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Group Title: Vocational, technical, and adult education : program of the Florida State Board for Vocational Education
Title: Projected program of the Florida State Board for Vocational Education for the fiscal year ..
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 Material Information
Title: Projected program of the Florida State Board for Vocational Education for the fiscal year ..
Series Title: Bulletin
Alternate Title: Program of the Florida State Board for Vocational Education for the fiscal year ..
Physical Description: v. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- State Board for Vocational Education
Publisher: Division of Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education, State Dept. of Education.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: 1968-1969
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Vocational education -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: 19-
General Note: At head of title: Vocational education.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00080861
Volume ID: VID00004
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AHQ5739
oclc - 22198011
alephbibnum - 001630952

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Title Page 1
        Title Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Table of Contents 1
        Table of Contents 2
        Table of Contents 3
        Table of Contents 4
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Full Text

























0 g 9 I


STATE DEPARTMENT
OF EDUCATION


sv oo 5 State Superintendent

F6 36 (b TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA
o, 'OE-SA
c.a.,


BULLETIN


MAY, 1968
















of the florida state

board for vocational

education for the

fiscal year






VOCATIONAL, TECHNICAL,

and ADULT EDUCATION


70E-15A













I. -


Tr .







BULLETIN 70E-15A


of the florida state
board for vocational
education for the
fiscal year

u1992-99


Imp'-'.,


DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL,
TECHNICAL, AND ADULT EDUCATION

CARL W. PROEHL, Assistant Superintendent


PROGRAM SERVICES


G. W. NEUBAUER -DIRECTOR


MAY, 1968









375. 0075-7
F563Gf b
k,7. -70E-Is
c~61 A







TABLE OF CONTENTS


Page

PROJECTED PROGRAM OF THE FLORIDA STATE BOARD FOR VOCATIONAL
EDUCATION FOR THE FY 1968-69 1

SUMMARY OF EMPLOYMENT DEMAND AND SUPPLY OF TRAINED PERSONNEL 3

THE STATE'S PLANS FOR AREA VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL SCHOOLS 9

PROGRAMS IN AREA VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL SCHOOLS IN OPERATION FY 1968-69 10

THE FLORIDA STATE ADVISORY COUNCIL FOR VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL EDUCATION 15

THE STATE'S PROGRAM PRIORITIES TO EXTEND AND IMPROVE VOCATIONAL-
TECHNICAL EDUCATION IN FY 1968-69 17

INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS TO BE EXPANDED IN FY 1968-69 18

NEW INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS TO BE PROVIDED IN FY 1968-69 19

S OFFICE OF EDUCATION INSTRUCTIONAL CODES AND TITLES 19-A

INSTITUTIONS PARTICIPATING IN VOCATIONAL AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION
PROGRAMS 20

IMPROVEMENT AND REPLACEMENT OF FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT, SPECIAL
NEEDS PROGRAMS, INNOVATIONS, AND OTHER SPECIAL PROGRAMS 21

S IMPROVEMENT AND REPLACEMENT OF FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT BY COUNTY
V,' AND BY OCCUPATIONAL FIELD ESTIMATED FY 1968-69 22

Programs for Persons with Special Needs 32

Innovations Planned in Vocational-Technical Education 32

Other Federal or State Programs 32

STATE OR FEDERAL PROGRAMS INVOLVING VOCATIONAL EDUCATION IN
ADDITION TO STATE PLAN PROGRAMS 33

Special Summer Programs 35

Special State Funding 35

THE CONSTRUCTION OF AREA VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL SCHOOLS 36

CONSTRUCTION PLANS FOR AREA VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS FY 1968-69 37

S THE STATE'S PLANS FOR STRENGTHENING VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL PROGRAMS 47

N. administration and Supervision 47

Teacher Training 63

SInstitutes, Workshops 63
N-,








































A








Page

Cooperative Arrangements, Special Pre-Service and In-Service
Education of Personnel, Conferences 64

Designated Vocational Education Teacher Training Institutions 64

DESIGNATED VOCATIONAL EDUCATION TEACHER TRAINING INSTITUTIONS 65

Vocational Guidance 67

Curriculum Development and Curriculum Materials 68

Research, Experimental, and Developmental Programs 69

Evaluation of Vocational Programs and Activities 70

The State's Plan for Work-Study Programs under the Vocational
Education Act of 1963 70

ESTIMATE OF ENROLLMENT AND FUNDS NEEDED FOR VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 71

Estimate of Total Expenditures for Vocational Education Purposes 73

Request for Transfer of Federal Funds 74

VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL EDUCATION EMPHASES FY 1968-69 75

Development of Post-Secondary Vocational-Technical Education 75

Programs for Persons with Special Needs 76











PROJECTED PROGRAM OF THE FLORIDA STATE
BOARD FOR VOCATIONAL EDUCATION FOR THE
FY 1968-69


Following is a description of the State Board's projected program of vocational-
technical education for FY 1968-69. It includes a review of employment opportunities
at various skill levels in non-professional sectors of the labor market, and describes
projected plans for meeting changing occupational needs.

Many data were gathered from the County Program Planning Guide. At the time of
preparation, guides had been received from most counties, and these were summarized
for this report. In addition to providing valuable information to help plan local
vocational programs, the guides have furnished information valuable in planning
for the development of the state's entire program of vocational and technical
education.

To study vocational programs and labor markets, each county reported courses
offered in the past year, courses to be offered in FY 1968-69, and employment
opportunities for trainees. The studies indicate a number of occupations with
good employment opportunities. Vocational programs to train youth and adults
for these occupations show program expansion potential in certain parts of the
state. Among the latter occupations are auto mechanic, secretary, registered
nurse, salesman, air conditioning and refrigeration mechanic, licensed practical
nurse, cook, and medical technologist.

Most assessments of employment opportunities in county planning guides are obtained
from the Florida State Employment Service, but local personnel also contribute
labor market information and evaluations. The following code was used by counties
in reporting employment opportunities along with vocational courses:

A Strong Demand
B Good Opportunities
C Local Supply Adequate
D Little Opportunity
E Supply Exceeds Demand

The following tables summarize projected employment demand and trained manpower
supply as it relates to the state's total program of vocational and technical
education in FY 1968-69 and for several ensuing years.

Total current employment was determined from reports of the U. S. Department of
Labor. Employment in major occupational areas was determined from analyses of census
data. For example, occupations for which home economics could provide the major
portion of the preparation required were identified and the number of persons needed
was projected. Total current employment was thus distributed over all major
occupational areaslisted. Employment in later years was projected as described
except that portions of major occupational areas were adjusted according to the
growth patterns established by staff personnel in consultation with the State
Employment Service.


- 1 -









Special attention is directed to projected employment in technical occupations.
The studies show relatively large percentage increases in these fields because
of Florida's present and projected economic growth. Data regarding training
shows increasing training output in technical occupations because of present
educational planning.

Future enrollments used to determine training output are based upon a yearly
increase in secondary vocational enrollments to reach 55% of students in grades
9-12 in 1975. Enrollments in post-secondary and adult preparatory programs were
projected to increase as a percent of the labor force and will also increase as
the labor force increases. Projected enrollments in each occupational area were
based somewhat upon increased guidance of students according to employment
opportunities in Florida and also upon increases in the percent of youth and
adults in vocational training programs.

The training output in vocational education was determined by examining enrollments
and completions in FY 1966-67 and using ratios established for the secondary level
and for the post-secondary and adult levels in succeeding years including FY 1972-
73. The training output in other sectors was determined by projecting the output
of the business sector for the entire state. This was done by using the output
in the Orange County area as reported by the Florida Employment Service in a
special study. The latter output, as a percent of the total state labor force
in the area involved, provided data to use in making estimates of the output of
the private sector for the entire state. To the latter was added the output of
other programs training for employment such as MDTA and the apprenticeship
program.


-2-








SUMMARY OF EMPLOYMENT DEMAND AND SUPPLY OF TRAINED PERSONNEL


State Florida


For Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 19_69


Projected Requirements Training Output
Current I/ Expansion Replacement Vocational Other 4/
Occupational Area Employment Needs Needs Total Education3/ Sectors Total

Agriculture- 107,293 5,364 5,364 1,454 188 1,642
Production

Agriculture- 193,128 9,656 9,656 19,312 2,570 11 2,581
Off Farm

Distribution & 579,384 34,763 28,969 63,732 8,665 7,129 15,794
Marketing ___

Health 42,918 6,438 2,575 9,013 1,753 1,753

Home Economics- 128,752 6,438 6,438 12,876 1,476 332 1,808
Gainful

Office 364,797 21,888 18,240 40,128 18,062 7,114 25,176

Technical 64,376 9,656 1,931 11,587 -1,360 428 1,788

Trade & 665,217 26,609 33,261 59,870 6,962 21,678 28,640
Industrial

Total 2,145,865 115,448 106,434 221,882 42,302 36,880 79,182


1/ Current employment related to number employed in occupations represented by O.E. code
instruction programs. (Employed in occupational areas listed.)
2/ Labor demand data supplied by Employment Service and from other sources.
34 Number completing vocational education programs during year at all levels.
4/ Includes completions from all sources, other than vocational education programs, such as
MDTA, apprenticeship, private sector, etc.


-3-









SUMMARY OF EMPLOYMENT DEMAND AND SUPPLY OF TRAINED PERSONNEL


State Florida


For Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1970


Projected Requifrements 2/ 1 Training Output
Current V/ Expansion Replacement Vocational Other_/
Occupational Area Employment Needs Needs Total Education 3/ Sectors Total

Agriculture- 112,121 5,606 5,606 1,698 197- 1,895
Production

Agriculture- 201,818 10,091 10,091 20,182 3,434 12 3,446
Off Farm

Distribution & 627,879 37,673 31,394 69,067 12,259 7,450 19,709
Marketing

Health 44,849 6,727 2,691 9,418 2,091 2,091

Home Economics- 134,545 6,727 6,727 13,454 2,262 347 2,609
Gainful

Office 381,212 22,873 19,061 41,934 20,763 7,434 28,197

Technical 67,273, 10,091 2,018 12,109 1,619 447 2,066

Trade & 672,729 26,909 33,636 60,545 8,329 22,654 30,983
Industrial

Total 2,242,4.26 121,091 111,224 232,315 52,455 38,,541 90,996


/ Current employment related to number employed in occupations represented by O.E. code
instruction programs. (Employed in occupational areas listed.)
2/ Labor demand data supplied by Employment Service and from other sources.
3/ Number completing vocational education programs during year at all levels.
4/ Includes completions from all sources, other than vocational education programs, such as
MDTA, apprenticeship, private sector, etc.


- 4-


- I .^ .


- -









SUMMARY OF EMPLOYMENT DEMAND AND SUPPLY OF TRAINED PERSONNEL


State Florida


For Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 19 71


j Current employment related to number employed in
instruction programs. (Employed in occupational
2/ Labor demand data supplied by Employment Service


occupations represented by O.E. code
areas listed.)
and from other sources.


3/ Number completing vocational education programs during year at all levels.
4/ Includes completions from all sources, other than vocational education programs, such as
MD2A, apprenticeship, private sector, etc.


-5-


Projected Requirements 2/ Training Output
Current 1/ Expansion Replacement Vocational Other 4/
Occupational Area Employment Needs Needs Total Education 3/ Sectors Total

Agriculture- 93,732 4,687 4,687 1,880 205 2,085
Production

Agriculture- 210,897 10,545 10,545 21,090 4,169 12 4,181
Off Farm_

Distribution & 656,126 39,368 32,806 72,174 16,194 7,785 23,979
Marketing

Health. 46,866 7,030 2,812 9,842 2,208 2,208

Home Economics- 164,031 8,202 8,202 16,404 3,198 362 3,560
Gainful

Office 398,362 23,902 a19,918 43,820 22,818 7,769 30,587

Technical 70,299 10,545 2,109 12,654 1,808 467 2,275

Trade & 702,993 28,120 35,150 63,270 9,751 23,673 33,424
Industrial

Total 2,343,306 127,712 116,229 243,941 62,026 40,273 102,299









SUMMARY OF EMPLOYMENT DEMAND AND SUPPLY OF TRAINED PERSONNEL


State Florida


For Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 19 72


Projected Requirements 2/ Training Output
Current I/ Expansion Replacement Vocational Other /
Occupational Area Employment Needs Needs Total Education3/ Sectors Total

Agriculture- 98,887 4,944 4,944 2,078 217 2,295
Production

Agriculture- 222,495 11,125 11,125 22,250 5,096 13 5,109
Off Farm

Distribution & 692,206 41,532 34,610 76,142 21,016 8,213 29,229
Marketing

Health 49,443 7,416 2,967 10,383 2,458 2,458

Home Economics- 173,052 8,653 8,653 17,306 4,335 382 4,717
Gainful

Office 420,268 25,216 21,013 46,229 25,116 8,196 33,312

Technical 74,165 11,125 2,225 13,350 2,055 493 2,548

Trade & 741,650 29,666 37,083 66,749 11,285 24,974 36,259
Industrial

Total 2,472,166 134,733 122,620 257,353 73,439 42,488 115,927


1/ Current employment related to number employed in
instruction programs. (Employed in occupational


occupations
areas listed(


represented
d,)


by O.E. code


2/ Labor demand data supplied by Employment Service and from other sources.
/ Number completing vocational education programs during year at all levels.
4/ Includes completions from all sources, other than vocational education programs, such as
MDTA, apprenticeship, private sector, etc.


-6-









SUMMARY OF EMPLOYMENT DEMAND AND SUPPLY OF TRAINED PERSONNEL


State Florida


For Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 19 73


1/ Current employment related to number employed in
instruction programs. (Employed in occupational
2/ Labor demand data supplied by Employment Service


occupations represented
areas listed.)
and from other sources.


by O.E. code


3/ Number completing vocational education programs during year at all levels.
4/ Includes completions from all sources, other than vocational education programs, such as
MDTA, apprenticeship, private sector, etc.


