• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Bunny's order
 The turkey and the hens
 Tale of a pony
 Say please, Daisy
 Polite Polly
 Busy bee
 April showers
 Jack and Jill
 The tigers
 The naughty hens
 Vengeance
 Whose pump?
 Keeping the May
 Dinner time
 Ambition
 What shall we buy?
 Little boy-blue
 Kitty's forgiveness
 Our secret
 At the seaside
 Two little mice
 Tiny Tim
 The toy soldiers
 See-saw
 Hilda
 One, two
 Back Cover














Title: Fine as a peacock
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00081069/00001
 Material Information
Title: Fine as a peacock
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : col. ill. ; 37 cm.
Language: English
Creator: DeWolfe, Fiske & Co. (Boston, Mass.) ( Publisher )
Publisher: De Wolfe Fiske & Co.
Place of Publication: Boston
Publication Date: [189-?]
 Subjects
Subject: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Shaped books (Publishing) -- 1895   ( rbpub )
Children's poetry -- 1895   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1895
Genre: Shaped books (Publishing)   ( rbpub )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: Book is in the shape of a peacock.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00081069
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002245654
oclc - 53018171
notis - ALJ6666

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Bunny's order
        Page 2
    The turkey and the hens
        Page 2
    Tale of a pony
        Page 3
    Say please, Daisy
        Page 3
    Polite Polly
        Page 4
    Busy bee
        Page 4
    April showers
        Page 5
    Jack and Jill
        Page 5
    The tigers
        Page 6
    The naughty hens
        Page 6
    Vengeance
        Page 7
    Whose pump?
        Page 8
    Keeping the May
        Page 8
    Dinner time
        Page 9
    Ambition
        Page 9
    What shall we buy?
        Page 10
    Little boy-blue
        Page 10
    Kitty's forgiveness
        Page 11
    Our secret
        Page 12
    At the seaside
        Page 12
    Two little mice
        Page 13
    Tiny Tim
        Page 13
    The toy soldiers
        Page 14
    See-saw
        Page 14
    Hilda
        Page 15
    One, two
        Page 15
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
Full Text













































































































































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APO".'y


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SBUNNY''S ORDER.

SO )ME bunnies, ',\ho lived in a fine lar-c field,
I *RecIuilved no- linger their ri'lhts to \ :ield.
SSaid ine of the hra\'ect, a handsome puss,
X W hy, blIts (Au. the ti Ild bel,,nh A t-, us."
SS. the\ puLt up a niti t: in lettLr large,
?- T.r -cus i", -'/i sisri ',t / LI,,"/ ,, / 1 L/ Cri .
? -
-" F 10i 's ,;I / tt/ if q ji k//: 1.? //t(is .


A \ .n /i,,: d r fee /i i, y i







B Ord"r .' 15' f '-A .-



F ..i, .'' ,. --and i. m ade me liil-, it \\as si
A l, V I1C1.





THE TURKEY AND THE HENS.

SREALLY don't care t') talk to: y\ou," ;i
Said the bold red turkey one day "
"I'm a splendid ftli l vyu dull. broi'n lienv --
Run away, little people, and plny


W" We're a;ill ~ri-lwn up," -aid their hens ti him I..
'And m;,thers oft chicken n, t ,;;
\W e \w-iuld n1.t lor the \\-rld be -, clunimsy and bi,- V. -'
And red and conceited as you." '



", 'm not conceited," the
.' ". .. '. turkey said,
S' But m!\i merits I can but

SWh, tA k3s :an notice of
'I %1~vI II p, r hiens? -
B iBut see hlit the\ talk to



The henI lauc1heCd loud.
S"' Ytas, they talk otf \Lou
"You sill,,, coInceited thing,
iBecause .- u:'l I be killed
I'.r the
Christ ma,
.dinner,
.. Buit :' shall lay ecos
k!- i in the
Spring!"

The Bald -in L-ar

- ..,: .:.. ,v '. ,-16.. '. ,,..


I















SBUNNY''S ORDER.

SO )ME bunnies, ',\ho lived in a fine lar-c field,
I *RecIuilved no- linger their ri'lhts to \ :ield.
SSaid ine of the hra\'ect, a handsome puss,
X W hy, blIts (Au. the ti Ild bel,,nh A t-, us."
SS. the\ puLt up a niti t: in lettLr large,
?- T.r -cus i", -'/i sisri ',t / LI,,"/ ,, / 1 L/ Cri .
? -
-" F 10i 's ,;I / tt/ if q ji k//: 1.? //t(is .


A \ .n /i,,: d r fee /i i, y i







B Ord"r .' 15' f '-A .-



F ..i, .'' ,. --and i. m ade me liil-, it \\as si
A l, V I1C1.





THE TURKEY AND THE HENS.

