• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Round the hearth
 A rabbits' school
 The cuckoo
 Say please, Daisy
 Our secret
 Tale of a pony
 The frog's school
 What robin told
 The speckled hen
 Ambition
 Hear the birdies
 Tessa
 "Put down one and carry one"
 In the hay
 Forget-me-not
 In the orchard
 Naughty Dolly
 The sweetest thing
 Garden party
 My pussy
 Taddy pole
 The bees
 Who are you ?
 At the seaside
 My shadow
 Pinkety-winkety-wee
 Deary me
 Whose ?
 Suppose
 By the sea
 The swing
 Invitations
 How we saw Santa Claus
 Back Cover






Title: Round the hearth
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00081085/00001
 Material Information
Title: Round the hearth
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : col. ill. ; 25 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Bennett, Harriett M
Mack, Robert Ellice ( Editor , Author )
Nister, Ernest ( Printer )
Weatherly, Frederic Edward, 1848-1929 ( Author )
Wood, Helen J ( Author )
Haskell, Lottie ( Author )
Nesbit, E ( Edith ), 1858-1924 ( Author )
E.P. Dutton (Firm) ( Publisher )
Publisher: E.P. Dutton & Co.
Place of Publication: New York
Manufacturer: E. Nister
Publication Date: [1891?]
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Pets -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1891   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1891
Genre: Children's poetry
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
Germany -- Nuremberg
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Harriett M. Bennett ; edited and arranged by Robert Ellice Mack.
General Note: Date of publication from inscription.
General Note: Verses by Fred. E. Weatherly, Helen J. Wood, Robert Ellice Mack, Lottie Haskell, and E. Nesbit.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00081085
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002224610
notis - ALG4876
oclc - 191092016

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Cover 3
    Half Title
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
    Table of Contents
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6-7
    Round the hearth
        Page 8
        Page 9
    A rabbits' school
        Page 10
    The cuckoo
        Page 11
    Say please, Daisy
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Our secret
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Tale of a pony
        Page 16
    The frog's school
        Page 16
        Page 17
    What robin told
        Page 18
    The speckled hen
        Page 19
    Ambition
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Hear the birdies
        Page 21
    Tessa
        Page 21
        Page 22
    "Put down one and carry one"
        Page 23
        Page 24
    In the hay
        Page 25
    Forget-me-not
        Page 26
    In the orchard
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Naughty Dolly
        Page 28
        Page 29
    The sweetest thing
        Page 30
        Page 31
    Garden party
        Page 32
        Page 33
    My pussy
        Page 34
        Page 35
    Taddy pole
        Page 36
    The bees
        Page 36
    Who are you ?
        Page 36
        Page 37
    At the seaside
        Page 38
        Page 39
    My shadow
        Page 40
    Pinkety-winkety-wee
        Page 41
        Page 42
    Deary me
        Page 43
    Whose ?
        Page 43
        Page 44
    Suppose
        Page 45
    By the sea
        Page 45
    The swing
        Page 46
        Page 47
    Invitations
        Page 48
        Page 49
    How we saw Santa Claus
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text

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EAKTtH


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AC


rI,",cd. .:.-herly, Heleix J.Vood,
I'el-l,'r- Ellice MackI
4 -Ilhe Haskell and
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A'R.',,i, .,,. Hearth, page 8 & 9.


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Say Please, Dais,, :.., -. .'

April, fage 12. Tale

Our Secret, page 14. .j The




The Speckled len, page Ip.

Ambition, page i9.

Hear the Birdies, page 21.

Tessa, page 21. -

"Put Down One and Carry On


of a Pony, page r6.

Frog's School, page

it Robin Told, page j


," pa 23.
e," page 23.


A Rabbits' School. page io.

The Cuckoo, page ii.





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In the Hay, page 25.

Forget-me-not, page 26.

SIn the Orchard, page 26.


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Naughly Dolly, "
piage 28. -

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The Sweetest Thing, 30 & 31.

Garden Party, page 33.

i My Pussy, page 35.


Taddy Pole, page 36.

Buzz! page 36.


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Who are You? fage 36. .

At the Seaside, page 38.

My Shadow, page 40.