-7-


Projected Requirements 2/ Trainin Output
Current 1_/ Expansion Replacement Vocational Other 4/
Occupational Area Employment Needs Needs Totall Education 3/ Sectors Total

Agriculture- 104,323 5,216 5,216 2,193 299 2,422
Production

Agriculture- 234,727 11,736 11,736 23,472 5,854 13 5,867
Off Farm

Distribution & 730,263 43,816 36,513 80,329 26,141 8,665 34,806
Marketing

Health 52,162 7,824 3,130 10,954 2,624 2,624

Home Economics- 182,566 9,128 9,128 18,256 5,598 403 6,001
Gainful

Office 456,415 27,385 22,821 50,206 26,907 8,647 35,554

Technical 91,282 13,692 2,738 16,430 2,272 520 2,792

Trade & 756,345 30,254 37,817 68,071 12,800 26,348 39,14C
Industrial

Total 2,608,083 143,835 129,099 272,934 84,389 4k25 129,214








The summary of employment demand and supply shows a training output far below
projected needs in FY 1968-69. It is anticipated output will steadily increase
so that the 36% of the demand being met in FY 1968-69 will grow to 47% in FY
1972-73.


-8-




THE STATE'S PLANS FOR AREA VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL SCHOOLS


Thirty-four area vocational-technical centers and junior college departments have been designated,
fifteen of which are open in new facilities. Eleven more are expected to open in new facilities
in FY 1968-69 and the remaining eight are being planned or are under construction. Schools now
operating are designated (0) on the following map. Schools expected to open in new facilities in
FY 1968-69 are designated (N). The location of each school is indicated on the following chart.
Where a school serves more than one county, the school number is placed in each of the counties
in the service area.


r-:-.---r--f -. Tr. 1


ARE VCATIONL15 0) 0)3 b 0
32 32 ..o. . 11 13 N2 ..30


$AV 6 (0) tw.r '4 t#0
er 9 (0) 13..ly(0oo-I-.aBvad () (N) -






Conat e e Braento ,sn ai... J..o.., ,7 N ?9 5
AREA VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL CENTERS NOW OPERATING (0) ) ow
j IN 26 (N) voiuA
County Operated Junior College Operated r 2 14
---limli -a (0)
Bradford Starke) Union 12. Brevard Junior College 7 1 19
Broward Hollywood) (Cocoa) Brevard (N) (N) N,-
Lee Fort Myers) 13. North Florida Junior College .. I I N\
Manatee Bradenton) (Madison) Madison, Jefferson, 71N ...r. _
Orange Orlando) Lafayette s .. ..
Pinellas Clearwater) 14. Daytona Beach Junior College 28. Pl -\oJolA 2
Sarasota Sarasota) (Daytona) Volusia, Flagler SeO'i \
Suwannee Live Oak) Hamilton 15. Chipola Junior College 23
Taylor Perry) Dixie (Marianna) Jackson, Calhoun 2(N (N)2
Washington IChipley) Holmes -'- ,-'"-'
Leon Tallahassee) (N"AA0' A A'Ieawrm -1
4(0) 33 33 U i
JAN 31 31
AREA VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL CENTERS TO BEGIN OPERATING IN NEW- -.-
FACILITIES 1968-69 (N)3
cltoorrt IS --
County Operated Junior College Operated i, (
"3 u" ^20 (N)
Bay Panama City) 24. Lake City Junior College 20 (N)
Citrus Inverness)Hernando,Sumter (Lake City) Columbia, Baker, ... -
Esoambia Pensacola) Gilchrist ...J -.....
Lake Eustis) 25. Florida Keys Junior CollegeO Co., O WA
Palm Beach Riviera Beach) (Key West) Monroe coi 2 (0)
Dade Miami) 26. Central Florida Junior College -,
Polk Bartow) (Ooala) Marion, Levy :l
Hillsborough Tampa) (
25 21 (N)
N)
IN PLANNING OR UNDER CONSTRUCTION OPEN AFTER FY 1968-69 IN NEW FACILITIES

County Operated Junior College Operated

Seminole Sanford) 30. Florida Junior College (Jacksonville) ,Ao
Pasoo Dade City) Duval, Nassau
St. Johns St. Augustine) 31. Indian River Junior College (Fort Pierce) "
D r e


Indian niver, Martin, St ucOe, UOeechobee
32. Okaloosa Walton Junior College (Valparaiso)
Okaloosa, Walton
33. South Florida Junior College (Avon Park)
Highlands, Hardee, DeSoto
34. Santa Fe Junior College (Gainesville)
Alachua


-9-


27.
28.
29.


lay, ru nia




PROGRAMS IN AREA VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL SCHOOLS IN OPERATION FY 1968-69


The programs, by instructional type, of the twenty-six schools expected to be open in new facilities by the end of
FY 1968-69, are as follows. Secondary (S), Post-Secondary (PS), Adult (A), including preparatory and supplemental
students, and Persons with Special needs (X) are identified. Also identified are types of schools as combination
secondary and post-secondary (SPS), junior or community college (JC), and vocational-technical post-secondary
schools (T).


NAME OF SCHOOL


ADDRESS


TYPE OF SCHOOL


VOC. PROGRAM
(AG., DE, ETC.)


LEVEL OF PROGRAM
(S, PS, A, X)


Bay County Area Vocational-
Technical Center







Bradford-Union Counties
Vocational-Technical School




Brevard Junior College
Vocational-Technical
Division





Broward Vocational-
Technical Center




Central Florida Junior
College


Drawer 820
Panama City 32401
1st Congressional District






Drawer 939
Starke 32091
Bradford County
2nd Congressional District


Cocoa 32924
Brevard County
5th Congressional District





Post Office Box 8369
Fort Lauderdale 33310
Broward County
10th Congressional District


Post Office Box 1388
Ocala 32670
4th Congressional District


SPS








SPS





JC







SPS





JC


Agriculture
Distributive
Health
Home Economics(Gainful)
Home Economics(Useful)
Trade & Industrial
Office
Technical

Agriculture
Home Economics(Gainful)
Trade & Industrial
Office
Technical

Distributive
Health
Home Economics(Gainful)
Home Economics(Useful)
Trade & Industrial
Office
Technical

Distributive
Health
Home Economics(Gainful)
Trade & Industrial
Office

Agriculture
Health
Trade & Industrial
Office
Technical


A
S, A
A
A
A, X
S, PS, A,
S, PS, A,
S, A

S, A, X
S, A, X
S, A, X
S, A, X
S, A, X


PS, A,
PS, A,
S, PS,
PS, A,
S, PS,
PS, A,
PS, A,


X
X
A, X
X
A, X
X
X


S, A.
PS, A
S, A
S, PS, A
S, A








NAME OF SCHOOL


Chipola Junior College
Vocational-Technical
Division



Citrus Vocational-
Technical Center


Daytona Beach Junior
College Vocational-
Technical Division



Florida Keys Junior College
Vocational-Technical
Division


George Stone Vocational-
Technical Center





Hillsborough County
Vocational-Technical
Center


ADDRESS


TYPE OF SCHOOL


Marianna 32446
Jackson County
2nd Congressional District



Post Office Box 38
Inverness 32650
Citrus County
4th Congressional District

Post Office Box 1111
Daytona Beach 32015
Volusia County
4th Congressional District


801 Fort Street
Key West 33040
Monroe County
12th Congressional District

215 West Garden Street
Pensacola 32502
Escambia County
1st Congressional District



105 West Ross Avenue
Tampa 33602
Hillsborough County
6th Congressional District


SPS






SPS


VOC. PROGRAM
(AG., DE, ETC.)

Distributive
Health
Trade & Industrial
Office
Technical

Agriculture
Distributive
Trade & Industrial
Office

Distributive
Health
Trade & Industrial
Office
Technical

Health
Trade & Industrial
Office
Technical


Agriculture
Distributive
Trade & Industrial
Office
Technical
Health

Health
Home Economics(Gainful)
Home Economics(Useful)
Trade & Industrial
Office
Technical


LEVEL OF PROGRAM
(S. PS, A, X)


S, PS, A
PS, A
S, PS, A
PS, A
S, PS, A


S, PS,
S, PS,
S, PS,
S, PS,


PS, A
PS, A
S, PS, A, X
PS, A
S, PS, A

PS
S, A
PS, A
S, PS, A


A, X
A, X
A, X
A, X
A, X
A, X


S, PS
A
S, A
S, PS, A
S, PS, A
S, PS, A






NAME OF SCHOOL


Lake City Junior College
Vocational-Technical
Division




Lake County Vocational-
Technical Center





Lee County Vocational-
Technical Center


Lewis M. Lively Area
Vocational-Technical
School


Lindsey-Hopkins
Education Center


ADDRESS


TYPE OF SCHOOL


Lake City 32055
Columbia County
2nd Congressional District




201 West
Burleigh Boulevard
Tavares 32778
Lake County
4th Congressional District


Drawer 2238
Fort Myers 33902
Lee County
9th Congressional District

Tallahassee 32301
Leon County
2nd Congressional District


JC






SPS






SPS


SPS


1410 N. E. Second Avenue
Miami 33132
Dade County
llth Congressional District


VOC. PROGRAM
(AG., DE, ETC.)


Agriculture
Distributive
Health
Trade & Industrial
Office
Technical

Agriculture
Distributive
Health
Home Economics(Gainful)
Trade & Industrial
Office.

Distribution
Health
Trade & Industrial
Office

Distributive
Health
Home Economics(Gainful)
Home Economics(Useful)
Trade & Industrial
Office
Technical

Distributive
Health
Home Economics(Gainful)


LEVEL OF PROGRAM
(S, PS, A, X)


S, PS, A
PS
PS, A
S, PS, A
S, PS, A
S, PS, A

S, PS, A
S, PS
PS
S, PS
S, PS, A
S, PS, A

A, X
PS
S, PS, A
S, PS, A


S, PS, A, X
PS, A
S, PS, A, X
S, A
S, PS, A, X
S, PS, A
S, PS, A


A, X
PS
A, X











NAME OF SCHOOL

Manatee County
Vocational-Technical
Center


Mid-Florida Technical
Institute




North Florida Junior
College Vocational-
Technical Division


i Palm Beach County
Vocational-Technical
Center


Pinellas Technical
Institute,



Polk County Vocational-
Technical Center


ADDRESS

Box 2069
Bradenton 33505
Manatee County
7th Congressional District


2900 West Oak Ridge Road
Orlando 32809
Orange County
5th Congressional District


Madison 32340
Madison County
2nd Congressional District


810 Gardenia Street
West Palm Beach 33401
Palm Beach County
9th Congressional District



6100 154 Avenue North
Clearwater 33516
Pinellas County
8th Congressional District

Route 1, Box 71E
Bartow 33830
Polk County
7th Congressional District


TYPE OF SCHOOL


SPS


SPS


VOC. PROGRAM
(AG., DE, ETC.)

Agriculture
Health
Home Economics(Gainful)
Trade & Industrial
Office

Distributive
Home Economics(Useful)
Trade & Industrial
Office
Technical

Agriculture
Health
Home Economics(Useful)
Trade & Industrial
Office
Technical

Distributive
Health
Home Economics(Useful)
Trade & Industrial
Office
Technical


Agriculture
Trade & Industrial
Technical


Agriculture
Health
Trade & Industrial
Office
Technical


LEVEL OF PROGRAM
(S, PS, A, X)

S, PS, A, X
PS, X
X
S, PS, A, X
S, PS, A


S, PS, A
PS
A
S, PS, A
S, PS, A
S, A


A, X
PS, A
A
S, PS, A, X
PS, A
S, PS, A


PS, A,
PS, A,
PS, A,


S, A
PS
S, PS, A
S, A, X
S, A






NAME OF SCHOOL


Sarasota County
Vocational-Technical
Institute


Suwannee-Hamilton Counties
Vocational-Technical Center


ADDRESS


TYPE OF SCHOOL


1001 S. Washington Blvd.
Sarasota 33577
Sarasota County
7th Congressional District


Pine Street
Live Oak 32060
Suwannee County
2nd Congressional District


SPS


VOC. PROGRAM
(AG., DE, ETC.)

Distributive
Health
Home Economics (Useful)
Trade & Industrial
Office
Technical

Agriculture
Distributive
Health
Home Economics(Gainful)
Trade & Industrial
Office


LEVEL OF PROGRAM
(S, PS, A, X)


S, A
PS, A
A
S, A
S, A
S


S, A
S, PS, A, X
PS, A
S, X
S, PS, A, X
S, PS, A


Taylor-Dixie Counties
Vocational-Technical
Center
I-i
Washington-Holmes
Counties Vocational-
Technical Center


Post Office Box 509
Perry 32347
Taylor County
2nd Congressional District

Chipley 32428
Washington County
1st Congressional District


SPS




SPS


Agriculture
Distributive
Trade & Industrial
Office

Agriculture
Distributive
Trade & Industrial
Office


PS
PS,
PS,
PS,

A
A
PS,
A


X
X
A, X



A


94b(aCllllil~e~a~








THE FLORIDA STATE ADVISORY COUNCIL FOR VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL EDUCATION


Following are the members of the Florida State Advisory Council on Vocational-
Technical Education for FY 1968-69, including names of members and the position
held in labor or management, by organizational affiliation, enabling them to meet
State Plan requirements.