SREALLY don't care t') talk to: y\ou," ;i
Said the bold red turkey one day "
"I'm a splendid ftli l vyu dull. broi'n lienv --
Run away, little people, and plny


W" We're a;ill ~ri-lwn up," -aid their hens ti him I..
'And m;,thers oft chicken n, t ,;;
\W e \w-iuld n1.t lor the \\-rld be -, clunimsy and bi,- V. -'
And red and conceited as you." '



", 'm not conceited," the
.' ". .. '. turkey said,
S' But m!\i merits I can but

SWh, tA k3s :an notice of
'I %1~vI II p, r hiens? -
B iBut see hlit the\ talk to



The henI lauc1heCd loud.
S"' Ytas, they talk otf \Lou
"You sill,,, coInceited thing,
iBecause .- u:'l I be killed
I'.r the
Christ ma,
.dinner,
.. Buit :' shall lay ecos
k!- i in the
Spring!"

The Bald -in L-ar

- ..,: .:.. ,v '. ,-16.. '. ,,..


I
















T..4LE OF


HAV l.t i k flnu m!itl. \

1- 1 l IC I LI Ii~ L Ii
1~J 1 -11111 1i Ini II Ii I IL I It II







BI L i. 1 111 LIk- 11 1 1- 1 (_C 1.. r,



lid 1 t- I I 1 :1, 11 1 1
1 1_ I \ u i LC I I-I ) 1 .1, 1.


SAY PLEASE


OME, Daisy dear. ;:i\, "1 II ,u i :l.Isc;' "
Come, ask :ne niiicl\, Jd.!
You ought to lIt p[.litc i.-, lt.,lk'
W hen they're p.-'lltc ite ',,u. .1


I ran into our meadi,-~, dear.,.
Directly school was do:nel
And picked these pretty\
-n\t \ers for vlu,u : 2
Yes, Daisy, eC ery
one! "


SYou can't say
please," poor
darling!
Well. never mind.
don't try'; .
Here. take the :
prc.tt\ luttirL ups,,
.-\nl thank me by i
and by.


C


7C7


.4 PONY
















T..4LE OF


HAV l.t i k flnu m!itl. \

1- 1 l IC I LI Ii~ L Ii
1~J 1 -11111 1i Ini II Ii I IL I It II







BI L i. 1 111 LIk- 11 1 1- 1 (_C 1.. r,



lid 1 t- I I 1 :1, 11 1 1
1 1_ I \ u i LC I I-I ) 1 .1, 1.


SAY PLEASE


OME, Daisy dear. ;:i\, "1 II ,u i :l.Isc;' "
Come, ask :ne niiicl\, Jd.!
You ought to lIt p[.litc i.-, lt.,lk'
W hen they're p.-'lltc ite ',,u. .1


I ran into our meadi,-~, dear.,.
Directly school was do:nel
And picked these pretty\
-n\t \ers for vlu,u : 2
Yes, Daisy, eC ery
one! "


SYou can't say
please," poor
darling!
Well. never mind.
don't try'; .
Here. take the :
prc.tt\ luttirL ups,,
.-\nl thank me by i
and by.


C


7C7


.4 PONY



























POLITE POLLY.

ISS POLLY and her Dolly
Were sitting on a log,
When up, out of the river,
There jumped a little frog.

And he said, "Good-nmorning, MisicL!
S And pra'', ho\\- m:lay \.cu i ;e'
," %I'm very well," said PoIll:
'"And how are you?" said she.

IVf you'lll come and sit beside me
''.'i' I'll wipe you nice and dry;
And we can have a cosey chat
Together, you and I."

... But ere the little maiden
-,. l Had turned her sunny face,
SThere stood a fairy on the log


And she said, "My little
maiden,
Because you've been po-
lite,
I'll be your friend forever,
And guard you day and
night."

.The moral of my song is
this:
S* When seated upon logs,
Be most polite to nimli
Especially to frogs.


BUSY BEE.


D EARY me!." cried a busy Bee,
What curious sights in town we see!
Children who've not tasted honey,
Big folks selling flowers for money!
Deary me!"' cried the busy Bee;
".The country is the place for me."


M


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POLITE POLLY.

ISS POLLY and her Dolly
Were sitting on a log,
When up, out of the river,
There jumped a little frog.

And he said, "Good-nmorning, MisicL!
S And pra'', ho\\- m:lay \.cu i ;e'
," %I'm very well," said PoIll:
'"And how are you?" said she.

IVf you'lll come and sit beside me
''.'i' I'll wipe you nice and dry;
And we can have a cosey chat
Together, you and I."

... But ere the little maiden
-,. l Had turned her sunny face,
SThere stood a fairy on the log


And she said, "My little
maiden,
Because you've been po-
lite,
I'll be your friend forever,
And guard you day and
night."

.The moral of my song is
this:
S* When seated upon logs,
Be most polite to nimli
Especially to frogs.


BUSY BEE.


D EARY me!." cried a busy Bee,
What curious sights in town we see!
Children who've not tasted honey,
Big folks selling flowers for money!
Deary me!"' cried the busy Bee;
".The country is the place for me."


M


, .
~:iji~~
'~"; '':~R~:~3,ls
Jli;
I-.t

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APRIL SHOWERS.


S1-I, happy is the tlnc ,I' Spring?
Oh, happy arc iur childhood's
hours,
S\\:henv we can smile at anything,
And tears are only April
homers.