Pinkety- Winkety- Wee, page 41.

Deary Me, page 43.

Whose ? fage 43. /eJ


S', .". 1' e, page 45.

...D':wn By The Sea, page 45.
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Invitations, fage 48.

How We Saw Santa Claus,

fage 50 & 52.


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1r OUJ\, D THE HE& T7TJH.

SUR lives are always happy,
All day long and every day,
There's always something nice to do,
Or something nice to say:
But the nicest things in all the day
Are always done and said
When we sit around the hearth at night,
Before we go to bed.






























When we are sitting on the hearth
And all of us are good,
We see all sorts of pictures then
Among the blazing wood;
We tell our nicest stories then,
It's then that pussy purrs,
She knows our language, I believe,
I wish that we knew hers!

I think one reason why we like
To sit all quiet there,
Is that there's always by the health
Dear grandpa's empty chair.
For ever since he went away-
To Heaven, mother said,
We think about him every night
Before we go to bed.

Yes, the nicest things in all the day
Are always done and said
When we sit around the hearth at night,
Before we go to bed.


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R PBIT SCHOOL.


SIREE small bunnies
went to school
In a most.
convenient hole,
Where a rabbit, wise and stern,
Taught them neathh a shady fern.
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Tauht them how to smooth the,:r ri.rs,
Howv. to brush and comb their ears,
H v.- to: turn their tails upright,
H,%w to bI irr~ow in the night.

Nt.t I-ne r:,bbit stayed away,
Never Ilut thLci books to play,
HoppI:d :traight lone when school was done,
Never lilt their tasks undone.












Learned, in a high degree,
As each rabbit ought to be,
Now, they sit in other holes,
Teaching other little schools.










































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Little you ween
What April days m
Ask your dear mot
My little Christine.
She has April show
Many long lonely i
But you are her su
My little Christine.


OME, Daisy dear, say, "if you please";
Come, ask me nicely, do?
":S;i You ought to be polite to folks,
When they're polite to you.

STan into our meadow, dear,
;;ectly school was done,
nd picked these pretty flowers for you;
Yes, Daisy, everyone !

You can't say "please," poor darling 1
Well, never mind, don't try;
i7, Here take the pretty buttercups,
( And thank me by and by.


,dPRIL.
T. T'HERE have you been,
)/ Little Christine?
Picking a posy
In meadows green ?
Run away home,
Don't stay and roam,
Mother is waiting, little Christine!

Quick ere the rain
ean, Wet you again,
her, Quick o'er the bridge
And up thro' the lane.
rers, Mother will fret
hours, If you get wet,
nshine, Run along, run along,
Up thro' the lane 1


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OUt SeCTer.


W'E'VE a secret or two,
But we'll tell it to you-
You must never tell it again.
We found it to-day,
When we went to play
In the little wood by the lane.

They cheeped and cried
When we looked inside,
And each opened a gaping beak;
And we'd lots to say,
If we'd known the way
That little bird-babies speak.

We offered them bread,
But each shook its head-
They knew that the food was wrong;
But they weren't afraid,
Although we stayed
And talked to them ever so long. -


When the mother bird comes,
She won't give them crumbs,
But an ant, or beetle, or fly.
They're sad all alone;
When our mother is gone,
We are lonely-and sometimes cry

Till they fly away,
We'll go every day
And peep at the mossy nest;
And I'm sure they
won't mind,
And we'll always be kind
To your babies, dear Specklebreast.


It's a beautiful nest:
Mother Specklebreast
Has five little birdies inside;
Such baby things,
With tiny wings
And yellow beaks, open wide I


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TILES OF I TOC Y.

IHA VE a little pony,
His name is Grenadier;
I got him on my birthday-
SI 'm six years old this year.
/ I do not think my pony
S "' Is quite as old as I;
SBut then he is much longer,
And he is just as high.

S .i '.. I give my pony apples,
'" He likes them more than hay;
I give him lumps of sugar,
--, And biscuits every day.
SI like to feed and pet him,
He loves me so, you see;
-And if I were the pony
He'd do as much for me.


THE8 FkOg'S SCHOOL.