NAME
--


TITLE


QUALIFICATIONS


Agricultural Education

Vacant



Business Education


Mr. E. W. Hopkins, Jr.
Mutual Federal Savings & Loan
Post Office Box 1969
Pensacola, Florida 32502


Executive Vice-President


Business leader


Distributive Education


Mr. James E. Gorman
Florida Retail Federation
American Heritage Building
Jacksonville, Florida 32202


Health Occupations Education

Miss Virginia Albaugh, R. N.
Orange Memorial Hospital
Orlando, Florida 32800


Home Economics Education

Mrs. E. William Gautier
1200 Magnolia Street
New Smyrna Bch, Florida 32069


General Manager


Director of Nursing


Homemaker


Business leader in
distributive fields


Contacts with many
health-related
occupations


Interest in home
economics education


Industrial Education

Mr. William E. Allen
Florida AFL-CIO
Post Office Box 7097
Tampa, Florida 33603


Secretary-Treasurer


Leader in labor
organizations


- 15 -







QUALIFICATIONS


Technical Education


Mr. Walter H. Clausen
Engineering Technical Services
Minneapolis-Honeywell
13350 U. S. Highway 19
St. Petersburg, Florida 33733


Manager


Close contact with
needs in technical
occupations


Higher Education


Dr. Roy F. Bergengren, Jr.
Daytona Beach Junior College
Daytona Beach, Florida 32015


President


Leader in the junior
college movement in
the state


Labor


Mr. Charles Harris
Florida AFL-CIO
Post Office Box 537
Allapattah Station
Miami, Florida 33142


County Superintendent of
Public Instruction

Mr. J. Hartley Blackburn
Manatee County Board of
Public Instruction
Post Office Box 2069
Bradenton, Florida 33504


President


Superintendent


Leader in labor
organizations


Close contact with
needs and resources
of county schools


Executive Secretary


Dr. Carl W. Proehl
Vocational, Technical, and
Adult Education
State Department of, Education
Knott Building, Room 204
Tallahassee, Florida 32304


Assistant Superintendent


Leader in vocational,
technical, and adult
education activities
in Florida


Consultant


Dr. Doak S. Campbell
Board of Associated
Consultants in Education
1001 High Road
Tallahassee, Florida 32304


Chairman


Close contact with all
levels of education
for many years


- 16 -


NAME
--


TITLE







THE STATE'S PROGRAM PRIORITIES TO EXTEND AND IMPROVE
VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL EDUCATION IN FY 1968-69


The state's vocational-technical programs in 1968 which may be extended and/or
improved in FY 1968-69 are listed below. The levels of programs used are the
same as in earlier tables (S, PS, A, X).

Data below are from reports received from counties which show enrollments in
vocational programs by level of instruction in 1968 and estimates for 1969.
A program is defined as instruction in a county in one or more classes, or
blocks of time, leading to employment in an occupational field, i. e,, auto
mechanics, dental assisting, and food services.


LEVEL OF
PROGRAM PROGRAM

Agricultural S
Production and PS
Agriculture A
Off-Farm* X

Distribution & S
Marketing* PS
A
X

Diversified* S

Health S
PS
A
X

Home Economics S
Gainful & Useful PS
A
X

Trade & Industrial S
PS
A
X

Office* S
PS
A
X

Technical S


NUMBER OF
PROGRAMS


NUMBER OF
TEACHERS

268
13
13
10


100
49
267
2


247
119
366
19


28
109
81


8
215
31
3

775
27
253
27

416
131
611
24


49
228
166


ESTIMATED
ENROLLMENT

16,177
249
921
641

3,599
1,284
20,580
968


2,946

441
3,500
2,000
118

87,841
237
35,061
125

11,952
2,720
34,547
362

10,855
9,954
55,130
267

613
10,500
5,500


ESTIMATED NO. TO
COMPLETE THIS
COMING FY


.4,024




8,665


1,753




1,476




6,962




18,062




1,360


* The "Number of Programs Column" is not meaningful because OE taxonomy numbers may
refer to a complete course or to units of instruction within a single course as
Florida programs are presently organized and preliminary planning reports from
counties do not always differentiate between them. Enrollments, however, are
not duplicated. 17 -







INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS TO BE EXPANDED IN FY 1968169


Instructional programs to be expanded in FY 1968-69 by level and the number of programs,
adcitionalteaqhers, and estimated additional enrollments are listed below.

A program is defined as instruction in a county in one or more classes, or blocks of
time, leading to employment in an occupational field, i. e., auto mechanics, dental
assisting, and food service.


NO, OF ESTIMATED
LEVEL OF PROGRAM NO. OF ADDTEACHERS ADDITIONAL
(S, PS, A, X) PROGRAMS '~TNE OR EXP.PROG-**-ENROLLMENT


See attached
details of new
and expanded
programs


Health


1Home Economics
Gainful & Useful


75
61
136
10


Trade &,
Industrial



Office*-




Technical


INSTRUCTIONAL'
PROGRAMS
(OE CODE)'

Agriculture*




Distributive*'




Diversified*


EST. NO,
TO COMPLETE
FY 1969-if any**

526




1,572


132


1,646
111
557
43

861
414
3,499
32

755

17
1,015
588
98

6,773
15
3,373
811

2,275
1,387
9,190
307

1,611
1,357
14,720
37

181
1,579
972
104


* The ":imiber of Programs Column" is not meaningful because OE taxonomy numbers may
refer to a complete course or to units of instruction within a single course as
Florida programs are presently organized, and preliminary planning reports from
counties do not always differentiate between them. Enrollments, however, are not
duplicated.
** Data not available *** The data did not show separately the number of additional
teachers for expanded and new programs. See following
chart for the total additional teachers.
18 -


1,831




233






NEW INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS TO BE PROVIDED IN FY 1968-69


New instructional programs to be offered in FY 1968-69 for the first time in a locality
according to information provided by counties are listed below.

A program is defined as instruction in a county in one or more classes, or blocks of
time, leading to employment in an occupational field, i. e., auto mechanics, dental
assisting, and food service.


INSTRUCTIONAL
PROGRAMS
(OE CODE)

Agriculture*


NO. OF
LEVEL OF PROGRAM NO. OF ADD, TEACHERS
(S, PS, A, X) PROGRAMS NEW OR EXP,PROG.

S See attached 19
PS details of new 8
A and expanded 16
X programs 2


Distributive*




Diversified*


ESTIMATED
ADDITIONAL
ENROLLMENT


308
242
599
240

388
337
875
103

225


EST. NO. TO
COMPLETE
FY 1969-if any**

310




557


Health


Home Economics
Gainful & Useful


Trade and
Industrial



Of fice*




Technical


112
571
1,381
284

245
154
11,216
167

2,295
1,186
3,777
299

791
362
715
172

148
541
778
118


679


1,058




483




130


* The "Number of Programs Column" is not meaningful because OE taxonomy numbers may
refer to a complete course or to units of instruction within a single course as
Florida progrnmp are presently organized, and preliminary planning reports from
counties do not always differentiate between them. Enrollments, however, are
not duplicated.

* Data not available


- 19 -









OFFICE OF EDUCATION

INSTRUCTIONAL CODES AND TITLES-


EXPANSION I iEW PROGRAMS
S I PS I A X S | PS A X


01.0000 AGRICULTURE

0100 Agricultural Production 33 2 4 1, 1 2 4 2
0200 Agricultural Supplies 22 2 1 1
0300 Agricultural Mechanics '23 1 3 1 2 5 12 2
0400 Agricultural Products 17 1 2 1
0500 Ornamental Horticulture 27 4 6 3 2 4 9 3
0600 Agricultural Resources 15 2 1
0700 Forestry 15 1 4 2 1
9900 Other Agriculture (Occ'.or Voc. Field) 16 5 2 1 6 2 1 1
Farm Welding 1
Agriculture, General 1


04.0000 DISTRIBUTION AND MARKETING

0101 Advertising Services 6 1 4 2 1
0102 Apparel and Accessories 9 3 2 4
0103 Automotive and Petroleum 12 1 3 2
0104 Finance and Credit 6 1 3 1 2
0105 Food Distribution 15 2 2 1 1
0106 Food Services -8 4 6 2 1 8
0107 General Merchandise 11 3 1 4 5
0108 Hardware, Building Materials, Farm
and Garden Supplies and Equipment 5 1 1
0109 Home Farnishing 4 1
0110 Hotel and Lodging 5 5 6 2 4 1
0111 Insurance 3 1 7 1 2
0112 International Trade 3 2
0113 Management (General-Miscellaneous) 7 2 5 2
0114 Marketing (General) 5 4 3 3 1 4
0115 Mid-Management 3 9 5 1 2 1
0116 Real Estate 2 1 13 1 2
0117 Retailing (General-Miscellaneous)NEC 14 1 8 3 3 10 1
0118 Transportation 2 2 2
0119 Wholesaling (General-Miscellaneous)Nc 6 1 1
0199 Ouher Instructional Programs(occ. or 5 3 16 1 2 2 2
Voc. Field)
Job Entry 1
Commercial Floral Design 1
Creative Selling 1
Sales and Marketing 1.
Business Management 1 1
Distribution Ed. Coop. Training 1
Supervisory Training 1
Project D. E. 1
19-A






EXPANSION II NEW PROGRAMS
S IPS A XII S PS IA X


07.0000 HEALTH OCCUPATIONS

0100 Dental Services

0101 Dental Assistant 1 3 1 1
0102 Dental Hygienist(Associate Deme) 2
0103 Dental Laboratory Technician 2 1

0200 Medical Services

0201 Cytology Technician
(Cytotechnologist)
0202 Histology Technician
0203 Medical Laboratory Assistant
0204 Nurse, Associate Degree
0205 Practical (Vocational) Nurse 1 7 9 2 3 1
0206 Nurses': Aide 1 1 7 2 2 1 7 1

0208 Hospital Food Service Supervisor
0209 Inhalation Therapy Technician

0211 Medical X-ray Technician
(Radiologic Technologist)
0212 Optician
0213 Surgical Technician (Operating
Room Technician)
0214 Occupational Therapy Assistant
0215 Physical Therapy Assistant

9900 Other (Opcior;)Voc. Field)
Hospital Food Service Worker 2 .1 1 1 2
Hospital Ward Clerk 1 3
Masseur 1 1
Medical Assistant 3 1 1
Medical Laboratory Technician (CIA) 2 2 -2
Medical Secretary 3 2 1 4
Optometric Assistant 2 1
Radiological (X-ray) Worker 2 5
Registered Nurse 9 3 2 2
Surgical Technician 2 1
Other Health 7 3 2 5 12 1
Orderly
Mental Health Technology Worker 1


09.0000 HOME ECONOMICS

0100 Homemaking--Preparation for Personal,
Home, and Family Living 58 1 21 14 2 -4 1

0101 Comprehensive Homemaking or
Home Economics
0102 Child Development
0103 Clothing and Textiles
0104 Consumer Education
0105 Family Health
0106 Family Relations

19-B






EXPANSION If EW PROGRAM
S IPS IA X S PS A X


0107 Foods and Nutrition
0108 Home Management
0109 Housing and Home Furnishings
0199 Other Homemaking .

0200 Occupational Preparation

0201 Care and Guidance of Children 4 1 1 2 3 7 2
0202 Clothing Management, Production,
and Services 2 7 3 7 1
0203 Food Management, Production,
and Services 5 7 1 2 6
0204 Home Furnishings, Equipment,
and Services 1 1 3 2 6 1
0205 Institutional and Home Manage-
ment and Supporting Services 1 1 3 1 2
0299 Other Occunational Preparation


9900 Other 5 2 5 1 1


14.0000 OFFICE OCCUPATIONS

0100 Accounting and Computing 5 11 17 2 1 2
0200 Business Data Processing System 4 6 8 1
0300 Filing, Office Machines, and General
Office Clerical 28 10 20 1 4 3 7 2
0400 Information Communication 3 2 5
0500 Materials Support, Transporting,
Storing, and Recording 1
0600 Personnel, Training, and Related 2 1 1
0700 Stenographic, Secretarial, & Related 22 19 21 1 5 1 5 1
0800 Supervisory and Administrative
Management 3 3 3 1 1
0900 Typing and Related 13 6 6 1 1 1 4 3
1000 Miscellaneous Offic-
9900 Other, NEC (Occ,.or Voc. Field)
C. B. E. Training 5 1
Bookkeeping 2 1 2
Business Machines 1
Secretarial Training 3 1 2
Shorthand 1
Legal Secretary Training 1
Business Communications 1
Business Math 2
Office Machines 1 4 1 2
Administrative Secretary Training 1
VOE Directing Time Training 1
Machine Shorthand 1
Day Business Education Training 1
Keypunch Training 1
Bookkeeping Machines 1
Secretarial Science 1
VOE Training 5 2 1 1

19-C









E. R. E.
Stenograph Machine Training
Medical Secretary
Accounting Machines Electronics
1st and 2nd Year Secretarial Training
Business English Training
Office Machine Operator
General Business Administrator
Aviation Administration
Library Technical Aid LIB
VOE II Training


16.0000 TECHNICAL'

0100 Engineering Related Technology

0101 Aeronautical Technology

0103 Architectural Technology
(Building Construction)
0104 Automotive Technology
0105 Chemical Technology
0106 Civil Technology
0107 Electrical Technology
0108 Electronics Technology
0109 Electro-Mechanical Technology
0110 Environmental Control Technology
0111 Industrial Technology
0112 Instrumentation Technology
0113 Mechanical Technology
0114 Metallurgical Technology
0115 Nuclear Technology
0116 Petroleum Technology
0117 Scientific Data Processing
0199 Other Related Technology

0500 Other Technical Education, NEC

0501 Chemical Technology
0502 Commercial Pilot Training
0503 Fire and Safety Technology

0505 Marine Technology
0506 Police Science Technology
0599 Other .i ;

9900 Other (Occ..or)Voc. Field)
Aerospace Technology
Air Conditioning & Refrigeration
Technology
Architectural & Building Construction
Technology
Building & Contracting Technology
Civil Engineering Technology
Drafting & Design Technology


19-D





EXPANSION NEW PROGRAMS
S PS IA X S PS A X

Electronic Data Processing 2 8 8 1 1 3 4
Graphic Arts Technology 1 4 1
Industrial Managtmeht Technology 2 2 1
Law Enforcement Technology 8 4 2 3
Mechanical Design Technology 3 1 2 1 3
Radiological Health Technology 1
Technical Mathematics 1
Applied Digital Electronics 1
Architectural & Civil Technology 1 1
Mechanical Engineering Technology 1 1
Electronic Engineering Technology 1 1
Microminiaturization Technology 1 1
General English Technology 1
Library 1
Mechanical Production 1
Data Processing 1 1 1 1
Radio-TV Production RTV 1
Computer Science Technology 1
Engineering-General EGN 1
Fire Science 1
Holt Law Enforcement Institute 1
Computer Programming 1 1
Quality Control & Reliability 2 1
Technical Writing 1 1 1 2
Electrical/Electronics Technology 1 1
Optics Technology 1 1 1
Fire Protection Technology 1 1