Then shines the sun upon the
tield,
S. gayly strewn with new-born
Lowers
I And early leaves a perfume yield,
Made sweetly fresh with April
.showers.

Then haste we to the old beech wood,
And make ourselves a ,had\'
bower,
Within a tree that long has stood
-A A shelter from the April



41i .The sun shines out in all his power.
t, do oyou know a time as sweet
As sunshine mixed with
April shower?



JACK AND fI.L.
A LONG way up! -the hill f.g
'Twill tire them so they sctic- .m IIs rI
That pail, too, they can nel VI ca1 i., i
Yet on they go and do not tarr,.
Always a way if there's a will,"
Says Jill to Jack, and Jack to Jill.

The stormy north wind beats them
back,
Their feet do tread a stony track
And stumble over prickly .whin;
Yet up they press and don't give in.
One foot before the othicr till
Will get us there," says Jack to
Jill.

And when the high hill-top
they gain ..
In spite of thorns, and
wind, and rain,
And tired limbs and
feet that ache:
"We'll always i-
try and coiIr- ''.

So we can get
up any hill," .- ,
Says Jill to Jack,.
and Jack to Jill. .














APRIL SHOWERS.


S1-I, happy is the tlnc ,I' Spring?
Oh, happy arc iur childhood's
hours,
S\\:henv we can smile at anything,
And tears are only April
homers.

Then shines the sun upon the
tield,
S. gayly strewn with new-born
Lowers
I And early leaves a perfume yield,
Made sweetly fresh with April
.showers.

Then haste we to the old beech wood,
And make ourselves a ,had\'
bower,
Within a tree that long has stood
-A A shelter from the April



41i .The sun shines out in all his power.
t, do oyou know a time as sweet
As sunshine mixed with
April shower?



JACK AND fI.L.
A LONG way up! -the hill f.g
'Twill tire them so they sctic- .m IIs rI
That pail, too, they can nel VI ca1 i., i
Yet on they go and do not tarr,.
Always a way if there's a will,"
Says Jill to Jack, and Jack to Jill.

The stormy north wind beats them
back,
Their feet do tread a stony track
And stumble over prickly .whin;
Yet up they press and don't give in.
One foot before the othicr till
Will get us there," says Jack to
Jill.

And when the high hill-top
they gain ..
In spite of thorns, and
wind, and rain,
And tired limbs and
feet that ache:
"We'll always i-
try and coiIr- ''.

So we can get
up any hill," .- ,
Says Jill to Jack,.
and Jack to Jill. .






































THE TIGERS.


HERE are two tigers,
With appetites hearty;
Not quite the guests
One would like at a party!

But oh, anxious parents,
Your fears you may smother,
For the tigers, are this side,
Your children -the other!

Keep away from the cage
And no harm you need fear;
But be sure there is danger
If you venture too near.




THE NAUGHTY HENS.


.4.- --
I .'' ,
'"i -:"'
b .., .-M .


Y OU little hens, you naughty hens,
Whatever have you done?
You've rooted up the cauliflowers,
And eaten every one.


When Harry comes and beats you,
As he most likely may,
Whatever will your dear mamma
And little sisters say?


I think you'll feel as I have felt
Sometimes before to-day,
So if you do not like the stick,
You'd better run away.


~:~~5~
r-.

p~. .r
~


5
,I
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''t~~,
~ C~L~L lr






































THE TIGERS.


HERE are two tigers,
With appetites hearty;
Not quite the guests
One would like at a party!

But oh, anxious parents,
Your fears you may smother,
For the tigers, are this side,
Your children -the other!

Keep away from the cage
And no harm you need fear;
But be sure there is danger
If you venture too near.




THE NAUGHTY HENS.


.4.- --
I .'' ,
'"i -:"'
b .., .-M .


Y OU little hens, you naughty hens,
Whatever have you done?
You've rooted up the cauliflowers,
And eaten every one.


When Harry comes and beats you,
As he most likely may,
Whatever will your dear mamma
And little sisters say?


I think you'll feel as I have felt
Sometimes before to-day,
So if you do not like the stick,
You'd better run away.


~:~~5~
r-.

p~. .r
~


5
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. .


VENGEANCE.

Y OUNG Neddy he sat on a gate one day,
Three little calves drew near;
"0 where is our mother?" these little calves cried,
0 where is our mother dear?"

'"0 how should I.know of your mother?" he cried,
t I expect she is dead," said he;
"And the butcher in blue is coming for you,
To kill you for dinner for me."

Then these three little calves they sighed and wept,
When they heard their mother was dead;
But when they all knew of the butcher in blue,
They took to their heels and fled.





'H '7 .. "- "-


Now, they had not departed a minute' ,o

S' '.- When, "Moo!" cried the old cow, ""oo!
.. -2 ? '

them so, ..#.. '' T -




Moo!hen, Moo cried the old cow, Moo!
You bad little boy, to mar all their joones sweet,
Now what shall be done to you?

PYou talked ofthe butcher andand poor N eddy he ran,
them so, .
Moo! cried the old cow, Moo!1
But if you. will eat my little ones sweet, e
Pray, why should I not eat you?"