HE sun was shining softly,
The day was calm and cool,
When forty-five frog-scholars met
Down by a shady pool-
Poor little frogs, like little folk,
Are always sent to school.

Their lessons seemed the strangest things-
They learnt that grapes were sour;
They learnt that four-and-twenty days
Exactly made an hour;
That bricks were made of houses,
And corn was made of flour.

As soon as school was over,
The master said, "No noise!
Now go and play at leap-frog"
(The game a frog enjoys),
"And mind that you behave yourselves,
And don't throw stones at boys!"










TILES OF I TOC Y.

IHA VE a little pony,
His name is Grenadier;
I got him on my birthday-
SI 'm six years old this year.
/ I do not think my pony
S "' Is quite as old as I;
SBut then he is much longer,
And he is just as high.

S .i '.. I give my pony apples,
'" He likes them more than hay;
I give him lumps of sugar,
--, And biscuits every day.
SI like to feed and pet him,
He loves me so, you see;
-And if I were the pony
He'd do as much for me.


THE8 FkOg'S SCHOOL.

HE sun was shining softly,
The day was calm and cool,
When forty-five frog-scholars met
Down by a shady pool-
Poor little frogs, like little folk,
Are always sent to school.

Their lessons seemed the strangest things-
They learnt that grapes were sour;
They learnt that four-and-twenty days
Exactly made an hour;
That bricks were made of houses,
And corn was made of flour.

As soon as school was over,
The master said, "No noise!
Now go and play at leap-frog"
(The game a frog enjoys),
"And mind that you behave yourselves,
And don't throw stones at boys!"






































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,. _.^ HWHNT ROI C, TOLD.


H 'OW do the robins build their nest?
Robin Redbreast told me.
3 First a wisp of amber hay
In a pretty round they lay,
Then some shreds of downy floss,
Feathers, too, and bits of moss,
Woven with a sweet, sweet song,
This way, that way, and across;
That's what Robin told me.


Where do the robins hide their nests ?
Robin Redbreast told me.
Up among the leaves so deep,
Where the sunbeams rarely creep;
Long before the leaves are gold,
Bright-eyed stars will peep, and see
Baby robins, one, two, three;
That's what Robin told me.
Geo. Cooper.










TH& STSCKLLE5DY HE8C.


S PECKLEDY hen speckledy hen 1
k What do you do in my garden pen ?
Mother will scold you, you know she will,
And father will beat you for doing ill;
And I'd like to know what you '11 do then,
You dear little, naughty speckledy hen ?


a~/M BITIOl3(.

/ ELL," said the duckling, "well,"
y As he looked at his broken shell,
If this is the world I've dreamt about,
It's a very great pity I ever came out."

My dear," said the duck, "my dear,
Don't imagine the world is here;
The world is a pond, it lies out there-
You shall soon see life, so don't despair."

But the duckling's spirit soared beyond
/- The reeds and weeds of that muddy pond,
And it certainly is most atrocious luck
To be born with a soul if you're only a duck.










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TH& STSCKLLE5DY HE8C.


S PECKLEDY hen speckledy hen 1
k What do you do in my garden pen ?
Mother will scold you, you know she will,
And father will beat you for doing ill;
And I'd like to know what you '11 do then,
You dear little, naughty speckledy hen ?


a~/M BITIOl3(.

/ ELL," said the duckling, "well,"
y As he looked at his broken shell,
If this is the world I've dreamt about,
It's a very great pity I ever came out."

My dear," said the duck, "my dear,
Don't imagine the world is here;
The world is a pond, it lies out there-
You shall soon see life, so don't despair."

But the duckling's spirit soared beyond
/- The reeds and weeds of that muddy pond,
And it certainly is most atrocious luck
To be born with a soul if you're only a duck.










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Hf EAR the birdies singing-
What is it they say ?
"Little happy children
In the country gay,
Think of the poor little children
Who cannot join your play."

See the flow'rets decking
Meadow, lane, and bower !
S. Pluck them, they were meant for you,
Blowing hour by hour;
But think of the poor little children
Who ne'er have.seen a flower.

Birds and flowers and meadows
- God has given to you,
"And surely something in return
You will try to do;
Try to make others happier,
Who are not blest like you.


TSSSJ.

