doctor's baby, who is two years old. He

takes care of him almost as well as a nurse.

One day Mrs. Lane was roasting oysters in the kitchen. The baby

was playing about the floor, and Nep was looking on. Just for sport,

Mrs. Lane snapped the tongs at the baby. Nep sprang up at once with

a deep growl, and showed all his teeth to Mrs. Lane. He seemed to say,

"You shall not harm this baby, if he is yours!"

The baby's mamma feels sure now that the baby is safe when he is

in Nep's care.








NEP AND THE BABY.


But the strangest thing is, that Nep is fond of picture-books!

He will stand up, with his fore feet upon the table, and paw

open the leaves of "Mother Goose," or some other little book. When

he finds the picture of a dog, he will wag his tail and say "Bow-wow!"

Sometimes he pulls the book upon the floor. Then he lies down

and turns over the ,leaves, and he and the baby look at the pictures

together. It would make you laugh to see them.
KHAM.
















































HOLD ON TIGHT!








BABY BUN AS DRIVER.


Baby Bun as Driver.


ARNEY was a fat, strong little donkey. The
| children had a small, gay cart which he could .
draw; so they had great fun driving about.
But Baby's mamma always said "No" when
Baby wished to go with the children; perhaps telling
him that Jane, the nurse, would take him some time. /
To go with Jane, however, was not what Baby Bun wanted.
At last, Baby thought he would invite some other
grown-up person to go with him. His mamma was not
well, and never went to drive. So he first asked his
dear old grandmamma. But she said, I am too old."
Then he asked his Aunt Helen. But she said, "I am
too busy." Then he asked his Aunt Sue. But she said.
"Oh, I should be afraid!"
That was the worst of all, Baby Bun thought. He
was four years old, and, of course, he could take care of her.
One day, soon after this, his mamma had a visitor, a lady who showed that she
knew Baby was a big boy, even if he did wear dresses. So Baby walked up to
her and said, I should like to take you to drive on the Barney cart!" Miss Dare
was delighted, and she said she would go as soon as he and Barney were ready.
When they got into the cart Miss Dare said, "Where are we going? "
"Well," said Baby Bun grandly, "we'll go all over the farm, and out on the
main road, and everywhere."
"That will be fine," said Miss Dare.
The donkey started. "That road leads to the stable," said Baby Bun; "but we
will go the other way." But when they came to the two roads, Barney chose to
go to the stable, and though Baby pulled and scolded, to the stable they went.
"Never mind," said Miss Dare. "I shall like to visit the stable, and we can
go to the farm another time. How nicely you drive, Baby Bun!"
After seeing the horses and driving back to the house, Miss Dare thanked Baby
and told mamma and grandmamma and the aunties that she had had a delightful
drive. And you may be sure Baby Bun was a proud and happy little boy.









TWO LITTLE MILKMAIDS.




c Two Little Milkmaids.
_t _


WO little milkmaids, merry and gay;
L Two little dogs running out to play;
Down through the fields they took their way,
In the sparkling grass of the early day.

Two little milkmaids and two little pails;
Two little dogs wagging two little tails;
Sun-bonnets fluttered like pretty white sails;
They danced over pathways, and climbed
over rails. .-

Two little maids, and *?
the cows were but
two.
The maids tramped -
along in the grass '4
and the dew..
The cows did their ,,
best to call out
"DOWN THROUGH THE FIELD
'' Bulaboo!"
Which, perhaps, in their language is How
do you do? "

Never were milkmaids sweeter than those :
Their gowns were all gathered, the pink of
the rose;
Their cheeks were like cherries; they turned
out their toes;
And their sashes were tied in most beautiful
bows.


,D


Two little milkmaids-plenty to say;
Two little friends with one birthday.
Work this morning-afterwards play !
The money for milk shall be theirs to-day.

Peggs said to Pattie, and Pattie to Peggs,
"We shall buy a fat chicken, and sell all
its eggs;

For eggs at the Castle her Ladyship


J`J
IVAI


begs,-
And soon we can buy
something nice on
four legs.