Poor Neddy he raced, and poor Neddy he ran,e -'' -. '.
Moo!" cried the old cow, "Moo!" B "E -
And I don't think he'll feel any fancy for veal,
If he lives to be ninety-two! ld
















WHOSE PUMP?


B UMPETY, bumpety,
bump,
With a hop, a skip, and
a Jump,
My mother said, "Dauh-
ter,
Bring me some water.
That's a good child, from the
pump."

SJumpety, jumpety, jump,
Whoever is that at the
pump ?
My name is Jim Crow,
It's my pump, you
know."
Stumpety, stumpety, stump.

Tumpery, tumpery, trump,
" You know that it isn't
your pump;
It's mother's, and so
S"- MIake haste and go,"
Said little Pink Bonnet;
Yu've~ no business on it."
i 'umpety. jumpety, jump.




KEEPING THE MAY.

Si\ W11WITHER away
... : Happy and gay,
', \Little ones, merry hearts,
Keeping the May?

Up through the meadow sweet
H utrry the happy feet.
( ,Up through the meadow
2 sweet,
Keeping the May.

But, in your laugh and song,
Think, as you dance along,
.( \VWho cannot join your throng
Keeping the May.

Some lying sick at home,
Some are too old to roam;
W \Vill you not think of them,
Keeping the May?
















WHOSE PUMP?


B UMPETY, bumpety,
bump,
With a hop, a skip, and
a Jump,
My mother said, "Dauh-
ter,
Bring me some water.
That's a good child, from the
pump."

SJumpety, jumpety, jump,
Whoever is that at the
pump ?
My name is Jim Crow,
It's my pump, you
know."
Stumpety, stumpety, stump.

Tumpery, tumpery, trump,
" You know that it isn't
your pump;
It's mother's, and so
S"- MIake haste and go,"
Said little Pink Bonnet;
Yu've~ no business on it."
i 'umpety. jumpety, jump.




KEEPING THE MAY.

Si\ W11WITHER away
... : Happy and gay,
', \Little ones, merry hearts,
Keeping the May?

Up through the meadow sweet
H utrry the happy feet.
( ,Up through the meadow
2 sweet,
Keeping the May.

But, in your laugh and song,
Think, as you dance along,
.( \VWho cannot join your throng
Keeping the May.

Some lying sick at home,
Some are too old to roam;
W \Vill you not think of them,
Keeping the May?

















'ro--. j.
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45 ..:- -
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DINNER TIAE.

T HAT do the moo-cows think ?" s.iid lMay,
S"As they feed in the mic;iadLNS. all ithl. da.i ?
What is the gossip the Ih -e rIpe.it
From flower to flower in the ,.d':ldcn sAct?
What is the song the little birds make
Over the meadow and deep in the brake?"


Bobbie looked up and shook his head.
\~" I don't know what it is," he said;
',1" "." How could ever a child like me
S''1 Know what the thoughts of a cow nmay be?
i, --' ., \ But I know what I think, and that's my song;
.. '' It's time for dinner, so come-along! "



AMBITION.

ELL," said the duckling, "well,"
SAs he looked at his broken shell,
If this is the world I've dreamt about,
It's a very great pity I ever came out."
\

" Ty dear," said the duck, "my dear,
Don't ilin tiinc the world is here;
The world-is a pond, it lies out there- '
You shall soon see life, so dmn't despair.". -- .

But the duckling's spirit soared
be vond
Th,.. reeds and weeds of that ."; ,
muddy pond,
And it cert.i.inlv is most atro-
cious luck .ar-
To be born with a soul if you're only' a duck. .


ILI'

















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3 -


45 ..:- -
..' -,J_ -'1-,,-*


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.- C.
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DINNER TIAE.

T HAT do the moo-cows think ?" s.iid lMay,
S"As they feed in the mic;iadLNS. all ithl. da.i ?
What is the gossip the Ih -e rIpe.it
From flower to flower in the ,.d':ldcn sAct?
What is the song the little birds make
Over the meadow and deep in the brake?"


Bobbie looked up and shook his head.
\~" I don't know what it is," he said;
',1" "." How could ever a child like me
S''1 Know what the thoughts of a cow nmay be?
i, --' ., \ But I know what I think, and that's my song;
.. '' It's time for dinner, so come-along! "



AMBITION.

ELL," said the duckling, "well,"
SAs he looked at his broken shell,
If this is the world I've dreamt about,
It's a very great pity I ever came out."
\

" Ty dear," said the duck, "my dear,
Don't ilin tiinc the world is here;
The world-is a pond, it lies out there- '
You shall soon see life, so dmn't despair.". -- .

But the duckling's spirit soared
be vond
Th,.. reeds and weeds of that ."; ,
muddy pond,
And it cert.i.inlv is most atro-
cious luck .ar-
To be born with a soul if you're only' a duck. .


ILI'






































WHAT SHALL WE BUY?

E Pussies three have each a Penny,
SBut, oh, the things 'twill buy are main;
Those Dicky-birds are cheap and sw eet.
And Sparrow-tarts are nice to eat.
A Mice-pie. so I've heard, is guod;
Would you like one? I'm sure I should.


