Group Title: The Trinidad Historical Society publication.
Title: Publication
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00080962/00348
 Material Information
Title: Publication
Physical Description: no. : ; 26 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Historical Society of Trinidad and Tobago
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Port-of-Spain
Publication Date: 1932?-52?
Frequency: irregular
completely irregular
 Subjects
Subject: History -- Periodicals -- Trinidad   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Trinidad and Tobago -- Trinidad
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: no. 1-1042.
Numbering Peculiarities: Ceased publication.
Issuing Body: Issued 1932-35 by the society under its earlier name: Trinidad Historical Society.
General Note: Reprints of documents relating to the history of Trinidad.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00080962
Volume ID: VID00348
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 45882505

Full Text








23/12/1672.





THE HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF TRINIDAD
AND TOBAGO.

Publication No. 360.

Captain William Poole to His Majesty's Right Honourable and
Principal Officers and Commissioners of His Majesty's Navy.

Source :-Public Record Office. State Papers Colonial.
S.P. 29/131.

Published by the courtesy of the Master of the Rolls and the
Deputy Keeper of the Public Records.

H.M.S. David,
TOBAGO,
December 23rd, 1672.
RIGHT HONOURABLES
I formerly transmitted to you an account from the Barbados
of our design against this place where we arrived on the
i9th instant with seven small vessels more that transported
Sir Tobias Bridge and 6o Officers and soldiers. On the I8th
we landed the soldiers not in the place we designed but rather
in a place for destruction through the mistake of the guides,
being above 12 miles to their forts and most of it through such
inaccessible woods that the enemy or at least want of water,
would have destroyed them in their march.

Being advised hereof, I went ashore to Sir Tobias (and on
my way forbid those that were yet aboard to land) to persuade
him to re-embark his men which was done. All the while the
enemy were alarmed and were making what provisions they
could against our landing.

At night we consulted again about another landing place
but could not agree whereupon I sent my Master in my
pinnace to sound over the French Bay and see if there were
conveniency of landing which he did but coming near the
shore was repelled by their small shot.











The next morn betimes everything being ordered for
landing as we had resolved it in the bay next to their forts
(the enemy expecting us at the French quarters) which was
done without any opposition. After all were well landed
Within a mile and a half of their forts, I hastened to fit my
ship to lie before them whilst Sir Tobias attacked them by
land according as I promised him when he went ashore.

As I went in I found that the regiment was not up to the
fort which made the enemy attack us the sooner. By one of
the clock (my ship being made fast) I began to engage them
and continued until sunset then I desisted for fear that I
should annoy our friends in case they should attack but it
seems something prevented their approach.

Next morn betimes I expected another rubber from the
forts but was prevented by a flag of truce sent by Sir Tobias
to demand the surrender of the Island. This the Governor
absolutely denied pretending the Prince of Orange his interest
(not knowing that the small fort had spiked up their guns
and quitted their post).

On Saturday morn the Governor examined his position
and not finding himself capable of further resistance (some of
his men deserting him) sent a flag of truce with articles of
surrender (a copy whereof is here enclosed) and at 9 at night
we took possession of their forts.

The Governor and many of the Dutch were sent to
Curassow, the remainder of the Dutch and French I transported
to the Barbados. We have burnt and destroyed the settlement
so as to render it incapable of future resettling.

I have received much damage in the ship's hull, masts and
yards, viz.: main yard, maintopmast and mizzen mast incapable
of further service more than to patch them up to carry me to
the Barbados where I hope to refit.

This is all I offer at present from
Your Honours' most humble servant,


WIL POOLE.




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