L7.0000 TRADES AND INDUSTRY

0100 Air Conditioning 6 5 13 7 5 8

0101 Cooling
0102 Heating
0103 Ventilating (Filtering and
Humidification)
0199 Other Air Conditioning"

0200 Appliance Repair 6 2 1 1 4 4 8 1

0300 Automotive Industries 8 4 1 1 5 1 6

0301 Body and Fender
0302 Mechanics 17 8 19 2 12 4 16 4
0303 Specilization
0399 Other Automotive Industries


0400 Aviation Occupations 2 2 2 1 3

0401 Aircraft Maintenance
0402 Aircraft Operations
0403 Ground Operations

0500 Blueprint Reading & Estimating 11 2 1 1
19-E






EXPANS ION NEW PROGRAMS
S PS A X S PS. A X

0600 Business Machine Maintenance 1 3 1 1 1

0700 Commercial Art Occupations

0800 Commercial Fishery Occupations

0900 Commercial Photography Occupations

1000 Construction and Maintenance Trades

1001 Carpentry 3 1 11 2 1 3 2
1002 Electricity
1003 Heavy Equipment(Construction)
1004 Masonry
1005 Painting and Decorating 1 2 1
1006 Plastering
1007 Plumbing and Pipefitting 8
1099 Other Construction and
Maintenance Trades

1100 Custodial Services (& Building
Maintenance) 2 2 2

1200 Diesel Mechanic 2 2 1 1 2

1300 Drafting Occupations 12 6 13 7 4 7

1400 Electrical Occupations

1401 Industrial Electrician 4 7 2 3 2
1402 Linemen
1403 Motor Repairman
1499 Other Electrical Occupations


1500 Electronics Occupations

1501 Communications (Radio) 5 1
1502 Industry
1503 Radio/Television 12 6 8 1 5 6 10
1599 Other Electronics Occupations


1600 Fabric Maintenance Services

1601 Drycleaning 2 1 3
1602 Laundering
1699 Other Fabric Maintenance
Services

1700 Foremanship, Supervision, and
Management Development

1800 General Continuation

1900 Graphic Arts Occupations

19-F





EXPANSION I NEW PROGRAMS
S PS I Aj IX S I PS A I X


2000 Industrial Atomic Energy Occupations

2001 Installation, Operation, and
Maintenance of Reactors
2002 Radiography
2003 Industrial Uses of Radio-
Isotopes
2099 Other Industrial Atomic
Energy Occupations ; .

2100 Instruments Maintenance and Repair
Occupations (Including watchmaking 1 2
and repair)

2200 Maritime Occupations

2300 Metalworking Occupations

2301 Foundry
2302 Machine Shop 8 4 11 2 1 4
2303 Machine Tool Operation
2304 Metal Trades (Combined)
2305 Sheet Metal 5 1 10 2 2 3
2306 Welding 6 3 15 1 1 4 6 2
2399 Other Metalworking Occupations


2400 Metallurgy Occupations

2500 Nucleonic Occupations

2600 Personal Services

2601 Barbering 1
2602 Cosmetology 13 14 6 3 3 5 2
2699 Other Personal Services

2700 Plastics Occupations

2800 Public Service

2801 Fireman Training 4 2
2802 Law Enforcement Training 1 1 14 1 2
2899 Other Public Services' ,-i

2900 Quantity Food Occupations

2901 Baker
2902 Cook/Chef (Commercial) 6 2 1 1 1 4 1
2903 Meat Cutter
2904 Waiter/Waitress 2
2999 Other Quantity Food
Occupations .

3000 Refrigeration

19-G





EXPANSION NEW PROGRAMS
S I PS A X S PS A XI


3100 Small Enginer Repair (Internal
Combustion)

3200 Stationary Energy Sources Occupations

3201 Electric Power and Generating
Plants
3202 Pumping Plants
3299 Other Stationary Energy Sources
Occupations ..:s .

3300 Textile Production and Fabrication

3301 Dressmaking 1 2 1
3302 Tailoring 3 1 4
3399 Other Textile Production and
Fabrication x ,i.P e

3400 Shoe Manufacturing/Repair 1

3500 Upholstering 2 1 1 3

3600 Woodworking Occupations

3601 Millwork and Cabinet Making
3699 Other Woodworking Occupations


9900 Other Trades and Industry
Occupations (Occ.'or'Voc. Field) 1
Brick and Blocklaying 10 2 13 7 6 4
Cabinet Making 7 3 5 1 2 3
Commercial and Advertising Art 5 2 5 2 1 1
Electric Line Service & Repair 3
Electric Wiring 2 1 10 2 2
Electronics, Industrial 6 2 8 2 1 1
Electronics Mechanics & Assembly 4 1 5 4 4
Gas Service Installation & Repair
Gasoline Engine Mechanics 7 2 9 2 1 2
Industrial Supervision & Foremanship 5 2
Iron Work 4
Landscaping 1 1 1 3
Lithography 2
Navigation 1 1
Operating Engineering 2 1
Photography & Photo Finishing 1 5 1 1 2
Power Machine Operation 1
Printing 3 3 3 2 2 1
Related Trade & Industrial Technology 1 4 1 1
Television Studio Productions 1
Vehicle Driving, Commercial 3 1
Water and Sewage Plant Operation 3 3
Fiberglassing 1 1
Precision Mechanical Inspection 1
Electricity,(Apprentice Training) 4
Electronics, Basic 1


19-H





EXPANSION AI NEW PROGRAM
S | PS I A IX S I PS JA X


Electronics, Transistor and
Fundamentals 1
Electro-Mechanical Cluster 2
Building Trades Cluster 1
Building Construction 1
Railroad Agency Training 1
Printing & Lithography 1 1
Surveying 1
Mechanical Cluster 2 1 2
Mill-righting 2
Musical Instrument Mechanics 1
Human Relations for Supervisors 1 1
Apprentice Related Training 1
Building Trades Apprentice Related 1
Plumber Apprentices Training 3
Sheet Metal Apprentice Training 1 1
Trade Related Work 1
Roofing 2
Tile Setting 1
Lathing 2
Glazing 1
Sign Painting & Decorating 1
Tool & Die Work 1
Automotive Air Conditioning 1
Recreational Leadership Training 1
Diversified Mechanics
Service Station Sales & Servic 1
Elec. Motors & Generators 1
Steamfitting Apprentice Training 1
Driver Education 1


19-1







INSTITUTIONS PARTICIPATING IN VOCATIONAL AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS


Institutions participating in vocational-technical education programs by type
according to the kinds of students served, estimated allocation of federal voca-
tional funds, and estimated vocational enrollments are as follows:

FY 1966-67 ESTIMATED ALLOCATION
NO. OF OF FEDERAL VOCATIONAL ESTIMATED VOCATIONAL
TYPE OF INSTITUTION SCHOOLS FUNDS FOR ALL PURPOSES ENROLLMENT

Specialized High School
and
Regular or Comprehensive
High School 469 $ 797,324

Secondary
129,000***

Adult Vocational-Technical 126 85,650

Secondary and Post-
Secondary Combination 20 2,590,175*

Post-Secondary
and Adult
194,000.**

Community or Junior
College 22 1,477,849**



*Includes a variety of decentralized facilities used for adult preparatory training

** Includes projected construction funds for area centers and area vocational-technical
departments of junior colleges

Secondary school students will be served by each type of institution identified
above, including some designated area vocational-technical departments of junior
colleges. Post-secondary and adult preparatory students will also be served by
each of the above types of institutions, including adult vocational schools
which have not been designated as area centers and secondary schools in which
facilities are used by adults after the regular school day. Alignment of
programs by type of institution is presently in a fluid state in many communi-
ties because of the varying stages of development of area centers. The prelimi-
nary planning information of counties does not yet provide this information
explicitly by kind of institution on a state-wide basis.


- 20 -








IMPROVEMENT AND REPLACEMENT OF FACILITIES
AND EQUIPMENT, SPECIAL NEEDS PROGRAMS,
INNOVATIONS, AND OTHER SPECIAL PROGRAMS


Improvement of Facilities and Equipment

County planning guides contained data regarding each school in which vocational-
technical facility or equipment improvements are projected for FY 1968-69. Only
facility improvements that exceed $1,500 in cost, and equipment improvements
exceeding $100 per unit cost are included. Data regarding students served and
occupational fields involved in improvements are included. The following table
reports improvements planned by counties.


- 21 -








IMPROVEMENT AND REPLACEMENT OF FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT BY
COUNTY AND BY OCCUPATIONAL FIELD ESTIMATED FY 1968-69


Improvement Type Code


Students Served Code

S Secondary
PS Post-Secondary


1 New Construction
2 Renovation
3 New Equipment for Replacement
4 New Equipment for Expansion


A Adult
X Persons


with Special Needs


AGRICULTURE

4-S
4-X


DISTRIBUTION


DIVERSIFIED


4-s
2-PS
4-PS


1-S
3-S


1-S
(2)4-S


(2) 1-S


1-S
3-S


(2)1-S


HEALTH-
RELATED

4-PS


HOME
ECONOMICS


INDUSTRIAL


OFFICE TECHNICAL


4-PS


(2)4-PS
4-A


1-S
3-S


(2)1-S


COUNTY

Alachua


Baker


Bradford



Brevard


---


---




AGRICULTURE


DISTRIBUTION


DIVERSIFIED


HEALTH-
RELATED


HOME
ECONOMICS


INDUSTRIAL


OFFICE TECHNICAL


Broward










Calhoun



Charlotte


S Citrus


Clay



Collier


Columbia

Dade


2-S
3-S


(6)4-s
4-A


(4)4-s


(2)4-PS (2)1-S
4-A (2)2-S
(22)3-s
.4-s
1-A
2-A
(5)3-A
(3)3-X


(2)4-s
(2)4-PS


3-S
4-A


(2)3-S


(2)1-S
(2)3-s


4-s


4-s
4-PS
4-A


(2)1-S
(2)4-S
3-PS
(2)1-A


(3)3-s


4-s


1-S
4-S
1-A
4-A


COUNTY


4-s
4-A
4-A


(6)2-S
(4)3-s
(5)4-s
4-PS
(6)2-A
(4)3-A
(5)4-A


1-S
(2)3-s
4-s
1-PS
3-PS
(2)4-PS
1-A
3-A
(2)4-A
4-x


4-s
4-x


1-S
1-PS
1-A


(4)1-s
(5)4-s
1-PS
(2)4-PS


1-S
(2)4-s
3-PS
4-PS


1-S
4-s
1-PS
3-PS









AGRICULTURE


DISTRIBUTION


DIVERSIFIED


HEALTH-
RELATED


HOME
ECONOMICS


INDUSTRIAL


OFFICE TECHNICAL


Dade (cont'd)