"' (A Penny buys a slice ot fifth,
Oh, that is such a lovely dish!
SSaucers of cream or milk to drink,
We never shall decide, I think;
-'""'', Of nice things there is such a lot,
'Pon my whiskers, we don't know what
To buy %x ith the Pennies we have got!"


r*


LITTLE BOY-BLUE..'

SITTLE Boy-blue had twenty-three
SPretty white baa-lambs out on the lea.
Little Boy-blue, what will he do?
Says he can only find twenty-two.



Little Boy-blue's been blowing his horn,
Calling the lost lamb since early morn.
Little Boy-bliue. what will he do?
Farmer will scold--I'm sorry, aren't you?



Little Boy-blue, why, can't you see
Stanrdini_, behind you is twenty-three?
Little Boii\-- lue'i aN Ilind as a bat. -
\\onders what we are laughing at!


'"~"h""~""~"_~a~--~-?;~,-~-~-






































WHAT SHALL WE BUY?

E Pussies three have each a Penny,
SBut, oh, the things 'twill buy are main;
Those Dicky-birds are cheap and sw eet.
And Sparrow-tarts are nice to eat.
A Mice-pie. so I've heard, is guod;
Would you like one? I'm sure I should.


"' (A Penny buys a slice ot fifth,
Oh, that is such a lovely dish!
SSaucers of cream or milk to drink,
We never shall decide, I think;
-'""'', Of nice things there is such a lot,
'Pon my whiskers, we don't know what
To buy %x ith the Pennies we have got!"


r*


LITTLE BOY-BLUE..'

SITTLE Boy-blue had twenty-three
SPretty white baa-lambs out on the lea.
Little Boy-blue, what will he do?
Says he can only find twenty-two.



Little Boy-blue's been blowing his horn,
Calling the lost lamb since early morn.
Little Boy-bliue. what will he do?
Farmer will scold--I'm sorry, aren't you?



Little Boy-blue, why, can't you see
Stanrdini_, behind you is twenty-three?
Little Boii\-- lue'i aN Ilind as a bat. -
\\onders what we are laughing at!


'"~"h""~""~"_~a~--~-?;~,-~-~-



















Y






ITTY 'S FORGII'ENESS.
" / \ IMMA\!" .s,-:bb,_d little Kitt\. "liok what nau,_,ht\ Vixen has ,,June!".!
Iti\ ..-nl'k that Id ,hoeil:te-bo\, ma'ami," tbRern ed Niuris ; "chil-

N Irse -pke in thi-.s \\a, t make li h It -,1 the Ni hci ]_. .i iir; but \11 1im 111.1
knei' I-'v t .. t-the a child'-. .rii- iiertCr than this. Slihe t. Ak Kitty on her kinee.
JIrid herii tc-ar- and kissed I:.l i c .:'l,.ri head, sai in_,'..
"1I h!...p.' \'oil did nt :Itl.Ie'lm t .1I pUlnisl \ixen'I
Sih' i- onl\ little d ,-, ;ind kn. \\- no b.tl.r."
}II uI .- .." N,, aiimmni, I I ,niv tlillW eid ie0 ;\,i\ Ia

EX -',*.".. '"C.I 1"'.'en that \\ I ld mIakl e Icr little hli '.tI \tr\ N \
S' -'d i I \L mmaT
r,,._. L 11 Cl--)it the pi cti t e lI11 bC :O t is :11il t11"11 i'l,
subbed K Itt\ L N i..,h.
N," c, ,111d. NV Ill-t tI,' andlt ,
S.. V ix n. I .i -.lc that e fee- 11, liha-
'.'been natTht\. i n ;ii nd look at lit Kill\.
-. She is begging you to forgive her." At last
1- .' '- little Kitty stroked poor Vixen's head.
.....". ,." '";'.: .. .'. "Now, my sweet, I am *,inie to see
''" dear Grandmamma for an hour, and when
I return, I hope my little girl will have been
brave enough not to cry any more."
!;itn.'-. eyes were very red when Mamma came back, but Nurse said that
she had not given way to tears again, although she had not had the heart to play
\with any of her toys.
"I never see a child take on so about a rubbish box," said Nurse. "And
as for Vixen, ma'am, she's run away into the garden, to hide herself."
"Come to me, Kitty," said Mamma; "I think the fairies must have told
GrandiWi.[inm.7i about your misfortune, because she had this all ready for me tIn
briig to you." Kitty gave a little cry of delight, for it was such a pretty bnboln,
box, tied up with pink ribbon, and on the lid was a picture of the m ist mis-
chievous kitten you ever saw.
Kitty ran into the garden with her new treasure, and. joyously called Vixen.
The clever dog saw in an instant that the past was forgotten, and that her little
mistress was happy once more, so she bounded to her side.
Vixen loved sugar-plannu-. but waited patiently, wagging her tail, while Kitty
opened the lid.
"Here, Vixen! I'll give OOu this large one, to show you I forgive ouu
about the old box."



























OUR SECRET.

