• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Acknowledgement
 Foreword
 Table of Contents
 Main














Group Title: Its Bulletin
Title: Flexible scheduling
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00080858/00001
 Material Information
Title: Flexible scheduling a vehicle for change : a guide for Florida schools
Series Title: Its Bulletin
Physical Description: 28 p. : ill. ; 22 x 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Education
Publisher: The Department,
The Department
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Publication Date: 1972
Copyright Date: 1972
 Subjects
Subject: Schedules, School   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Bibliography: p. 26-28.
Statement of Responsibility: Florida Dept. of Education.
General Note: Cover title.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00080858
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AHR2831
oclc - 02702480
alephbibnum - 001637942

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page i
    Acknowledgement
        Page ii
    Foreword
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
    Main
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
Full Text





U

















ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS




The Department of Education expresses its appreciation to the
following Florida educators whose knowledge, talent, and
enthusiasm combined to produce this bulletin:

Mr. Bernard Kurland
Committee Chairman
Dr. Donald P. Altieri
Dr. Michael DeBloois
Mr. Allen Geyer
Mr. James Link
Mr. John Neller
Mr. Martin Rubinstein
Mr. Eric Whitted
Dr. Mary Zellner


It was the privilege of the staff members of the Department of
Education, especially those in the Bureau of Curriculum and
Instruction, to assist this committee in producing this bulletin.




" 1! rd I-'


foreword


We are living in an era of rapid change. Change is evident in all
facets of our society. Even though public schools are changing, the
society in general is changing at a more rapid rate and thus the gap
between the society and the function of the school is increasing.
Public education must be concerned about developing systems for
keeping abreast of the changes in society as well as providing the
necessary leadership to implement the needed changes.
Flexibility in school organization is needed if public education is
to continue to survive and provide a meaningful education for the
1980's.
This guide is offered as a preliminary step in helping educators to
think about not only their existing program and its ability to provide an
adequate education, but also to offer a system for making meaningful
change if the existing program is not adequately meeting the needs of
the students.
This is a working document-not an end product. You are
encouraged to use it and modify it to develop the best program of
instruction utilizing people and resources in a flexible manner.


cr _' `n ? K























RATIONALE


OBJECTIVE OF
GUIDE




ASSESS EXISTING

CIRCUMSTANCES




CAN YOUR
PRESENTPROGRAM
IMPROVE YOUR
b SITUATION


EASILY
SATISFIED
AREN'T YOU


DESIGN TIME
ARRANGEMENTS FOR
YOUR PROGRAM



AREYOU
FAMILIAR WITH
VARIOUS STAFFING
ARRANGEMENT




PLAN STAFFING

ARRANGEMENTS




ARE YOU
FAMILIAR WITH
ALTERNATIVE SPACE
1, ARRANGEMENTS_


STUDY STAFFING

ARRANGEMENTS


STUDY SPACE

ARRANGEMENTS


PLAN SPACE
UTILIZATION


ASSESS NEEDS

ESTABLISH GOALS




ARE YOU
HAVING DIFFICULT
ESTABLISHING
GOALS




DEVELOP YOUR

OBJECTIVES




DOES
YOUR PRESENT
PROGRAM SUPPORT
THESE
k GOALS


YOU
RFAnY


STUDY MODULE
'DEVELOPING
GOALS'