DeSoto


Dixie









Duval







Escambia


COUNTY


1-X
(4)4-x


4-s


(4)1-A
(5)4-A


3-A
(3)4-A


(2)4-PS
1-A
(2)4-A


4-s
4-A


1-S
3-S
4-s
1-PS
3-PS
4-PS
1-A
3-A
4-A


(2)3-s
(21)4-s


1-S
3-S
4-s
1-PS
3-PS
4-PS
1-A
3-A
4-A


(7)1-s
(4)1-A
4-A


(15)4-S







2-S
(2)3-S
(3)4-S


(4)1-s
2-S
3-S
(2)4-S
1-A
2-A


3-S
4-s


(2)1-S
3-s
4-s
1-A
3-A
4-A


4-PS


(2)1-S
(2)4-s


4-PS
4-A


3-S
(9)4-s
1-PS
2-PS
(3)4-Ps
(4)1-A
(2)3-A

(2)2-S
4()3-S
(5)4-s
2-PS
3-PS
4-ps
2-A
3-A
4-A


2-S
4-s
1-PS
3-PS
1-A
3-A
1-X
3-X




COUNTY

Flagler

Franklin

Gadsden


Gilchrist






Glades


AGRICULTURE


DISTRIBUTION


DIVERSIFIED


HEALTH-
RELATED


HOME
ECONOMICS


INDUSTRIAL


OFFICE TECHNICAL


(2)1-S


1-S


1-A


(2)2-S
(2)3-S


1-S
(2)1-X


Gulf


(2)3-S


1-S
3-S
4-s


(2)3-S
(2)4-s

(2)3-s


3-S
4-s
3-A
4-A

3-S
4-s


Hamilton


Hardee


(2)2-S


3-S
3-PS
3-A
2-S
2-PS
2-A


1-A
(2)1-X


3-s


3-S
4-s

(2)4-S


Hendry 3-S


I









AGRICULTURE


DISTRIBUTION


1-S
3-S
(2)4-s


DIVERSIFIED


HEALTH-
RELATED


4-s


HOME
ECONOMICS


(2)3-S
(2)4-s


INDUSTRIAL

3-S
4-S


OFFICE TECHNICAL

3-S
4-s


4-s


Hillsborough







Holmes

Indian
River

Jackson


Jefferson

Lafayette

Lake


4-s


1-S
2-S


Lee


COUNTY

Hernando


Highlands


4-PS


1-S
(12)4-s
1-A
(15)4-A
(3)4-x


(20)3-s


1-S


1-S
2-S
(2)4-s
3-PS
1-A
2-A


4-s


1-S
(11)4-s
1-PS
(2)4-PS
(3)1-x


(2)4-s


4-s


(2)2-s


4-s


(5)4-s


4-s


4-Ps
4-A


3-PS





AGRICULTURE


DISTRIBUTION


DIVERSIFIED


COUNTY

Leon




Levy




Liberty


Madison


HEALTH-
RELATED

4-s


(2)1-S
(2)4-s
(2)1-A
(2)4-A


HOME
ECONOMICS


INDUSTRIAL


OFFICE TECHNICAL


3-S
4-s
1-PS
4-PS


(2)4-s
(2)4-A


1-PS
4-PS


2-S
4-s
2-A
4-A


4-S
4-X

(2)3-s
3-A


' Manatee
rO
--3







Marion






Martin


1-PS
4-ps


2-PS
2-A


1-PS
1-A


4-A


(4)1-s
(6)3-s
(7)4-S
(2)1-A
(3)3-A
(3)4-A


(2)2-S
3-S
(3)4-s
2-X
4-x


(3)2-S
(10)3-s
(9)4-s


(3)3-s
(5)4-s
(2)3-A
(2)4-A
4-x


1-PS
2-PS
3-PS
4-PS
1-A
2-A
3-A
4-A


3-S
(4)4-s


Monroe


3-S


~i~f~Els~~


---


---


2-S


2-S


1-S










AGRICULTURE

1-S


DISTRIBUTION


DIVERSIFIED


HEALTH-
RELATED


HOME
ECONOMICS


1-S
4-S


4-s


INDUSTRIAL

i-S
(2)4-S
4-A


(3)3-S
(4)4-s


1-S
4-s


OFFICE TECHNICAL

1-S
2-S
(2)4-s

2-S
3-S
(3)4-s


Okeechobee

Orange






I Osceola




Palm Beach






Pasco


COUNTY


Nassau



Okaloosa


(2)3-s
4-s
4-PS


3-A
4-A


(3)3-S
(3)4-S
4-PS


4-s


(2)4-s
4-A


2-S
(2)3-s
2-A
(2)3-A


3-S
(10)4-s
3-PS
4-PS



(2)2-A
(2)4-A



2-S
2-A


(9)3-S
(12)4-S
(2)3-PS
(2)4-PS
3-A
4-A

3-S
4-s
3-A
4-A

(2)2-s
1-S


2-S
(4)4-s
(3)4-x


3-S
(2)4-S
3-A
(2)4-A

(3)1-s
(2)2-S
(2)4-s
(3)1-A
(2)2-A
(2)4-A


1-S
1-A


1-S


1-S


1-S
1-A


1-S
1-A


1-S
1-A




COUNTY


AGRICULTURE

1-S
4-s


DISTRIBUTION

4-s
3-PS
4-PS
3-A
4-A


DIVERSIFIED

(2)4-s


HEALTH-
RELATED

(2)2-PS
(3)3-Ps
(2)4-PS
2-A
3-A
(2)4-A


HOME
ECONOMICS

1-S
(7)3-s
(6)4-s
(2)3-A
(12)4-A
(3)4-x


OFFICE TECHNICAL


INDUSTRIAL

(3)1-s
(2)2-S


4-PS
4-A


Putnam


Saint Johns


Saint Lucie




Santa Rosa


4-PS (2)2-S


Sarasota


3-S
(5)4-s
4-A
4-x


Pinellas


Polk


4-PS


(2)1-S
(2)3-S
(4)4-s


(2)3-S
3-A
4-PS


4-PS

4-PS


4-PS

(2)1-S
(2)1-A
2-PS
(3)4-s
(3)4-A


1-S
1-A
(2)2-S
2-PS
2-A
(2)3-S
(2)3-A
(3)4-s
(3)4-A


4-s


4-s


1-s
3-S


1-S
3-s


(2)4-S


1-S
3-S
1-A
3-A

(4)3-s
3-A
(2)4-s
4-A


(2)4-S
4-A


3-S
3-A


(2)4-S


1-S
3-S


1-S
3-s
4-s


4-s
4-Ps


2-S
(2)3-S
4-s


3-S
3-x









AGRICULTURE


DISTRIBUTION


1-S
4-s


DIVERSIFIED

2-S
4-S


HEALTH-
RELATED


HOME
ECONOMICS


(2)1-S
4-S
4-P:

(4)3-s
(3)3-x


COUNTY

Seminole



Sumter .


INDUSTRIAL

(3)4-s
4-PS
(2)4-A


OFFICE TECHNICAL


4-s
4-PS


1-S
(2)4-S
4-PS

1-S
(2)3-S
(2)4-S
1-A
(2)3-A
(2)4-A
1-X
(2)3-X
(2)4-X


LO Suwannee






Taylor

Union


Volusia


(2)1-S
(4)3-s
(2)4-S
(2)1-PS
(3)3-PS
(2)4-PS
(2)1-A
(3)3-A
(2)4-A
(2)1-X
(3)3-x
(2)4-X


4-s
4-x


1-S
1-A
1-X
3-s
3-A
3-X


4-s


3-S
4-s

1-s


4-s





COUNTY

Wakulla


(3)3-s


DISTRIBUTION


DIVERSIFIED


HEALTH-
RELATED


HOME
ECONOMICS


AGRICULTURE

1-S
3-S
(2)4-S


INDUSTRIAL

1-S
4-S


(4)3-s
4-s


OFFICE TECHNICAL

3-S
4-S


1-S
4-s


Washington


Note: Numbers in parentheses indicate schools offering programs


4-s


Walton


---








Programs for Persons with Special Needs


The State Board for Vocational Education has continued as one of its areas of
program emphasis for FY 1968-69 vocational and vocationally-related supportive
instruction for disadvantaged youth and adults which will make it possible for
them to progress in a vocational program and to secure employment.

Continuing emphasis on vocational programs for persons with special needs has
encouraged program growth in an increasing number of counties. Indicators of
this growth are: (1) 30 of the 67 counties will be operating special programs
compared with 21 last year; (2) summer workshops for teachers of the disadvan-
tages are increasing; (3) an increasing number of area vocational-technical
centers are providing special vocational classes and special basic education
classes to assist students in regular or special vocational classes; (4) work-
experience and work-study programs to assist students with economic needs have
increased substantially in number.

It is estimated that approximately 5,500 secondary school students with special
needs will be served in FY 1968-69 by the various program sections.


Innovations Planned in Vocational-Technical Education

Several innovative projects are in progress. Leadership institutes for vocational
administrators are being held. New courses are being offered in health-related
occupations. The occupational "cluster concept" is being implemented in industrial
education. The vocational sections are cooperating in efforts to develop cross-
disciplinary curricula. For example, the agricultural education section and the
distributive education section are jointly developing programs to prepare persons
for off-farm selling occupations. Individualized learning activity packages in
home economics are being prepared and field-tested. Research projects are being
conducted in cooperation with institutions and agencies in other states. Various
experimental programs are being evaluated to determine their effectiveness.
Vocational education is promoting the development of creative and innovative
solutions to problems through projects specifically designed to improve local
programs. In addition, however, state-wide application of promising practices
is being encouraged.


Other Federal or State Programs

Programs having implications for vocational education, but which are outside the
regular state vocational education structure are listed below. Information was
received from the Office of Economic Opportunity for the State of Florida.


- 32 -




STATE OR FEDERAL PROGRAMS INVOLVING VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
IN ADDITION TO STATE PLAN PROGRAMS


PROGRAM

Neighborhood Youth Corps
(Ongoing)


SPONSOR

Board of Public Instruction

Board of Public Instruction

City of Tampa

Community Action Organization

Community Action Program

Board of Public Instruction

Economic Opp. Coord. Group

State Board of Forestry

Greater Jax Econ. Opp. Inc.

Board of Public Instruction

Board of Public Instruction

Board of Public Instruction

Metropolitan Dade County

Board of Public Instruction

State Board of Parks

Board of Public Instruction

Seminole Tribe of Florida

So. Fla. Econ. Opp. Res. Council


COUNTY

Bay

Calhoun

Hillsborough

St. Lucie

Escambia

Dade

Broward

State-wide

Duval

Hillsborough

Hernando

Manatee

Dade

Orange

State-wide

Pinellas

Broward

Dade


ENROLLEES

100

300

325

300

100

1750

530

100

950

1525

240

450

450

400

200

500

131

500


FEDERAL
FUNDS

$ 266,500

169,270

751,740

285,640

133,140

669,720

281,430

237,190

1,052,110

819,060

116,590

473,370

433,570

234,770

471,110

237,320

76,550

865,370


GRANTING
DATE

1/6/68

9/3/67

9/1/67

12/16/67

2/15/68

9/1/67

12/16/67

9/12/67

9/4/67

8/29/67

9/1/67

11/1/67

3/1/68

9/4/67

10/1/67

8/26/67

12/16/67

9/15/67










PROGRAM

New Careers

Operation Mainstream

On-Job-Training


EASA Title I, Business Ed.


EASA

EASA


Title

Title


EASA Title I,


EASA

EASA

EASA

EASA

EASA

EASA


- Title

- Title

- Title

- Title

- Title

- Title


Industrial Arts

Industrial Arts
and Business Ed.

Industrial Arts
and Other

Craft

VOE

Agriculture

Industrial Arts

Vocational

Industrial Arts


SPONSOR

Econ. Opp. Program, Inc.

Community Action Organization

The Hospital and Welfare Board,
Welfare Department

Board of Public Instruction

Board of Public Instruction


Board of Public Instruction


Board

Board

Board

Board

Board

Board

Board


Public

Public

Public

Public

Public

Public

Public


Instruction

Instruction

Instruction

Instruction

Instruction

Instruction

Instruction


COUNTY

Dade

St. Lucie


Hillsborough

Bradford

Columbia


Gadsden


Highlands

Indian River

Marion

Pinellas

Walton

Washington

Polk


ENROLLEES

130

51


200


100


650


60

100

40

15,360

60

150

1,570


FEDERAL
FUNDS

$ 481,896

173,020


GRANTING
DATE

6/2/67

6/2/67


128,986 2/15/68


5,719

9,000


55,000


2,000

80

16,000

19,550

9,501

4,620

21,644








Special Summer Programs

The agricultural education section will sponsor a Future Farmers of America state
meeting for 700-800 boys. The meeting will be held in the summer of 1968 and will
include state finals in certain sponsored activities. It will be a leadership and
training conference for youth and many awards will be made. The section will
sponsor a FFA forestry camp for approximately 120 boys per week for each of two
weeks. The latter is a joint venture between the section, the Florida Forest
Service, and the forest industry which will finance the camp. the state officers
in the FFA will visit production agriculture installations, off-farm agricultural
enterprises, and retail industries. They will tell the story of agricultural
education as they tour the state. At the local level, FFA members will continue
their meetings through the summer months.

The home economics section will sponsor a leadership conference for new state
officers of FHA. Girls will be trained in leadership qualities, in parliamentary
procedures, and in public speaking and research. Thirty-nine girls from local
organizations and 10 advisors and staff members will attend the national meeting
of the FHA. The state staff will participate in numerous meetings with girls in
local chapters of FHA.

The state staff will sponsor a tour of the state by designated. DECA members.
Businesses will be visited and, under state staff supervision, observations will
be made of business practices pertinent to the study of distributive techniques
and distributive occupations.


Special State Funding

Additional funds in the amount of $1,218,000 were provided by the State Legislature
in 1968 to assist in more adequate funding post-secondary vocational and adult
education programs exclusive of those in junior colleges. The funds will be used
for current operating expenses, replacement of worn-out and obsolete equipment,
and the purchase of books, reference materials, and other instructional aids.
Funds are to be expended on the basis of a prepared plan of operation and a
program budget which is approved by the State Board for Vocational Education.


- 35 -








THE CONSTRUCTION OF AREA VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL SCHOOLS


Area schools open and schools designated total 34. These schools will serve 56
counties of the state. State personnel have been active in site review, program
development, and facilities planning. For a number of schools, planning has now
reached the stage determining program needs for Phase II construction. The
following data reports the status of construction projects as of May 1968, and
expansion planned for the next fiscal year:
County
Area Junior
Schools College

Number of projects under construction May 15, 1968 9 4

Number of projects to start construction in fiscal 1969 6 4

Number of projects to be completed in fiscal 1969 7 6

Number of projects, previously funded, which will be 9 4
funded in fiscal 1969

Number of projects to be funded for the first time in 3 2
fiscal 1969


Following is information on programs and construction progress planned for area
vocational-technical education school facilities during FY 1968-69.


- 36 -




CONSTRUCTION PLANS FOR AREA VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS FY 1968-69


PHASE I


Total Cost
Estimated of Project
Name and Address Type of Vocational Level of Beginning Estimated Eligible Type of
County and Cong. School 1/ Programs Programs Constr. Opening under Building Construc-
District (A,B,C,D) (AG,DE,etc.) (S,PS,A,X) Date Date 1963 Act Capacity 2/ tion 3/
Indian River Jr. JC Not Not Not Not $ 702,818 F
College, 3209 Va. determined determined determined determined
Ave.,Ft. Pierce,
Fla. 33450
St. Lucie County
9th District
Pasco County Voca- HS Not Not Oct.1968 Sept.1969 200,000 F
tional-Technical determined determined
Center, Dade City,
Fla. 33525
Pasco County
4th District

Santa Fe Jr. JC AG A Not Not 200,000 H
College, P.O. Box DE PS,A determined determined
1530, Gainesville, H-RE PS,A
Fla. 32601 HE(Gain.) A
Alachua County T & I S,A
2nd District OFF. PS,A
______TE S,PS,AX

Seminole Co.Voca- S,PS DE PS,A,X Nov.1968 Sept.1969 1,052,100 H
tional-Technical H-RE PS,A
Center, 202 Com- T & I S,PS,A,X
mercial Avenue, OFF. S,PS,A,X
Sanford, Fla.32771 TE S,PS,A,X
Seminole County
4th District










PHASE I (Cont'd)


CONSTRUCTION PLANS FOR AREA VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS FY 1968-69


Total Cost
Estimated of Project
Name and Address Type of Vocational Level of Beginning Estimated Eligible Type of
County and Cong. School 1/ Programs Programs Constr. Opening under Building Construc-
District (A,B,C,D) (AG.,DE,etc.) (S,PS,A,X) Date Date 1963 Act Capacity 2/ tion 3/

South Florida Jr. JC AG PSA Not Not $ 200,000 H
College, P.O.Box 84, DE A determined determined
Avon Park,Fla.33825 HE(Gain.) A
Highlands County T & I S,PS,A
7th District OFF. PS,A
TE S.PSA_

St.Johns Vocational- S,PS Not Not Jan.1969 Nov.1969 540,500 H
Technical Center, determined determined
P.O.Box 500,
St.Augustine, Fla.
32082
St.Johns County
4th District


/ The code used here is the one contained in the present format for this report and is
SS Specialized Secondary; T Vocational-Technical Post-Secondary; HS Regular or Comprehensive
Secondary; JC Junior or Community College; C University or College; SPS Combination (Secondary,
Post-Secondary).
2/ Capacity of vocational students at one time.




