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 Title Page
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 Back Cover














Group Title: Annual descriptive report of the Florida State Board for Vocational Education
Title: Annual descriptive report, the Florida State Board for Vocational Education ..
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 Material Information
Title: Annual descriptive report, the Florida State Board for Vocational Education ..
Series Title: Bulletin
Alternate Title: Annual descriptive report, the Florida State Board for Vocational Education, vocational education program activities and accomplishments
Annual descriptive report of the Florida State Board for Vocatinal Education of vocation education program activities and accomplishments
Physical Description: v. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- State Board for Vocational Education
Florida -- Division of Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education
Florida -- Division of Vocational Education
Publisher: Division of Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education, the State Dept. of Education
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: 1965-1966
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Vocational education -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: 19-
Issuing Body: Some volumes issued by the division under its later name: Florida. Division of Vocational Education.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00080860
Volume ID: VID00006
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ALW7522
oclc - 22198026
alephbibnum - 002362953

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Title Page 1
        Title Page 2
    Letter of transmittal
        Page i
        Page ii
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
    Back Cover
        Page 51
        Page 52
Full Text


BULLETIN 70E-13


TE DEPARTMENT
EDUCATION



75.0State Superintendent

73 TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA
&o. 704 -/3


FLORIDA STATE BOARD FOR
VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
JULY 1, 1965 JUNE 30, 1966















September, 1966




















UNIVERSITY
OF FLORIDA
LIBRARIES


I













ANNUAL DESCRIPTIVE REPORT


OF

THE FLORIDA STATE BOARD FOR VOCATIONAL EDUCATION

JULY 1, 1965 JUNE 30, 1966
















STATE BOARD FOR VOCATIONAL EDUCATION

Hon. Haydon Burns, Governor, President of the Board

Hon. Tom Adams, Secretary of State

Hon. Earl Faircloth, Attorney General

Hon. Broward Williams, State Treasurer

Hon. Floyd T. Christian, State Superintendent of Public Instruction,
Secretary, and Executive Officer of the Board










375.0 o5. Cl




C, L









E


FLOYD T. CHRISTIAN
SUPERINTENDENT


STATE OF FLORIDA

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
TALLAHASSEE 32304


CARL W. PROEHL
DIRECTOR
DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL, TECHNICAL,
AND ADULT EDUCATION


September, 1966







Honorable Floyd T. Christian
Executive Officer
State Board for Vocational Education
Tallahassee, Florida

Dear Superintendent Christian:

Attached is the Annual Descriptive Report of the Florida State Board for
Vocational Education for the period beginning July 1, 1965 and ending
June 30, 1966.

This bulletin, submitted for approval, and transmitted to the United States
Office of Education, highlights the activities of the vocational services as
requested by the Assistant Commissioner for Vocational Education, Office
of Education, United States Department of Health, Education, and Welfare,
Washington, D. C.

Included are many details regarding the activities of Florida's sixty-seven
counties to expand and strengthen local programs of vocational and technical
education. Also included is the statistical report.


tCarl W. Proehl,' Director '
Vocational, Technical, and
Adult Education


CWP:lw
Enclosures


AM1

















PROGRAM OBJECTIVES AND DEVELOPMENTS


Manpower and Employment Needs Impact of the Vocational-Technical Programs

Studies have been made to project Florida's future manpower require-
ments. Advances in technology, business patterns, medical care,
defense activities, and other functions and services of the state
and local governments have been studied to try to determine their
effects on Florida's growth and the employment pattern. These have
been discussed in planning for local area school development and also
as they may affect the entire state. Bureau of the Census figures
which project the future population and labor force have been used
as follows:


Male Female

Population Labor Force Population Labor Force

1960 2,437,000 1,251,000 2,515,000 636,000
1965 2,829,000 1,665,000 2,976,000 844,000
1970 3,369,000 2,127,000 3,542,000 1,031,000
1975 3,986,000 2,517,000* 4,221,000 1,266,000*
1980 4,656,000 2,940,000* 4,942,000 1,532,000*


The following table is illustrative of data used to recommend
occupational programs for area vocational schools to meet state
criteria for such schools which require that offerings must re-
flect labor market demands. Illustrative studies show projections
which have been made to help justify requests for state funds and
to help local personnel plan further expansions of vocational pro-
grams for the labor markets. These estimates are based on employ-
ment by occupation as a percent of the total labor force in 1960.






*These projections of the labor force are not from federal reports.
They were made by assuming the labor force would remain the same
percentage of the population, or grow slightly.


- 1 -






NUMBER EMPLOYED IN FLORIDA AND PROJECTIONS
FOR THE FUTURE

(Illustrative)


Female


Occupation


1960


1965


1970


Bookkeeper
Cashier
Maid
Cook not private household
Cosmetologist
Hospital Attendant
Office Machine Operator
Practical Nurse
Receptionist
Sales Clerk Retail
Secretary
Stenographer
Telephone Operator
Typist
Waitress

Total Estimated Labor Force


23,185
14,152
12,481
9,585
9,343
6,824
3,459
4,859
3,519
38,530
40,959
4,607
9,161
9,067
27,095


30,764
18,779
16,559
12,719
12,398
9,056
4,591
6,448
4,667
51,130
54,354
6,111
12,154
12,027
35 954


37,580
22,940
20,228
15,537
15,145
11,063
5,609
7,877
5,701
62,458
66,396
7,464
14,846
14,692
43.921


636.000 844,00 1.031.000


46,146
28,169
24,839
19,079
18,598
13,584
6,887
9,672
7,001
76,694
81,530
9,166
18,230
18,041
53,932


55,841
34,087
30,058
23,087
22,505
16,438
8,334
11,704
8,472
92,809
98,661
11,092
22,061
21,831
65,,263


1.266.000 1,532,000


Male


Occupation

Auto Mechanic
Auto Service Station Attendant
Airplane Mechanic
Masons Brick, Stone
Carpenter
Cook
Construction Worker
Delivery or Route Man
Electrician
Heavy Machinery Operator
Gardener
Insurance Agent, Broker
Caretaker
Lineman
Machinist
Manager
Painter
Plasterer
Porter
Radio & TV Repairman


1975


1980


1960

19,550
10,616
8,901
7,325
30,138
7,841
24,571
11,186
9,643
8,352
10,828
11,590
11,082
8,497
5,070
18,000
9,751
3,993
6,189
4,023


1965

26,007
14,136
11,855
9,757
40,110
10,440
32,701
14,885
12,837
11,122
14,419
15,418
14,752
11,305
6,743
24,000
12,970
5,311
8,242
5,361


1970

33,224
18,058
15,144
12,464
51,239
13,336
41,774
19,015
16,400
14,208
18,420
19,696
18,845
14,442
8,614
31,000
16,569
6,785
10,529
6,849


1975

39,316
21,369
17,921
14,750
60,635
15,782
49,434
22,502
19,406
16,814
21,797
23,307
22,301
17,090
10,194
37,000
19,607
8,029
12,459
8,105


1980

45,923
24,961
20,933
17,228
70,825
18,434
57,742
26,284
22,665
19,639
25,460
27,224
26,048
19,963
11,907
43,000
22,903
9,379
14,553
9,467


-2-







Occupation


Salesman Manufacturing
Salesman Retail
Salesman Wholesale
Store Clerk
Truck & Tractor Driver
Waiter
Wholesale Trade Manager

Total Estimated Labor Force


10,697
35,346
12,785
6,953
45,923
4,622
5,555

1,251,000


14,236
47,036
17,000
9,257
61,106
6,144
7,393

1,665,000


18,186
60,088
21,717
11,826
78,061
7,849
9,444

2,127,000


21,520
71,105
25,699
13,995
92,374
9,288
11.175

2.517.000


25,137
83,055
30,017
16,346
107,898
10,849
13,054

2.940.000


The above occupations, although illustrative, include approximately 34% of the
total projected female work force and approximately 28% of the projected male
work force. In the past year training for most of these occupations was
offered, but studies of the labor market indicate the need for expansion.

A survey was made of ten pilot counties in the state to relate training programs
for gainful employment to job opportunities in the counties. The information
given in the following table was supplied by seven of the ten counties surveyed,
including Dade, Escambia, Hillsborough, Jackson, Lake, Manatee, and Pinellas
Counties. These counties comprise approximately 40% of the state's population
and include most of the principal employment areas.


The following table reports total enrollment in training programs,
for representative occupations in the above seven counties for the
school year.

