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 Front Cover
 Dame Trot and her comical cat
 Back Cover






Group Title: Santa Claus series
Title: Old Dame Trot and her comical cat
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00081066/00001
 Material Information
Title: Old Dame Trot and her comical cat
Series Title: Santa Claus series
Physical Description: 18 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: McLoughlin Bros., inc ( Publisher )
Publisher: McLoughlin
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: c1891
 Subjects
Subject: Nursery rhymes -- 1891
Bldn -- 1891
Genre: Nursery rhymes
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00081066
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001869917
oclc - 02711464
notis - AJU4594

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Dame Trot and her comical cat
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
Full Text



















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iL\ME TROT was out walking one very fine day,
>.nd close by her side went her nimble dog, Tray,
Wh.hn all of a sudden she heard such a sound,
Of somebody crying, she had to look 'round.
And what do you think she beheld, the good soul?
Why, a dear little kitten as black as a coal,
That looked in her face with a pitiful Nlie\\ !"
As if it said, Please let me go home with you."
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DAME TROT AND HER COMICAL CAT.

Dame Trot took the kitten up close in her arms,
And stroked it, and quieted down its alarms,
And soon it was purring quite happy enough,
And the Dame said, "Why, Puss, you're as good as a muff!"
So Muff was the name that she gave to the cat,
For she found it would readily answer to that,
And when it lay curled on the floor in a fluff
It really and truly looked just like a muff.
'Twas the cunningest kitten that ever you saw,
With a little white mitten on each little paw,
And a little white collar of fur 'round its neck,
That never was seen with a stain or a speck.
Now Tray was as jealous as jealous could be,
For the pet of the household he wanted to be,
And he growled at Miss Muff when she
wanted to play,
And said very plainly, "Keep out
of my way!"
But Puss was forgiving and kind, 4
it is true,
Nor wanted to fight as so many cats do,
So she humped up her back like a camel, r
and went
To her place on the rug, where she slept quite content.

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"DAME TROT FED HER CAT ON THE NICEST OF MILK."


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DAME TROT AND HER COMICAL CAT.


Dame Trot fed her cat on the nicest of milk,
Till its fine suit of fur was as glossy as silk,
And pussy was grateful, so neat and so nice,
She soon rid the house of the rats and the mice.

One morning Dame Trot went off early to town,
To buy her some tea, and a calico gown,
And she said as she parted from Muff and from Tray,
" Now be very good children while I am away."


The dog said "Bow-wow," and the cat said "Miew-miew,"''
Just as if every word that was spoken they knew,
And Dame Trot went away with a smile on her face,
Quite sure that no robbers would enter her place.


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"THE CAT AND THE DOG SHE SAW DANCING TOGETHER."


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DAME TROT AND HER, COMICAL CAT.

And when she came back what a sight met her eyes!
She lifted her hands, and exclaimed with surprise;
For there on the floor---each as light as a feather---
The cat and the dog she saw dancing together!

Now kittens and children, said worthy Dame Trot,


Should always improve in their manners.


Why not?


And that Tray and Miss Muff might learn all they were able,
They each had a chair at their mistress's table.

Muff daintily ate from a nice china dish,
And helped herself freely to oysters and fish,
And out of a saucer of milk drank her fill,
And was careful indeed lest a drop she should spill.


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DAME TR OT AND HER COMICAL CAT.

One day when the ground was all covered with snow,
Puss begged to go out, but the Dame said No, no!
You'll get your feet wet, and then sick you will be,
And have to drink gallons of strong catnip tea."

But Pussy sat up as you wouldn't suppose,
And wagged her fore-paws alongside of her nose,
Till the Dame, much more ready to laugh than to scold,


Said, "Go out then;


but mind you come in when you're cold!"


How Pussy did frolic
and flourish around
In the snow, that was not


very deep on the


ground!


Now sliding off here, and then capering there,
And tossing the white flakes up high in the air.


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DAME TROT AND HER COMICAL CAT.


Then over and over she rolled with delight,
Till her coat was all spotted with patches of white,
And played in this way till, beginning to tire,
She was glad to come back to her place by the fire.
Now Puss had a doll that Dame
Trot bought to please her,
And gave it the beautiful name
of Louisa,
And when Kitty was lonesome or
wanted to play,
She'd cry for Loo! Loo! in a '
comical way.

The dollie was petted, was kissed
and caressed,
Though often quite roughly it
must be confessed,
And so pleased was Miss Puss
with Louisa's fair charms,
She took her cat-naps with the
doll in her arms.
Sometimes Master Tray would growl underneath
His breath, and get angry, and show his white teeth,
And all because Pussy, so graceful and slim,
At play with her doll, took no notice of him.





