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 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Errata
 Letter of transmittal
 Table of Contents
 Main
 Back Cover














Group Title: Annual descriptive report of the Florida State Board for Vocational Education
Title: Annual descriptive report, the Florida State Board for Vocational Education ..
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00080860/00007
 Material Information
Title: Annual descriptive report, the Florida State Board for Vocational Education ..
Series Title: Bulletin
Alternate Title: Annual descriptive report, the Florida State Board for Vocational Education, vocational education program activities and accomplishments
Annual descriptive report of the Florida State Board for Vocatinal Education of vocation education program activities and accomplishments
Physical Description: v. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- State Board for Vocational Education
Florida -- Division of Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education
Florida -- Division of Vocational Education
Publisher: Division of Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education, the State Dept. of Education
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: 1966-1967
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Vocational education -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: 19-
Issuing Body: Some volumes issued by the division under its later name: Florida. Division of Vocational Education.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00080860
Volume ID: VID00007
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ALW7522
oclc - 22198026
alephbibnum - 002362953

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Title Page 1
        Title Page 2
    Errata
        Page i
        Page ii
    Letter of transmittal
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Table of Contents
        Table of Contents 1
        Table of Contents 2
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 9a
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 24a
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 31a
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 38a
        Page 39
        Page 39a
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 42a
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
    Back Cover
        Page 47
        Page 48
Full Text


BULLETIN 70E-16


.1 B1 EP BT
OF THE
FLORIDA STATE BOARD
FOR VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
JULY 1,1966 JUNE 30, 1967

THE STATE DEPARTMENT
OF EDUCATION


State Superintendent

TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA DECEMBER, 1967
3 15?. 090757
P63O'6 6
no.-ior-/b
C- 2






















UNIVERSITY
OF FLORIDA

LIBRARIES


I

















ANNUAL DESCRIPTIVE REPORT

OF

THE FLORIDA STATE BOARD FOR VOCATIONAL EDUCATION

JULY 1, 1966 JUNE 30, 1967





















STATE BOARD FOR VOCATIONAL EDUCATION

Hon. Claude R. Kirk, Jr., Governor, President of the Board

Hon. Tom Adams, Secretary of State

Hon. Earl Faircloth, Attorney General

Hon. Broward Williams, State Treasurer

Hon. Floyd T. Christian, State Superintendent of Public Instruction,
Secretary, and Executive Officer of the Board









T7 a. o09-1 Sl

C-. O I-c,






- t -, ** -. -
:: Correctiois, Pages 6, Y, --Annual btescriptirve Report 1966-67


NUMBER OF SCHOOLS OFFERING SECONDARY LEVEL
VOCATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS
BY COUNTY AND PROGRAM


COUNTY

Bay

Brevard

Broward

Charlotte

Collier

Dade

Duval

Escambia

Hillsborough

Lake

Lee

Leon

Manatee

Martin

Okeechobee

Orange

Osceola

Palm Beach

Pasco

Pinellas

Polk

Sarasota

Sumter

Volusia

Washington


OFFICE

0


DIST. DIVERS.

2

4

7

1








N0: -"






.: ,...-.... ,..: .:.

STATE OF FLORIDA

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSIS SPNTDENT
FLOYD T. CHRISTIAN T A L L A H E 3 2 3 0 4 DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL. TECHNICAL,
SUPERINTENDENT 3AND ADULT EDUCATION




September 8, 1967





Honorable Floyd T. Christian
Executive Officer
State Board for Vocational Education
Tallahassee, Florida

Dear Superintendent Christian:

Attached is the Annual Descriptive Report of the Florida State Board for
Vocational Education for the period beginning July 1, 1966 and ending
June 30, 1967.

This report, submitted for approval, and transmitted to the United'States
Office of Education, highlights the activities of the vocational services
as requested by the Assistant Commissioner for Vocational Education, Office
of Education, United States Department of Health, Education, and Welfare,
Washington, D. C.

Included are many details regarding the activities of Florida's sixty-
seven counties to expand and strengthen local programs of vocational and
technical education. Also included is the statistical report.

Respectfully submitted,



Carl W. Proehl
Assistant Superintendent
Vocational, Technical, and
Adult Education

CWP:jb

Enclosures


"400.1







''V.










Table of Contents


Page


THE IMPACT OF VOCATIONAL AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION
PROGRAMS ON MANPOWER AND EMPLOYMENT NEEDS 1

ACHIEVEMENTS IN EXPANDING AND IMPROVING VOCATIONAL
AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION FOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS 5

ACHIEVEMENTS IN EXPANDING AND IMPROVING VOCATIONAL
AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION FOR POST-HIGH SCHOOL
STUDENTS, INCLUDING GRADUATES AND DROPOUTS 10

ACHIEVEMENTS IN EXPANDING AND IMPROVING VOCATIONAL
AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION FOR PERSONS WHO HAVE
ALREADY ENTERED THE LABOR MARKET 14

ACHIEVEMENTS IN EXPANDING AND IMPROVING VOCATIONAL
AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION FOR PERSONS WITH SPECIAL
NEEDS 16

THE IMPACT OF AREA VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL SCHOOL
CONSTRUCTION UNDER THE VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
ACT OF 1963 18

THE STATE'S ACTIVITIES IN PROVIDING FOR THE
ORGANIZATION AND STAFFING OF THE STATE AGENCY
FOR ADMINISTERING AND SUPERVISING STATE PLAN
PROGRAMS 24

ACTIVITIES TO STRENGTHEN TEACHER TRAINING,
GUIDANCE, CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT, RESEARCH,
AND EVALUATION 25

ENACTED LEGISLATION AFFECTING VOCATIONAL AND
TECHNICAL EDUCATION IN FLORIDA 32

ACTIVITIES AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS REGARDING
COOPERATION WITH OTHER STATE AGENCIES 34

OUTSTANDING FEATURES OF THE STATE PROGRAM-
MAJOR STRENGTHS, CURRENT NEEDS, AND PROBLEMS 36

VOCATIONAL YOUTH ORGANIZATION ACTIVITIES AND THE
PROGRAM OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 39

THE STATE ADVISORY COUNCIL AND OTHER ADVISORY
COMMITTEE ACTIVITIES 40


STORIES ILLUSTRATING PROGRAM EFFECTIVENESS













THE IMPACT OF VOCATIONAL AND TECHNICAL
EDUCATION PROGRAMS ON MANPOWER
AND EMPLOYMENT NEEDS


Information concerning projected employment demand, current and projected occu-
pational education programs, and enrollments by instructional type, was compiled
and studied for each county in the state by local and state personnel. Titles
of vocational-technical programs and specific occupations for which they prepare
were also useful information made available for study. Employment demand was
indicated and also projected occupational instructional programs and anticipated
enrollments for the year. Employment demand within a county was obtained from
the Florida State Employment Service, other governmental agencies, and from
additional sources including judgments of personnel from local schools, business
and trade associations, and advisory committees. Demand for each occupation was
indicated by a symbol obtained from the Florida State Employment Service publica-
tion Opportunities for Work in Principal Areas of the State which was used as one
source of information.

To arrive at the following rank order of employment demand, certain hypotheses
were used to evaluate employment indicators on a numerical basis. For example,
the occupation waitress may have received an "A" employment demand rating in a
county. It was assigned a certain number of points based upon this rating.
Fewer points were assigned as demand declined. All occupations were treated in
the same manner, and at the conclusion of the study points were totaled for each
occupation. Occupations were then arranged in rank order and the top 20 were:

RANK ORDER RANK ORDER
OCCUPATIONS OF DEMAND OCCUPATIONS OF DEMAND

Waitress 1 Machinist 11
Auto Mechanic 2 Cook, Short Order 12
Stenographer 3 Nurse, L. P. 13
Secretary 4 Upholsterer 14
Nurse, Reg. 5 Salesman 15
Draftsman 6 Truck Mechanic 16
Auto Bo.dy Repairman 7 Cook 17
Steno Bookkeeper 8 Sheet Metal Worker 18
Service Station Attendant 9 Clerk Typist 19
Mechanic, Refrigeration Appliance Serviceman 20
and Air-Conditioning 10

A highlight of the work of the Division has been special studies to help counties
plan occupational programs for new area schools, and to expand and strengthen
programs in existing comprehensive high schools, junior colleges, and adult cen-
ters. For example, the Technical Education Section conducted a survey in January,
1967, to determine the demand for technicians in Florida. The following is
illustrative of data reported in the survey:


- 1 -









NO. EMP.
JAN. 1967


TECHNOLOGY


Aeronautical
Data Processing
Electronics
Graphic Arts
Mechanical
Tool and Die Design


477
2,029
7,322
2,446
4,065
508


ADD. TECH.
NEEDED
1967

243
908
2,387
616
1,110
286


From data such as the above, local and county school personnel have been furnished
valid current information concerning employment opportunities in technical educa-
tion in Florida.


A survey of employment in health
demand for employees in Florida.
reported in the survey:


related occupations was made to determine the
The following is illustrative of findings


OCCUPATION


Certified Lab. Asst.
Hospital Ward Clerk
Medical Secretary
Nurse Aide-Orderly
Nurse, L. P.
Nurse, Registered
Radiological Tech.

Totals


NUMBER
EMPLOYED
1967


705
1,222
1,194
10,306
4,241
9,076
769

30,182


PRESENT
VACANCIES


87
157
87
790
769
1,208
78

3,579


TOTAL
ADDITIONAL
NEEDED
1967-69

363
758
346
4,196
2,726
4,948
340

15,469


PERCENT OF
CHANGE BY
12/31/69


To plan for state-wide program development, Bureau of the Census figures pro-
jecting population and labor force growth to 1970 have been used. Projections
for 1975 and 1980 were made by the Occupational Information Specialist:; using
the assumption that the labor force will constitute the same percentage of the
population as presently, or will increase only slightly. Figures reported were:


MALE
POPULATION LABOR FORCE


FEMALE
POPULATION LABOR FORCE


2,437,000
2,829,000
3,369,000
3,986,000
4,656,000


1,251,000
1,665,000
2,127,000
2,517,000
2,940,000


2,515,000
2,976,000
3,542,000
4,221,000
4,942,000


636,000
844,000
1,031,000
1,266,000
1,532,000


The data below were based upon the 1960 Census and included employment in leading
occupations by sex in Florida. To project the number of employees in these major
occupations in later years, the ratio of employees in each occupation to the total
labor force in 1960 was determined. Percentages thus calculated were applied to
future estimates of Florida's labor force to estimate the projected number of
employees for each occupation. A marked increase in employment of women is
apparent, emphasizing the importance of occupational programs for women.