0 F what do you sing, little Tessa,
Little maid with the laughing black eyes ?
"Of a gay golden strand, in a fair, sunny land,
Of mountains and bonnie blue skies;
"-) Tra la la, tra la la,
Ting-a-ting, ting-a-ting;
Of my dear native land do I merrily sing."
,













Hf EAR the birdies singing-
What is it they say ?
"Little happy children
In the country gay,
Think of the poor little children
Who cannot join your play."

See the flow'rets decking
Meadow, lane, and bower !
S. Pluck them, they were meant for you,
Blowing hour by hour;
But think of the poor little children
Who ne'er have.seen a flower.

Birds and flowers and meadows
- God has given to you,
"And surely something in return
You will try to do;
Try to make others happier,
Who are not blest like you.


TSSSJ.

0 F what do you sing, little Tessa,
Little maid with the laughing black eyes ?
"Of a gay golden strand, in a fair, sunny land,
Of mountains and bonnie blue skies;
"-) Tra la la, tra la la,
Ting-a-ting, ting-a-ting;
Of my dear native land do I merrily sing."
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TUT 'DOW'A ON 8
,fJD Ca4kJo 0 e(."

W HEN I do my sums in school,
I remember but one rule,
When eleven's to be done,
"Put down one and carry one."

'/i i | p That sounds very queer to me,
I ii I don't care for sums, you see;
l,". 1It's not my idea of fun,
S i "Put down one and carry one."

I,'. I brought home, the other day,
Two dear puppies, black and grey,
From my uncle Robert's farm,
Carrying one dog in each arm.

When I reached the stream, I thought,
"Oh, what heavy dogs I've brought;
I can never cross, I see,
They are quite too much for me I"

And I dared not let one go-
,It might run away, you know-
The one set down away will run
If you only carry one.

So I took them both across;
We were all so tired and cross.
Perhaps I should have better done
To put down one and carry one.

But I did not know, I own,
Which to carry, which set down,
So I carried both with pains;
I took two-and nought remains.























































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IKN THE HAtY.


O VER the
Over
There's
Been


hills, farmer,
the hills away;
someone out in your hay, farmer,
there since break of day.


'Tis not the hare or rabbits, farmer;
'Tis not the birds so gay ;
But there's someone out in your hay, farmer,
Been there since break of day.

'Tis only three little folk, farmer,
Tony, and Dot, and May,
Picking the flowers in your hay, farmer,
In your hay since break of day.

Don't drive them away, farmer,
Those little birdies three;
They'll make the hay more sweet, farmer,
More sweet for you and me.





















^ .FO. R, T-6Me-PCo T.

JHJIEN to the flowers so beautiful
V The Father gave a name,
Back came a little blue-eyed one
(All timidly it came),
And standing at its Father's feet,
And gazing in His face,
It said, in low and trembling tones-
"Dear God, the name thou gavest me,
Alas I have forgot."
Kindly the Father looked him down
And said, Forget-me-not."



I2 THE OPRCHALRD.

IF passing through the orchard,
Folks always shake the trees,
And pick the rosy apples
As often as they please;

Just answer me these questions,
You many little hearts:
"What shall we do for cider?
What shall we do for tarts ?"





















^ .FO. R, T-6Me-PCo T.

JHJIEN to the flowers so beautiful
V The Father gave a name,
Back came a little blue-eyed one
(All timidly it came),
And standing at its Father's feet,
And gazing in His face,
It said, in low and trembling tones-
"Dear God, the name thou gavest me,
Alas I have forgot."
Kindly the Father looked him down
And said, Forget-me-not."



I2 THE OPRCHALRD.

IF passing through the orchard,
Folks always shake the trees,
And pick the rosy apples
As often as they please;

Just answer me these questions,
You many little hearts:
"What shall we do for cider?
What shall we do for tarts ?"












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3\CdUQHTY DOLLY.


1T OW Dolly, see what you have done I
V You've spoilt my letter quite.
Mother would only give me one
Large sheet on which to write;
"L. She thought I ought to make it do,
., And now it's blotted both sides through.

You had my woolly dog, and such
A lot of books about
To look at: and I said, "Don't touch,"
Just now when I went out
To ask mamma the right address-
And now it's in a dreadful mess.