DAME TROT AND HER COMICAL CAT.










And once, I remember, oh, sad was the day,
The cat answered back in an impudent way,
And Tray was so jealous, the two had a fight,
And between them the doll was a terrible fright.
In a closet the catnip was kept on a shelf,
And Puss, though quite handy at helping herself,
Had been taught by Dame Trot better manners than that,
And was really a very remarkable cat,
For when she was ill-as was sometimes the case-
'She'd go to Dame Trot, and look up in her face,
Then run to the closet, and scratch on the door
Till some of the catnip was thrown on the floor.
Dame. Trot made a nice little dress for the cat,
All covered with ribbons and lace, and all that,
And a Normandy cap with the crown in a puff,
That was very becoming indeed to Miss Muff.






DAME TROT AND HER COMICAL CA .


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And when she was dressed she would sit in a chair,
And look all around with a ladylike air,
Through a pair of large spectacles over her nose,
And she cut a fine figure as you may suppose.

Dame Trot was well known, and her cat had great fame,
And children to visit them frequently came,
For though in their houses they had playthings enough,
They were much more amused by the antics of Muff.






DAME TROT AND HER COMICAL CAT.


She was better than any fine doll they possessed,
When in the long clothes like a babe she was dressed;
And in the dolls' carriage they took her to drive,
Delighted to know that the child was alive.

Sometimes they would get up a circus, and play
For hours at a time with the cat and dog Tray,
And such comical tricks would these animals do,
That the children all laughed, and the grown people too.

Puss would jump through a ring with
astonishing grace,
Or ride on Tray's back at a runaway
pace,
Or swing in the air from a rope they
let down,
While Tray was performing the part
of a clown.

But Dame Trot was not willing her
dog or her cat
Should day after day be so foolish
as that,
For children and animals need to be taught
That others grow weary of seeing them sport.



















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DAME TROT AND HER COMICAL CAT.


So she bought them some books and
she taught them to spell,
And really and truly they did very
well,
For soon they found out, after
many a spat,
D-O-G spelt dog, and C-A-T
spelt cat.
Muff learned in good season to make up her bed,
And was clever at baking both biscuits and bread;
She could sweep, she could dust, and take care of her room,
As if all her life she'd been used to a broom.
But Puss had one failing, she was fond of fine clothes,
And at poorly dressed people would turn up her nose,
And she studied the fashions and styles of the day,
And thought of them oft in her dreams, I daresay.
So one day when Dame Trot had gone out for a walk,
With her friends and her neighbors to have a good talk,
Puss dressed herself up in her best hat and feather,
And she and dog Tray left the cottage together.
Dame Trot coming home from her visit that day,
As the weather was fine took a roundabout way,
And turning a corner she nearly fell flat
With surprise, at beholding her dog and her cat.

































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DAME TROT AND HER COMICAL CAT.

For Tray was the pony; and there on his back,
Sat pretty Miss Muff in her fine suit of black;
And the Dame with her laughter so long and so loud
In a very few moments attracted a crowd.
"You're a very great lady, Miss Pussy," said she;
And Puss gave a simpering giggle---" Te-he !"
Or it sounded like that, for it never would do
For one in such grandeur to utter a Miew.
But Tray was uneasy and restless the while,
For he wasn't much given to putting on style,
And though pretty Pussy he could but admire,
To welcome his mistress was now his desire.
So he sprang to the side of
Dame Trot with a leap,
And down went the pussy-cat-i ------.--
all in a heap, J
CAnd her flounces and feathers
were draggled and torn,
You ne'er saw a creature so
crushed and forlorn.
Dear Puss," said Dame Trot, "'tis the love of fine clothes,
That brings on good people one half of their woes,
And sooner or later you're certain to find
That pride has a fall of the very worst kind.
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DAME TROT AND HER COMICAL CAT.


."You're a beautiful cat, and I'm free to confess,
You please me the most in your natural dress;"
And Puss, looking just as if ready to speak,
Raised a velvety paw, and then stroked the Dame's cheek.


Dame Trot held the kitten awhile in her lap
Where it had an exceedingly comforting nap,
SThen giving Miss Pussy another good hug,
SShe settled her down on the cushion so snug.


"TI'm tired and sleepy," the good woman said,
"And 'tis time I am sure that we all went to bed;
So good night!" said Dame Trot. "Bow-wow!" said dog Tray.
"Miew-miew!" said the cat. And they slept till next day.


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