-2-


PERCENT
INCREASE
1967


1960
1965
1970
1975
1980










OCCUPATION


NUMBER EMPLOYED IN FLORIDA AND
PROJECTIONS FOR THE FUTURE

FEMALE
1960 1965


Bookkeeper
Cashier
Maid
Cook not private household
Cosmetologist
Hospital Attendant
Office Machine Operator
Practical Nurse
Receptionist
Sales Clerk Retail
Secretary'
Stenographer
Telephone Operator
Typist
Waitress

Total Estimated Labor Force


23,185
14,152
12,481
9,585
9,343
6,824
3,459
4,859
3,519
38,530
40,959
4,607
9,161
9,067
27,095


30,764
18,779
16,559
12,719
12,398
9,056
4,591
6,448
4,667
51,130
54,354
6,111
12,154
12,027
35,954


37,580
22,940
20,228
15,537
15,145
11,063
5,609
7,877
5,701
62,458
66,396
7,464
14,846
14,692
43,921


636,000 844,000 1,031, 00


MALE


Auto Mechanic
Auto Service Station Attendant
Airplane Mechanic
Masons Brick, Stone
Carpenter
Cook
Construction Worker
Delivery or Route Man
Electrician
Heavy Machinery Operator
Gardener
Insurance Agent, Broker
Caretaker
Lineman
Machinist
Manager
Painter
Plasterer
Porter
Radio & TV Repairman
Salesman Manufacturing
Salesman Retail
Salesman Wholesale
Store Clerk
Truck & Tractor Driver
Waiter
Wholesale Trade Manager

Total Estimated Labor Force


19,550 26,007
10,616 14,136
8,901 11,855
7,325 9,757
30,138 40,110
7,841 10,440,
24,571 32,701
11,186 14,885
9,643 12,837
8,352 11,122
10,828 14,419
11,590 15,418
11,082 14,752
8,497 11,305
5,070 6,743
18,000 24,000
9,751 12,970
3,993 5,311
6,189 8,242
4,023 5,361
10,697 14,236
35,346 47,036
12,785 17,000
6,953 9,257
45,923 61,106
4,622 / 6,344
*5,555 _7,393


33,224
18,058
15,144
12,464
51,239
13,336
41,774
19,015
16,400
14,208
18,420
19,696
18,845
14,442
8,614
31,000
16,569
6,785
10,529
6,849
18,186
60,088
21,717
11,826
78,061
7,849
9,444


1,251,000 L65,000 2,127,000
2_ .z


46,146
28,169
24,839
19,079
18,598
13,584
6,887
9,672
7,001
76,694
81,530
9,166
18,230
18,041
53,932

1,266,000



39,316
21,369
17,921
14,750
60,635
15,782
49,434
22,502
19,406
16,814
21,797
23,307
22,301
17,090
10,194
37,000
19,607
8,029
12,459
8,105
21,521
71,105
25,699
13,995
92,374
9,288
11,175

2,517,000


55,841
34,087
30,058
23,087
22,505
16,438
8,334
11,704
8,472
92,809
98,661
11,092
22,061
21,831
65,263

1,532,, 000



45,923
24,961
20,933
17,228
70,825
18,434
57,742
26,284
22,665
19,639
25,460
27,224
26,048
19,963
11,907
43,000
22,903
9,379
14,553
9,467
25,137
83,055
30,017
16,346
107,849
10,849
13,054

2,940,000


-3-


1970


1975


1980









The Projected Program of the Florida State Board for Vocational Education for
FY 1966-67 reported employment and educational.data from representative areas
which included 40% of the state's population. Ten counties were selected as
pilot areas for close examination of employment opportunities and vocational
programs. The study included a review of employment opportunities at selected
skill levels in non-professional sectors of the labor market and also described
projected plans, by educational level, for meeting changing individual and
occupational needs.

The pilot studies showed, generally, that vocational program offerings tended
to parallel employment opportunities in the year 1966-67. However, good employ-
ment opportunities were reported in one or more pilot counties for accountants,
air conditioning technicians, civil and construction technicians, office managers,
mechanical technicians, licensed practical nurses, registered nurses, auto body
repairmen, cabinet makers, clothing maintenance specialists, plumbers, sewing
machine operators, and cooks, but no additional programs were being planned.

Poor employment opportunities were reported for hostess jobs, upholsterers, and
chambermaids, but courses were scheduled. Thus, the studies emphasized short-
comings and successful aspects of the plans in ten counties.

The pilot study furnished valuable information, but indicated that refinements
were needed. It was determined that data should be reported by major labor
markets of the state in order for'it to be consolidated and used more effectively.
To further develop the study instrument, HEW's occupational educatioA code was
adopted.

Much study was given to determining ways for reporting employment opportunities
according to principal labor market areas as defined by the Florida Development
Commission.

It is the intention of the Division to further explore the area concept of
employment opportunities in work with county personnel.


- 4-






ACHIEVEMENTS IN EXPANDING AND IMPROVING
VOCATIONAL AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION
FOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS


Efforts of county and state personnel to improve and expand vocational education
have included a variety of approaches. Programs, facilities, and personnel needed
for program operation have been studied and goals established to expand these
three items to provide for more students at the high school level. Following are
enrollments in high school programs for selected years.


High School Enrollment in
Vocational and Technical Education
Selected Years

1964 1966 1967

Agriculture Education 14,256 13,346 16,695
Business Education 944 5,337 9,736
Distributive Education 906 2,410 2,869
Health Related Education 44 47 80
Home Economics Education 67,484 74,229 76,981
Industrial Education 7,682 9,684 11,094
Technical Education 616 678 711
Other 1,760

The number of programs offered at the high school level in 1966-67 are listed in
the following table. The table shows the number of schools in each county which
offer programs on the secondary level, and shows also the diversity of vocational
education at the county level. Some increases over 1965-66 occurred in the
number of schools offering programs but some counties also showed decreases. The
latter does not necessarily indicate retrenchments because certain programs may
have been consolidated in one school. Increases included three additional programs
in office education in Brevard County, and increases in distributive education,
home economics and industrial education in Broward County.


- 5 -









NUMBER OF SCHOOLS OFFERING SECONDARY LEVEL
VOCATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS
BY COUNTY AND PROGRAM


COUNTY

Alachua

Baker

Bay

Bradford

Brevard

Broward

Calhoun

Charlotte

Citrus

Clay

Collier

Columbia

Dade

DeSoto

Dixie

Duval

Escambia

Flagler

Franklin

Gadsden

Gilchrist

Glades

Gulf


AGRI.

9

1


DIST.

1


DIVERS.

3





1


HOME ECONOMICS
HEALTH OCC. USEFUL

8

2

6

1

23

2 26

3


1

15

15

2

3

6

2

1 1

3


-6-


TECH.

1





1


OFFICE

3





1

7

5

1


nxj_ s.

4



2

1

10

4







COUNTY

Hamilton

Hardee

Henry

Hernando

Highlands

Hillsborough

Holmes

Indian River

Jackson

Jefferson

Lafayette

Lake

Lee

SLeon

Levy

Liberty

Madison

Manatee

Marion

Martin

Monroe

Nassau

Okaloosa

Okeechobee

Orange

Osceola


HOME ECONOMICS
AGRI. DIST. DIVERS. HEALTH MCC. USEFUL OFFICE TECH. INDUS,

2 1 2 1

1 1 1 1

2 1 3

2 1 2 2 1

4 2 4 3

14 3 1 2 35 14 4 3

4 4 4

2 2 1 2 1

10 10 10 2

2 2

1 1

7 3 2 10

1 2 3 7 4

4 3 6 2 1


10

1

1 3

6

10


1 25

4


-7-









COUNTY


Palm Beach


HOME ECONOMICS
AGRI. DIST. DIVERS. HEALTH 0CC. USEFUL

4 1 23


OFFICE TECH. INDUS.

1 4


Pasco


Pinellas


3 30


Polk


Putnam

St. Johns

St. Lucie

Santa Rosa

Sarasota

Seminole

Sumter

Suwannee

Taylor

Union

Volusia

Wakulla

Walton

Washington


2 3


1 4


In comparing the actual offerings above with the total projected for 1966-67, it was noted
that many counties did not offer as many programs as had been anticipated. Programs, however,
were usually offered in the major fields as planned. In a number of instances counties also
exceeded the number of new programs originally anticipated.

The following are representative activities of the respective vocational services designed to
promote growth and improve vocational and technical education in secondary schools. At times
there may have been some overlap with other instructional levels, but this has been kept to
a minimum.

Programs of Agriculture Education in the New Smyrna Beach area will benefit from a school farm
of 80 acres which has recently been made available. Excellent progress has been made in
developing additional horticultural and livestock programs at the Pinellas County Agricultural
Education Center. In Deland, about ten acres have been fenced and partially cleared for


-8-










pasture and crops. A 40-acre school farm is being developed at Ocala. Storage
barns have been constructed in DeSoto, Hendry, and Palm Beach Counties. Four new
departments of agriculture education were established during the year and one
department was reestablished. In the state, four additional teachers were added
to existing departments. Considerable work was done to develop off-farm placement
programs for students.

Enrollments in Business Education continued their increase over the preceding
year. The bulk of the increase, (3430) was in vocational office education block
programs and in directing-teacher programs.

The programs in Distributive Education continued to expand in enrollment and in
the number of programs offered, the latter having increased to 70 during the
year. In addition, there were four project distributive education programs at
the secondary level. Enrollments in cooperative distributive education totaled
1560, and students earned over $1,800,000. In addition, 2076 students received
training in distributive occupations in diversified cooperative training programs.

Offerings were expanded in Health-Related Education to include a nurse aide
program at St. Petersburg. Two classes in nurse aide education for disadvantaged
students were activated in Manatee County. In addition, the practical nursing
program at Woodham High School, in Pensacola, continues as the only high school
practical nursing program in the state.