I thought I'd put it out of reach.
HI-ow did you get up here ?
I've tried so very hard to teach
You to be good, my dear,
And yet you always disobey
Whenever I'm out of the way.

You do not seem to care a bit
For spoiling my nice letter;
And I was really proud of it,
Because the writing's better.
Get down, and go away from me,
I'm angry-as I ought to be.


It's no use crying, like a goose- .
You know I ought to scold;
Mother scolds me if I don't choose
To do as I am told. .
I am your mother, I scold, too, ,'
And hope it may be good for you.














































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THE STVW TEST THILN(Q.


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B ENEATH a small window
A dear little bird
Kept singing this song
(And I heard every word)
"Oh sweet are the berries,
The red and the white,
. And sweet are the crumbs
That you gave me last night;
And sweet to the squirrels
Are nuts in the wood !
But there's nothing so sweet
As a child that is good !


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"Oh! sweet was the scng that my wife sang to me,
When we built our small nest in the old apple-tree;
'Twas made but of mud, yet with love it was built,
And love keeps us warm, with some leaves for a quilt;
But sweet is the dear little girl that is good,
Who gives to the robins each morning their food.


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" Oh, jam is much sweeter !" said dear little Nell,
"And there's treacle, and honey, and jelly as well.
Here's a big piece of bread and some crumbs for your tea:
Don't you think these are sweeter than Maggie or me ?"
But Robin made answer, as loud as he could,
"There's NOTHING so sweet as a girl that is good !"










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I LIKE to be friends with everyone, but I don't like people to
be rough;.
And I think when' Kitty walked over my copy-book, and made it all
smeary, it was bad enough;
And I scolded her, and kissed her, and said I'd forgive and forget.
But I did not ask her to tea to-day, because we're six without her,. and
there are only six teacups in my set.
We had tea on the lawn. I had all the dolls, and I'd set them all nicely up,
And I'd got the little teapot that really pours out, and saucers .(for all
but one cup);
And.I'd got some real milk and real sugar, and real tea from .the teapot
the servants use.
It was cold, but I don't see that that matters: people may drink cold tea
if they choose.
Araminta sat next to me: she is the newest, but I'm fonder of Jane
(She's the one without arms; they came off the first day I had her, and
Rover worried them so they weren't fit to be put on again),
And the others were sitting opposite; I'd just poured a cup out for each,
When that wicked Kitty came tumbling in, and turned over everything
she could reach.
Susan, and the fair Persian, and Desdemona, she upset them everyone,
And drank out of the milk-jug-which isn't manners, even in fun.
And I couldn't do anything because.I had the teapot to hold, and so all
the cups were upset;.
K And that's why I think a cat's a greater responsibility than any other
\ doll.I 've had yet.
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SNurse says I'm a great responsibility, and I'm sure from the way she says
it I couldn't be anything worse;
But if I'm as dreadful a one as Kitty, all I can say is-I'm sorry for Nurse.












































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I5uY PUSSY.

I T'S my birthday, it's my birthday, and I'm four, I'm four!
I never had a pussy of my own before;
I never had a pussy to cuddle and to hold,
Oh, it's grand to have a pussy, and be four years old

I fetched her from my granny's, in the lane, the lane;
She 's never going back (except to tea) again!
I shall let her go to tea sometimes, when I go too,
And can see that she behaves as little cats should do.

I borrowed gran's umbrella to keep off the sun,
For my pussy's such a baby-such a little one!
But I couldn't keep it up because the wind blew so,
And I do not think my pussy minds the sun, you know

I have wrapped her in my shawl, and I don't think she's cold,
But I wish she would not kick, she is so hard to hold;
I'm afraid to let her run for fear she'd run away;
And I couldn't lose my pussy on the first, first day !

Oh, my pussy, do be quiet! You're so soft and nice,
I love you more than dolly, or than Dick's white mice.





.. .
,.. -~.f-2 > -






Be quiet, there's a darling! If you' re good, you'll see
You shall have some jam, and oranges, and cake for tea!















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*- ~ *


ITA"DDY ROLE.