NUMBER OF STUDENTS ENROLLED, BY PROGRAM LEVEL, IN
SELECTED OCCUPATIONAL TRAINING PROGRAMS IN SEVEN
COUNTIES OF FLORIDA--1965-66

Code Program Level


by level,
1965-66


S-Secondary Preparatory
PS-Post-Secondary Preparatory
A-Adult Preparatory
X-Persons with Special Needs
E-Supplemental
R-Apprentice Related


Occupational Training Program Number of Students Enrolled

S-716 E-203
Auto Mechanic PS-8
A-203

Airplane Mechanic S-314 R-120
A-150

Bookkeeper S-618 A-1813
S'PS-196 E-655

Carpenter S-16
R-277


-3-


1960


1965


1970


1975


1980









Cosmetologist S-610 A-129
PS-8 E-228

Electrician S-67
R-600

Machinist S-226 A-57
E-84

Mason-Brick, Block S-70 R-19
E-47

Office Machine Operator S-1511 A-1886
PS-40 E-658

Painter R-81


Practical Nurse,Licensed S-11 E-126
A-407

Radio & TV Repairman S-214 E-179
A-83

Salesman S-223 A-790
PS-31 E-722

Secretary S-145 A-1145
PS-1962 E-1032

Stenographer S-486 A-1573
PS-363 E-857

Typist S-1031 A-3760
PS-30 E-1517

Waiter S-5 E-75
A-220

Waitress S-64
A-250

The division is conscious of the state's above average growth in population and
economic development. Vocational and technical education courses are being
expanded to meet the needs of various groups of persons, on different educa-
tional levels. Existing and emerging occupations are being studied together
with communities, counties, and areas of the state to determine how vocational
and technical programs can contribute to meeting manpower and employment needs
and opportunities.


-4















Program Objectives Expanding and Improving
Vocational and Technical Education for High School Students


Efforts of the state to improve and expand vocational education have
included a variety of approaches. Numerous studies have been made to
report and evaluate programs, facilities, and numbers of personnel
employed and needed. Reporting and evaluation have been by instruc-
tional level, and have included projections by state and local school
personnel of future needs for growth and improvement. Growth of the
programs in 1965-66 was evident from numerous measures, including the
increase in high school enrollments as follows:


NUMBER OF ENROLLMENTS IN VOCATIONAL
AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION--HIGH SCHOOL LEVEL,
SELECTED YEARS


1961-62 1963-64 1965-66

Vocational Agriculture 13,109 14,256 13,346

Home Economics Education 46,967 67,484 74,229

Trade and Industrial Education 9,181 7,682 9,684

Technical Education 661 616 678

Distributive Education 560 906 2,410

Health-Related Education N.R. 44 47

Business Education N.R. 944 5,337


Vocational programs offered in the state in 1965-66 are listed in the
following table. The table shows also the number of programs offered
in each county.


-5 -












NUMBER OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS BY COUNTY -
BY VOCATIONAL SPECIALTY AND BY LEVEL OF INSTRUCTION
(SECONDARY LEVEL)


County

Alachua

Baker

Bay

Bradford

Brevard

Broward

Calhoun

Charlotte

Citrus

Clay

Collier

Columbia

Dade

DeSoto

Dixie

Duval

Escambia

Gadsden

Gilchrist

Glades


Agri.

9


Dist.

1


Divers.

3


Home Economics
Health Occ. Reg.

9


Office Tech.

3 1


6 7 5


2 15

2


-6-


Indus.

3









County

Gulf

Hamilton

Hardee

Hendry

Hernando

Highlands

Hillsborough

Holmes

Indian River

Jackson

Jefferson

Lafayette

Lake

Lee

Leon

Liberty

Madison

Manatee

Marion

Martin

Monroe

Nassau


Agri. Dist.

1

2


Home Economics
Divers. Health Occ. Reg.

1 3

1 2


1

3

2

4

2 34

4

1

10

2

1

9

7

6

1

6

7

10

2

3

5


Office Tech.



1

1



2


-7-


Indus.










County

Okaloosa

Okeechobee

Orange

Osceola

Palm Beach

Pasco

Pinellas

Polk

Putnam

St. Johns

St. Lucie

Sarasota

Seminole

Sumter

Suwannee

Taylor

Union

Volusia

Wakulla

Walton

Washington


Ar

2

2

14

2

4

4

2

21

3

2

1

1

3

4

4





7

3

2

3


Dist.

1



6



1



6

3





1

3

1

1







1


Home Economics
Divers. Health Occ. Reg.

3 9

1

9 1 23

1 3

12 12

2 4

6 29

12 24

1 6

2 3

2 3

3 8

1 5

4 4

2 1 4

3 2

1

6 15

3

1 4

4


Office Tech.

1 1

1

4


-8-


Indus.





9









Supervisory Services on the State Level--High School Students


The following presents a number of activities reported by the respective voca-
tional services regarding progress or growth in providing vocational and tech-
nical education for high school students. At times there may be some overlap
with other instructional levels, but this has been kept to a minimum.

Vocational Agriculture

The agricultural education section reported workshops and in-service programs
for high school, post-high school and other teaching personnel and for youth
as follows:


Event or
Conference


No. Purpose


Date Duration


Annual Vocational
Agriculture Teachers
Conference

Group Conference for
Voc.-Ag. Teachers &
A.S.C.S. Personnel


Meat Marketing
Clinic


District & Group
Conferences


1 Improve teachers



3 Assist teachers
develop materials



1 Mutual assistance
with Swift & Co,


6
district
meetings
33
group
meetings


Preparation for
new school year


July,
1965


Dec.,
1965



Aug.,
1965


4. days Approx.
300
teachers


3 days




2 days


Sept., 1 day
1965 each


Jan.,
1966


1 day
each


66 teachers,
A.SoCoS. work-
ers & state
staff

6 teachers
from Fla. and
Ga.

Teachers,
principals,
superintendents,
directors, &
coordinators
(445 persons)


State Forestry
Camp for F.F.A.



State F.F.A.
Convention



F.F.A. Day
at State Fair


State Staff
Conference
& Meetings


2 Development


July,
1965


1 Recognize students June,
interested in ago 1966
career


S Development-young
persons & adults
interested in ag,

Annual Meeting to
plan activities.
Monthly meetings
to plan & evalu-
ate practices &
procedures


Feb.,



Aug.,
1965
1965-
1966


2 weeks Persons inter-
ested in ag.
and forestry


1 day




1 day



3 days

15 days


Individuals
interested
in ag.; 900
persons attended

Boys, teachers
& others, 5000
persons

Staff and
Teacher-
Educators


People
Served








Vocational
Agriculture
& Agriculture
Extension Staffs



National F.F.A.
Convention



F.V.A.T.A.
Officers


1 Annual meeting
to discuss
development




1 To participate
& aid state
delegation


2 To plan


Oct.,
1965





Oct.,
1965



Oct.,
1965
Mar.,
1966


j day






4 days




. day

1 day


Staff
members -
vocational
agriculture
& agriculture
extension

Teachers &
youth, busi-
nessmen,
parents, etc.

Officers,
directors,
& staff
members


In addition, the supervisory staff attended further meetings concerned with
professional growth and improvement of teaching personnel.

Consultative assistance was given to county school officials, secondary adminis-
trators, and citizens advisory committees in improving vocational agriculture
programs. Staff members assisted in evaluating vocational agriculture departments
throughout the state.


Business Education

Enrollments in vocational business education in the secondary schools increased
134% over the preceding year as a direct result of funding support under the
Vocational Education Act of 1963. Most of the increase is represented by the
vocational office education plan I block programs and vocational office education
plan II directing teacher programs. Enrollments were 1660 students in plan I,
2113 students in plan II and 674 students in cooperative programs. Eight hundred
and ninety students received training through the diversified cooperative training
program. Total enrollment was 5337 compared to 2278 in the previous year.


Distributive Education

The secondary program continued to expand, enrollments being up 13% over the
previous year. Nearly all the increase was the result of 12 additional co-
operative programs. Enrollments included 1451 students in cooperative pro-
grams, 75 in preparatory programs, and 884 students in diversified coopera-
tive programs.

The annual planning conference for high school teacher-coordinators was held
August 9-12 with approximately 275 coordinators, guidance persons, consultants,
and state staff attending. The theme of the conference was Education for
Employment.


- 10 -










Home Economics Education


A course in supervised food services which trains high school students for
gainful employment was begun in Orange County. Considerations in establishing
the course were that girls need to be trained to earn a living, that there should
be personal satisfaction from work for wages, and that pride in work performance
is important. The course was successful and now will be introduced in a number
of additional counties.