:-" E'VE a -e r- or tw,-,,
J. But we'll tell it to
you -
N. 'Yu must never tell it aiain.
W tc found it to-day,
\hen .. _went to play
Il the little wood l:' the lane.

a" t The:,- cheeped and cried
\ hen \% e looked inside.
'And each opened a gapingr
beak;
A lnd. w e'd lots to si\,
II we'd known the \va\
SThat little bird-babies ipeak.

W \ o-,rfered them bread,
Bu t _ach shook its head -
STheI kr c w that the food was wrong;
.i.- Ait they w,:,:n't afraid,
Althl, ugh we stayed
And talked to them ever so long.

W\'he til I t' r birt v _',,ma ,
]le \' i ,!i i thel cni iumrbs,
Btit a1n t1tl. 01 lerrl,-. 0_r flV.
Thrvr" .ad all 'line
W1lhen ,.ur n,'ther is g,-.ne,
/V/ arc lonel\ -and sac,'il/imes cry!



4T THE SE..4SIDE.
SJ..
IE .jolliest tfine in all the \ear
I 1 her, ,, ,,, da In t,, the sca:
And playing all da\ o:n the sxand. is tiln, W'
} For Tomnm\ and DolI and me; .,'
There are such bealittitl things to lo
And beautitfIl things to eae.


You can build a castle I'at sand arid t ones, r
NVith a bridge anid ita t\vei and a moant-
YOcu ca111 dig dIeep i Oi ers. and pndis, and lakes.
Where ra. biggest ship will float;
O)r \.u can make sailors oI little dolls "'
To sail in \i ur p ni boat.
law,:'.: -S'


"-- "-- -~-~~r--



























OUR SECRET.

:-" E'VE a -e r- or tw,-,,
J. But we'll tell it to
you -
N. 'Yu must never tell it aiain.
W tc found it to-day,
\hen .. _went to play
Il the little wood l:' the lane.

a" t The:,- cheeped and cried
\ hen \% e looked inside.
'And each opened a gapingr
beak;
A lnd. w e'd lots to si\,
II we'd known the \va\
SThat little bird-babies ipeak.

W \ o-,rfered them bread,
Bu t _ach shook its head -
STheI kr c w that the food was wrong;
.i.- Ait they w,:,:n't afraid,
Althl, ugh we stayed
And talked to them ever so long.

W\'he til I t' r birt v _',,ma ,
]le \' i ,!i i thel cni iumrbs,
Btit a1n t1tl. 01 lerrl,-. 0_r flV.
Thrvr" .ad all 'line
W1lhen ,.ur n,'ther is g,-.ne,
/V/ arc lonel\ -and sac,'il/imes cry!



4T THE SE..4SIDE.
SJ..
IE .jolliest tfine in all the \ear
I 1 her, ,, ,,, da In t,, the sca:
And playing all da\ o:n the sxand. is tiln, W'
} For Tomnm\ and DolI and me; .,'
There are such bealittitl things to lo
And beautitfIl things to eae.


You can build a castle I'at sand arid t ones, r
NVith a bridge anid ita t\vei and a moant-
YOcu ca111 dig dIeep i Oi ers. and pndis, and lakes.
Where ra. biggest ship will float;
O)r \.u can make sailors oI little dolls "'
To sail in \i ur p ni boat.
law,:'.: -S'


"-- "-- -~-~~r--




















/~


; 1
. ... ..J.;'.. .
. .. . .


TWO LITTLE MICE.


T HERE were two little mice, two gray little mice
(Not those of the nursery clock),
Who, once on a time, if ther 'c truth in a rhyme,
Did "diccory, diccory, dock."
These were quite other mice,--one foolish, one wise;
Ay, one,. dear, was wiser by far
Than the other who went--on marauding bent--
Round the rim of a blue china jar.
For he sat on a shelf by his own little self,
.-.. And squeaked, "Little brother, it's plain -
There--just as I said, gone-heels over head!
He will ne'er go a-hunting again."


TINY TIM.

'M just a little pony,
My name is Tiny Tim,
My little Master loves me,
And I am fond of him.



And every sunny morning
I take him fbr a ride
Besidc the daisied meadows,
An I o'er the moorland wide.
i

I gallp and I canter, ".
And toss my mane in glee;
There's not another pony
SSo happy and so free.


Y.-
!




















/~


; 1
. ... ..J.;'.. .
. .. . .


TWO LITTLE MICE.


T HERE were two little mice, two gray little mice
(Not those of the nursery clock),
Who, once on a time, if ther 'c truth in a rhyme,
Did "diccory, diccory, dock."
These were quite other mice,--one foolish, one wise;
Ay, one,. dear, was wiser by far
Than the other who went--on marauding bent--
Round the rim of a blue china jar.
For he sat on a shelf by his own little self,
.-.. And squeaked, "Little brother, it's plain -
There--just as I said, gone-heels over head!
He will ne'er go a-hunting again."


TINY TIM.

'M just a little pony,
My name is Tiny Tim,
My little Master loves me,
And I am fond of him.