T ADDY Pole and Polly Wogg
Lived together in a bog;
Here you see the very pool
Where they went to swimming school.


THE BeES.


H UMBLE Bee and humble Buzz!
Such a fuss as never wuz
To tell the world what some folk does.


WHO fP\R YOU?

<" 7T'r ^HO are you, dear, under there?"
)' Little maiden, can't you see?
- ;. I am you, and you are me:
- Don't you know your rosy cheeks and golden hair ?

No, no, no, that can't be right:
Though your eyes, like mine, are blue,
You're not me, and I 'm not you,
But I'm mother's little Bessie
day and night.















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^ "

*- ~ *


ITA"DDY ROLE.

T ADDY Pole and Polly Wogg
Lived together in a bog;
Here you see the very pool
Where they went to swimming school.


THE BeES.


H UMBLE Bee and humble Buzz!
Such a fuss as never wuz
To tell the world what some folk does.


WHO fP\R YOU?

<" 7T'r ^HO are you, dear, under there?"
)' Little maiden, can't you see?
- ;. I am you, and you are me:
- Don't you know your rosy cheeks and golden hair ?

No, no, no, that can't be right:
Though your eyes, like mine, are blue,
You're not me, and I 'm not you,
But I'm mother's little Bessie
day and night.















O, _;v I'

I '
i'




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-\ .1 1 \
.2 : -f .. .



^ "

*- ~ *


ITA"DDY ROLE.

T ADDY Pole and Polly Wogg
Lived together in a bog;
Here you see the very pool
Where they went to swimming school.


THE BeES.


H UMBLE Bee and humble Buzz!
Such a fuss as never wuz
To tell the world what some folk does.


WHO fP\R YOU?

<" 7T'r ^HO are you, dear, under there?"
)' Little maiden, can't you see?
- ;. I am you, and you are me:
- Don't you know your rosy cheeks and golden hair ?

No, no, no, that can't be right:
Though your eyes, like mine, are blue,
You're not me, and I 'm not you,
But I'm mother's little Bessie
day and night.













/1


F.


1 1 I I


'










AT THE SeASID6e.


Cr'HE jolliest time in all the year
Is when we go down to the sea,
And playing all day on the sands is fun,
For Tommy and Dolly and me;
There are such beautiful things to do
And beautiful things to see.

You can build a castle of sand and stones,
With a bridge and a tower and a moat;
You can dig deep rivers, and ponds and lakes,
Where your biggest ship will float;
Or you can make sailors of little dolls
To sail in your penny boat.


Or you can make gardens with winding v1.Ls,
And an oyster-shelly wall,
And plant the sea-weed in it for flowers,
The kind that is pretty and small;
And the great wide ribbons of sea-weed do
To hang at home in the hall.


SAnd then, there are caves
and inside them
What wonderful things might be 1
One's half afraid to go in and peep,
And one day we stole in to see:
There was nothing there
but a horrid crab
That frightened Dolly and me.

Tom was more brave,
but he's five years old,
Andr you must be brave at five,
And not be afraid of the
dark or waves,
Or crabs-if they are alive;
A ndl never cry in the
bathing machine,
But screw up your eyes and dive.


We love the seaside: the sand is so soft,
And the sea is so bright and blue;
And there are such hundreds of things to see,
Such dozens of things to do;
And we wish all the poor little children in town
Could come here and be happy, too.


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/M~J \IY SHI)DOW.

/ 7 HA VE a little shadow that
S Igoes in and out with me,
And what can be the use of him
is more than I can'see.
He is very, very like me from the
heels up to the head;
And I see him jump before me,
when I jump into my bed.

The funniest thing about him is the way he likes to grow,
ot at all like proper children, which is always very slow;
For he sometimes shoots up taller like an india-rubber ball,
And he sometimes gets so little that there 's none of him at all.

He hasn't got a notion of how children ought to play,
And can only make a fool of me in every sort of way.
He stays so close beside me, he's a coward you can see;
I'd think shame to stick to nursie as that shadow sticks to me !

One morning, very early, before the sun was up,
I rose and found the shining dew on every buttercup;
But my lazy little shadow, like an arrant sleepy-head,
Had stayed at home behind me and was fast asleep in bed.
Robert Louis Stephenson.





