Enrollments at the high school level were as follows:

Enrollments
Course Title 1965-66

Required Comprehensive- 34,919
Advanced Comprehensive 6,576
Modern Family Living 7,342
Clothing and Textiles 7,155
Food and Nutrition 6,342
Child Development 5,211
Personal, Family, Social Relations 3,197
Housing and Home Furnishings 4,310
Home Management 2,176

Total 77,228


Health-Related Education

Approximately 50% of the 11 enrollees in practical nursing at William J.
Woodham High School completed the course and were referred to the adult
program. There is only one high school practical nursing program in the
state.


Technical Education

In general, programs in technical education fulfilled objectives. Expansion
included four new programs in electronics and one in computer programming.
Equipment was purchased to improve laboratories in several high schools.

Three conferences and workshops concerned with the development, organization,
and administration of technical education programs were conducted by the State
Department of Education during 1965-66 fiscal year. One was conducted in Duval
County for the purpose of developing a course outline and teaching guide for a
two-year electronics technology program for secondary schools. Four instructors,
assisted by state technical education consultants, developed a teaching outline
to provide 1080 hours of basic instruction during the junior and senior years of
high school. The course content and periods of instruction were determined co-
operatively by instructors, business personnel, and interested employees.


- 11 -






Three new secondary programs in electronics were initiated in Duval County during
the year. These are the first technical programs on any level in the county.
In addition, one new secondary program in Data Processing was begun in Hills-
borough County.


Industrial Education

High school enrollments increased from 9139 in 1964-65 to 9684 in 1965-66.
Thirty-six industrial and service occupational areas were represented and
courses were offered for high school students in 25 of the 67 counties of
the state.

The most significant enrollment increases occurred in a number of counties
having considerable concentration of population, namely, Brevard, Broward,
Dade, Escambia, Hillsborough, Orange, Pinellas, Putnam and Sarasota.
Enrollment increased significantly in the following occupational areas:

Commercial and Advertising Art
Drafting
Cooking and Baking
Cosmetology
Law Enforcement
Tailoring
Cabinetmaking and Millwork
Machine Shop
Welding
.Auto Mechanics

Attention was directed to expansion and improvement, primarily, in three ways:

1. Planning with county school personnel for increasing offerings for high
school students through area vocational schools and comprehensive high
schools

2. Assisting county personnel in up-grading equipment and facilities

3. Emphasizing in-service training of teachers in county work shops.


- 12 -















Program Objectives Expanding and Improving Vocational
and Technical Education for Post-High-School Students
Including Graduates and Dropouts


Post-secondary education is, generally, growing in Florida. The
trend reflects increasing activity in the state in the number and
volume of trade and business enterprises, of population growth,
and the general economic growth of the state. Plans for area
vocational schools include expanded and strengthened programs for
post-high school students and dropouts with concomitant enrollment
increases anticipated. Enrollments by vocational service reported
for all counties were as follows:


ENROLLMENT IN VOCATIONAL AND
TECHNICAL EDUCATION--POST-HIGH
SCHOOL AND ADULT PROGRAMS IN
SELECTED YEARS


1961-62 1963-64 1965-66

Vocational Agriculture 2,092 1,528 1,410

Home Economics Education 23,981 28,443 32,997

Trade and Industrial Education 26,724 32,003 34,556

Technical Education 7,258 12,449 15,548

Distributive Education 14,322 19,272 21,594

Business Education N.R. 54,967 54,642

Health-Related Education 1,765 2,267 5,667



The table following on the next two pages reports the post-secondary
programs offered in Florida.


- 13 -












NUMBER OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS BY COUNTY -
BY VOCATIONAL SPECIALTY AND BY LEVEL OF INSTRUCTION
(POST-SECONDARY AND ADULT LEVELS)


Home Economics
Agri. Dist. Divers. Health Occ. Reg.


A-3
PS


Office Tech. Indus.


A-27 A-10


PS A-3


A-2


A,PS


A,PS A-10 A-6
PS PS


PS A-12
PS


A-14 A-12
PS
A,PS A-2
PS-2


PS A,PS


Hillsborough


A
PS-2


A A-2 A-3


- 14 -


County

Alachua


Bradford

Brevard

Broward

Calhoun

Citrus

Collier

Columbia


Dade


DeSoto

Dixie

Duval

Escambia


Gadsden

Hamilton

Hernando


A-3


A,PS


A-2


A-2
PS


A-2
PS


A-3









County

Jackson

Lake

Lee

Leon

Manatee

Marion

Palm Beach

Pinellas


Polk


Agri. Dist.



PS


Home Economics
Divers. Health Occ. Reg.


Office Tech.


A A-4 A-2


Indus.

A

A,PS


A A


A,PS


A-3
PS


PS

A-3
PS

A,PS


A,PS

A
PS-2


PS A,PS

A-3
PS

A-7 A,PS


A

PS A


A,PS

A-2
PS

A,PS


A-3

A-3


A,PS


A-2 PS PS


PS A


A

A,PS

A


PS A-2


A A A,PS

A


A A


A-2

PS


- 15 -


Putnam

St. Johns

St. Lucie

Sarasots

Seminole

Volusia


A

A-2

A-2











Supervisory Services on the State Level--Post-High School Students,
Including Graduates and Dropouts

The following presents a number of items reported by vocational services
regarding progress or growth in providing vocational and technical education
for post-high school students, including graduates and dropouts:

Business Education

Several junior colleges were designated as area vocational schools. Enrollments
in vocational business in all types of institutions offering post-secondary
programs increased to 6705 over enrollments of 4928 in the previous year.

Distributive Education

The section continued to work closely with the Division of Community Junior
Colleges to provide assistance in distributive education programs. Junior
colleges reported an increase of nearly 42% in enrollments-in distribution
and marketing programs. There was also a 50% increase in cooperative mid-
management programs. A total of about 400 students were enrolled in all
types of programs.

The post-high school distributive education summer institute, held at the
University of Florida, was attended by 16 instructors. A two-day in-service
meeting was also held to discuss the need for program expansion and to develop
guidelines for a junior college mid-management program.

Home Economics Education

The following reports enrollment of adults by courses in 1965-66.

Homemaking, including infant care, clothing,
nutrition, home management, family economics, etc. 29,511 29,511

Wage Earning Child Day Center Worker 337

Visiting Homemaker 4

Food Service Worker 15

Companion to Elderly Person 26

Homemakers Assistant 38

Alterations Specialist 39 459

School Food Service Worker 2,389

Miscellaneous 86 2,475

Post-High School 552 552


32,997


Total






The above enrollments are higher than in the previous year and it is antici-
pated that they will continue to increase, particularly because of the opening
of additional area schools and the emphasis on training for gainful employment.

Health-Related Education

The year seemed to reflect the tenor of the times as interest increased in
health occupations in vocational schools and junior colleges. For some it
was a year of exploration and planning, for others a year of implementation.
The following are illustrative of programs offered:

Programs Enrollments

Practical Nursing 737
The total number of programs was reduced to 20..
During the year 717 graduate took the state test
and 697 passed. Total enrollments showed a gain
over the previous year.

Nurse Aide 461
Of students enrolled, 418 were in MDTA programs.
Three hundred and fifty-eight completed their
course. Work has been done to make the curricu-
lum more flexible.

Surgical Technician 41
One new program was opened during the year and
12 persons completed the course.

Other courses were offered to train for these occupations: certified laboratory
assistant, medical secretary, dental laboratory technician, dental assistant
and others.

Technical Education

In general program objectives were met. Indications are that schools will have
to continue to expand in numerous technologies to meet employment demand.

Industrial Education

Enrollments of out-of-school youth and adults in preparatory industrial educa-
tion increased from 8317 in 1964-65 to 11,423 in 1965-66. Forty-six occupa-
tional areas were represented. Increased enrollments in preparatory programs
were mainly in the following occupational areas:

Commercial Art Welding
Drafting Carpentry
Photographing Painting
Law Enforcement Aviation Mechanics
Building Maintenance Automotive Mechanics
Upholstery Air Conditioning


- 17 -














Activities: to improve and expand preparatory courses included the following:

1. Planning with county personnel for increasing offerings
in area vocational schools and junior colleges

2. Assisting county school officials in upgrading
equipment and facilities

3. Emphasizing in-service training of teachers.


- 18 -






Program Objectives Expanding and Improving Vocational
and Technical Education for Persons in the Labor Force


A detailed statement of the vocational education programs offered, by county,
in 1965-66 follows:


NUMBER OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS BY COUNTY -
BY VOCATIONAL SPECIALTY AND BY LEVEL OF INSTRUCTION
(SUPPLEMENTARY AND APPRENTICE RELATED EDUCATION)

Code

E-Supplementary
R-Apprentice Related


County

Alachua

Broward

Collier

Columbia


Home Economics
Agri. Dist. Divers. Health Occ. Reg.