ARE YOU A
TEACHER


- ARE q
YOU A TEAM
LEADER


rAaa
THIS GUIDE TO
SOMEONE ELSE


'ARE YOU AN'
DMINISTRATO


APPROPRIATE
PROCESS OR


TALK TO COLLEAG
TEAM LEADERS
ADMINISTRATORS



DISCUSS GUIDE
WITH
ADMINISTRATORS


GET FACULTY


INVOLVED


PLAN YOUR

PROGRAM


FARE YOU-
FAMILIAR WITH
ALTERNATIVE USE
OF TIME


I UUY
VARIOUS TIME
ARRANGEMENTS


IF READY -
OPERATIONALIZE
USING THE GUIDE
AS A VEHICLE










RATIONALE


Educators throughout Florid;
change. There is.a growing recogn
methodologies of proceeding dec
and curriculum are not necessarily
tomorrow. There is an increasing
alternative programs designed to p
with the dramatic societal changes
INDIVIDUALIZED learning
Varied SCHEDULING and STAFF
CURRICULUM REVISION must
reader interested in alternatives
students should find the Guide h
means of helping to break the
effort experienced when teachers
for the same amount of time.
The suggested changes wil
teachers and students to spend tir
need it.
Your first encounter with tl
exercise. It is suggested that you
making notes as necessary. Do
answer questions in detail.
This Guide is designed for us
school situations. You may wish t(
group-perhaps a total school I
individually.


Given a perception of the
students, staff and community rer
goals of the school, design a progi
which will result in a more flexible


re concerned about and involved in
)n that the idealogies, statutes, and
es relative to school organization
plicable today, nor appropriate for
demand for educators to provide
3are youth with the ability to cope
visioned for the years ahead.
)ortunities need to be increased.
NG concepts as well as significant
e studied as possible routes. The
fearing educational advantages to
ful. This Guide is offered as one
otonous expenditure of time and
d students meet each subject daily

provide more opportunities for
where and how they perceive they

Guide should be as an academic
ad through the Guide completely,
attempt to gather resources or

i elementary, middle, or secondary
advance through this activity with a
ulty, community and youth-or


of circumstances in your school,
sentatives will determine the major
h and implement a change process
;e of time, space and staff.
















First, assess your school sitL
appropriate records and accura
below.

1. Total enrollment.
2. Percent of pupils repeating a
3. Number of discipline problem
4. Number of pupil emotional
academic expectations.
5. Number of pupils who routir
6. Number of students who "d
7. Number of apparently very
of knowledge who never fini:
8. Number of dollars lost by p
last year.
9. Number of pupils who fail
pencils-needed for daily act
10. Number of pupils and teach
clipping file, periodicals.
11. Number of parents who asst
fund instructional programs.
12. Number of pupils utilizing I
13. The number of pupils who "


on. Please do a little research into
r complete the assessment scale


de one time.

oblems stemming from unrealistic

r go to the clinic.
Iream" often.
able students with rich background
assigned written tasks.
I failures or absence in your school

iave working tools,-paper, books,
ies.
who make use of filmstrips, slides,

i the leadership roles to adequately

time.
pped out" of school.


CAN YOUR PRESENT
ORGANIZATION WITH ITS
CURRENT CURRICULUM, USE NO
OF SPACE, DAILY SCHEDULE,
AND EXISTING STAFFING
PATTERN EFFECTIVELY
IMPROVE THE SITUATION VOU
HAVE JUST ASSESSED?



4

YES
















If you actually believe that you resent organization can effectively
improve your educational program then you need not proceed further
than this page. However, if u are not satisfied that your
organizational structure will bring out desired improvement, then
resume working through the Gui




GOALS


It is important for a schc
important because they repress
community. The activities of th
these goals. Here are some exampi
Goals for Students:
Will develop skills in coi
Will develop increasingly
Will become an effectivE
Will accept increasing rn
learning.
Will develop those skill!
group living and democr

Goals for Faculty:
Are continuous learners
Assume responsibility f(
Facilitate growth in coil
Recognize community
educative process.

You have been given example
which are generally acceptable. I
own list of goals. Include any of tl
seem appropriate.

If you are having difficult
developing your goals, turn to pa


to have stated goals. Goals are
general agreement in a school
school must be selected to reflect
)f goals.


unication and computation.
sitive perceptions of himself.
e-long learner.
onsibility for his own behavior and

id attitudes necessary for effective
c interaction.




he total school program.
ues.
nd parents as partners in the



f student and faculty general goals
e space provided below make your
e listed on the previous page which



6.































Develop your goals, then turn to page 9.


Do you have a written statement of
your school's goals?


You may very well be the object of
the analogy which compares a
school without a philosophy of
education to a ship at sea without
navigation equipment.