High school student enrollment in preparatory Industrial Education programs
increased state-wide from 9684 in 1965-66 to 11,085 in 1966-67. Thirty-six
industrial and service occupational areas were represented. Courses were offered
for high school students in 26 of the 67 counties of the state. The more signifi-
cant increases in enrollment occurred in a number of counties having considerable
concentration of population, namely, Brevard, Broward, Dade, Escambia, Hills-
borough, Orange, Pinellas, Putnam, and Sarasota. -Attention during the year was
given to the expansion and improvement of industrial education for high school
students primarily in three ways. planning with county school officials for
increasing the offerings for high school students through area vocational schools
and comprehensive high schools, assisting county school officials in up-grading
equipment and facilities for on-going programs, and placing emphasis upon the
in-service training of teachers through the initiation of county workshops
held during the summer. A limited number of pilot programs involving variations
in scheduling within the secondary school were considered during the year.

Although Technical Education is not emphasized at the high school level, in
general, program objectives were met. A new technical science building con-
taining 20,000 square feet of laboratory space was completed at Nova High School at
Ft. Lauderdale. Thus, provision has been made at the latter school for all students
who desire work in a variety of technologies including drafting, electronics, data
processing, and graphic arts technology.


- 9 -










ACHIEVEMENTS IN EXPANDING AND IMPROVING VOCATIONAL AND
TECHNICAL EDUCATION FOR POST-HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS,
INCLUDING GRADUATES AND DROPOUTS


Post-secondary education is growing in Florida. Program emphases included
technical and health-related education and appropriate vocational instruction
for school dropouts. State and federal funds in excess of $12,000,000 were
provided in the 1965-67 biennium for the construction of area school facilities,
exclusive of junior colleges. Additional state and federal funds were used to
employ personnel to make post-secondary programs operative. However, results
of building activity and program planning for area schools will not be fully
evident until FY 1967-68 when most are scheduled to open.


Enrollment in Post-High School
Vocational and Technical Education
Selected Years

1964 1966 1967

Agriculture Education 1,528 1,410 2,010
Business Education 54,967 54,642 65,232
Distributive Education 19,272 21,594 20,683
Health Related Education 2,267 5,667 5,413
Home Economics Education 28,443 32,997 36,052
Industrial Education 32,003 34,556 36,934
Technical Education 12,449 15,548 15,587

The following table reports the post-secondary and adult preparatory programs
offered in Florida.


- 10 -









NUMBER OF SCHOOLS OFFERING POST-SECONDARY VOCATIONAL
EDUCATION PROGRAMS BY COUNTY BY VOCATIONAL
SPECIALTY AND BY LEVEL OF INSTRUCTION


Code

PS Post Secondary
A Adult


AGRI. DIST. DIVERS. HEALTH

PS

A PS,A

PS PS PS-2


HOME ECONOMICS
OCC. USEFUL





A-7 A-ll


OFFICE

PS

PS, A

PS, A-9


TECH. INDUS.



PS, A-2 A

PS-2,
A-5


A-2


A-2


A-2

PS-3,A PS-2 PS-2,A


COUNTY

Alachua

Bay

Broward


Calhoun

Clay

Collier

Columbia

Dade


DeSoto

Dixie

Duval

Escambia


PS-2,
A-16
PS


PS-3, A PS-2


PS, A

PS-3,
A-13
PS-2,
A-3


A



PS-12,
A-6


Gadsden

Gilchrist

Hamilton

Hillsborough


Jackson

Lake


A-2


PS-2


A-2


A A-2


A-5


Lee


- 11 -


PS-2,A

PS-3,A


PS,A


PS,A


A

PS-2,
A-2
PS,
A-2

A


PS-1,
A-2


A

A-2

PS,
A-2






HOME ECONOMICS
AGRI. DIST. DIVERS. HEALTH OCC. USEFUL


OFFICE TECH. INDUJS.


PS, A


PS, A


PS, A


PS, A-2 PS, A PS, A-2


A

A-2


Manatee

Martin

Monroe

Orange

Osceola


Palm Beach

Pinellas


Polk


Putnam


PS, A-6 PS

PS, A PS, A

PS


St. Johns

St. Lucie

Sarasota

Seminole

Suwannee

Volusia


PS, A

PS-2


PS, A


A-2


A PS, A


PS, A-2


PS, A-7 PS, A-2 A-5

PS, A PS, A PS, A


PS, A


PS, A


A-3


A-2


The following presents a number of items reported by vocational services regarding progress
or growth in providing vocational and technical education for post-high school students,
including graduates and dropouts.

New Agriculture Education programs were established in animal science specializing in racehorse
farms, ornamental horticulture, and turf grass management. Additional programs have been
planned for six new area schools and include farm mechanics, forestry, citrus culture, and
ornamental horticulture.

In keeping with the expansion of opportunities for people at instructional levels other than
secondary, Business Education served more students than other sections, with a total of 65,232
enrolled during the last year.

State personnel in Distributive Education continued to work closely with the Division of
-Community Junior Colleges to provide consultative services to the junior colleges. The junior
colleges reported over 400 full-time cooperative students enrolled in 19 mid-management
programs. An additional 400 students took mid-management classes in the junior colleges.


- 12 -


COUNTY


Leon


A A









In general, program objectives were met in Technical Education as the post-secondary
level. The "area concept" has been developed which will help to establish locations
for technical programs, to meet the needs of particular areas of the state. Strategic
location of courses according to need will provide savings which can be used to add
other needed technical education programs or courses. A basic tool in developing
the area concept for locating technical education programs has been the state study
of need for technicians in Florida counties.


- 13 -









ACHIEVEMENTS IN EXPANDING AND IMPROVING VOCATIONAL
AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION FOR PERSONS WHO
HAVE ALREADY ENTERED THE LABOR MARKET


Vocational-technical education for persons who have entered the labor market
continued to receive emphasis during the year. Over 1200 adults attended
80 classes in agriculture education which were taught by regular teachers of
agriculture. Classes included production agriculture, farm mechanics, and
ornamental horticulture.

An in-service training program was sponsored by the business education staff
for secretarial and clerical workers employed in Tallahassee.

Among the courses in health related education offered at post-secondary insti-
tutions were refresher courses for registered nurses, practical nurses, home
health aides, dental assistants, nurse aides, and medical secretaries.

Financial support was provided by the state for training for approximately
3000 food service personnel. The training was intended to up-grade skills
and to bring to participants new ideas and techniques for their work. Classes
have continued for personnel engaged in child day care work.

Enrollment in industrial education supplemental classes for persons already
in the labor market increased from 23,130 in 1965-66 to 26,435 in 1966-67.
Forty-three occupational areas were represented. Courses were offered in 58
of the 67 counties, Examples of increases in state-wide enrollment over the
previous year were in navigation, surveying, law enforcement, custodial and
building maintenance, and upholstery. Related classes for apprentices were
provided in 24 trade areas. Increases in enrollment over the year were in
electric wiring, carpentry, painting and decorating, plumbing and pipe fitting,
lathing, and glazing.

Supplemental courses for persons employed in technical occupations have
continued to increase in number as individuals have worked to up-grade them-
selves. Programs are available at most post-secondary institutions which offer
two-year technical programs. For example, Brevard Junior College has many
programs such as industrial management, special courses in electronics, and
refresher courses for engineers. Other junior colleges offering such work
include Miami-Dade, Daytona Beach, and Broward. The Pinellas Technical
Education Institute offers similar courses as do many additional institutions.


- 14 -







Counties in the state reported schools offering vocational-technical education for employed
workers as follows:

COUNTIES OFFERING SUPPLEMENTARY AND APPRENTICE-RELATED
PROGRAMS, BY VOCATIONAL FIELDS


Code
E Supplementary
R Apprentice Related


COUNTY

Alachua


HOME ECONOMICS
AGRI. DIST. DIVERS. HEALTH OCC. USEFUL

E


OFFICE TECH. INDUS.


E-2


E-2


E-8


Broward

Columbia


E-2


E-6,R-6


E

E,R


Escambia

Hillsborough


E-2


E-2


E-2


Palm Beach

Pinellas

Polk

Putnam

St. Lucie

Sarasota

Seminole

Suwannee


E-6


E-5


E-ll


E-3


E

E-6,R


E-7


E-2

E,R


E-4


E,R


Volusia


Alachua, Escambia, Hillsborough, Lee, Palm Beach, and Suwannee Counties were among those report-
ing increases in the number of schools offering programs for employed workers. Increases were
reported in each major area of vocational education although not every county reported increases
in more than one area.
15 -


Dade

Duval


Lee


Manatee

Orange







ACHIEVEMENTS IN EXPANDING AND IMPROVING VOCATIONAL
AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION FOR PERSONS
WITH SPECIAL NEEDS


The growth of vocational programs for persons with special needs continues
with new programs being added in the instructional areas represented by the
various sections of the Division. Full-time programs were operated in
agriculture education in five schools and two part-time programs were
operated. Persons with special needs were enrolled in regular programs of
distributive, health related, and technical education. Much work was done
by personnel from the sections in determining needs and in identifying
possibilities of operating additional programs. The state consultant met
regularly with specially-designated personnel from each section to discuss
the development of programs in each specialized area.

There has been no standard pattern in the development of the special needs
programs. Occupational experiences are provided on-campus or off-campus, in
laboratories or shops, or by work-experiences in the businesses and institu-
tions of the communities. The most distinctive arrangement is the "center"
approach in the Manatee Area Vocational-Technical Center at Bradenton.

Recent developments seem to indicate that another approach may develop.
That approach is the provision for disadvantaged persons in occupational
laboratories in the manner of the comprehensive school. Dade County, for
example, is planning programs in diversified mechanics to be placed in
eight senior high schools.

In addition to the support given to the operation of special vocational
programs in regular schools and vocational centers, provisions are also made
for the support of programs for the mentally retarded in sheltered workshops.

The Manatee Project for educationally deprived youth 14-19 years of age
provides training in a number of semi-skilled occupations. These include
domestic service, aid to elderly or infirm persons, custodial and building
maintenance, landscape maintenance and commercial nursery work, service
station work, and small engine repairs. The basic education related to
the occupations being studied is provided in a half day of study in "home"
schools.

At Manatee, vocational classes are restricted in number to ten students,
thus permitting much individual attention and the use of a variety of
appropriate instructional techniques. The program is conducted in close
cooperation with the Florida State Employment Service, the Vocational
Rehabilitation Division, the County Public Health and Welfare Department,
and other county agencies.