Office Tech. Indus,


E,R


E-10


E-5


Dade

Duval


Escambia

Hamilton


E-2,R


E-8,R


E-2,R-2


E-2,R


E-2


Hillsborough


Lee

Leon


Manatee

Marion

Okaloosa


Palm Beach


Pinellas


E-4


E-2


E E


E-5


E-3


R

E-2,R


- 19 -





Home Economics
County Agri. Dist. Divers. Health Occ. Reg. Office Tech. Inds

St. Lucie E E E. E- E. E ER

Sarasota E-3 E-2 E-7 E-2 E-2,1

Seminole E E. E,R

Suwannee E-2 E-2

Volusia E.


Supervisory Services on the State Level--Persons Who Have Already Entered
the Labor Market

The following presents data and activities reported by the respective vocational
services regarding programs, growth, and needs in providing vocational and techni-
cal education for persons who have already entered the labor market.

Business Education

The adult curriculum was an important concern of the state staff, redultingqin an
Adult Business Education Conference March 11-12, 1966. The purpose of the confer-
ence was to consider suggestions for strengthening adult programs. Adult enrollments
increased nearly 3000 in 1965 over 1964.

Distributive Education

The program for adults enrolled 19,500 students, an increase of 2500 students over
the previous year. The number and type of course offerings remained fairly constant.
The most popular courses were those related to the hotel-motel-restaurant industry
and to trade. These courses enrolled over 12,000 students.

Home Economics Education

Consideration of ways to aid in new training or in retraining needed by persons
already employed is a concern of the department. Studies are being made to determine
how courses in home economics may better serve persons already employed.

Health-Related Education

The number of persons participating in evening trade extension courses for the
following occupations totaled 852.
Centers Students
Practical Nursing 7 344
Home Health Aide 1 16
Dental Assistant 2 87
Dental Technologist 1 102
Medical Assistant 2 206
Medical Secretary 1 80
Nurse Aide 1 17


- 20 -






The number of students in practical nursing was 44% under the previous year,
apparently because of the need to revise and update courses offered. Efforts
are now underway to correct this situation.

Technical Education

Supplementary technical programs for employed persons of all ages are available
at most institutions offering post-secondary work. Programs have been meeting
,objectives and continued to expand as employed persons sought more education.

Industrial Education

Enrollments in supplementary programs increased from 21,792 in 1964-65 to
23,120 in 1965-66. Forty-three occupational areas were represented. Courses
were offered in 58 of the 67 counties.

Major increases in enrollments were in the following occupational areas:

Navigation
Surveying
Upholstery
Electric Wiring
Dry Cleaning
Auto Body and Fender Repair
Air Conditioning

Related classes for apprentices were provided in 24 trade areas. Increases
in enrollments over the previous year were in the following:

Electric Wiring
Carpentry
Painting
Plumbing
Lathing
Glazing
Operating Engineers


- 21 -






Program Objectives Expanding and Improving Vocational and
Technical Education for Persons With Special Needs


In 1965 A Guide for Planning Special Vocational Programs for the Disadvantaged
was released. The bulletin contained a form for application for funds under
the Vocational Education Act of 1963, various information sections, a selected
bibliography, and specific directions for executing the required form for
funds. The guide helped acquaint county personnel with problems of disadvan-
taged persons. Also, it helped county personnel find assistance for solving
problems. Topics discussed included the following:

1. Identifying disadvantaged persons
2. Characteristics of the disadvantaged
3. Vocational education's responsibility to the disadvantaged
4. Types of programs possible
5. Class size
6. Home visitations
7. Making requests for funds.

Enrollments in classes reported by the respective vocational services were
as follows:

ENROLLMENT IN VOCATIONAL AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION -
PERSONS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS, 1965-66

Vocational Agriculture 135
Trade and Industrial Education 30
Distributive Education 446
Health-Related Education 10

Programs for persons with special needs were offered in the following counties
by the following services:

NUMBER OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS BY COUNTY -
BY VOCATIONAL SPECIALTY (PERSONS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS)
Home Economics
County Ari. Dist. Divers. Health ucc. Keg. Office Tech. Indus.

Brevard 1

Broward 8

Charlotte 1

Hillsborough 1 1

Hamilton 2

Manatee 1

Marion 1


- 22 -








Home Economics
Divers. Health Occ. Reg.


County

Osceola

Pinellas

Sarasota


Office Tech.


In industrial education the Consultant for Special Vocational Programs is responsible
for coordinating the programming for persons with special needs. A limited number of
programs was offered in which industrial courses were given. The Consultant for
Special Vocational Education Programs is cooperating with the representative from
program services, and others concerned, to establish guidelines for program development.


- 23 -


Indus.


Agri. Dis t.













Work-Study Programs for Youth -
Adequacy and Accomplishments of the Programs


Work-study programs were operated in 23 of Florida's 67 counties
and in the Florida School for the Deaf and Blind at St. Augustine.
Programs were operated according to the State Plan under the
immediate supervision of the State Consultant for Special Voca-
tional Programs.

Funds designated for administrative use were utilized in operating
an office with secretarial assistance. Necessary application forms
and program operation and fiscal accounting records were kept.

Programs during the academic year together with special summer
programs used all available funds plus an additional $125,000
received through reallocation. Enrollments averaged approximately
1850 per month. Students averaged 40 hours of work per month with
approximately one-eighth receiving travel allowance because they
did not live within reasonable commuting distance of their employ-
ment.

Requests for funds far exceeded the amounts available both in the
academic year and in the special summer program. Indications
are that the necessary 75-25 matching basis for fiscal year
1966-67 will severely curtail the number of counties participating.


- 24-






Area Vocational Schools Impact of Construction
Under the Vocational Education Act of 1963


Program planning for area vocational schools was a major activity of the
division in 1965-66. Program determination and facilities surveys were
conducted in Hillsborough, Bay, Palm Beach, Suwannee, Polk, Orange, Bradford,
Lee, Sarasota, Washington, Lake, Taylor, Dade, Seminole, and Citrus Counties.
Representatives from each section of the division participated in these
studies which considered economic, sociological, and educational data having
implications for vocational and technical programs in the new schools.
Divisional personnel also participated in numerous studies to determine the
extent of state, federal, and local financial support for area schools.

Area vocational school allotments came from the following sources:

Vocational-technical center bond funds $ 6,779,661
Vocational-technical center surplus funds 903,954
Junior college bond funds 4,202,279
Federal funds 5.454,687

Total $17,340,581

During the year the Florida State Board for Vocational Education approved
construction of ten area vocational schools at a cost of $8,349,536. Of
the total cost, $2,397,336 is from federal funds and the remainder from
state and local sources.

The Board also approved the purchase of sites for two additional schools which
are to be built during the 1966-67 fiscal year. The cost of these two sites
was $76,480 of which half will be paid from federal funds.

These ten area schools will provide 145 new shop and laboratory facilities and
58 related classrooms having a total of 569,154 sq. ft. of floor space and will
accommodate 6305 additional students. The expenditure for individual facilities
ranges from $254,000 to $1,932,480.

Five of the facilities are extensions or expansions of junior colleges and five
are other types of area vocational-technical centers. Five of the facilities
will have vocational agriculture, home economics, and technical education pro-
grams, eight will house office occupations, nine will have training for health
occupations, and all ten will include industrial education programs.

Nineteen other locations for area vocational schools have been approved. When
these are completed the state will have a total of 29.

Designated area schools essentially junior colleges or in temporary facilities -
reporting vocational programs in operation in 1965-66 are shown on the following
map.


- 25 -






AREA VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS 0,PENED 1965-66


Conntles


Brevard
Columbin, Baker, Gilchrist
Dade
Madison, Jefferson, Lafayette
tlanatec
Marion
Orange
Polk
Volusia


Note: Schools and their areas of service are indicated
by their numbers on the map.


- 26 -









Illustrative of levels of programs offered in area vocational schools in the
past year are reports from counties as follows:


EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS OFFERED IN
AREA VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS 1965-66
BY COUNTY OR COUNTIES


Code

S-Secondary Preparatory
PS-Post-Secondary Preparatory
A-Adult Preparatory
X-Person with Special Needs
E-Supplemental
R-Apprentice Related


Home Economics
Agri. Dist. Divers. Health Occ. Rejg.


PS,A,
E


PS PS


Office Tech. Indus.


A,E A,X, PS,A, PS,A,
E X,E E


A,E,R


PS S,A


Dade (N,R.)

Madison,
Jefferson, &
Lafayette (N.R.)