And every sunny morning
I take him fbr a ride
Besidc the daisied meadows,
An I o'er the moorland wide.
i

I gallp and I canter, ".
And toss my mane in glee;
There's not another pony
SSo happy and so free.


Y.-
!




-i __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ _


kab




t y

b. -
*1 -..^---
r, 3 ,,^. ...-A- -
^^^^... :;. ^/^^
'' ^ 'eA s-.,t.^> ''


THE TOY SOLDIERS.

\ J i E'IE .nIl I olen ,liClicr-, ;nu l F111 unill' :rm is paint.
A l l lt't :"11 ; 'f il ,ij\ : i_,i r LiE', t ,, r h ; t n> ,'r [!lint.

A t'LII liti't 1,.ii \ li:. ii I-i\ t- i hi. t- J tlc ,:it cri dau\.


T hO l 1 *i r aLc- hi\ 1 i c' .i -, \ _'t 'A.\ t: 1LII I theicn l t.he e:
L : <1." 1,,ngl.nlt t Oiiir |i .-t l.- |,,' I .r 1"_'- -- ",f t ,i l' e m '-.Ii,, 1 knr,\v ;
1i' ,\ lh t e f.\ r k ,1 ,,f ;.-i11. \ l:Ir,_"A C li tI Iit Im I l r i 111i 1i .,ntI.
It L.,i iu n, t -trili. ,k In intf -,i(i n ,l 'l ,. -I.I i.' l IC'a 1t-.

I lItnt 'l k t\-'. i,' lll\ I-Ii._-Lh ~ lli tl %Al,,,,, IdL.' n i ., !,,,I ll ;,ri .i:tn l,

A nHi l i th- 1l' h \ L- 1 1.11.- ',. \ n ,ihrIl I_ 1 ..1 i I .iid


.. l a tJ :l inn l said ni f t 111 1, Ic i ;l- I :>L-' Q !" W ut C1 1 i' i-. irnn -.-
M l 1111 is b )ack.
his back.


It'I

3% i

;~~~~~~-a,--


\'i II i i :11l iL t. .11
1 in I1, 1, -,
T 1 *L*' L I t [It .I Ck llr_ i t l ti I tl> I Tl l il alt-

iimir t 'I I II.
LI! p,'l .i i' .i i. ll' t'o Ij l'' i hi I .t h tii'c\
11nlad u ,I' I*'.-1 1 t1 i .
A m 1LN- Lit 1 1 1 !- 1 ir I l> i i|' i t \licn thlc.\ 're
m a l .1I 11t -- 11 :1n1l b 'l. i !


SEE-S.41,'.


U


P anld dcini iln pI'I \' L .
.S'omn etil e l ln i.' Il -ani.Ltil'l i\\
On tlhe plank -.' I. -lii. and -pir.I'.A1 -
H old on ti-ht, .,r el,- ,,u'll 1i ll.


Life i. like the vame w\e pliy.
.Tlp- .ini1 dClI \\ns tl'rm 1 la to 1t.i\1.
Thi- ;ll\ ia c I .i. c to all, -
Hi.Ild I rn tight, or else you'll l
fall.


L. ..-


Q4.


t. _


r
r,
- "..




-i __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ _


kab




t y

b. -
*1 -..^---
r, 3 ,,^. ...-A- -
^^^^... :;. ^/^^
'' ^ 'eA s-.,t.^> ''


THE TOY SOLDIERS.

\ J i E'IE .nIl I olen ,liClicr-, ;nu l F111 unill' :rm is paint.
A l l lt't :"11 ; 'f il ,ij\ : i_,i r LiE', t ,, r h ; t n> ,'r [!lint.

A t'LII liti't 1,.ii \ li:. ii I-i\ t- i hi. t- J tlc ,:it cri dau\.


T hO l 1 *i r aLc- hi\ 1 i c' .i -, \ _'t 'A.\ t: 1LII I theicn l t.he e:
L : <1." 1,,ngl.nlt t Oiiir |i .-t l.- |,,' I .r 1"_'- -- ",f t ,i l' e m '-.Ii,, 1 knr,\v ;
1i' ,\ lh t e f.\ r k ,1 ,,f ;.-i11. \ l:Ir,_"A C li tI Iit Im I l r i 111i 1i .,ntI.
It L.,i iu n, t -trili. ,k In intf -,i(i n ,l 'l ,. -I.I i.' l IC'a 1t-.

I lItnt 'l k t\-'. i,' lll\ I-Ii._-Lh ~ lli tl %Al,,,,, IdL.' n i ., !,,,I ll ;,ri .i:tn l,

A nHi l i th- 1l' h \ L- 1 1.11.- ',. \ n ,ihrIl I_ 1 ..1 i I .iid


.. l a tJ :l inn l said ni f t 111 1, Ic i ;l- I :>L-' Q !" W ut C1 1 i' i-. irnn -.-
M l 1111 is b )ack.
his back.