The Southwest Junior High School at Melbourne has, for the past year,
provided a coordinated program to serve the special needs group. In this
program approximately 80 educationally retarded ninth grade students aged
14-16 have been provided with special pupil personnel services along with
occupational education. The latter has included home economics and
industrial education together with appropriate basic education.


- 16 -







The Douglas MacArthur School in Dade County provides a special program
of occupational training for boys who have not been able to succeed in
the regular high school program. Each student assigned to this special
school has a "home" school, but his attendance is full-time at the center.
Progressively, the school plans to add a grade each year and will become
a secondary institution providing for graduation upon completion of the
twelfth grade. Programs have offered training in agriculture jobs, service
station work, building and grounds maintenance, food services, and the
fabrication of products of wood and metal.

Plans were made in Pensacpla, in cooperation with personnel from the University
of West Florida, to conduct a survey of local schools to determine the most
appropriate procedure for providing instruction for students having special
needs. It is expected that once the program is in operation, a dual purpose
will be served by providing appropriate vocational education for youth with
special needs and serving as a laboratory for the training of instructional
personnel in teaching disadvantaged persons.

The State Consultant attended a Seminar for Supervisors and Teacher-
Educators of Teachers for Persons with Special Needs. The teacher-educator
for the program at the University of West Florida also attended the Seminar.
It is expected that impetus for the programs will result from information
gathered at the meeting.


ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND NEEDS THE STATE'S EFFORTS
TO PROVIDE WORK-STUDY PROGRAMS FOR YOUTH


The Work-Study Program for the fiscal year 1966-67 operated in 19 of the 67
counties and in the Florida School for the Deaf and Blind.

Guidelifles were provided counties and institutions which conducted work-
study programs. Financial assistance was provided for 4Sif students whose
employment ranged from semi-skilled jobs to secretarial and data processing
work. A total of 89 state and local public agencies employed work-study
students. Funds expended for work-study programs, inclusive for summer
programs, totaled $115,773.

About 10% of the total number of eligible schools participated in the program.
The number would probably have been greater if 25% in matching funds had not
been required.

Summer programs were operated in 15 counties to provide much needed summer
employment, mainly for rural and small town youth.


- 17 -








THE IMPACT OF AREA VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL SCHOOL CONSTRUCTION
UNDER THE VOCATIONAL EDUCATION ACT OF 1963


The construction of area vocational-technical schools in Florida has progressed
rapidly. Prior to FY 1966-67, 29 area vocational-technical schools had been
designated by the State Board for Vocational Education. Twenty-one of these
were vocational-technical centers and eight were departments of junior colleges.
During the year three additional schools were approved to bring the total to
32. Two of the new designations will be departments of junior colleges and the
other will be a vocational-technical center.

New designations approved, locations, service areas, and tentative programs
based upon program determination studies in the two junior colleges follow.


FLORIDA JUNIOR COLLEGE


Location


Counties in Service Area


Jacksonville


Duval, Nassau


Occupational Programs


Agriculture Education
Horticulture, Landscaping
Agriculture Machinery
Agriculture Supplies, Sales
and Service
Forestry Technology
Agriculture Chemical Technology


Home Economics Education
Family Relationships, Child
Development
Consumption, Family Living
Nutrition
Clothing
Textiles
Housing
Art in Every Day Life
Management of Family Finances


Industrial Education
Machine Shop
Tool and Die Making
Instrument Repair
Business Machine Mechanics
Aircraft Mechanics
Welding
Drafting
Air Conditioning and
Refrigeration
Printing
Radio and Television Repair
Cooking and Baking
Industrial Machine Maintenance
Peace Officer Training
Diesel Mechanics
Appliance Repair

Business and Distributive Education
Accounting
Data Processing
General Office Work
Typing
Office Management
Sales
Banking
Transportation
Real Estate and Insurance


- 18 -







Technical Education
Electronics
Drafting and Design
Data Processing
Graphic Arts
Civil and Construction Technology
Surveying


Health Related Occupations Education
Registered Nurse
Certified Laboratory Assistant
Physician's Assistant
Dental Assistant
Medical Secretary
Practical Nurse
Ward Clerk
Surgical Technician
Obstretrical Technician
Emergency Room Technician


In addition, needs were identified in supportive General Adult Education for
literacy, elementary, and high school completion courses; courses for the aged;
and speech, health, and personal development.


INDIAN RIVER JUNIOR COLLEGE


Counties in Service Area

St. Lucie, Indian River,
Martin, Okeechobee


Fort Pierce


Tentative
Occupational Programs


Agriculture Education
Citrus Technology
Farm Machinery Service


Industrial Education
Auto Mechanics
Welding
Sheet Metal Mechanics
Air Conditioning
Electronics
Cosmetology


Business and Distributive Education
Mid-management
Distribution


AREA VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL SCHOOL


Counties in Service Area

St. Johsn, Putnam, Flagler


St. Augustine


A program determination study is scheduled this fall for the above school.


Area vocationaltechnical facilities designated by the State Board prior to
FY 1966-67 included the following as identified by city of location, counties
in the service area, and type of institution.


- 19 -


Location


Location







Counties in Service Area


Cocoa
Lake City
Miami
Marianna
Tallahassee
Madison
Bradenton
Ocala
Key West
Valparaiso
Orlando
St. Petersburg
Bartow
Fort Pierce

Daytona Beach


Brevard
Columbia, Baker, Gilehrist
Dade
Jackson, Calhoun
Leon
Madison, Jefferson, Lafayette
Manatee
Marion, Levy
Monroe
Okaloosa, Walton
Orange
Pinellas
Polk
St. Lucie, Indian River, Martin,
Okeechobee
Volusia


Junior College
Junior College
Vocational-Technical Center
Junior College
Vocational-Technical Center
Junior College
Vocational-Technical Center
Junior College
Junior College
Junior College
Vocational-Technical Center
Vocational-Technical Center
Vocational-Technical Center


Junior College
Junior College


Division staff members continued to work closely with local personnel in planning
construction and facilities, staffing needs, instructional programs, and other com-
ponents of area school operation. During the year slightly more than $11,000,000
from local, state, and federal sources was applied to the construction of all area
vocational-technical facilities.

The impact of the new area schools on the state has been impressive. A publication,
Bridge to Excellence, which describes the place of the area vocational-technical
school in Florida's educational planning has been well received. The publication
identifies steps for securing designation and funding for construction. It also
illustrates the school's effect on the community and describes the variety of
programs and other services which may be provided. In schools already approved,
approximately 90% of the population of the state will be served.


- 20 -


Type of Institution


Location





ADDITIONAL VOCATIONAL AND TECHNICAL SCHOOL
FACILITIES CONSTRUCTED
(Other than area vocational schools)


Studies were made to determine the number of improvements in vocational
education facilities either through new construction or renovations made
in the counties of Florida in 1966-67. The studies were designed to in-
clude a description of the type of school involved and the students
served in the facilities. The following reports counties making improve-
ments.


FACILITIES CONSTRUCTED OR IMPROVED IN COUNTIES
OF FLORIDA, BY OCCUPATIONAL FIELD 1966-67
(Exclusive of area schools5


Students Served Code VOCATIOAL FIELD

S--Secondary Students Agricul- P Home
PS--Post-Secondary Students ture 0 8 Economics P*
A--Adult Preparatory Students o o
X--Disadvantaged Students 0
D--School Dropouts .
E--Supplemental Students o o j o 8

W 0 09 H o W ,
NUMBER H W > a (
COUNTY SCHOOLS H

Alachua
Voc. Agriculture
Site New Const. 1 S

Bay
Post-Sec. Renovation 1 PS

Brevard
Secondary New Const. 1 S

Broward
Post-Sec. Renovation 2 A,X S,PS
A
Junior College New Const. 1 PS

Charlotte
Secondary Renovation 1 S

Citrus
Secondary New Const. 1 S,A

Dade
Secondary Renovation 1 S
Post-Sec. New Const. 1
Post-Sec. Renovation 1
Junior College New Const. 1 PS PS PS PS PS PS


21 -




VOCATIONAL FIELD

Pg Home
Agriculture P o Economics
o o o *
O *U

o oo oo o o
NUMBER 0 oH

COUNTY SCHOOLS J o


DeSoto
Secondary New Const. 1 S

Dixie
Secondary Renovation 1 S

Duval
Secondary New Const. 3 S S X X SPS
Secondary Renovation 8 S S

Escambia
Secondary New Const. 1 S
Junior College New Const. 1 A,E PS PS
A,E

Hardee
Secondary Renovation 1 S

Hillsborough
Secondary Renovation 7 S S
Specialized and Post-Sec.
Voc. School Renovation 2 S,A S S,P
A

Jackson
Secondary New Const. 1 S S

Lake
Secondary New Const. 2 S S,A S,A
Secondary Renovation 1 S
Junior College New Const. 1 SPS
A
Junior College Renovation 1 SPS

Lee
Sp. High School Renovation 1 PS

Levy
Secondary Renovation 1 S

Manatee
Secondary New Const. 2 S
Junior College New Const. 1 PS


- 22 -




VOCATIONAL FIELD

Home
Agriculture Economics
U p
o a 0 a

o a 0 0
oMBER p o o0 '
0 0 W jj OO
c(soo0 h a 0 os o C

COUNTY SCHOOLS 8 g i W

Marion
Secondary New Const. 1 S

Okaloosa
Secondary New Const. 1 S S s s S S

Palm Beach
Secondary New Const. 5 S S,E
Secondary Renovation 3 S
Junior College New Const. 1 PS PS

Pasco
Secondary New Const. 1 S S S S

Pinellas
Secondary New. Const. 3 S
Renovation S S
Post-Secondary
Voc. Renovation 1 A PS A

Polk
Secondary Renovation 2 S
Junior College Renovation 1 PS PS PS

Putnam
Junior College New Const. 1 PS PS PS

St. Lucie
Secondary Renovation 1 S S

Santa Rosa
Secondary New Const. 2 S S

Union
Secondary Renovation 1 S

Wakulla
Secondary Renovation 2 S

Washington
Secondary New Const. 1 S S


- 23 -








THE STATE'S ACTIVITIES IN PROVIDING FOR THE ORGANIZATION
AND STAFFING OF THE STATE AGENCY FOR ADMINISTERING
AND SUPERVISING STATE PLAN PROGRAMS


During the year a new state director was appointed and the title of the position
changed to Assistant Superintendent, Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education.
The new position Executive Director, Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education,
was also filled.