S,A,X,
E,R


A PS


A,X,
E


A,X,
E


PS,A,
X


PS,A,
E


PS PS,A


E A,X PS,A, S,PS,
X A


S,A,
X,E

A,E,


S,A,R


S,A, S,A,E,
E R

S,A, S,A,E,
E R


- 27 -


Counties

Brevard

Columbia
Baker, &
Gilchrist


Manatee


Marion

Orange


Polk


Volusia






Additional Vocational and Technical School Facilities Constructed -
Accomplishments and Needs (Other Than in Area Vocational Schools)


New construction and/or renovation of vocational education facilities were
reported by approximately one-half of the state's 67 counties. Included
were facilities in junior high schools, junior-senior high schools, senior
high schools, vocational and technical high schools, adult education centers,
and junior colleges operating vocational departments.

A summary of the new construction and renovations follows:


SUMMARY OF NEW CONSTRUCTION OR
RENOVATION OF FACILITIES BY
VOCATIONAL SPECIALTY AND BY
LEVEL OF STUDENTS SERVED

POST-
SECONDARY SECONDARY ADULT DISADVANTAGED DROPOUTS SUPPLEMENTARY

Agriculture
Classroom 20 2 3 1 2
Laboratory 36 2 4 1 4

Distribution 14 5 2 1

Diversified 16 1 1

Health-Related 1 4 4 1 2

Home Economics
Classroom 17 2 2
Laboratory 27 3 1 2

Industrial 27 6 12 7 2 8

Office 23 5 7 1 1 7

Technical 4 8 5 1 1 4

TOTAL NUMBER
OF ITEMS 185 30 43 14 4 32

Some programs in practical nursing were moved to new facilities and several
new facilities are being planned and built. Inventories of books have been
greatly increased.

Other health occupations programs will be housed in new facilities as the
state builds area vocational schools and expands junior colleges. But many
programs are presently housed in below standard facilities and additional
enrollments will magnify the problem.


- 28 -





Organization and Staffing of the State Division -
Accomplishments and Needs


Additional staff were employed during the year as follows:

VOCATIONAL SERVICE NUMBER

Business Education

Business Education Consultant (not filled 1965-66) 1
To advise Florida Business Leaders Association members
and perform other consultative services

Curriculum Specialist for Business Education 1
To develop curricular materials

Teacher Educator for Business Education 1
To help prepare teachers of business subjects

Distributive Education

Curriculum Specialist 1
To develop curricular materials

Health-Related Education

Five new consultative positions were established but none
were filled. These positions were:

Registered Nurse 3

Dentist 1

Medical Technologist 1

Technical Education

Consultant for Technical Education 1
To advise school personnel concerning the
development of technical education

Program Specialist 1
To study and advise concerning program development

Industrial Education

Instructional Specialist 1
To improve teaching

Consultant for Special Industrial Education Programs 1
To develop programs for persons with special needs
with initial emphasis being given to junior high
school dropouts or potential dropouts


- 29-




Program Specialist
To improve programs

State Coordinator, Peace Officers Training 1
To develop standards for recruitment and
training of law enforcement personnel

There has been increasing emphasis on training in the field of
cosmetology. A staff member was added at the end of 1965-66
to provide leadership in this area.

Program Services

Foundations and Grants Specialist 1
To establish contacts with governmental, philanthropic,
business, educational and other units and to relay to
interested personnel developments which are of value
in expanding and strengthening vocational and technical
education. This person also directs the activities of
the Research Coordinating Unit

Consultant for Vocational Guidance 1
To promote the vocational emphasis in guidance

Vocational Survey Assistant 1
To help state and local personnel conduct studies
which may be used in vocational program development

Educational Materials Assistant 1
To help in the development of materials for
vocational and technical education

Occupational Information Specialist 1
To study and report information regarding the
labor markets of the counties, areas, state,
and nation

Vocational Studies Assistant 1
To investigate pertinent problems in vocational
and technical education, to make reports and recommendations,
and to assist in coordination of research activities

Consultant, Vocational Center Construction 1
To advise regarding facilities for area schools and to insure
that all legal and contractual provisions in construction
are observed

Although the above additional staff has increased the capacity of the division
to aid in developing the vocational services identified, additional personnel
will be required. Additional curriculum specialists and additional consultants
will be needed by the technical education section. Three registered nurses,
one dentist, and one medical technologist will be needed for health-related
education to meet adequately the need for consultative services to plan and
implement programs. Other sections also expect to secure additional profes-
sional personnel to aid in planned expansion.


- 30 -






Activities to Strengthen Teacher Training; Guidance;
Curriculum Development; Research; Leadership Training;
Experimental. Developmental, and Pilot Programs;
and Program Evaluation


During the past year the division has been active at the local and state levels
to encourage development in the above areas. County personnel, in preparing
their vocational plans, have furnished data regarding their activities and pro-
posals for research, guidance, program experimentation, evaluation and related
services. It is encouraging to note that counties which did not report these
activities in the past have made provisions for such services in their future
plans.

The following reports activities of the respective vocational services in the
above areas.

TEACHER-TRAINING

Vocational Agriculture

The department engaged in a number of activities including the preparation of
pamphlets and other materials to recruit teacher trainees. In-service teachers
were asked to council with senior high school students to urge the latter to
become teachers. Staff members visited schools to give talks regarding careers
in agriculture and participated in Agriculture Career Day which attracted over
300 boys.

The state staff helped to plan and manage the five-day annual conference for all
vocational agriculture teachers. Staff members also visited all first-year
teachers and all in-service teachers reporting special teaching problems.

Business Education

During the year pre-school conferences were held in four cities and were attended
by approximately 500 business education teachers. Florida Atlantic University
has completed its first year of offering an undergraduate program for business
education teachers.

Distributive Education

The teacher training program for distributive education continued to expand at
the University of South Florida. Approval has been given to establish a Master's
Degree program. A second teacher-educator has been approved to initiate a new
teacher-training program at Florida Atlantic University.

Home Economics Education

The Florida State University and the Florida Agricultural and Mechanical Univer-
sity have continued to recruit outstanding students for their schools of home
economics through contacts with local, district, and state groups. Members of
the department and local and district FHA advisors have encouraged high school
girls to enter the field of home economics.


- 31 -






Health-Related Education

For health-related education, teacher-training efforts have been concentrated
chiefly upon short summer courses at Florida State University. Courses have
dealt mainly with curriculum development and program evaluation. In April the
first meeting for faculties of associate degree nursing programs was held to
search oit ways for improvement. It was decided that instructors in health
occupations would profit from workshops, more consultative services, and related
kinds of assistance.

Technical Education

The teacher-training program is well established at the University of Florida.
A full-time teacher-trainer is on the staff and a Master's Degree program in
technical education has also been established.

A six-week course in electronics was offered at Daytona Beach Junior College
and was accepted for credit at the University of Florida.

Fifteen technical education teachers attended a two-day non-credit workshop
on Fundamentals of Digital Computers which was held at the Pinellas County
Technical Education Center. A two-week course was offered by Miami-Dade Junior
College for instructors of civil engineering technology, credit for which was
accepted for certification. Fifteen instructors attended the classes.

Industrial Education

In industrial education the program of credit courses provided by approved
teacher-training institutions is reasonably adequate. But because of growth
in educational programs needs of the near future must be studied and evaluated.
Greater emphasis must be placed on instructional supervision at the state, county,
and school levels as well as in the in-service training of teachers on a non-
credit basis.

GUIDANCE

Vocational guidance has long been a major concern of the division. In the past
year a Consultant for Vocational Guidance was employed and was attached to the
Guidance Section of the Division of Instructional Services. The consultant has
been active in studying techniques of guidance and through pilot studies in
ascertaining student needs and interests for occupational training.

During the year the consultant made presentations to counselors, directing
teachers, coordinators of guidance, and state supervisors of vocational educa-
tion on techniques in counseling people in making vocational choices and on the
implications of federal funding support for counseling services. The consultant
also helped to distribute occupational information from the state office.

The development and use of film strips to acquaint students with career and work
opportunities was encouraged and enrollments in vocational courses were studied
and interpreted in cooperation with local counselors. The consultant also helped
train counselors to administer the General Aptitude Test Battery, assisted in
planning guidance workshops, and participated in developing materials for workshops.


- 32






CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT


Business Education

Studies and other activities to promote curriculum development have progressed.
A major publication was A Guide: Business Education in Florida. Seventeen
outstanding teachers, in addition to the state staff and special consultants
from Northern Illinois University, met several times to help prepare the Guide.

A second major publication has been completed and is ready to print. The Voca-
tional Office Education Teacher's Handbook was the product of a workshop which
lasted two weeks. The section also developed A Guide for Educational Specifi-
cations for Business Education which will assist county personnel in planning
vocational programs for the new area schools.