This statement is most likely a
statement of school PHILOSOPHY.
Take it down from the shelf and
re-read it carefully.


Does it reflect the needs of your
changing community and students?


1


INU


* YES


II~


III






NO


The staff should survey the desires
of the community, the opinions of
students and their own professional
judgment about the purpose of
public education, and then write a
statement of educational
philosophy.


The statement of philosophy
should be re-written. The total
staff, community, and student
body should have a part in its
formulation.




I


You should now have a written
statement of the educational
philosophy of the school which is
relevant and current!!

You must disseminate this
statement to members of the
community and student body and
ask if they agree that it represents
the larger mission of the school.



YES Do you have consensus? ---


Now, based on the school
philosophy, begin writing the goals
you hope to accomplish.


You may continue if you desire,
however, your chances of
successfully achieving your goals
will be reduced. We suggest you
recycle and write a statement of
philosophy on which consensus can
be gained.


YES Are your goals clearly written?
YES1 Are your goals clearly written?-i


Check the goals against the school's
philosophy to determine their
consistency.


Discuss with your colleagues both the
products you desire and the process you
feel should be initiated to achieve those
products. Check both the process and
product goals against your philosophy for
consistency.


IU I


T C








You now have a set of educational goals
which must be operationalized to be of
any further value-that is, these goals
must be stated in such a manner that you
describe what the student will be doing
when the goal has been achieved.


--


Expand your set of goal statements into a
set of more specific instructional
objectives which are stated in terms of
the learner. There are resources available
which will assist your writing these
objectives should you need such
assistance.



Are the instructional objectives consistent
with the process and product goals
written previously? Are they
comprehensive enough to cover the
learning domains suggested in the goal
statements?

Are they consistent with the educational
philosophy of the school?


I "O


Do you have a set of instructional
objectives which the teaching staff,
students and representative community
groups agree are appropriate for your
school?

YES


At last you have arrived at the point
where you should make some decisions
about MEANS. Until now you have been
talking about what you hope to
accomplish-the ENDS you hope to
achieve.


Perhaps you need to do some re-writing
so that the instructional objectives you
propose for students are consistent with
the stated philosophy and mission of the
school.

V NO

REVISION MUST CONTINUE UNTIL A
CONSENSUS CAN BE OBTAINED,
otherwise program development will lack -
the support necessary for successful
implementation.


YES


II


=.A

















The activities of your ii
to reflect your school goals. Youi
practices and activities. The foil
goals previously identified.


Each student is provii
requirements to achie
communicative and con
Each student helps dial
learning goals and activi
Major emphasis is upon
solutions as an instruct,
Students will determine
spent for at least a porti
Students will particips
decision making activity

Develop other objectives in the
goals you identified.


ructional program must be selected
aals must be translated into specific
ing student objectives reflect the




with opportunities or
survival skills in the
national areas.
e and prescribe his own

oblem identification and
I procedure.
w their activities will be
of the day.
in group planning and



ice provided below to reflect the


Whe yo hve ompetd dve inyorbjcietnpa.


When you have completed deve


ing your objectives, turn page.












NO


Is your present
program effectively
these goals?


YES


If you have proceeded this far ii
that the present educational sysl
alternative methods of educating
expenditure of your time and eff


the Guide and you are convinced
needs neither critical review nor
lildren, it is unlikely that further
in the Guide will be very fruitful.


The following are some activ
the objectives you have listed previ
Now match the suggested ac1
added, that may be used to achieve


suggested as means of achieving


may have


uPlease give the Guide to someone
r 7Y feel might benefit from its use.








LI

LI


LI

LI

LI

LI

LI

LI


O


Students wh

Students who are immatt

Certification regulate

Accreditation standards

Technological difficulties

Aides in the classroom

INVESTIGATION WILL FINE
BARRIERS TO INDIVIDUAL
SCHOOL ORGANIZATIONAL


Change the length of periods.
Provide unstructured time for
students.
Use small group discussion.
Change length of school day.
Bring additional adults into
the classroom to assist.
Use self-instructional materials
which encourage students to
pace themselves.
Remove a wall to provide
more flexible space.
Establish behavorial
objectives.
Provide for Planning time.
Develop learning resource
centers.
Provide open laboratories.
List Other Activities


re difficult to manage
Technological difficulties
of Scheduling
s
Technological difficulties
of scheduling

Carnegie units
State statutes

HAT THESE ISSUES ARE NOT
INTERESTED IN IMPROVING
PICTURES.
