Additional state staff were employed during the year as follows:

Consultant for Business Education
Curriculum Specialist in Home Economics
Two Consultants for Nursing Education
Consultant for Medically Related Programs
Vocational Studies Assistant
Consultant for Cosmetology Education

State staffs have continued to function to aid, supervise, and develop programs
throughout the state. Budget limitations have materially restricted the
expansion of state staffs.

A special consultant was designated by each section of the Division to work with
the State Consultant for Special Vocational Programs. Although there are addi-
tional responsibilities assigned to existing personnel, it is expected that this
new plan will enable the State Consultant to emphasize each major vocational area
in planning programs.


- 24. -









ACTIVITIES TO STRENGTHEN TEACHER TRAINING, GUIDANCE,
CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT, RESEARCH, AND EVALUATION


During the past year the Division has been active at the local and State levels
to encourage development in the above areas. County personnel, in preparing
their vocational plans, have furnished data regarding their activities and pro-
posals for research, guidance, evaluation and related services. The following
reports activities in these areas.


TEACHER-TRAINING

Numerous efforts were made during the 1966-67 fiscal year to strengthen programs
of teacher education. The resume which follows will briefly identify areas re-
ceiving emphasis during the year.

Programs of trainee recruitment were planned and conducted by agriculture
teacher educators and teachers in conjunction with the University of Florida
College of Agriculture and Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University
personnel.

Pamphlets and other occupational information material were prepared and distri-
buted to graduating senior high school students. It is anticipated that the
efforts will.result in increased enrollments in teacher education.

A new course entitled Agricultural Science Concepts and Opportunities was
developed by the Department of Agriculture Education at the University of Florida
to be offered to all students in the College of Agriculture. A preview of this
course was made available to a number of high school seniors where vocational
agriculture departments exist. It is anticipated that there will be an increase
in students majoring in teacher education during the 1967-68 school year. A
number of students in the College of Agriculture are changing their majors to
Agriculture Education.

Enrollment in both the undergraduate and graduate DE program continued to in-
crease. The undergraduate program at Florida Atlantic University was approved
and work has begun for seeking approval of the master's program there. Extensive
promotional efforts were made by the teacher-educators to visit every junior
college mid-management program in the state. Future plans call for increasing
the staff at Florida Atlantic University and the University of South Florida.

Pre-school conferences were held to assist approximately 650 business education
teachers in using improved methods of teaching. Private businesses aided in
demonstrating new methods of teaching shorthand.

Techniques for improving instruction by using the cooperative method received
added attention during the Annual Business Education Planning Conference.

Conferences were held for teacher educators of associate degree nursing programs
to consider the development of programs designed to prepare registered nurses.
Also, two-day conferences for teachers of practical nurses were held during the
year.


-25-







In-service agricultural education teacher training activities included offering
ten off-campus courses during the year with a total enrollment of 164. In
addition, nine graduate courses were held on the campus during the year for in-
service teachers with a total enrollment of 128.

Fourteen teachers who are not fully certified to teach were enrolled in an
on-campus course during the early part of the summer. This course was designed
to provide instruction in methods and procedures for teaching vocational agri-
culture. Enrollment in this course was limited to those in-service teachers
not fully certified.

New courses were added to teacher education curricula at the Florida Agricultural
and Mechanical University. The training program has been improved in the follow-
ing ways:

Additional courses in the humanities, communication arts, and
social sciences are included.

Additional courses in the areas of agricultural mechanics, orna-
mental horticulture, and forestry are included.

Provision is made for the selection of a larger number of elective
courses in technical agricultural subjects.

Pre-service training in the development of programs in non-farm
agricultural occupations will be provided.

In industrial education, to date, the program of credit courses provided by
approved teacher training institutions on-campus and by extension is reasonably
adequate but will need to be re-studied as the program expands. Greater
emphasis needs to be continued upon instructional supervisory services at state,
county and school levels as well as the in-service training of teachers on a
non-credit basis.


GUIDANCE

New procedures, new philosophies, and new emphases have characterized vocational
guidance during the FY 1966-67. Increased numbers of post-high school institu-
tions, expanded vocational programs at secondary and post-secondary levels, and
increased public awareness of the need for adequate occupational preparation and
the counseling needed for it have affected the responsibility of counselors.

These changes produced a need for a broader concept of counselor services. The
effect has been an expansion of counselor activity to include, in addition to
college counseling, pre-vocational and vocational counseling responsibilities.
It has been accomplished through cooperative efforts of personnel in education
and related disciplines.

Organization for change included planning and conducting several conferences to
orient personnel at all educational levels of the new responsibilities. Staff
personnel attended national seminars to obtain information useful in developing
unique supervisory approaches to the vocational aspects of counseling.


- 26 -







In addition, a seminar was organized and held for vocational administrators and
directors of area vocational-technical centers to explore the responsibilities
and functions of newly appointed counselors for vocational programs.

Six advisory committees of local personnel were appointed to study and make
recommendations on various aspects of student personnel services. These included
the preparation of job descriptions of student personnel directors and counselors,
production of audio-visual materials for use in area vocational-technical schools
throughout the state, identification and organization of appropriate techniques
for group testing and student appraisals, development of an in-service curriculum
for vocational guidance counselors, study of student personnel records for adaption
to electronic data processing, and development of procedures for gathering follow-
up information on vocational-technical center graduates.

Recommendations were presented by each committee for implementing and disseminating
the findings through state-wide workshops and consultant visitations.

A Directory of Occupation-Centered Curriculums for Florida was developed under the
leadership of the consultant for use by counselors and administrators in planning
and implementing realistic vocational guidance services for youth and adults. An
advisory committee consisting of representatives of state agencies, local educators,
and higher education assisted in the planning. Information concerning occupationally-
centered curriculums of 25 Florida junior colleges and 71 adult centers was included.

The Consultant assisted in conducting five vocational program surveys in ten counties
interested in initiating or expanding vocational education services. The Student
Vocational Survey Technique developed by the Ohio Division of Guidance and Testing
was utilized to ascertain student interests in training programs which could be
provided.

The Occupational Information Consultant prepared a release, Occupational Information
for Florida Schools, having significant implications for vocational guidance and
program planning. It contains manpower information available from local, state
and national sources, and presents information on the past, present, and projected
labor force of the state and the nation, including trends within various occupa-
tional groups. Emphasis is placed upon Florida information and relative manpower
demand for each occupation in the various counties.


CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT


Studies were made by University of Florida personnel to determine needed changes
in the vocational agriculture curriculum. Recommendations were made and group
conferences were held to acquaint teachers with proposed changes and to discuss
alternative courses of action for curriculum improvement. Multi-county meetings
were held to discuss in detail the Annual State Teachers' Conference recommenda-
tions relating to the improvement of instructional programs.

The following publications designed to aid in Business Education curriculum
development were completed and distributed: A Guide to Business Education in
Florida Schools, a guide for Vocational Office Education in Florida High Schools,
and Phase III of A Guide for Adult Vocational Business Education. Plans to
develop and publish A Guide to Cooperative Business Education in Florida High
Schools were initiated. The Annual Business Education Conference discussed


- 27 -







implications of the Vocational Education Act of 1963 for the business education
curriculum. The necessity for shifting from skill development to career objectives
was emphasized, and needed curriculum changes identified. Seventy-seven adult
business education teachers, county directors, and supervisors participated in
an Adult Vocational Business Education Conference in Hollywood Beach. The purpose
of the Conference was to determine ways of evaluating, revising, and strengthening
existing business education programs for adults.

The following publications in Distributive Education were completed and dissemi-
nated: Organization and Operation of DE Programs for Adults, the Project Plan
for DE in Florida High Schools, and Distributive Education in Florida's Junior
Colleges. Draft copies of several teaching guides for first-year secondary pro-
grams were completed and distributed. The guide for organizing and operating
courses in junior colleges was completed and distributed. A two-day meeting was
held at the University of South Florida for junior college coordinators and adult
distributive education personnel to discuss plans for strengthening and expanding
programs.

Curricula for the Junior High Work Experience program, supervised by the Business
and Distributive Education section, were developed. Currently, a format for eval-
uating the effectiveness of the program is being developed jointly with the Research
Coordinating Unit Staff.

Expansion of existing programs and the development of new courses characterized
curriculum development activities of the Health Related Education staff during
the year. Progress was made in establishing standards and curriculum guidelines
for the courses offered. Courses to prepare practical nurses, dental assistants,
surgical technicians, certified laboratory assistants, nurse aides, and registered
nurses were developed or strengthened. Staff personnel developed an extension
course for licensed practical nurses. The section is working to develop a two-
year associate degree program and a continuing education program for nursing home
administrators. A tentative program has been developed and a grant has been
received for experimental work which will involve five or six junior colleges
in the further development of this program.

New occupational programs in Home Economics Education were designed for adults
including clothing alterations, child care, food service, and home catering.
A new course, Textile Merchandising, was developed for one high school. Staff
personnel worked in eight counties to help local personnel with curriculum
development. The department is cooperating with another state department to
develop a course for the occupation of home health aide. State adopted text-
books were reviewed by teachers, supervisors and the state staff for the purpose
of making recommendations for changes to the State Textbook Committee. A work-
shop was sponsored at the Florida State University to revise the curriculum guide
for the course in Housing and Home Furnishings. A family economic curriculum
guide was developed to provide students with a background of family economics
for personal and family living.

The emphasis on curriculum development in Industrial Education has been at the
county and school level with consultative services from the Division and the
section. With the addition of staff members to the section as Instructional
Specialists, greater emphasis will be placed upon the development and distri-
bution as "sample" course outlines and courses of study.


- 28 -







Consultants from industry, local program administrators, and state staff personnel
in Technical Education cooperated in developing guidelines and minimum standards
for Civil Engineering Technology and Mechanical Technology.


RESEARCH

Research and related activities designed to improve vocational-technical education
in Florida received increased attention during the year. Efforts to initiate,
coordinate and conduct research involved the special talents of state and local
vocational educators, their colleagues in other disciplines, and representatives of
other public and private agencies.