Distributive Education

Two curriculum workshops were held in distributive education during the year.
One, the Project Plans Workshop was to develop effective guidelines for the
organization and operation of distributive education programs utilizing the
project method of instruction. Attention was given to determining appropriate
units of study to be included in the curriculum, differences between coopera-
tive and project methods of instruction, and sequence patterns. A second
workshop was concerned mainly with a curriculum for cooperative programs.
Eighteen instructors, two guidance counselors, two state staff members, and
the teacher educator from the University of South Florida participated in the
workshop.

Home Economics Education

Members of the faculty of the School of Home Economics at Florida State
University have been involved in curriculum revision. As the new curricula
are tested they will be evaluated and revised as necessary.

Health-Related Education

Personnel concerned with health occupations worked with school personnel to
develop materials for practical nursing, nurse assisting, operating room
assisting, and laboratory and medical assisting. Requirements for certifi-
cation were examined and requirements for the associate degree for students
in health-related occupations were studied.

In conjunction with the Florida Licensed Practical Nurses Association, plans
are underway to provide a new series of courses for continuing education for
licensed practical nurses. The first courseof 20 hours will be available on
tape for loan to local groups of licensed practical nurses. Subsequent courses
will be articulated with the first course which is designed as a foundation
course. The first course will be available in this fall of 1966.

The Florida State Board of Nursing requested the Curriculum Specialist to
explore with them ways and means to improve the rules and regulations
for conducting practical nursing programs to implement chapter 464, Florida
Statutes.


- 33 -





During the first half of the year the Curriculum Specialist, Practical Nursing
Education, continued giving direct in-service assistance on a full-time basis
to local faculty groups. However, during the last half of the year this ser-
vice was on a part-time basis as responsibilities changed due to the retirement
of the Consultant for Health Occupations Education.

A special committee of the Florida Nurses Association met twice during the
year to revise the Guidelines to be followed in setting up MDTA training for
nurses aides. This revised publication will be available the fall of 1966.

The Industrial Arts and Vocational Education Department, Florida State Univer-
sity, selected a committee of nurse educators to develop plans for an Occupa-
tional Competency Examination for registered nurses teaching in Florida Practical
Nursing Programs. The committee met three times and will submit its report to
the university in September.

Industrial Education

In industrial education the emphasis on curriculum development has been at the
county and school levels with consultative services from the division and
section. With the new staff, greater emphasis will be placed on the development
and distribution of illustrative course outlines and courses of study.

Program Services

Program Services made a study of the occupational cluster concept during the year.
A preliminary to the study was a presentation dealing with this concept at the
Annual Conference for Local Supervisors and Administrators of Vocational Educa-
tion. A progress report was presented before the State Coordinating Committee
in July. Study in this area is continuing.


RESEARCH

The state staff in business education is participating in research projects with
the University of Florida and with Michigan State University. One project is
concerned with assigning priorities to significant problems in business education.
The other will test the value of the block-time approach for advanced office
education at the secondary level. Four other states are cooperating in the latter
project.

The state staff in distributive education and six coordinators of cooperative
programs participated in a research project entitled A Competency Pattern
Approach to Curriculum Construction in Distributive Teacher Education. The
purpose of the project was to determine the learning experiences which should
be included in pre-service and in-service teacher education programs. The
distributive education section is also engaged in developing a project in occupa-
tional clustering.

Research and studies have been carried on by state and local personnel. In home
economics education the Florida State University cooperated with the national
Future Homemakers of America in research projects. Slides and transparencies
were made by graduate students to illustrate the results of research. Enroll-
ment studies and placement and follow-up studies were made and work was done to


- 34 -







identify research needed. Also, studies were made to identify gainful employ-
ment opportunities utilizing home economics skills. Additional work is planned
to determine the number and location of job opportunities for people trained
in home economics.

Program Services personnel were active in providing services and research at
the state, county, and area levels. Services and research involving develop-
mental and operational aspects of vocational and technical education were pro-
vided to federal agencies, the general public, county school superintendents,
and other county and local school personnel. Data were gathered from state
and federal sources, reports of business and industry, reports of special geo-
graphical divisions of the state, and from original research. The staff pro-
vided or helped to gather and interpret educational and labor market data,
financial data, and other comparable kinds of information for school personnel
and others planning new area vocational schools or other vocational education
facilities. Special surveys concerned with program development were also
conducted in Brevard, Charlotte, Glades, Hendry, and Sarasota Counties.

During the year the Florida Vocational Program Research Coordinating Unit was
established. The unit assists in coordinating and evaluating current research
projects. Also, it tries to identify the human resources available for research
activities. To date, the unit has used the talents of local administrators,
junior college personnel, teachers, and other state and federal personnel.
Other activities included sponsorship of a conference devoted to identifying
problems and priorities in research needs and the development and dissemination
of research bulletins. The unit advisory committee has been very helpful in
evaluating the effectiveness of the coordinative function.


LEADERSHIP TRAINING

A two-day Leadership Development Conference for supervisors and administrators
was held by the division in April. Among the more fruitful aspects of the
conference was the work done by committees. Fifteen committees were formed to
work on areas of concern that had been identified by local educators as needing
attention. These work committees will continue to operate throughout the year
and make a report of their activities and findings at the next annual conference.

Seven State Department of Education staff members attended a two-week Leadership
Development Conference at the University of Maryland. The purpose of the con-
ference was to assist in up-grading the leadership qualities of new State Depart-
ment personnel.

The vocational agriculture section sponsored numerous conferences during the year.
One of these, at the University of Florida, was concerned with the need for re-
cruiting more teachers of vocational agriculture.

The state staff also helped to plan and supervise a five-day annual conference
for all teachers of vocational agriculture in the state.


- 35 -







In-service programs for business education teachers included the Annual Planning
Conference, the Annual Business Education Conference, the Vocational Office
Education Plan I Conference, and the Vocational Office Education Plan II Con-
ference. The Annual Planning Conference was held August 9-12, 1965. The pur-
pose of the latter was to discuss techniques for improving instruction by using
the cooperative method. It was attended by approximately 275 teacher-coordinators,
guidance personnel, consultants, and state staff personnel. The conference used
consultants from industry in addition to educational personnel. The Annual
Business Conference attracted approximately 300 teachers of business education.
A major topic was implications of the Vocational Education Act of 1963 for
business education.

The home economics section sponsored a two-day teachers' conference using the
theme "Improving the Home Economics Program." Major topics of discussion in-
cluded:

Common Objectives of Vocational Education
A Look to the Future
Concepts and Generalizations
Future Homemakers of America
Educating for the World of Tomorrow
Home Economics in Florida 1964-65 and Plans for 1965-66

The eleventh annual conference for practical nursing instructors was held in
Tampa, November 5-6, 1965. Seventy-eight of the eighty-one instructors attended.
Others attending included the secretary-treasurer and the educational director
of the Florida State Board of Nursing and staff members of the Florida State
Department of Education. The conference was concerned with improvement of
program effectiveness.

The Seventh Annual Conference of Deans and Directors of Technical Education Programs
was held in Tallahassee, October 7-8, 1965. Attending the two-day conference
were 29 deans and directors representing 20 junior colleges offering technical
education programs. Areas of principal consideration included increased emphasis
on occupational education in the junior colleges, student recruitment and selec-
tion,insuring quality programs, and planned expansion of programs.


DEVELOPMENTAL AND PILOT PROGRAMS

During the past year county personnel were requested to provide information re-
garding developmental and pilot programs. They were also requested to project
plans for such programs in the new year. A pilot program was defined as a trial
program providing training in new occupational fields, for new kinds of students,
or using new instructional procedures or materials. The following reports voca-
tional and technical pilot programs under the above definitions by counties,
number of programs, vocational services, and instructional levels in 1965-66.


- 36 -






NUMBER OF VOCATIONAL AND TECHNICAL PILOT PROGRAMS
BY OCCUPATIONAL FIELDS, COUNTIES, AND
TYPE OF STUDENTS PARTICIPATING-1965-66


Code

S-Secondary Preparatory
PS-Post-Secondary Preparatory
A-Adult Preparatory
X-Persons with Special Needs
E-Supplemental

County Agri. Dist.

Alachua

Bay

Brevard


Broward


Divers. Health Home Ec.


Office Tech.

S


S,X


S-3,A,
X-4,E


Indus.