CONSTRUCTION PLANS FOR AREA VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS FY 1968-69
PHASE II


Total Cost
Estimated of Project
Name and Address Type of Vocational Level of Beginning Estimated Eligible Type of
County and Cong. School 1~ Programs Programs Constr. Opening under Building Construc-
District (AB,CID) (AG.,DE,etc.) (S,PS,A,X) Date Date 1963 Act Capacity 2/ tion 3/

Bradford-Union Area S,PS AG S,A,X June,1968 Nov.1968 $ 414,850 140 F
Vocational-Techni- HE(Gain.) S,A,X
cal Center, Drawer T & I S,A,X
939, Starke, Fla. OFF. S,A,X
32091 TE S,A,X
Bradford County
2nd District

Daytona Beach Jr. JC DE PS,A Not Not 2,678,692 F
College,P.O.Box H-RE PS,A determined determined
1910,Daytona Beach, T & I S,PSA,X
Fla. 32015 OFF. PS,A
Volusia County TE S,PS,A
4th District
George Stone Voca- S,PS AG S,A,X Nov.1968 June,1969 1,166,000 240 F
tional-Technical DE S,A,X
Center,215 West H-RE S,A,X
Garden St.,Pensa- T & I S,A,X
cola, Fla. 32502 OFF. S,A,X
Escambia County TE S,A,X
1st District
Lake County Voca- S,PS AG S,PS,A Oct.1968 June,1969 1,119,400 160 F
tional-Technical DE S,PS
Center,P.O.Box 357, H-RE PS
Tavares,Fla.32778 HE(Gain.) S,PS
Lake County T & I S,PS,A
4th District OFF.. S,PS,A
Lee County Voca- S,PS DE A,X Jan.1969 Sept.1969 1,053,450 180 F
tional-Technical H-RE PS
Center,3800 Michi- T & I S,PS,A
gan Avenue, Fort OFF. S,PS,A
Myers,Fla. 33902
Lee County
9th District









PHASE II (Cont'd)


CONSTRUCTION PLANS FOR AREA VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS FY 1968-69


Total Cost
Estimated of Project
Name and Address Type of Vocational Level of Beginning Estimated Eligible Type of
County and Cong. School 1/ Programs Programs Constr. Opening under Building Construc-
District (A,B,C,D) (AG.,DEetc.) (S,PS,A,X) Date Date 1963 Act Capacity 2/ tion 3/
Lewis M. Lively Area S,PS DE S,PS,A Nov.1968 June,1969 $ 1,056,150 420 F
Vocational-Technical H-RE PS,A
School,500 N.Apple- HE(Gain.) S,PS,A,X
yard Dr.,Tallahasseq HE(Use.) S,A
Fla. 32304 T & I S,PS,A
Leon County OFF.. S,PS,A
2nd District TE SPSA
Mid-Florida Tech- T DE PS,A Jan.1969 Sept.1969 1,379,500 420 F
nical Institute, HE(Use.) PS,A
2908 W. Oak Ridge& T & I PS,A
Rd.,Orlando,Fla. .OFF.. PS,A
32809, Orange Cty. TE PS,A
5th District
North Florida Jr. JC AG S,PS,A Not Not 345,176 F
College, Madison, H-RE PS determined determined
Fla. 32340 HE(Use.) A
Madison County T & I S,PS,A
2nd District OFF. S,PS,A
STE SA
Palm Beach County S,PS DE A,X Jan.1969 Sept.1969 1,278,510 420 F
Vocational School, H-RE PS,A
810 Gardenia St., HE(Use.) A
West Palm Beach, T & I S,PS,A,X
Fla. 33401 (will 'QFF. PS,A
move to new site TE S,PS,A
during 67-68 school
year, to be known as
N.Technical Educa-
tion Center, 7071
Garden Rd.,Riviera
Bch, Fla. 33404)
Palm Beach County
9th District




UTVEUT id'Jb Fiuh AtuB.A VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS YY 100-09


PHASE II (Cont'd)


Total Cost
Estimated of Project
Name and Address Type of Vocational Level of Beginning Estimated Eligible Type of
County and Cong. School 1~ Programs Programs Constr. Opening under Building Construc-
District (A.B,C,D) (AG.,DEetc.) (S,PS.A,X) Date Date 1963 Act Capacity 2/ tion 3/
Pinellas Technical T AG PS,A,X Sept.1968 June,1969 $ 1,487,600 400 E,F
Institute, 6100 T & I PS,A,X
154th Ave. North, TE PS,A,X
Clearwater, Fla.
33516
Pinellas County
8th District
Polk County Voca- S,PS AG S,A Nov.1968 Sept.1969 1,275,450 220 F
tional-Technical H-RE PS
Center, Rt.1,Box T & I S,PS,A
71-E,Bartow,Fla. OFF. S,A,X
33830 TE S,A
Polk County
7th District
Sarasota County S,PS DE S,A Sept.1968 June,1969 1,057,500 180 F
Vocational-Tech- H-RE PS,A
nical Center,1001 HE(Use.) A
So.Washington Blvd., T & I S,A
Sarasota,Fla.33577 OFF. S,A|
Sarasota County TE S
7th District
Sheridan Vocational S,PS DE S,A Nov.1968 Sept.1969 1,488,950 294 F
Center,5400 Sheri- H-RE PS,A
dan St., Holly- HE(Gain.) S,A
wood, Fla. 33021 T & I S,PS,A
Broward County OFF. S,A
10th District









PHASE II (Cont'd)


CONSTRUCTION PLANS FOR AREA VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS FY 1968-69


Total Cost
Estimated of Project
Name and Address Type of Vocational Level of Beginning 'Estimated Eligible Type of
County and Cong. School I/ Programs Programs Constr. Opening under Building Construc-
District (A,B,C,D) (AG.,DE,etc.) (SPSAX) Date Date 1963 Act Capacity 2/ tion 3/

Suwannee-Hamilton S,PS AG S,A May, 1969 Oct.1969 $ 417,550 140 F
Area Vocational- DE S,PS,A,X
Technical Center, H-RE PS,A
Live Oak,Fla.32060 HE(Gain.) S,X
Suwannee County T & I S,PS,A,X
2nd District OFF. S,PS,A

Taylor-Dixie Area S,PS AG S,PS May, 1969 Sept.1969 413,500 140 F
Vocational-Technical DE S,PS,X
Center,P.O.Box 780, T & I S,PS,X
Perry,Fla.32347 OFF. S,PS,A,X
Taylor County
2nd District

Tom P. Haney Area S,PS AG A Jan.1969 Sept.1969 1,050,750 F
Vocational-Tech- DE S,A
nical School,P.O. H-RE A
Drawer 820, Panama IH~Gain.) A
City, Fla. 32401 HE(Use.) A,X
Bay County T & I S,PS,A,X
1st District OFF. S,PS,A,X
TE S,A

Washington-Holmes S,PS AG S,A May, 1968 Sept.1968 416,200 160 F
Area Vocational- DE S,A
Technical Center, T & I S,PS,A
Chipley, Fla, 32428 OFF. S,A
Washington County
1st District




CONSTRUCTION PLANS FOR AREA VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS FY 1968-69


PHASE II (Cont'd)


Total Cost
Estimated of Project
Name and Address Type of Vocational Level of Beginning Estimated Eligible Type of
County and Cong. School 1/ Programs Programs Constr. Opening under Building Consturc-
District (A,BCD) (AG.,DE,etc.) (S,PS,A,X) Date Date 1963 Act Capacity 2/ tion 3/

Withlacoochee S,PS AG S,PS,A May,1969 Oct. 1969 ? 418,900 140 F
Vocational- DE S,PS,A
Technical Center, T & I S,PS,A
P. 0. Box 38, OFF. S,PS,A
Inverness, Fla.
32650
Citrus County
4th District









CONSTRUCTION PLANS FOR AREA VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS FY 1968-69


PHASE I & II


Total Cost
Estimated of Project
Name and Address Type of Vocational Level of. Beginning Estimated Eligible Type of
County and. Cong. School /! Programs Programs Constr. Opening under Building Construc-
District (A,B,C,D) (AG.,DE,etc) (S,PS,A,X) Date Date 1963 Act Capacity 2/ tion 3/

Florida Junior JC Not Not Not Not $2,500,000 H
College at determined determined determined determined
Jacksonville,
1450 Flager
Avenue,
Jacksonville,
Fla. 32207
Duval County
3rd District _____





Total Cost
Estimated of Project
Name and Address Type of Vocational Level of Beginning Estimated Eligible Type of
County and Cong. School / Programs Programs Constr. Opening under Building Construc-
District (A,B,C,D) (AG.,DE,etc.) (SPS,A,X) Date Date 1963 Act Capacity 2/ tion 3/
Brevard Junior S,PS AG -PS,A,X $1,380,539
College Vocational- H-RE PS,A,X
Technical Division, HE(Gain.) S,PS,A,X
Cocoa, Florida HE(Use.) PS,A,X
Brevard County T & I S,PS,A,X
5th District OFF.. PS,A,X
TE. PSAX
Central Florida JC AG PS 359,490
Junior College H-RE PS,A
Vocational-Tech- T & I PS,A
nical Division, OFF. PS
Ocala, Florida TE PS,A
Marion County
4th District
Chipola Junior JC DE S,PS,A 684 608 F
College Vocational- H-RE PS,A
Technical Division, T & I S,PS,A
Marianna, Florida OFF. PS,A
Jackson County TE S,PS,A
2nd District
Florida Keys Junior JC H-RE PS
College Vocational- T & I S,A
Technical Division, OFF. PS,A
Key West, Fla. TE S,PS,A
Monroe County
12th District
Hillsborough County S,PS H-RE S,PS 1,490,300
Vocational-Technica HE(Gain.) A
Center, HE(Use.) S,A
Tampa, Florida T & I S,PS,A
Hillsborough County OFF.. S,PS,A
6th District ____ TE SPSA


-- ~--- --- ---------- ---------- --


No construction or planning 18 for


FY 1968-69 at the following institutions:









ic: ..ted A'.o. i- FY L,' o- t( -)j.t the following in: itun: <.:


Nai e *':,iZ .id-'es .
County -.,I "-,Y


La e Ci y junior
College Vocation-
al-Technical Eiv.,
Lake City, Fla.
Colu-jibia County
2nd Di trict

Lindsey-Hopk.ins
Educ -~ion Center,
MiSaii, Florida
Dade County
11th District

Manatee County
Vocational-
Technical Center,
Bradenton, Fla.
M;.- .tee County
7th D1i -eict

Okaloos --Wal ton
Junior College
Vocational-
Technical Div.,
Valparaiso, Fla.
Okaloosa County
Ist District


Jc


AG
DE
H-RE
HE(Gain.
HE(Use.)
T&I
T & I
OFF.
TE


PS,A,X
PS,A,X
X
A,X
A,X
PS,A,X
PS,A,X
PS,A,X


1,156,968


L


~I i -(-1-~--------i--c-- ~u


No const.;-uc-;to- or plannin--







THE STATE'S PLANS FOR STRENGTHENING VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL PROGRAMS


County school officials report they will emphasize guidance, conduct surveys to
determine needs and employment opportunities in local and area labor markets, and
make studies to identify new and additional courses needed and ways of improving
current offerings. In addition, some anticipate emphasizing placement and
follow-up. Staffs of still others expect to initiate or continue program and
facility studies needed for area school development.


Administration and Supervision

Personnel from state departments have engaged in numerous activities to develop
plans and procedures to evaluate educational programs. The development of
Accreditation Standards for Vocational-Technical Schools and Adult High Schools
will help establish guidelines to determine the effectiveness of post-secondary
vocational-technical and adult general education programs outside the junior
college structure. Standards are designed to cover the school's administrative
structure, personnel employed, the instructional program, school services, and
the school plant and facilities.

Plans for strengthening programs of administration and supervision include use
of additional state staff in industrial education to assist local school districts
in program development. Personnel employed for this work include two additional
area supervisors and one coordinator of pre-vocational education. The industrial
education section will encourage local districts to employ more qualified admini-
strators and supervisors, including additional coordinators of special needs
programs, county supervisors of industrial education, and assistant principals
of vocational education.

In agricultural education, the state staff has developed a program to supervise
beginning teachers.

An additional state consultant will be added in business education who will be
stationed in Pinellas County. Communications with counties will be improved
through expansion of the Florida Newsletter. Additional state staff personnel
will permit more intensive work with local programs and better supervision.

Distributive education state staff personnel will continue to study the state
administrative structure for distributive education. They will also assist
in the revision of teacher certification requirements and help revise
accreditation standards. A staff member will be assigned to a central location
in the state to expedite service to teachers.

Supervision and administration of the junior high work experience program will
be improved by adding county staff supervisors in Dade and Duval Counties.
Teacher certification requirements will be sought for coordinators together
with full financial support for each unit. Program standards will be further
developed for inclusion in K-12 Accreditation Standards.


- 47 -







To strengthen administration and supervision standards in diversified cooperative
training, an additional state staff member will be stationed in Palm Beach County.
A local coordinator will also be added to the staff of Dade County. Separate
teacher certification will be sought for teachers of diversified occupations
programs. Work will begin on revising standards for diversified cooperative
education for inclusion in K-12 Accreditation Standards.

The technical and health occupations section is being reorganized, and a program
specialist for health occupations education will be added to work full-time in
the development of health occupations education.

The home economics section, in conjunction with the vocational conference to
be held in Jacksonville, will offer seminars and training sessions to up-date
teachers and supervisors. Instructional areas to be covered include child
development, family economics, housing, and trends in home economics education.
Other projects include workshops for personnel concerned with child day care
centers and the in-service training of food service workers in Broward County.
Another occupations specialist and two additional area supervisors will be added.