LVKE TY-winkety-wee!
Ten pink fingers has she,
Ten pink toes,
One pink nose,
And two eyes that can hardly see;
Andiil they blink and blink, and they wink and wink,
So you can't tell whether they are blue or pink.





Pinkety-blinkety-winkety P
Not much hair on her head 1h, -I: :
She has no teeth, and she calnit t.lk ;
She is not strong enough yet t., v.-.lik;
She cannot even so much as .reep :
Most of the time she is fast i-_le:l- ;
Whenever you ask her
how she feels,
She only doubles
her fist and squeals. R
The queerest bundle
you ever did see,
Is little Pinkety-winkety-wee. ,









































" D'V. lpd% [IIVY:















SR EARY me !" cried a busy Bee,
SD I "What curious sights in town we
* see !
Children who 've not tasted honey,
*. Big folks selling flowers for money 1
Deary me! cried the busy Bee,
The country is the place for me."






WHOSE?

0ONE Two! Three!
Wonder whose 't will be?
Who speaks first, I, think, should get it;
One! Two! Three!

One! Two! Three!
Mother's not like me;
Who speaks first she makes wait latest,
As she does when I eat fastest.
One! Two I Three!

One! Two! Three!
There-'tis Dot's, you see,
Dot's the smallest. Well, I never
Big dogs, you're not half so clever,
Sirs, as she.















SR EARY me !" cried a busy Bee,
SD I "What curious sights in town we
* see !
Children who 've not tasted honey,
*. Big folks selling flowers for money 1
Deary me! cried the busy Bee,
The country is the place for me."






WHOSE?

0ONE Two! Three!
Wonder whose 't will be?
Who speaks first, I, think, should get it;
One! Two! Three!

One! Two! Three!
Mother's not like me;
Who speaks first she makes wait latest,
As she does when I eat fastest.
One! Two I Three!

One! Two! Three!
There-'tis Dot's, you see,
Dot's the smallest. Well, I never
Big dogs, you're not half so clever,
Sirs, as she.































































Ke, Rcije.


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SUppOSe.


" SUPPOSE
And let
Said Jack,


we dig a great big hole,
the sea come in,"
a sturdy little soul-


"I think we will," said Min.

" But when the sea is in the hole,
How will the sea get back ? "
IS. Min, a curious little soul-
"Oh, never mind," said Jack,

"For when the sea is in the hole,
The other sea'll dry,
And we can play out there all day
Together, you and I."


S( F Sa.


D O- II- .V by the sea the livelong day,
Charlie and Willie love to play,
Watching their boats so gaily ride
Up and down on the tiny tide.
And they talk all day and dream all night
Of the ships and sailors and ocean bright:
"They'll go to sea very soon," they say,
And, of course, be admirals, too, some day.


'Tis twenty or thirty years since then,
Charlie and Willie are middle-aged men, --
No matter how it has chanced to be,
But they neither have ever been to sea ,;,....*'""
Well-just once; and, the truth to tell.
They did not relish it very well,
But they say when their dreams
they e'er recall,
"Everyone can't be an admiral !"


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SUppOSe.


" SUPPOSE
And let
Said Jack,


we dig a great big hole,
the sea come in,"
a sturdy little soul-


"I think we will," said Min.

" But when the sea is in the hole,
How will the sea get back ? "
IS. Min, a curious little soul-
"Oh, never mind," said Jack,

"For when the sea is in the hole,
The other sea'll dry,
And we can play out there all day
Together, you and I."


S( F Sa.


D O- II- .V by the sea the livelong day,
Charlie and Willie love to play,
Watching their boats so gaily ride
Up and down on the tiny tide.
And they talk all day and dream all night
Of the ships and sailors and ocean bright:
"They'll go to sea very soon," they say,
And, of course, be admirals, too, some day.


'Tis twenty or thirty years since then,
Charlie and Willie are middle-aged men, --
No matter how it has chanced to be,
But they neither have ever been to sea ,;,....*'""
Well-just once; and, the truth to tell.
They did not relish it very well,
But they say when their dreams
they e'er recall,
"Everyone can't be an admiral !"


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THS SwLIJ'CG.