An overview of activities include compilation and distribution of summaries of
significant research, identification of human resources available to conduct
research, determination of significant problem areas, assistance to personnel
at all levels in developing grant applications, design of data-gathering instru-
ments, and analysis and interpretation of data for future program planning.

Research projects illustrative of those completed during the year include:

1. An Identification of Significant Researchable Problem Areas in
Business Education conducted jointly by University of Florida,
Florida State University, and Florida Atlantic University Depart-
ments of Business Education .

2. Use of Pilot Programs in Developing State Guidelines for Distributive
Education conducted by State Department of Education staff and
selected county coordinators.

3. Effectiveness of Home Economics Facilities in Providing Quantity
Food Instruction conducted by State Department of Education staff.

4. Professional Competencies of Teachers of Technical Education in
Florida conducted by University of Florida Department of Vocational
Education personnel.

5. An Assessment of the Occupational Opportunities Which Utilize
Knowledge and Skills Derived From the Field of Home Economics -
conducted by Florida State University Home Economics staff members.

6. A Competency Pattern Approach to Curriculum Construction to Distri-
butive Education conducted jointly by Distributive Education and
Virginia Polytechnic Institute staffs.

7. A Survey of Small Business in the Tampa Bay Area conducted jointly
by Distributive Education and University of South Florida staffs.

8. A Pilot Study in Effectiveness of Large Typewriting Classes -
conducted jointly by Business Education and University of
Florida staffs.


- 29 -







Surveys were also conducted by certain of the vocational services to determine
job opportunities. Examples include studies to identify employment demand for
technicians in industry and for personnel in health-related occupations.

A study was made to examine the rationale for and implications of the "cluster
concept" for vocational education in Florida. Programs based on the concept are
being developed for evaluation in several counties of the state.

Another study was made to develop a procedure and an instrument for collecting
current information concerning job entry requirements for specific occupations
with provisions to evaluate the procedure and instruments in selected geographic
areas of the state. The specific occupational field chosen was automotive
mechanics, including a number of the more specialized occupations which it contains.
Performance levels were identified by the amounts of skill and technical knowledge
required to perform each operation. The information provided will be used in
revising or validating course content.

A continuing service of the Division is conducting, at the request of county
superintendents of schools and boards of education, surveys to determine ways to
strengthen end expand county programs of vocational, technical, and related educa-
tion. The surveys are a cooperative effort of the Division and are designed to
help local personnel plan for program development. During the year staff members
participated in studies involving Columbia, Baker, Gilchrist, Levy, and Putnam
Counties. Program determination studies were also conducted to aid in planning
area vocational-technical schools.


EVALUATION

Continued emphasis was placed on the importance of evaluating the effectiveness
of policies, procedures, and programs to establish a logical basis for continuing
or modifying present activities.

The County Program Planning Guide was revised and used for reporting county plans
for vocational-technical education. The instrument was useful in gathering quan-
titative data needed for program planning and budgeting.

Work was also started during the year to revise the accreditation standards for
secondary vocational-technical programs. Accreditation standards for post-secon-
dary vocational-technical schools and programs, exclusive of those in junior
colleges, were developed jointly by the Division of Vocational, Technical, and
Adult Education and the Accreditation Section of the Division of Teacher Education,
Certification, and Accreditation. Included are standards relating to physical plant
and facilities, instructional staff, administrative and supervisory personnel,
program content, and related factors. The standards were reviewed by a selected
group of local vocational administrators, and field-tested in the Lindsey Hopkins
Education Center (Dade County), the Tomlinson Adult Education Center (Pinellas
County), and the Mid-Florida Technical Institute (Orange County).

Special projects dealing with the significant problems of vocational-technical
education were submitted by secondary schools, junior colleges and other post-
secondary institutions, and universities requesting funding support. Eachiprojedt


- 30 -








was reviewed to assess its effectiveness in relation to its stated purposes and
objectives. Guidelines were developed and staff made available to assist indivi-
duals as they developed projects.

Increased emphasis has also been given to the role of evaluation in sectional
conferences and workshops.

Staff members of the Home Economics Section sponsored a series of drive-in con-
ferences throughout the state for supervisors and teachers to evaluate the program.
The purpose of the evaluation was to identify changes and additions to the State
Accreditation Standards. Major implications of the conclusions include a belief
that home economics below the 9th grade should serve as an enrichment program and
that an interdisciplinary approach to instruction is needed to eliminate duplica-
tion of wage-earning programs. Other implications are that attention should be
given to designing curricula to meet students' needs ii contemporary life and
that quality in-service education for home economics teachers must be provided.
Also of interest is the implication for increased emphasis upon consumer education
and upon defining program objectives in order to establish more effective evaluation
techniques. Evaluation results provided a direction for curriculum revision.

A survey of 38 schools in selected counties was conducted to determine attitudes
and evaluate experiences of senior high school girls. The survey instrument was
designed and structured so that responses might reflect optimum objectivity. It
was administered to 4304 students. Approximately 75% of the students indicated
they would have taken occupationally-oriented courses if such had been available.
Much interest was shown in child care services. Approximately 75% of the students
indicated the need for more sex education. Of students interested in post-
secondary education, approximately 50% indicated a preference for personal educa-
tion in Home and Family Life.

The state Business Education staff visited programs at all levels as a means of
evaluating programs. Summary forms which reported visitations were analyzed to
determine the effectiveness of programs.

Considerable data was collected by specialists for Distributive Education to
study students enrolled in distributive programs whose career objective was other
than a distributive job. Factors regarding the placement of students were studied,
and judgments based on these studies were made available to county directors,
coordinators, and supervisors.


- 31 -










ENACTED LEGISLATION AFFECTING VOCATIONAL AND
TECHNICAL EDUCATION IN FLORIDA


Following is a resume of recent state legislation affecting vocational-technical
education.

Increased funding support for vocational-technical education, provided through
legislative action, will allow County Boards of Public Instruction to cope with
problems of providing realistic programs of vocational-technical education. Use
of the funds will permit preparation and upgrading in a greater number and variety
of occupations for high school and post-high school students, out-of-school youth,
adults, and for persons with special handicaps and needs.

Flexibility in the assignment of teacher responsibility and duty will assist
vocational-technical educators in providing education and training for all who
seek and can profit from it. Greater emphasis can be placed upon services to
individual students other than teaching so that individuals may benefit more from
instruction. Teacher time during the school day for conferences, lesson planning,
guidance, student placement, recruitment, and time to work with colleagues on
mutual school problems is now possible.

A change in basis for determining financial support will allow vocational-
technical administrators an opportunity to provide a greater number of realistic
programs to meet individual needs. New classes may be established with low initial
enrollments, and advanced classes may also be offered without financial penalty to
county boards, through unit proration because of low individual class enrollments.

Immediate training needs of industry can more adequately be met in the future
through an Act authorizing the establishment of an Industrial Services Unit. No
appropriation accompanied the authorization, but if it is ultimately funded it
will be possible to provide modern industrially-oriented training programs based
upon labor market research, labor force analysis, and wage and salary information.
Services could be provided to analyze industrial manpower, training, and recruiting
needs. A master plan for recruiting, selecting and training workers could be
developed with an adequate lead-time schedule so that activities could be keyed
to the new industry time table.

Provision of additional state funds in the amount of $5,715,000 accruing to the
Division through sale of bonds during the 1967-69 biennium will be used to finance
the second phase of construction in vocational-technical area schools, exclusive
of junior colleges, where a need for more elaborate facilities has been justified
and to begin construction of new centers which have been designated but are not
yet funded.

Representation of the Division on the Florida Teacher Education Advisory Council
will assist in relieving the deficiency of vocational leadership. Membership
provides an opportunity to enlist the aid of the Council as plans are considered
to compensate for manpower shortages in vocational-technical education. The
Council will be used to carefully examine the role of teacher education in
recruiting prospective teachers, developing new courses, and demonstrating those
programs found to have value. Membership will also offer an opportunity to ex-
amine certification standards in light of current and future demands for occupa-
tional education.


- 32 -







Representation on the Council on Post-Secondary Education will insure inclusion
in its recommendations to the legislature of directions for action needed to
resolve some of our most pressing problems. The Council can assist vocational-
technical education as it becomes aware of problems relating to enrollment,
structure, recruitment and preparation of teachers, program planning information,
facility requirements, and other needs in vocational-technical education.

A failure to secure favorable legislation relating to the transportation of
students to area vocational-technical schools and return to their homes or "home"
high schools may have some negative effects upon the extent of the service pro-
vided. It is possible that students who could profit from participation in area
vocational-technical programs will be unable to enroll because of transportation
problems.


- 33 -







ACTIVITIES AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS REGARDING COOPERATION
WITH OTHER STATE AGENCIES


Procedures for implementing a policy of maintaining close relations with other
state agencies have continued to receive attention. All state agencies have been
encouraged to cooperate with the Division and the Division has pledged continued
cooperation to other agencies. Interagency cooperation with the State Board of
Health has furnished data which have been used in many vocational studies.

Divisional personnel worked closely with the Florida State Employment Service in
gathering information included in a new release, Occupational Information for
Florida Schools. Continuous cooperation with the Employment Service now provides
periodic information on occupational demand for 15 additional occupations that are
of concern to the Technical Education section.

Illustrative of other public agencies with which close association and cooperation
are maintained are the following:

The Florida Hotel and Restaurant Commission
The State Board of Regents
The State Board of Health
The Council of Economic Development
The Florida Development Commission
The Florida Industrial Commission
The Board of Commissioners of State Institutions
The Junior College Advisory Board
The Teacher Education Advisory Council
The Department of Public Welfare
The State Department of Agriculture

Cooperation and association with specialized boards and agencies was also reported
by the vocational services. For example, the Agriculture Education section was
very active in cooperating with state and local public agencies such as the Game
and Fresh Water Fish Commission, Agricultural Extension Service, Florida Forest
Service, Department of Public Safety, and with business and industry.

The state Business Education staff assumed a leadership role in the annual meeting
of the American Association in Denver. Two state staff members.aided in planning
and conducting conference sessions for a Congress on Consumer Affairs held at the
Florida State University. The staff also participated in a Consumer Economics
Workshop at the University of Maryland and at the National Curriculum Materials
Seminar at Kansas City.