PS,A, A,E
E

PS S,A,E


Calhoun

Clay

Dixie

Escambia

Hamilton

Hendry

Hernando

Holmes

Lee

Manatee

Martin

Monroe

Okaloosa

Okeechobee

Orange


S-2

S,A

PS


PS,A,E

S-2,A-2


S-2,
A-2


S,E


PS

S,E

S

S-4


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County Agri. Dist. Divers. Health Home Ec. Office Tech. Indus.

Palm Beach PS S PS S

Pinellas A S,PS S

Polk A-2 S-6 E8,S-4 PS,A S,A,X,
X,E, D,E
A-2

St. Lucie S A

Sarasota X-2 X-2 X-2 X-2

Suwannee S,E S

Volusia PS,E


In health occupations a pilot project is underway in Palm Beach County to de-
termine how experience with the care of a mental patient can be incorporated
in the practical nursing program.

A pilot program in law enforcement was sponsored by the industrial education
section. The program was established in a comprehensive high school in Hills-
borough County to determine the feasibility and acceptability of such training
at the secondary school level for employment purposes or as preparation for
further study at the post-high school level. A limited number of pilot programs
involving variations in scheduling industrial education were studied during
the year. Consideration is being given to establishing pilot programs for
persons with special needs.


EVALUATION

Some emphasis has been placed on evaluation during the year. A County Program
Planning Guide has been developed and is of much assistance. As county personnel
have filled out the guide they have been able to see their total program as it
was. County personnel have been asked to state their plans for the new fiscal
year in each area of activity. As personnel report what is being done and what
is planned in different phases of vocational education, evaluation is to a
degree being undertaken.

An instrument designed specifically for vocational program evaluation is now
being developed by the state staff. Where the County Program Planning Guide
is primarily a quantitative evaluation, the new instrument will also help to
evaluate qualitative factors in program operation.

A study of evaluative criteria for business education was continued during
the year.


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All cooperative programs in distributive education were self-evaluated. The
completed evaluations will be used during supervisory visitations, copies of
the evaluation having been sent to local school personnel and to the state
office.

A 45-hour course in evaluation as it relates to.health-related program
effectiveness was conducted in June, 1966. This is the fourth summer the
Industrial Arts and Vocational Education Department, Florida State University,
has made provision for summer courses for practical nursing instructors.
Eight teachers, including one from a neighboring state were enrolled. The
state Consultant for Health.Occupations Education was again loaned to the
university to teach this course.

In industrial education, programs are evaluated periodically by the area
supervisors.





















Legislation



The Florida State Legislature did not meet in regular
session during the fiscal year. The next regular ses-
sion will convene in April, 1967.


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Cooperation with Other Agencies Accomplishments


It is the policy of the division to maintain close relations with all state
agencies which can contribute to or benefit from vocational education devel-
opment. The State Board of Health, through its planning division, has
furnished data regarding economic and sociological conditions in Florida.
These data have been used in numerous studies undertaken to expand vocational
education.

Much aid has been received from the Division of Research of the State Depart-
ment of Education. This division has furnished basic educational data, includ-
ing enrollments by grades and by counties, teaching personnel, expenditures for
different educational programs and the like.

The State Employment Service has continued to furnish information regarding
employment in counties and areas of Florida and cooperation with the Employment
Service has been exceptionally good. A survey of employment needs and job
opportunities was conducted in the summer of 1965 by the State Employment
Service. Of the 67 counties in the state, the employment service has forwarded
to the vocational division occupational information gathered in 58 counties.
Information about the remaining 9 counties is expected in the near future.

Employment service personnel were most helpful in the development of the
Florida Vocational Directory. The State Employment Service has contributed
especially as facilities and program studies have been made prior to construction
of area vocational schools in the state.

The division has collaborated extensively with the School Plant Section in
studies to determine facilities needed in new area schools. Also, the division
has requested the aid of the Junior College Division of the state and universities
for higher education in studies undertaken to help counties plan expanded voca-
tional-technical programs.

Upon numerous occasions the division has received help from universities, federal
agencies, other state departments, and the like in meetings for state and local
personnel.

Illustrative of additional agencies with which close associations and cooperation
are maintained are the following:

The State Board of Regents
The State Board of Health
The Council on Economic Development
The Development Commission
The Industrial Commission
The Board of Commissioners of State Institutions
The Junior College Advisory Board
The Teacher Education Advisory Council
The Department of Public Welfare


- 40 -







Additional cooperation with boards and agencies is reported by vocational
service as follows.

Vocational Agriculture

The state staff cooperated with numerous agencies including the following:

State Department of Agriculture
Florida Vocational Association
Agricultural Extension Service of the University of Florida
Florida Education Association
U. S. Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Committee
Florida Farm Bureau Federation
Florida Production Credit Association
Florida Forestry Service
Farmers Home Administration
Florida Cattlemen's Association
Florida Fruit and Vegetable Association
Florida Power Corporation
Gulf Power Corporation
Tampa Electric Company

Business Education

The state staff assumed a leadership role in the American Vocational Associa-
tion meeting in Miami. The state supervisor was chairman of business education
programs and other staff members had active roles presiding or as panel members
in sectional meetings.

Distributive Education

The state staff participated in a conference of the Florida Retail Federation.
The conference was attended by approximately 300 retailers from throughout
the state. The staff also participated in the Florida Association of Public
Junior Colleges fall conference, and in numerous other conferences.

Home Economics Education

The department cooperated with many state departments. One department aided
in the presentation of visual aids and other materials for conferences. The
librarian of the department of education library assisted personnel in pro-
curing books and pamphlets. The state staff worked with teachers in three
counties to collect curriculum materials for the course in family finance.
State staff worked with university personnel in two counties to collect and
plan the use of materials in the area of child development. Members of the
staff served on a number of school evaluation committees. One staff member
served on the State Accreditation Committee.


- 41 -






Health-Related Education


The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, the Florida State Department of
Education, has used the Consultant for Health Occupations Education to assist
with the development of a health-related curriculum for special education
students. Progress is being made in planning a two-phase curriculum which
can lead to preparation for employment.

Technical Education

The staff participated with many other agencies in planning for development.
In August two technical consultants participated in a two-day workshop for
guidance counselors in a seven-county area. The purpose of the workshop
was to acquaint counselors with vocational programs.

The staff continued to work closely with industry and the Florida Industrial
Commission in determining the need for technicians in Florida.

The entire staff attended the American Vocational Association convention in
Miami.

Staff members attended or participated in the following conferences and pro-
grams.

Academic Council Conferences
Council of Junior College Presidents Conference
Data Processing Seminar
Eleventh Annual Conference for Vocational, Technical
Education Administrators and Supervisors
Florida Education Association Conference
Florida Industrial Arts Teacher's Conference
Governor's Education Conference
Industrial Education Conference
National Leadership Clinic
General Education Supervisors State-Wide Conference
Vocational Facilities Conference

Industrial Education

The State Supervisor of Industrial Education is an ex-officio member of the
Florida Apprenticeship Council. As such, he attended and participated in
the council meetings during the year.

The state supervisor and/or staff members attended a variety of conferences
and in many instances participated in the program. Among these were:

American Vocational Association Convention
General Education Supervisors State-Wide Conference
Florida Education Association Conference
Florida Vocational Association meetings
Industrial Education Association meetings
Florida Trucking Association meetings


- 42 -











Florida School Plant Management Association meetings
Florida AFL-CIO State Convention
Florida Police Chiefs Convention
Florida Peace Officers Association Convention
Florida State Building Trades Conference
Florida State Apprenticeship Conference
Florida Electric Cooperative Association meetings
Governor's Safety Conference
National REA Job Training and Safety Conference
Florida Industrial Arts Teachers Conference
Southern States Workshop


- '43 -







Outstanding Features of the State Program -
Major Strengths and Weaknesses


During 1965-66 a survey was made of the state's 67 counties to identify major
strengths and weaknesses of the county program. The following summarizes
significant generalizations reported.

Number of
MAJOR STRENGTHS Counties

1. Improved curricula 36
2. Strong work-study program, including DCT 10
3. Improvement and/or additional equipment,
facilities, space 28
4. Better guidance, student placement, follow-
up, and testing 13
5. Progress made in planning for area schools 9
6. Better supervision from the state, including
surveys 8

MAJOR WEAKNESSES

1. Lack of facilities, equipment, and space 44
2. Inadequate curricula and course offerings 32
3. Poor guidance, student placement, and follow-up 19
4. Lack of teachers, and other personnel 12
5. Insufficient supervision and guidance from the
state office 7
6. Lack of funds 5


Major strengths of the state program include the following:

1. Vocational and technical education in the state is growing numbers
served are increasing, additional facilities and personnel are being
provided, and people in the state are becoming increasingly aware of
the need for and benefits from vocational and technical education.