The following organization charts show the current state staff structure together
with personnel who administer the state program of vocational and technical
education.


- 48 -





ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRENT STATE STAFF
DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL, TECHNICAL AND ADULT EDUCATION











ORGANIZATION OF T7E CURRENT STATE STAFF
DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL, TECHNICAL AND ADULT EDUCATION


T. W.
J. H. Fling C. M. Lawrence J. R. Barkley Frances Champion F. J. Bailey C. R. Crumpton G. W. Neubauer Strickland ;
s




ORGANIZATION uF TE CURRENT STATE STAPRT*
AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION


Secretary II Secretary II








ORGANIZATION OF THE CUIRRNT STATE STAFT
AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION


L. A. Marshall R. F. Kelly

I





ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRENT STATE STAFF
BUSINESS AND DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION











ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRENT STATE STAFF
BUSINESS AND DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION


Diversified
Programs



J. P. McClellan
---7-- -- J




ORGAN4IZATON OF THE CURRENTT STTH -STAFF
HD)E EGONCUICS EDUCATION


Educational Educational Educational
Consultant Consultant Consultant
I II II
1 --- ^--- ^^ --









ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRENT STATE STAFF
HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION




INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION



Progran- Director




Secretary II





ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRENT STATE STAFF
INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION


L Irene Brown,




ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRENT STATE STAFF
PROGRAM SERVICES










ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRENT STATE STAFF
PROGRAM SERVICES





ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRENT STATE STAFF
TECHNICAL AND HEALTH EDUCATION


Special Education Edu cation Education
Program Consultant CoLsultant Consultant
Consultant IIII I
II
I I


Education *
Consultant Education
II Consultant
II


** Administratively attached to the Industrial Education Section, but also serves as consultant for
Law Enforcement Technology Program.








ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRENT STATE STAFF
TECHNICAL AND HEALTH EDUCATION


William J.
Vacant Carlson







Teacher Training

Establishment of an additional teacher education program at either the University
of West Florida (Pensacola) or at the University of South Florida (Tampa) is
planned by the industrial education section to help relieve the shortage of
qualified teachers.

Two additional teacher-educators in business education will be stationed at state
institutions, one at The University of South Florida (Tampa) and the other at
The Florida Atlantic University (Boca Raton). The section will conduct special
meetings for business education teachers at the division conference in Jacksonville.
The section will cooperate with the Gregg Publishing Company and with the South-
western Publishing Company to offer a series of one-day conferences for teachers.

Continued emphasis will be placed on the recruitment of outstanding students to
become teachers of vocational agriculture. The state staff, the College of
Agriculture of The University of Florida, the State Recruitment Committee, and
other persons who may guide students will cooperate in stimulating recruitment.
The teacher education program will be expanded to provide more courses in related
technical-agriculture programs. In-service development of teachers will be
expanded to include additional workshops, institutes, and conferences devoted
to teacher improvement.

The diversified cooperative training staff will sponsor a summer workshop to
develop a teacher-training handbook and will also sponsor special sessions for
DCT teachers at the annual summer conference.

Drive-in meetings for teacher-coordinators of junior high work experience programs
are planned for 1968-69, and special meetings for teachers are planned for the
summer conference in Jacksonville.

The technical and health-related occupations section has planned several seminars
in curriculum and instruction and methods of teaching. There is no institutional
preservice teacher-training program for health occupations, but the program for
technical education teachers will continue at the University of Florida.

Projects have been planned by the home economics staff to assist teachers in
developing programs for individualized instruction which will include the
development of "lap" packages for independent study by students. Programs will
also be developed to improve teacher competencies and prepare instructional
materials in the field of food service. The latter will include foundations
of school food service, food preparation, management, and basic nutrition.

The state staff for distributive education will develop a series of courses
designed to help junior college and adult-level teachers. It will provide in-
service training programs for teachers at the summer conference at Jacksonville
and at other locations in the state as well.


Institutes, Workshops

Thirty-three proposals for workshops involving approximately 20 counties and three
state universities have been considered for funding for an amount exceeding
$138,000. Proposals are for help to area school personnel to develop student
follow-up and program evaluation procedures, to develop instructional materials,
revise curriculum outlines, and conduct studies to improve teaching techniques.


- 63 -







Other proposals include the study of wage earning opportunities for disadvantaged
girls, studies of the relationship of secondary programs to area school and
junior college programs, and activities designed to strengthen numerous vocational
courses and programs.


Cooperative Arrangements, Special Pre-Service and In-Service Education of Personnel,
Conferences

Vocational educators are working actively with business and industry to train present
and prospective employees. During the last regular session of the legislature, a
law was passed creating an Industry Services Unit. The Unit is designed specifically
to enable vocational education to do an even better job in assisting new and expanding
business and industry to meet operational deadlines by helping to identify the
competencies of local labor and providing the specific job training needed.

Beginning July 1, 1968, the state will allocate for educational improvement $1,720
for each instructional unit in each county. The funds are to be used by each county
in the most effective way to improve its educational program. The $1,720 per
instructional unit is for all segments of the school system in each county, and
vocational and technical education programs will participate. A mandatory feature
of the state legislation creating this educational improvement fund is that top
priority must be given to staff improvement through workshops, conferences, and
other planned pre-service and in-service educational experiences for professional
and nonprofessional personnel.

In August, 1968, the state-wide First Annual Vocational, Technical, and Adult
Educators' Conference will be held in Jacksonville for teachers, local directors,
coordinators, supervisors, deans, and other persons concerned with and interested
in vocational-technical and adult education. Speakers of national repute will
provide philosophical, inspirational, and informative data. Sectional meetings
will be organized for teachers and others interested in particular vocational
services. It is anticipated that this meeting will be the largest ever organized
in Florida to promote and strengthen vocational, technical, and adult education.
The Conference theme centers around people, jobs, and education.


Designated Vocational Education Teacher Training Institutions

Designated teacher training institutions in Florida are as follows:


- 64 -




DESIGNATED VOCATIONAL EDUCATION TEACHER TRAINING INSTITUTIONS


State Florida


--PROGRAM AREA NAME AND TITLE OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
(HOME ECONOMICS, TECHNICAL ADMINISTRATOR OR HEAD OF TEACHER TRAINING STAFF
NAME AND LOCATION EDUCATION, COUNSELOR VOCATIONAL AND TECHNICAL INDICATE NO. BY PROG. AREA
TRAINING, ETC.) ) TEACHER EDUCATION FULL-TIME PART-TIME


Florida A & M University
Tallahassee, Florida











University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida





University of South Florida
Tampa, Florida


Agriculture *



Home Economics *



Industrial Education *




Agriculture *


Technical Education *



Distributive Education *


B. B. Archer, Teacher-
Educator, Agriculture
Education

Mrs. Lillie Robinson
Teacher-Educator
Home Economics Education

W. G. Gaiter, Teacher-
Educator, Vocational-
Industrial Education

W. T. Loften, Head
Agriculture Education

Dr. E. L. Kurth, Teacher-
Educator, Technical
Education

James Pope, Teacher-
Educator, Distributive
Education


Business Education*


1 K*
1A

l**NACW


To be filled









DESIGNATED VOCATIONAL EDUCATION TEACHER TRAINING INSTITUTIONS


State Florida


PROGRAM AREA NAME AND TITLE OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
(HOME ECONOMICS, TECHNICAL ADMINISTRATOR. OR HEAD OF TEACHER TRAINING STAFF
NAME AND LOCATION EDUCATION, COUNSELOR VOCATIONAL AND TECHNICAL INDICATE NO. BY PROG. AREA
________TRAINING, ETC.) TEACHER EDUCATION FULL-TJIME PART-TIME


Florida Atlantic University
Boca Raton, Florida






Florida State University
Tallahassee, Florida







Dade County Board of Public
Instruction and University
of Miami
Coral Gables, Florida

Schools will be partially
** Part-time staff in indust
~** Part-time staff in agrict
*4H* Part-time staff in techno


Business Education*



Distributive Education *



Home Economics *



Industrial Education *




Industrial Education *




reimbursed for salary expense
rial education are graduate st
Ltural education is a graduate
-al education works approximat


Miss Ruth Brewer, Teacher-
Educator Business
Education

Dr. LeRoy Buckner
Teacher-Educator
Distributive Education

Dr. Anne G. Buis, Head
Teacher-Educator, Home
Economics Education

Head
Teacher-Educator
Vocational Industrial
Education

John Doughman, Teacher-
Educator, Vocational-
Industrial Education



Ldents and work approximately 3
student and works approximately
ily 1/2 time.


3



3




2





/2 time.
y 3/4 time.








Vocational Guidance

The State Board will continue to emphasize the provision of occupational information
and counseling and to assist counties to initiate or improve placement and follow-up
activities for students.

Inasmuch as 34 area vocational-technical centers have been designated under Florida
Statutes, the need to extend occupational training and exploratory opportunities for
youth and adults is being partially met. A program of student personnel services
has been developed in these centers. Such services will help students decide on
both long-range and short-range vocational goals and take constructive steps toward
reaching those goals. Within each center, specific guidance for vocational training
and careers will be made available. This kind of counseling service is particularly
valuable inasmuch as each center serves a diverse population from a single or multi-
county service area.

Student personnel workers assigned to an area vocational center will provide support
services for teachers and administrators. These services will be designed to
increase the capability of the centers to reach their over-all objectives and to
fulfill the responsibility of meeting the educational needs of students.

Student personnel services will provide and maintain a community liaison program.
This will involve keeping the community informed about the technical, vocational,
and adult curricula available, as well as providing students with occupational and
employment information and trends. In addition, student personnel services will
obtain and make available to students occupational information which is appropriate
for their training and goals. It will be the responsibility of the student
personnel office to compile information about job demands and predictions of
employment trends. This information will be made available to school administrators
to insure that training programs are realistic.

Placement and follow-up services, as a part of student personnel services in area
centers, will be maintained for facilitating initial contacts between students and
prospective employers. Personnel services will also help students attain a pattern
of skills, attitudes, and understandings which will be effective in achieving
satisfactory job placement and successful work adjustment. To enable each
individual to take advantage of all opportunities available, student personnel
services will develop and disseminate information about local, regional, and
national manpower needs.

Counseling services will continue to be emphasized.to provide adequate vocational,
educational, and personal counseling services for all students, prospective
students, and former students. When practicable, group counseling activities will
be available. Professional relationships will be maintained with all community
and professional agencies which are qualified to provide services beyond the
scope of the center. Referrals to such agencies will be made only with
appropriate safeguards for the protection of students and confidential records
of the school.

The business education section will work with county curriculum study committees to
provide specialized occupational information for guidance personnel. Consultants
in distributive education will develop a series of promotional brochures to
publicize opportunities in distributive education at the secondary and adult levels.
Increased support of guidance departments will be sought to establish better under-
standing of the goals and objectives of distributive education.


- 67 -







The technical and health occupations education section will work cooperatively with
several professional and lay organizations to publicize opportunities for employment
in health-related occupations.


Curriculum Development and Curriculum Materials

The agricultural education section will revise The Curriculum Guide and suggested
teaching-learning activities will be added. Teachers will be given more help in
writing and organizing instructional materials with particular emphasis upon the
use of visual aids.

The industrial education section has added one staff person whose sole responsi-
bility will be curriculum development. A course of study will be developed in
cosmetology under the direction of the State Coordinator for Cosmetology Education.
Additional courses are planned in REA job and safety training and in law enforcement.

Consultants in distributive education will work to complete revisions of first- and
second-year teaching guides for secondary programs. The state staff in business
education will complete and distribute the Cooperative Business Education Handbook
and the Adult Vocational Business Education Guide. An experimental cooperative
program to train telephone operators will be established in Dade County. The
state staff will also work with personnel in Brevard, Broward, Dade, and Pinellas
Counties to install an innovative approach to individualized instruction through
modular scheduling. Assistance will be provided counties in establishing
curriculum study committees which will engage in evaluation and the preparation
of long-range plans for business education.

Consultants in business education will work with personnel at Florida Atlantic
University to develop micro-teaching materials. They will also conduct in-service
training sessions for teachers who will use closed circuit TV facilities. A
summer workshop will be held to prepare a guide for the development of cooperative
programs, and a youth activities manual is also planned.

During the next year, technical education consultants, in cooperation with
appropriate advisory committees, will concentrate upon curriculum recommendations
for electromechanical technology, fire technology, food supervisory work, law
enforcement technology, social worker aide training, and physical therapy aide
training.

The home economics section will continue work on Phase III of a project to develop
curriculum guides for home economics for gainful employment. A workshop for thirty
participants is planned. In addition, a workshop is planned for twenty participants
to write a curriculum guide for Comprehensive Home Economics I. The home economics
staff is concerned with other curriculum needs relating to useful and gainful
employment. The studies concerned with useful employment are devoted to family
living, food and nutrition, textiles, child development, and enrichment courses.
Those concerned with gainful employment include the preparation of a handbook and
attention to instruction in purchasing, record keeping, use and care of equipment,
and other aspects of school food service. Bulletins describing offerings in
junior colleges and instructional guides for adult courses will also be prepared.


- 68 -








Research, Experimental. and Developmental Programs


Experimental programs in diversified mechanics, primarily for disadvantaged youth,
will be continued by the industrial education section. Cluster programs in
mechanics, electro-mechanics, and building construction will be activated in a
number of vocational centers, and several industry-school cooperative programs
will be initiated in auto mechanics and industrial electronics.

Experimental programs in cooperative training are planned for tenth grade youth
in Dade and Volusia Counties. The programs are designed to appeal particularly
to former junior high work experience students who have advanced into high school
and to other tenth grade students as well. A cooperative training program will
be initiated in Duval County especially designed for disadvantaged and under-
employed adults. Consultants from the state staff will help to develop these
programs. If they prove successful, the plan may well be extended to additional
counties.