W,,ING, swing!
Laugh and sing!
The sun is shining on everything.
High, high!
Up to the sky!
Catch at the leaves as the swing goes by.
The birds swing always on twig and bough,
As we six people are swinging now.

Drop, drop !
We're going to stop!
Keep still, Kitty !-be quiet, Mop I
You don't suppose
That Tommy and Rose
Will drop you out of the swing as it goes 1
Sit still, little baby, and look up, too,
And see the bright leaves with the sun shining
through.

Push off! So
Up we go!
The bough creaks loudly as we swing to and fro I
The birds don't fear,
Though we come so near;
They know the swing will not stop up here;
It goes down to the grass and up to the tree,
But won't it stop still till we've gone to tea 1











,t -4






....-.. ^,'-" /IJ' ITaTIONS.

0,1OME dow-n, pretty Robin!
come down, Robin dear I
There's nothing to harm you-
no pussies are here;
N, Just Loo, Nell, and I-
We never count 'Ti,'
He's only an -o6 little.pDi Robin dear.

"Come up, little children! come up!" Bobby fT.
"To live on a tree-top, if ev.r you tried,
You'd ne'er live bel.:v. .
In a world of sno-,
Nor under umbrellas your little lh.-al hide."

"Come down, saucy Robin-
make haste, Robin red.l
We know you are hungry,
and want to be fed:
Don't sit there and sinr,,
And flutter your wing;
Come down, and we'll give \ut
some crumbs of nice bre.t-l.'

"Now, what's to be done?" said the odd little pup ,
"Bob will not come down and they cannot fly up?
I hope they won't stay
And argue all day,
For I should prefer to go home," said the pup.
























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HOW WS S W S{9(T a CLaUS.


L AST night not one of us three could sleep though we went quite early
to bed,
For mother said she'd such ots of things to see to, and our chatter put
it out of her head;
So Billy and I called out to Sissy to
\/ come into our bed and to bring
\ dolly too-
\iFor Sissy believes dolls don't like the dark
/, and being alone in the cold any more
than we do,
\\d just as we were thinking that if we
'' didn't go to sleep soon it wouldn't be
\ 'I very much good going to sleep at all-
\ / I heard a noise like somebody coming in a cab,
S" '. and luggage being brought into the hall.
\ A-\ld I said to Billy, "It's Santa Claus, and he
hasn't come down the chimney, because it's
so narrow he can't;
But he's come in th cab from the station just like an uncle or an aunt.
Perhaps he's come home with father, for he said he should very likely be late."
And we all tried to keep very still, but it wasn't easy to be patient and wait,
We've had many presents before,
But we've never heard Santa Claus drive up in a cab to the door,
And we've never seen him-and we shall now-if we keep as quiet as mice.
"I don't care a bit what he brings," said Sissy, "it's sure to be something nice."
And then there came a sort of rustle and a sound of feet on the stair.
I knew there was nothing to be afraid of, and we oughtn't to have been
frightened; but I'm rather afraid we were.
Then the door opened-ever so gently-like you open it when you think some-
one's hiding inside.
And we all three sat up in bed, holding on to each other, with our eyes
open very wide,
And some one came in with a heap of toys, a doll, and a bat, and a ball;
And they turned the light up, and it was only mother, and it was not Santa
Claus at all.
We were very disappointed, of course; but mother only laughed and shook
her head :





















allp

ii-.


So we all got into my bed, and covered ourselves up as warm as we could-
Though, after all, two blankets and one quilt for four isn't much good-


~1


ARAs










S. If little children will sit up talking, when they ought to be asleep in bed,
It isn't likely, that Santa Claus will come himself to bring them their presents,"
she said.
And. she said we might think ourselves lucky at getting any presents at all,.
Which wouldn't have happened, if she hadn't happened to meet the person who
brought them in the hall.
And she tucked us up in .our own beds, and as she put out the light, she said,
"Little children who want to see Santa Claus should go asleep the minute
they get, into bed,
For he. only comes when you're fast asleep" (and, of .course, what mother says
is true);
S But if he only comes when we're asleep, I don't see how we're ever to see
'.him-'do "you ?


-*Ve" ~.7


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