We could get in the
market a very thin


sheep,

,' And gather fresh clo-
ver all day for its
S THEY TOOK THEIR WAY."
keep,

And sell it off fat, and go on with a leap,
To buy a young calf-second-hand, you know,
cheap.

The calf would grow into a very big
cow,
Profits on profits the milk will allow-
A neat little farm, a man and a plow ;-
Our fortune is made, do you see, Pattie,
now ?"











TWO LITTLE MILKMAAIDS.


"Our fortune is made!"-"Oh
yes !" and "Oh, yes! "
"Satin and silk shall be every-day ..
dress;
We shall ride upon donkeys, like
any princess,
And have twenty dozen of dolls-
no less! "

They stopped and laughed in each .*"
other's eyes.
Oh! but the village would get a
surprise !
Pattie and Peggy felt ever so wise,
And their castles in air ran up to the skies.

They pitied the children that sat in school
They called the cows from the reedy pool,
And each sat down on her milking-stool,
And milked the cows in the morning cool

Two little maids sang a milking tune :
" Pattie and Peg will have money soon-


',: F i.


> '* i .*',


"A BOY WITH HIS HANDS BEHIND HIS BACK."


C. "
..I& AL
-v


"AND MILKED THE COWS IN THE MORNING COOL."


Ladies in silk, with a silver spoon,
Donkeys and dolls and a toy balloon!"

A boy drew near in a smock-frock sack-
A boy with his hands behind his back;
For wasting time he had a knack,
And so his name was Idle Jack.

Pattie and Jack went frisking about-
Pattie and Jack with a laugh and a shout.
One little milkmaid alone
left out,-
Poor little Peggy began to

I' ... pout.


Pattie playing with Idle Jack
Climbed to ride on the old
cow's back.

Peggy went sulking around
the haystack-
No one to play with-alas
and alack !













TWO LITTLE MILKMAIDS.


"HE DRANK THE MILK TILL IT MADE HIM COUGH."


Two little pails unguarded stood,

Milking pails of the whitest wood.
Two little dogs said, "We would if we
could !"
Their tongues were thirsty, it looked so good.


The farmyard dogs, with bark and scoff,
Said "Who's afraid ? and "Come show
off! "
The pug said, "I car climb a trough!"
And he drank the milk till it made him

cough.


Pail number one upset--moreover,
'Twas done by the milkmaids' terrier
Rover,
And the milkmaids' pug went rolling
over
Out of the milk and into the clover.


Pail number two stood full and white,
Till six little dogs began to fight.
Splash went the second pail. Oh! what a

sight -
Six little dogs in a terrible plight!


Four little dogs went
scrambling up,
Greedy to plunge in

so sweet a cup,
Growling, "Get out!"
and "'Let me get
a sup "
And "'Mind you don't
tumble, my dar-
ling pup !


. '

" OU L O EN S B. .


.,,, I1.( ".


O ;UR L .T T L O W'E "C'AM I G iP


" FOUR LITTLE DOGS WENT SCRAMBLING TiP."


Far away from the
dairy gate,
Two little milk-
maids mourned
their fate.

Peggy took care
of her pail too
late.

Toby and Rover sat
down to wait.


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TWO LITTLE MILKMAIDS.


Impudent Rover got into the pail.
On the stool sat the pug with the curly
tail;
In the middle stood Peggy to weep and
wail-
Not a penn'orth of milk had the maids for
sale.

No milk, no money, no silk, no sheep,
No dozen of dolls, no donkey to keep:
Slowly home they had to creep,
Bending the bonnets down to weep.


First came Peggy, to point the track,
Dogs came next, white, brown and black;
Pattie was sobbing along at the back,
With the pails, and the stools, and Idle
Jack.


' IN THE MIDDLE STOOD PEGGY, TO WEEP AND WAIL.-



Cheer up, little maidens ; -cheer up say I.
After spilt milk it's no use to cry.
The castles in air fell down from the sky;
But we all shall have honey for tea by
and by.


"SLOWLY HOME THEY HAD TO CREEP."


rk- ,


**-;*.- ; ,- >-i; -.
* .. -. -" -- *- ' *


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GOOD-NIGHT!


I J jl




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