In the field of distributive education, specialized programs will be developed at
the post-secondary level in petroleum distribution, banking, insurance, and real
estate. A priority program of research needs in distributive education will be
developed, and studies will be made to organize interdisciplinary courses in
agricultural marketing and textile merchandising.

Consultants in the technical and health-related occupations section will work with
representatives of the University of Florida and Central Florida Junior College to
design and implement a program for students who are interested in technical courses
but who are deficient in basic education, primarily mathematics. A state-wide
survey of 20-25 technical occupations and 26 health occupations will also be made
by the state staff during the year to gather data needed in modifying existing
programs and planning new programs.

Consultants in health education will work with personnel from the Florida State
Board of Health, nursing associations, and selected junior colleges to develop
a three-year program for administrators of health institutions, including both
preparatory and supplemental courses. A cooperative health education program
will also be activated in selected schools in Dade County.

The Research Coordinating Unit will participate in selected research, and develop-
mental programs which will be funded during the year. Funding will be based upon
the potential of programs for improving vocational education in the state.
Examples of projects to be funded include cost effectiveness studies; field tests
of programs designed to introduce junior high school students to the world of
work; development and evaluation of programs for youth with special needs; and
surveys to determine labor market needs for major metropolitan areas of the state.
The Unit will collaborate with the home economics section in three curriculum
development projects. One project will consider, with field tests throughout the
state, curricula for home economics for gainful employment. Another will be
concerned with the development of individual learning packages for secondary
students in Pinellas County. A third project in Broward County is designed to
develop junior high school home economics programs centered around skill and
concept development with critical thinking at the senior high school level.


- 69 -







The RCU will continue to compile summaries of studies in process. It will also
help to identify resources available for studies and provide assistance to county
and higher education personnel in conducting studies.

Evaluation of Vocational Programs and Activities

Evaluation techniques are being developed as a part of the revised program of
agricultural education. Appropriateness of program objectives in particular
counties will be studied along with the accomplishments of students and the
suitability of instructional materials and facilities. Surveys will be conducted,
teacher and student records studied, and reports and reactions of groups con-
cerned with agricultural education will be assessed.

Improved evaluation and supervision will be possible in business education as a
result of dividing the state into a greater number of supervisory areas. Newly
developed adult high school and area vocational school accreditation standards
will be used in evaluating facilities and programs for adults. Cooperative
programs will continue to be evaluated through reports of teacher-coordinators,
high school principals, and county administrators supplemented by visitations
of state staff personnel. Distributive education will be evaluated to determine
the guidelines needed for cross-disciplinary programs, and an instrument will also
be developed to determine the effectiveness of the project plan for distributive
education.

In industrial education, supervisors and program specialists will continue to
evaluate the effectiveness of all courses by means of visitations and observa-
tion, conferences with local staff and teachers, and participation in surveys
and special studies.


The State's Plan for-Work-Study Programs under the Vocational Education Act of 1963

At the state level, the work-study program is administered by a coordinator and a
secretary in cooperation with county designated work-study coordinators. It is
anticipated that 27 local educational agencies of Florida will participate in
work-study programs in FY 1968-69 and that approximately 1,600 students will
benefit.


- 70 -




ESTIMATE OF ENROLLMENT AND FUNDS NEEDED FOR VOCATIONAL EDUCATION


PURPOSE

Secondary


Post-Secondary




Adult

I


Persons with
Special Needs


Construction
of Area
Vocational
Schools


Ancillary
Services


FISCAL ENROLLMENT


1969
1970
1971
1972
1973

1969
1970
1971
1972
1973

1969
1970
1971
1972
1973

1969
1970
1971
1972
1973

1969
1970
1971
1972
1973

1969
1970
1971
1972
1973


146,994
161,380
176,829
192,792
208,036

44,000
51,000
58,000
65,000
67,000

172,467
182,815
193,784
205,411
217,735

5,500
8,690
10,610
13,495
16,642

xxxxxxXXX
xxxxxxxxx
XXXXXXXXX
XXXXXXXXX
XXXXXXXXX


XXXXXXXXX
XXXXXXXXX
XXXXXXXXX
XXXXX00XXXX


% FROM
LOW
INCOME
FAMILIES*

23 $
xxxxxxx
xxxxxxx
XXXXXXX0
XXXXXXX0


15 %




X20 0%XX
xxxxxxx




75 %
XX200XXX
XXXXKXX
XXXXXXX


xxxxxxx
xxxxxxx)
xxxxxxx)

xxxxxxx)


XXX200C
XXX=00C
XX20C2
XX20000C
XXX200C


FEDERAL
FUNDS

$ 863,002
922,983
922,983
922,983
922,983

649,611
694,597
694,597
694,597
694,597

354,333
378,325
378,325
378,325
378,325

196,853
211,848
211,848
211,848
211,848

3,049,907
5,500,000

5,500,000


2,237,201
2,393,154
2,393,154
2,393,154
2,393,154


ESTIMATED TOTAL


STATE
FUNDS

$ 14,695,200
15,751,370
17,641,534
19,758,518
22,129,540


12,434,400
13,329,207
14,928,711
16,720,156
18,726,575

6,782,400
7,271,362
8,143,925
9,121,196
10,215,740

750,000
974,400
1,091,328
1,222,287
1,368,961

3,228,378
10,446,000

10,850,000


3,018,000
3,920,985
4,390,503
4,918,483
5,508,700


FUNDS NEEDED
LOCAL
FUNDS

$ 1,470,000
2,353,654
2,636,092
2,952,423
3,306,713


1,245,000
1,991,721
2,230,728
2,498,415
2,798,224

680,000
1,086,526
1,216,909
1,362,938
1,526,490


250,000
145,600
163,072
182,641
204,558

250,000


1,006,000
585,895
656,202
734,946
823,140


6,261,201
6,900,034
7,440,859
8,046,583
8,724,994


* Percentage of enrollment representing persons coming from families having an annual income of $3,000 or less.


I w


* t


TOTAL
FUNDS

$ 17,028,202
19,028,007
21,200,609
23,633,924
26,359,236

14,329,011
16,015,525
17,854,036
19,913,168
22,219,396

7,816,733
8,736,213
9,739,159
10,862,459
12,120,555

1,196,853
1,331,848
1,446,248
1,616,776
1,785,367

6,528,285
15,946,000

16,350,000









ESTIMATE OF ENROLLMENT AND FUNDS NEEDED FOR VOCATIONAL EDUCATION


FISCAL ENROLLMENT


)oooC=OOOO
loo0oooooo
xxxxxx0OO
xDxbaoota
xxmboaoo


% FROM
LOW
INCOME
FAMILIES*

XXXXXXX
xx~ooom )
XXXXXcK)
1:00000)


FEDERAL
FUNDS

$ 7,350,907
14,701,814

14,701,814


ESTIMATED TOTAL
STATE
FUNDS

$ 40,908,378
97,890,325

120,543,156


FUNDS NEEDED
LOCAL
FUNDS

$ 4,901,000
13,066,399

16,390,488


TOTAL
FUNDS

$ 53,160,285
125,658,538

151,635,458


* Percentage of enrollment representing persons coming from families having an annual income of $3,000 or less.


PURPOSE


TOTAL


1969
1970
1971
1972
1973


I




Form OE 4256

State FLORIDA
Fiscal Year 1968-69


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE
Office of Education
Bureau of Adult, Vocational, and Library Programs
Division of Vocational and Technical Education
Washington, D. C. 20202


Estimate of Total Expenditures for Vocational Education Purposes under all Vocational Education Acts


PURPOSE

(1)


Secondary--- -------------------
Post-Secondary (Purpose (2), 1963 Act)--
Adult-----------------------------------
Persons with special needs--------------
Construction of area vocational schools--
Ancillary services (Total)--------------
Administration and supervision----
Teacher education----------------
Guidance-------------------------
Research-----------------------
Curriculum development------------
Other In-Service Education--------
Total-----------------------------


$ 17,028,202
14,329,011
7,816,733
1,196,853
6,528,285
6,261,201
4,054,224
490,226
415,000
372,751
345,000
584,000
$ 53,160,285


S$ 95,279


//////////
96,702
70,014
26,688




$ 191,981


$ 767,723
649,611
354,333
196,853
3,049,907
2,140,499
1,314,210
333,538
25,000
92,751
75,000
300,000
$ 7,158,926


$ .14,695,200
12,434,400
6,782,400
750,000
3,228,378
3,018,000
2,000,000
100,000
300,000
200,000
200,000
218,000
$ 40,908,378


I I I--- - -~---~"-3~- -


Work Study-------------------


$ 1,470,000
1,245,000
680,000
250,000
250,000
1,006,000
670,000
30,000
90,000
80,000
70,000
66,000
$ 4,901,000


1/ Estimates of expenditures as projected in accordance with the policies and procedures in Section 1.3 of the
State plan.
2/ Include all funds under Smith-Hughes and George-Barden allotments, except funds to be transferred to the
allotment under the 1963 Act.
3/ Include funds to be transferred from Smith-Hughes and George-Barden allotments to the allotment under
Section 3 of the 1963 Act.

I certify that the information set forth herein, including the representation as to amounts of State and local
funds to be expended under the plan during the stated period, is true to the best of my knowledge and belief.


(Date


(Signed)


Assistant Superintendent,
(Title) Vocational, Technical, & Adult Education


* The proportional relationship of state to local support is conjectural because of new state legislation
which increased the ratio of state support but affects the counties differently, depending upon the
milage each county had been allocating to education.


Total Federal Funds State and Local Funds
All Funds Smith-Hughes
(Cols 3 + 4 and George- 1963 Act 3/ State Local*
+ 5 + 6) Barden 2/
(2) (3) (4) (5) (6)


Original Estimate / 7
Revised Estimate


-I ` `


7


^ J ---e 1 v-2,-1


//////////


)


June 12 1968







U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE
Office of Education
Bureau of Adult, Vocational, and Library Programs
Division of Vocational and Technical Education
OE 4255 Washington, D.C. 20202

State FLORIDA
Fiscal Year 1968-69
Request for Transfer of Federal Funds
Allotted under Smith-Hughes and George-Barden Acts


Allotment from Allotment to
which transfer which transfer
is to be made is to be made Amount Explanation 3/
(Code No.) l/ (Code No.) 1/___

1.1 5 $ 71,604.00 See attached sheets
1.2 5 70,578.40
1.3 5 18,487.33
2.1 5 74,147.00
2.3 5 231,520.00
2.4 5 68,138.00
2.5 5 22,500.00
3.0 5 96,104.00
4.0 5 288,311.00
1.3 2.2 9,243.67
1.2 2.2 17,644.60


- ~~~(Signe~d) -


June 19, 1968
(Date)


State Superintendent of Public Instruction
(Title)


- 74 -




































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a





































































*








VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL EDUCATION EMPHASES
FY 1968-69


Program emphases for FY 1968-69 are again concentrated upon the improvement and
expansion of vocational-technical education at the post-secondary level and upon
the development of vocational and vocationally-related programs for disadvantaged
persons at all appropriate instructional levels.


Development of Post-Secondary Vocational-Technical Education

A total of 34 area vocational-technical schools have been established by the State
Board for Vocational Education. Twenty-two are area centers administered directly
by the County Board of Public Instruction of the county of location and 12 are
departments of junior colleges. All but two are post-secondary institutions although
they may also serve high school students in their service area if this responsibility
was included in their request for designation by the State Board. One of the remainder
is a specialized high school which also serves adults and the other is a comprehensive
high school.

Fifteen of the schools are now operating in new or improved facilities and another 11
are scheduled to begin operation during FY 1968-69. Construction incorporating a
total of 4575 student stations, exclusive of those in junior colleges, will have been
completed or be under contract by the close of the 1967-69 biennium with contract
status pending on another 3840, awaiting a favorable bond market.

During the first phase of area school development, primary attention has been directed
to the relocation of programs housed in obsolete and substandard facilities. Through
a study of representative laboratory equipment costs, it has been determined that the
cost of equipping a student station is approximately $750. Funds in the amount of
$2,282,000 from the Vocational Education Act of 1963 have been used to equip student
stations for relocated programs as well as student stations for new programs which
have been completed or which are under contract.

The State Legislature appropriated $1,218,000 for use in FY 1968-69 by the 22 centers
administered directly by county boards to provide for more uniform funding of programs
in area centers and junior college departments. These funds may be used for current
operating expense, replacement of obsolete equipment, and purchase of instructional
references and aids, but not for initial purchase of equipment for new or ongoing
programs.

No State funds have been appropriated expressly for the initial purchase of equipment,
so funding from federal sources will need to continue if the capability of facilities
is to be more than partially realized. The cost of equipping the 3840 student stations
which are not yet under contract will approximate $2,880,000 and is to be apportioned
over a three-year period beginning with FY 1968-69.

In addition, funds are needed to assist in program expansion in six adult centers and
14 junior college departments which have not been designated as area facilities but
which are providing needed vocational and technical preparatory instruction.


- 75 -





Oate DuP


Programs for Persons with Special Needs

The second principal area of emphasis for FY 1968-69 is further promotion and develop-
ment of vocational and vocationally-related programs for persons with special needs.
Some programs for disadvantaged persons were being conducted by sections within the
Division prior to FY 1967-68. During the present school year, however Minimum
Foundation Program special vocational instructional units in considerably greater
number have been allocated to the support of vocational education programs for
persons with special needs. In addition, experimentation has been initiated and
more is being planned to identify appropriate learning experiences which will prepare
disadvantaged youth for entry level employment in a variety of occupations.

Approximately 2300 students in 21 of the state's 67 counties are enrolled in special
vocationally-oriented programs this school year. It is anticipated that in FY 1968-69
a total of 31 counties will be providing special programs serving approximately 5500
secondary and post-secondary students. These programs will be supported with 175
Minimum Foundation Program special vocational instructional units in combination with
other local, state, and federal funds.

It is requested, therefore, that federal funds allocated under the Smith-Hughes and
George-Barden Acts be transferred to the Vocational Education Act of 1963 for
disbursement under provisions of that Act.


- 76 -






37~52 97q~c5



























































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TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA




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