The Distributive Education staff cooperated with the Small Business Administration,
sections of the Division, and many other agencies in matters of mutual concern.
Representatives from public and private agencies have acted as consultants in
distributive education conferences, and members of the staff have acted as con-
sultants to numerous outside agencies.

The Home Economics Education section has been involved in work with County Wel-
fare Agencies, Visiting Nurses Association, Florida Dietetic Association,
County Boards of Health, Visiting Homemakers, and Child Care Associations.


- 34 -







The Director of Industrial Education is an ex-officio member of the Florida
Apprenticeship Council. As such, he attended and participated in the council
meetings during the year. Staff members attended a variety of conferences and
in many instances participated in the program. Among these were: American
Vocational Association Convention, Florida AFL-CIO State Convention, Florida
Peace Officers Association Convention, and Southern States Work Shop.

The Technical Education section maintains close relations with many state agencies
and professional societies which help in development of technical education pro-
grams. Included are the Florida Development Commission, American Society for
Engineering Education, Florida Engineering Society, National Society for Pro-
fessional Engineers, American Society of Civil Engineers, Florida Society of
Professional Land Surveyors, Florida State Employment Service, American Congress
on Surveying and Mapping, Aerospace Industries, Inc., and the American Technical
Education Association.

The Health Related Education staff worked with state agencies and organizations
which aid in program development. Examples are The Florida Nursing Home Asso-
ciation, Florida Dietetics Association, State Board of Health, Division of
Junior Colleges, state universities, medical associations, medical societies,
divisions of mental health and scholarship and research foundations.


- 35 -







OUTSTANDING FEATURES OF THE STATE PROGRAM -
MAJOR STRENGTHS, CURRENT NEEDS, AND PROBLEMS


During 1966-67, efforts were made in each county to identify major strengths and
weaknesses of vocational-technical education. Consolidated, they indicate out-
standing features of the total program together with continuing needs to be met.
Major achievements of the program include:

1. Increased service to people. More people are being served in new and
improved facilities by more teachers than in the past. Through sectional
and divisional releases and publications and the addition of state staff
personnel, people are becoming more aware of the benefits derived from
occupational education.

2. Coordinating Committees. The state continues to be divided into areas.
Area coordinating committees, consisting of representatives of the
respective vocational services, studied project applications to evaluate
requests for grants and to make recommendations to the State Coordinating
Committee for funding those having the most significance for local program
improvement and state-wide program development.

3. Construction of area vocational-technical schools. Florida's area
vocational-technical schools will provide approximately 90% of the state's
population with expanded vocational-technical education opportunities.
As planning for the new schools progresses, emphasis is being placed upon
the development of "educational specifications" as a prerequisite to
architectural planning.

4. Added emphasis on research. The Division continues to be active in its
leadership role of encouraging, conducting, and assisting in the develop-
ment of research projects designed to improve vocational-technical
education in the state.

5. Improved communication through the use of publications. The publication,
Bridge to Excellence, is an example of divisional efforts to tell the
area vocational-technical school story. The brochure reviews the need for
area schools in Florida and the services which they are designed to
provide. It has assisted in creating a better understanding of vocational-
technical education throughout the state.

6. Expanded staff. Additional state and local staff personnel have been
employed to assist in developing all phases of vocational-technical
education. Additional human resources have enabled local and state
leaders to more adequately meet the needs of all people who can benefit
from such programs.

7. Assistance to people with special needs. Help for persons with special
needs continued to be a major concern of the Division. A state committee
composed of the Consultant for Special Vocational Programs and a repre-
sentative from each vocational service are coordinating activities
designed to provide maximum vocational education opportunities for dis-
advantaged persons.

Each of the vocational services identified outstanding program features, but also
indicated important unmet needs.
36 -







In Agriculture Education, for example, administrative relations remained excellent
between state staff personnel and teacher-educators. A philosophy of the Division
of Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education has proven progressive and has re-
sulted in the development of guidance and counseling programs as well as improved
programs for prospective teachers. There is, however, a need to improve articula-
tion between different levels of instruction, and the shortage of certified
teachers of agriculture continues to remain a serious problem.

Enrollments in secondary and post-secondary Business Education classes have
continued to increase. A new program guide has been developed, and curricula have
been up-dated. Other areas of strength in the program include increased adult
enrollments and the expansion of business education in junior colleges and area
vocational-technical schools. Major weaknesses of the program include a shortage
of vocational business and office education teachers and coordinators and insuffi-
cient state funds to support the program.

The Distributive Education program provides for a wide range of student interests
and ability levels. Increased emphasis was given in the state program to the
vertical approach in planning and implementing instruction in distributive occupa-
tions. Other major strengths of the program have been the steady growth in enroll-
ments and the development of multiple-teacher departments at the high school and
junior college levels. Unmet needs include a shortage of experienced state staff,
and the lack of funds for in-service training programs for inexperienced coordina-
tors. In addition, there is a continuing need for teacher-coordinators.

As adequate state staff in Health-Related Education has been employed. Surveys
have been conducted, in cooperation with special advisory committees, to determine
job opportunities for health services personnel. However, there is a need for
additional program guidelines, instructional aids, and curriculum materials, and
for more well-qualified teachers. Improved in-service teacher-training programs
are essential along with better articulation between various agencies and insti-
tutions providing health education.

County supervisors of Home Economics have placed emphasis upon curriculum develop-
ment. Enrollments have continued to increase and there is growing interest in
programs for disadvantaged persons. State and local personnel have participated
in conferences, workshops, and seminars. Unmet needs include a dearth of in-
service education because of a shortage of teacher-educators. Inexperience in
these areas has also resulted in some reluctance to provide training for gainful
employment and to participate in program experimentation.

Major strengths of the Industrial Education program include the outstanding
ability of vocational personnel in local leadership positions. Program growth
can be attributed to the ability of local administrators to promote, develop, and
operate such programs in spite of a number of handicaps. Significant increases
in enrollment occurred in air conditioning, refrigeration and heating, automobile
body repair and refinishing, law enforcement, aviation mechanics, cabinet making
and millwork, machine shop, welding, electric wiring, electronic mechanics and
assembly, brick and blocklaying, dry cleaning, automotive mechanics, small gasoline
engine mechanics, appliance service, industrial electronics, and business machine
mechanics.


- 37 -






A major strength of the program in Technical Education is the excellent relations
between business and industry and the institutions offering technical programs.
Personnel in business and industry have cooperated with the staff by serving in
advisory capacities, in helping students to obtain employment, and in donations
of equipment. Additional staff has made possible the provision of more leadership
in local schools and the development of a broad range of programs for youth and
adults. The recently completed survey of employment opportunities for technicians
has provided valuable information for state and local personnel and for business
and industry. However, there is a need for more qualified students and for more
seminars and workshops for teachers. More effective instructional materials,
including audi-visual aids, need to be developed and used. There is also a
shortage of certified teachers in some areas of the state.


- 38 -







































































































































































































































1








VOCATIONAL YOUTH ORGANIZATION ACTIVITIES AND
THE PROGRAM OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION


The Agriculture Education staff has helped to provide many activities for farm
youth. The Future Farmers of America sub-district contests throughout the state
attracted approximately 7000 participants and the six district contests approxi-
mately 2000. One thousand boys attended the state convention and 200 Florida
boys attended the FFA National Convention in Kansas City. State staff participated
in these activities and in boys' activities at the Florida State Fair. The out-
standing accomplishments of the Future Farmers of America program in Florida are
due in large part to a good public relations program. The public and leaders in
business, industry, and education have cooperated to promote the program.

During the past year, the Business Education section began to sponsor the Busi-
ness Education Clubs, Future Business Leaders of America, and Phi Beta Lambda,
a professional post-secondary youth leadership organization. For the first time,
a staff member has primary responsibility to serve as state advisor to these
organizations. Membership in the clubs increased from 1450 in September to
1605 in June.

Interest in the Distributive Education Clubs of America youth organization is
increasing. The Florida Association has 1481 members. The Florida Retail Fed-
eration sponsored a DECA-FAME Goodwill Tour of the state for 11 state officers.
The 1966 State Leadership Conference registered nearly 500 students, advisors,
judges, and guests. A delegation of 32 persons flew to Chicago to the DECA
National Leadership Conference at which two Florida high school students were
honored as contest finalists. The Florida Association of Managerial Education
(FAME), a post-secondary affiliate of DECA, had its second Annual State Leader-
ship Conference. Over 150 junior college students, coordinators, and business-
men attended. The FAME winners of the various project competitions participated
in the National DECA Conference and produced one national winner.

Cooperative Education Clubs of Florida has a present membership of 4295 students,
representing 180 schools in 14 districts. The State Leadership Conference was
held in Clearwater with 800 delegates attending.

There are 19,256 members in the 443 Florida chapters of the Future Homemakers
of America. Fifteen hundred students attended the State FHA Convention in Tampa,
and approximately 8000 young women attended the nine district meetings which were
held in the Fall of 1966. Forty girls and advisors attended the National Conven-
tion in Los Angeles. Florida's national officer, Edlyne Boykin, was active in
the publication of the national magazine Teen Times.


- 39 -






































I























































































I)







THE STATE ADVISORY COUNCIL AND
OTHER ADVISORY COMMITTEE ACTIVITIES


The following are the members of the Florida State Board Advisory Council on
Vocational-Technical Education for the 1966-68 biennium and the area of responsi-
bility which each represents. The Council is established in part 1.21, Section I,
of the State Plan to function as an advisory council to the State Board for
Vocational Education in carrying out the provisions of the State Plan.