It'I

3% i

;~~~~~~-a,--


\'i II i i :11l iL t. .11
1 in I1, 1, -,
T 1 *L*' L I t [It .I Ck llr_ i t l ti I tl> I Tl l il alt-

iimir t 'I I II.
LI! p,'l .i i' .i i. ll' t'o Ij l'' i hi I .t h tii'c\
11nlad u ,I' I*'.-1 1 t1 i .
A m 1LN- Lit 1 1 1 !- 1 ir I l> i i|' i t \licn thlc.\ 're
m a l .1I 11t -- 11 :1n1l b 'l. i !


SEE-S.41,'.


U


P anld dcini iln pI'I \' L .
.S'omn etil e l ln i.' Il -ani.Ltil'l i\\
On tlhe plank -.' I. -lii. and -pir.I'.A1 -
H old on ti-ht, .,r el,- ,,u'll 1i ll.


Life i. like the vame w\e pliy.
.Tlp- .ini1 dClI \\ns tl'rm 1 la to 1t.i\1.
Thi- ;ll\ ia c I .i. c to all, -
Hi.Ild I rn tight, or else you'll l
fall.


L. ..-


Q4.


t. _


r
r,
- "..




I -~- Q 1


HILDA.


W HENEVER Hilda read fairy tales,. he lbrgot everything else. She even
forgot that sh --was Hilda, and thought herself somebody else,--generally
the Princess who married the Prince, though sometimes she was the Goo.d
Fairy, and gave everybody what they wi.hld for, long before they asked for it.
One day, it was in the holidays, she sat down in her favorite place to read
Cinde-rella, and, of course, thought she was Cinderella herself. She felt very miserable
when the sisters went to the ball without her, and very glad when the Fairy God-
mother popped into the kitchen, and said she might go too.
Of course she ran very fast to fetch the Pumpkin, which turned into a beau-
tiful carriage. Hilda had never been to a real ball before, you know; but she
enjoyed the story-book ball all the more; but still, as she was a kind little girl, she
really was sorry to see that nobody noticed the ugly sisters, for all their silks and
satins and gay feathers.
And what a sweet moment that was when the Prince came and danced with
her! How her glass slippers twinkled beneath her white satin dress, and how
everybody looked at them and wondered who Cinderella could be! At last the clock
struck twelve! It was twelve, for Hilda counted every
stroke; and just as she was going to tear herself away
from the Prince, and the Prince was handing her a
bouquet, somebody said, "It's striking twelve, Hilda,
darling!" And there stood her little sister Maggie,
-; Sholding out a prc-tty bunch of flowers, waiting to be
.-. taken home to dinner!


ONE, TWO.


O\NE, two,
.- Buckle my shoe;
.. -Three, 6.i,
Shut tlh door;
Nine, ten,
A good fat hen;
Elevetn, twelve,
\VWho will delve?
Thirteen, four-teen.
Maid's a-courting; ,
Fifteen, sixteen,
Maid's a-kissing;
Seventeen, eighteen.
Maid's in waiting:
Nineteen, tentt\.
Mv stomach's empty.


7i.


ive, six,
ck up sticks;
.'ven. eight, ''.
ay then straight;



&qiw




B^^^^^'A




i ArtW '0 f

B~i~i"- ,B|


-- .




I -~- Q 1


HILDA.


W HENEVER Hilda read fairy tales,. he lbrgot everything else. She even
forgot that sh --was Hilda, and thought herself somebody else,--generally
the Princess who married the Prince, though sometimes she was the Goo.d
Fairy, and gave everybody what they wi.hld for, long before they asked for it.
One day, it was in the holidays, she sat down in her favorite place to read
Cinde-rella, and, of course, thought she was Cinderella herself. She felt very miserable
when the sisters went to the ball without her, and very glad when the Fairy God-
mother popped into the kitchen, and said she might go too.
Of course she ran very fast to fetch the Pumpkin, which turned into a beau-
tiful carriage. Hilda had never been to a real ball before, you know; but she
enjoyed the story-book ball all the more; but still, as she was a kind little girl, she
really was sorry to see that nobody noticed the ugly sisters, for all their silks and
satins and gay feathers.
And what a sweet moment that was when the Prince came and danced with
her! How her glass slippers twinkled beneath her white satin dress, and how
everybody looked at them and wondered who Cinderella could be! At last the clock
struck twelve! It was twelve, for Hilda counted every
stroke; and just as she was going to tear herself away
from the Prince, and the Prince was handing her a
bouquet, somebody said, "It's striking twelve, Hilda,
darling!" And there stood her little sister Maggie,
-; Sholding out a prc-tty bunch of flowers, waiting to be
.-. taken home to dinner!


ONE, TWO.


O\NE, two,
.- Buckle my shoe;
.. -Three, 6.i,
Shut tlh door;
Nine, ten,
A good fat hen;
Elevetn, twelve,
\VWho will delve?
Thirteen, four-teen.
Maid's a-courting; ,
Fifteen, sixteen,
Maid's a-kissing;
Seventeen, eighteen.
Maid's in waiting:
Nineteen, tentt\.
Mv stomach's empty.


7i.


ive, six,
ck up sticks;
.'ven. eight, ''.
ay then straight;



&qiw




B^^^^^'A




i ArtW '0 f

B~i~i"- ,B|


-- .




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