2. The state has been divided into three supervisory areas which are the
same for each vocational service. Area committees 'consisting of service
representatives have been established to study and aid in total program
development and make recommendations to the state coordinating committee
regarding the apportionment of funds under the Vocational Education Act
of 1963. The special area committees are especially active in encouraging
vocational education development in each county.

3. The Research Coordinating Unit has been established and is active in
encouraging and disseminating findings from research in vocational
problems and in establishing research priorities.


-44 -







4. A form has been developed for each county to use in reporting activities
in vocational education. The county plan enables state personnel to study
vocational planning in each part of the state and serves as a valuable
tool for program development in each county.

5. Additional professional personnel have been employed to assist in total
program development.

6. The planning for area vocational schools continues. Schools now open
or to open during the next biennium will serve approximately 83% of the
state's population.

7. Help for disadvantaged persons is a major concern of the division.
Personnel are working to help local groups organize and operate educa-
tional programs to prepare disadvantaged persons for immediate employment.

8. Counties have reported rather extensive use of public relations media to
publicize vocational and technical education. The 67 counties reported
using the following media:

Number of
Counties

Radio 47
Television 24
Local newspaper 58
County vocational paper 2
Meetings with civic groups 54
Open house programs 40
Exhibits 46
School publications 43
Displays 47
Career day 42
Professional publications 16
News releases 17
Miscellaneous; including contests, surveys
circulars, craft committees and others.

Outstanding features of the business education program included the 134%
growth in enrollments in 1965 over 1964, the development of a new guide, and
the modernization and up-dating of curricula to meet current needs. A major
strength is the arrangement with universities to train teachers.. A major
weakness is the lack of sufficient minimum foundation program units to support
business education.

An outstanding feature of the program in distributive education is that it offers
opportunities to students at all levels. In the past year 446 junior high
school pupils, 3410 secondary enrollees, 2019 junior college students, and
19,575 adults participated in various programs. Major strengths of the state
program include its constant growth, the national reputation of the junior
college mid-management program, and the published guides for teachers. Major
weaknesses are the shortage of minimum foundation program units to support
distributive education programs and the shortage of teachers.


- 45 -









In health education outstanding features are expansion of the whole program
and employment of additional state personnel to give leadership and direction.
Long-range planning and continuous work on instructional materials and efforts
toward teacher improvement in practical nursing education are showing positive
results. Local advisory committees are active. However, guidelines for
training in more occupations should be established, instructional materials
are needed and teachers need help to improve their teaching because too many
are not adequately prepared. Better articulation between the high school and
junior colleges is needed to enable students to have easy access to health
education programs. Additional surveys are also needed to determine demands
and requirements in health occupations at present and in the years ahead.

An outstanding feature of the technical education program is the broad range
of offerings. Another outstanding strength is the excellent relationship
between industrial and educational personnel. The latter cooperate exten-
sively in planning for new and improved programs. A major weakness, however,
is the difficulty in recruiting sufficient qualified students. The state
department constantly strives to promote better understanding of technical
education and the role of the technician in the state's and nation's develop-
ment to counter this difficulty.

Perhaps the outstanding feature of the state program in industrial education
at this time is the planning and development of area vocational education
schools. The area schools will provide opportunities for vocational educa-
tion over and beyond those already existing in comprehensive high schools,
other vocational schools, junior colleges, and adult centers. When the new
area schools are completed, improved and expanded vocational offerings will
be within commuting distance of approximately 80% to 85% of the state's
population. As planning for the new area schools progresses, emphasis is
being placed upon the development of "educational specifications" as a pre-
requisite to architectural planning.

Another major strength of the state program in industrial education is the
outstanding ability of vocational personnel in local level leadership
positions. The steady growth can be attributed to the ability of local
administrators to promote, develop and operate such programs notwithstanding
handicaps.


- 46 -






Vocational Youth Organizational Activities and
The Program of Vocational Education


The Future Farmers of America continued active during the year. A state
forestry camp, a state convention, FFA Day at the State Fair, and the National
FFA Convention were activities aided by the state staff and attended by over
6000 youth. Other activities included the State Public Speaking and Parliamen-
tary Procedure Contest, a State Livestock Judging School, a State Livestock
Judging Contest, and participation on state land judging committees.

During the year sponsorship of the Future Business Leaders of America was
transferred to the state department. Membership in the club totals 1450.
A new staff position has been approved to have as one major responsibility
the FBLA program.

Interest is increasing in the distributive education clubs. The Florida
association had 1460 members and ranked 8th in the nation. The 1966 Lead-
ership Conference attracted nearly 500 participants. A delegation of 55
Florida youth attended the National Distributive Education Clubs of
America (DECA) meeting in Chicago.

The Florida Association of Management Education (FAME), an affiliate of
DECA, had its first leadership conference with over 100 students, coordi-
nators, and businessmen attending. The Florida mid-management contest
winners brought back to the state three national winners from the National
Post-Secondary DECA Conference. Florida DECA was successful in developing
the DECA Diamond Club program and was one of six states to contribute $500
to the national club.

The Future Homemakers of America was active to promote youth activities for
girls interested in home economics. Following are data regarding the
association:

Chapters 443
Members 19,292
Members attending state convention 1,126
Members attending national convention 47
State degree awards 26
Honor roll chapters 20
County councils 20


- 47 -





Advisory Committee Activities as They
Affect Vocational Education Programs


The use of advisory committees in vocational and technical education programs
was a special point for consideration in 1965-66. Counties reported the use
of committees as follows:

Number of Counties
Reporting

Number which used a general vocational-
technical advisory committee 16

Number which did not use a general
vocational-technical advisory committee 33

Number not reporting 18

Number which reported the use of advisory
committees in the following fields:

Vocational Agriculture 27
Distributive Education 19
Diversified Education 19
Health-Related Education 22
Home Economics Education 17
Industrial Education 24
Office Education 15
Technical Education 21

In addition to the above, 23 counties reported they used advisory committees
for specific occupations and 35 reported they did not.

The State Business Education Advisory Committee was active during the year.
Discussions included the following topics:

The Role of Advisory Committees
Junior College Development
Activities of the Florida Business Education Association
Business Teacher Training in Florida

A recommendation of the committee was the endorsement of summer programs for
teacher in-service and/or work-experience training.

The advisory committee for distributive education met during the year and
discussed the following topics:

What Coordinators Expect from Training Agencies
The Effect of the Minimum Wage Hike
The Sharp Delineation of Educational Services
The Vocational Education Act of 1963.


- 48 -





A member of the committee, who is an executive of the Winn-Dixie Stores,
reported 55% of distributive education students employed by his company will
attend college. Recommendations of the committee included the following:

1. The curriculum should emphasize economic fundamentals and proper work
attitudes

2. State and county personnel should establish more contact with industry
groups

3. Coordinators should join personnel associations

4. Opportunities in distributive fields should be emphasized in junior
colleges.

A state advisory committee is used in health occupations education. The com-
mittee gives state personnel suggestions for programs, program organization,
leadership, and provides a direct communication with many health professions
and with community leaders. Local advisory committees have also been organized
to help local administrators and teachers.

The technical education section is aided by a general advisory committee which
helps determine economic and sociological trends having implications for
technical education. The committee also helps the section gain public support.
The committee met May 30-April 2 with the state technical education staff.
Various suggestions and recommendations were made for the guidance of state
and local boards of education relative to improving technical education programs.

Consultants from Florida industries took part in the Eighth Annual Technical
Education Conference.

State advisory committees for industrial education in apprenticeship training,
REA job and safety training, peace officers training and commercial vehicle
driver training were utilized during the year to assist the staff in planning,
promoting, developing and operating the industrial education program and its
components.

Emphasis throughout the year was placed upon the utilization of local advisory
committees.

During the State Department and Local Vocational Administrators Leadership Con-
ference held in Clearwater in March, a meeting of the State Board Advisory
Council was held during which the activities of the division were reviewed and
areas of program emphasis for the 1966-67 school year discussed.

One advisory board meeting for the Research Coordinating Unit was held to
acquaint the members with:

1. The intent and purpost of the unit
2. The tentative program of work
3. The proposed budget for the unit
4. A report of accomplishments in light of objectives.


- 4? -










Personnel of the unit sought recommendations for new directions on program
emphasis.

The advisory board recommended that the unit

1. Continue to use the coordinative function as a basic guide
2. Consider including a Development Commission staff member on
the Advisory Board
3. Continue to release periodic newsletters including a section
on abstracts of recent occupational research
4. Maintain a close working relationship with the State Employment
Service to guard against duplication of effort in conducting
occupational surveys.


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C. 4









































TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA




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