Agriculture Education


Industrial Education


Mr. Sandy Johnson, Vice-President
Sales and Marketing, Florida Farm
Bureau Federation of Insurance Companies
P. 0. Box 730
Gainesville, Florida 32601


Business Education


Mr. William E. Allen, Secretary-Treasurer
Florida AFL-CIO
P. 0. Box 7097
Tampa, Florida 33603


Technical Education


Mr. E. W. Hopkins, Jr.
Executive Vice-President
Mutual Federal Savings & Loan
P. 0. Box 1969
Pensacola, Florida 32502

Distributive Education

Mr. James E. Gorman, General Manager
Florida Retail Federation
American Heritage Building
Jacksonville, Florida 32202

Health Occupations Education


Miss Virginia Albaugh, R. N.
Director of Nursing
Orange Memorial Hospital
Orlando, Florida 32800


Home Economics Education


Mrs. E. William Gautier
1200 Magnolia Street
New Smyrna Beach, Florida


Executive Secretary

Dr. Carl W. Proehl
Assistant Superintendent
Vocation, Technical, & Adult Education
State Department of Education
Room 204, Knott Building
Tallahassee, Florida 32304


Mr. Walter H. Clausen, Manager
Engineering Technical Services
Minneapolis-Honeywell
13350 U. S. Highway 19
St. Petersburg, Florida 33733

Higher Education


Dr. Roy F. Bergengren, Jr., President
Daytona Beach Junior College
P. 0. Box 1111
Daytona Beach, Florida 32015

Labor

Mr. Charles Harris, President
Florida AFL-CIO
P. 0. Box 537
Allapattah Station
Miami, Florida 33142

County Superintendent of Public Instruction

Mr. J. Hartley Blackburn, Superintendent
Manatee County Board of Public Instruction
P. 0. Box 2069
Bradenton, Florida 33504

Consultant

Dr. Doak S. Campbell, Chairman
Board of Associated Consultants in Education
1001 High Road
Tallahassee, Florida


- 40 -







The Florida State Board Advisory Council met once in FY 1966-67 but voted to meet
more often in the new fiscal year. Other action by the Council included expres-
sion of the need for closer liaison between junior colleges and area vocational-
technical schools, more programs for disadvantaged persons, more attention to job
placement for students, and more financial support for vocational education. The
group reviewed the proposed legislative program and went on record in recommending
that a divisional staff position dealing with public relations be established.

A state-wide advisory committee for Agriculture Education was formed and has been
active. Each committee member represents an important component of agriculture
such as livestock raising, fruit growing, vegetable production, and forestry.
Sub-committees are being formed in different instructional areas to help identify
occupational training needs and assist with curriculum development. Over 50% of
the local programs have advisory committees.

The state Business Education Advisory Committee was active during the year. It
reviewed several topics including the role of advisory committees, program develop-
ment in junior colleges, teacher education in Florida, textbooks for business
education, and the need for program articulation. One important action of the
Committee was the endorsement of summer programs for teacher in-service and/or,
work-experience training.

The Florida Distributive Education Advisory Committee met during the year to
discuss the following topics: What Coordinators Expect from Training Agencies;
The Effect of the Minimum Wage Hike; The Sharp Delineation of Educational Services;
and The Effects of the Vocational Education Act of 1963. A member of the Committee,
Mr. J. C. Lynd, Director of Personnel, Winn-Dixie Stores, Inc., reported that his
company's records show that well over half of the distributive education students
employed with Winn-Dixie were continuing their education in an institution of
higher learning. The Committee recommended that:

1. The marketing and distributive education curriculum should
emphasize economic fundamentals and attitudes.

2. State and county level distributive education personnel should
be identified to various industry groups.

3. Coordinators should be encouraged to join personnel associations
and explain programs in various house organs.

4. Coordinators and industrial representatives should jointly
develop approaches for improving the image of retail occupations.

5. Coordinators should establish closer relationships with community
business leaders, especially those who may not have the opportunity
to help operate a training agency.

6. Junior college students should receive more help in recognizing
opportunities in marketing occupations.

The School Food Service Advisory Committee met to identify content to be included
in the Home Economics course Foundations for School Food Service. The material
will be expanded into a teachers' guide.


- 41 -








State advisory committees in apprenticeship training, REA job and safety train-
ing, peace officers training, and commercial vehicle driver training were uti-
lized during the year to assist the staff in planning, promoting, developing
and operating the Industrial Education program and its components.

The Technical Education Advisory Committee met twice during the year. The
Committee aided staff personnel by projecting employment trends and advising
concerning program development and service. Ad hoc committees were appointed
and have helped to develop curriculum guidelines.

The Health-Related Education Advisory Committee met once and aided staff members
in planning a state-wide survey to determine employment needs and trends in health
occupations in Florida. Ad hoc committees also provided valuable assistance in
determining worker tasks and developing curriculum guidelines.


- 42 -





























9

























































































S
i







STORIES ILLUSTRATING PROGRAM EFFECTIVENESS


Local Vocational Graduates Design, Construct Area Facility

The design and construction of the Sarasota County Area Vocational School will
be influenced by "know how" acquired in vocational classes offered in the Sara-
sota County vocational education program.

Approximately fifteen years ago, the architect for the new school studied voca-
tional drafting at Sarasota High School. Another former vocational student was
the successful bidder to construct the school, and the superintendent for con-
struction was also a former vocational student at Sarasota High School.


Uses DCT Training for College Education

The Director of Federal Programs for Walton County was a former diversified
cooperative education student and teacher. Her decision to attend college and
to prepare for a career in vocational education was influenced by her experiences
in the high school DCT program. As a cooperative education student, she worked
for a Tallahassee bank which continued to employ her on a part-time basis while
she attended Florida State University. With this financial assistance, she was
able to complete her college education and become a DCT coordinator.


Vocational Education Grad Joins State Staff

A former vocational industrial education student in a Sarasota High School was
recently named Consultant for Industrial Education in the Florida State Department
of Education.

While in high school, he was state president of the Technical Education Clubs of
Florida. At 24 years of age, he had earned a B. S. and M. S. degree from Florida
State University. Prior to his appointment as a state consultant for Industrial
Education, he worked as a high school coordinator of vocational classes.


Ex-Gob Studies Photography

After three years in the U. S. Navy and visits to 40 countries, an ex-sailor
will embark upon a new career in photography. His training is being completed
at Mary Karl Vocational School, in Daytona Beach, and is being sponsored under
the Veteran's Administration Rehabilitiation Program. Following graduation, he
hopes to be employed in newspaper photography and would like to work with the
Defense Intelligence Agency in Washington.


- 43 -







Home Ec for Disadvantaged Boys


A special course for eighth and ninth grade boys with special needs who are
potential drop-outs, was offered in a junior high school located in a predomi-
nantly low-income area. Nineteen students were enrolled in a home economics
class. The teacher began the course with a unit on personal appearance and
clothing care. Each unit stressed job opportunities available in the county for
boys who would complete high school. During the period of instruction, the boys
were taken on field trips to clothing and fabric stores, food markets, and
restaurants. The students selected patterns and fabrics for various clothing
items including swim suits, double-faced vests, and sport shirts. Other inter-
esting projects included the preparation of dinner for mothers, and a cookout
on the beach. The humor, understanding, and firmness of the teacher inspired
the boys to develop better grooming and manners, and to improve attitudes and
academic achievement.

At the end of the course, each boy had his own success story. All were working
part-time during the school term and expected to work full-time during the
summer. One student told the teacher that the sport shirt he had made in the
class was used by his older brother while home on leave from the Navy.


Needletrades Training Pays Off at Tarpon Springs High School

Thirteen 12th grade girls were selected for a new seamstress course at Tarpon
Springs High School. The selection was based upon dexterity and other screening
tests administered by the school guidance staff and representatives of the Florida
State Employment Service. Though the course was developed primarily for the
non-college bound students, several students who planned to attend college
enrolled to learn a skill with which they could earn extra money. A local
clothing manufacturer furnished four power machines, many yards of fabric,
thread, and needles for the program. Field trips to drapery, slipcover, and
clothing factories were highlights of the course. Related areas of study in-
cluded marketing, textile characteristics, and modeling. The class enrollment
was limited to insure maximum individual attention and supervision in the
development of skills.

Two of the thirteen students discovered that they lacked dexterity and coordina-
tion needed to become a seamstress; two students developed a desire for advanced
study; and five or six plan to seek employment with the local clothing factory.


Food Service Course for Disadvantaged

Two classes of ninth grade boys, who were potential drop-outs, were carefully
screened by the school's guidance department. A Food Service Course was insti-
tuted in an effort to prevent school leaving. The boys were given health exami-
nations and issued health cards and work permits. The course, taught by school
and County Health Department personnel, provided instruction in health, sanitary
procedures, and safety precautions. The students toured the county school lunch
warehouse, a bakery, two cafeterias, a hospital, nursing home, meat packing plant,
and a food and equipment show. Guest speakers and films were included in the
instructional program. During the second semester the boys worked approximately
half-time in the school cafeteria. Of the 31 boys who began the course, 30


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completed it and 19 registered for the Food Service Course in high school.
Nine joined the Explorer Scout Food Service #303 sponsored by the area res-
taurant association. The program has received many compliments from the
restaurant association, the food service industry, school lunch personnel,
school personnel, and people in the community. Comments indicated that the
boys were improving attitudes and work habits, taking a professional interest
in food service work, improving their appearances, and becoming more interested
in school work. The students indicated an improved self-concept at school and
at home. Plans are being made to continue and to improve the study-experience
program during the coming academic year at the junior and senior high levels.
In addition, the food service industry will assist the advisory committee to
establish scholarships and job opportunities.


MDTA Grads Organize Club

There were 118 enrollees between the ages of 20 and 72 years in the MDTA home
attendant training course offered in Sarasota, Florida. Graduates of the program
have organized a club to discuss in-service problems and to exchange information.

The program and club activities of the graduates has served as a means for
up-grading and developing skills of many domestic and unemployed women.


Instructor Adds Automotive Training

The automotive sections of the industrial education departments of vocational
schools located in Pinellas County have received assistance from several promi-
nent motor companies.

One instructor participated in an intensive training session in Detroit during
the summer. In September, this instructor initiated a special evening class
sponsored by the company for advanced automotive students. The class was com-
pleted with graduation and awards exercises and climaxed with a banquet sponsored
by the company.

Another corporation has generously donated to the three high school automotive
programs by providing training equipment; e.g., engines, transmissions, differentials,
and various equipment teaching aids.

These and other examples of assistance by the industry have helped to generate
interest among students in automotive training programs. For the first time during
the summer session of 1967, Dixie Hollins High School offered automotive training
programs. A sufficient number of students enrolled to employ two instructors.

The electronics program offered at Dunedin High School has been articulated with
the course taught at the Technical Education Center so that students may receive
credit or transfer without loss of credit.


Cosmetology Places Grads

The Pinellas County secondary schools have four cosmetology programs operating.
An adult program in cosmetology is taught at the Tomlinson Adult Education Center.


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Of all students enrolled, 98% who complete the course pass the State Board
examination. The courses offered make provision for the beginning student
as well as the advanced student.


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TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA




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