Now that you have develop
you may find it desirable to revi
If your present program does r
new design should take into
curriculum development, as
manipulator of variables to indiv
When you have developed
to consider its demands for flexi


Reserved for your reflections:


your goals, objectives and activities,
your present instructional program.
reflect these objectives, then your
consideration the teacher's role in
facilitator of learning and as a
alize learning.
ir.new curriculum, you will be ready
use of time, space and staff.


Now that you have completed
constructing your time
arrangements, please turn to page 20.







I


This module is designed to give you
examples of how time can be
manipulated to meet curriculum
needs.


Simplified Block Schedule
Framework: Traditional schedule
Two or more teachers in a team are given identical
schedules with a common planning period.
Encourages cooperative planning eliminates
duplication of effort and creates opportunity for
professional growth. Students profit from more
varied learning experiences such as large group
instruction, small group discussion and
independent study.


Period


Teacher A
English II
Section I
(30 pupils)


Teacher A
English III
Section I
(30 pupils)


Teacher B
English II
Section II
(30 pupils)


Teacher B
English III
Section II
(30 pupils)


Planning Period Teachers A & B


Turn Page







Back-to-Back


Frame work: Traditional schedule

Interdisciplinary teams of teachers (Example, two
English and two social studies) are scheduled for
two periods with average class load (120). Basically
the same as Simple Block Schedule except greater
opportunities for flexible time, student, staff and
teaching mode arrangements.


Period


Teacher A
Eng. II
Sec. 1
(30 pupils)


Teacher A
II Eng. II
Sec. 3
(30 pupils)


Teacher B
Eng. II
Sec. 2
(30 pupils)


Teacher C
S.S. II
Sec 3


Teacher D
S.S. II
Sec. 4


(30 pupils) (30 pupils)


Teacher C Teacher D
S.S. II S.S. II
Sec. 1 Sec. 2
(30 pupils) (30 pupils)


Inter-disciplinary schedules


Framework: Traditional schedule

Designed for small schools-two teachers of
different disciplines have a three-period block of
time. On any given day the teachers have the
option to incorporate teaching modes as they see
fit (large group instruction, small group discussion
or independent study).


School Wide Block Schedule


Framework: Modular schedule

Fundamentally requires team teaching in the case
subjects (English-social studies, math-science). The
school day may be divided into twenty 20-minute
modules with each case team assigned four
modules each. Team can allocate tine, space and
talent.


I




20 Minute Grade 7 Grade 8 Grade 9
Modules

1-4 Mathematics Language Arts Humanities
Science Social Science Foreign Language


5-8 Occupational Ed. Mathematics Language Arts
Physical Education Science Social Science


9-12 Humanities Occupational Ed. Mathematics
Foreign Language Physical Education Science


13-16 Lunch, Band, Choir, Club Meetings, Independent Study


17-20


Language Arts Humanities Occupational Ed.
Social Science Foreign Language Physical Education


Open-Lab Schedule


Framework: Modular schedule

English-social studies and math-science teams meet
with all grade levels at different time of the day.
Use of time in each four 20-minute module time
block is left to the teams involved. Each student
has a block of time called Related Arts involving
many elective subjects, allowing students another
dimension: student decision making.


20 Minute
Modules Eng. -S.S. Math-Science Related Arts-I.S.

1- 4 Grade 9 Grade 7 Grade 8

6-8 I Z"nIj I
6-8 L Grade 7 Grade 8 Grade 9

9-10 Lunch

11 -14 Grade 8 Grade 9 Grade 7

15 18 Student Non-Structured Time for "Core" Related Arts, Band, Choir
and Independent Study.








Rotating Schedules


Framework: Traditional schedule

Many alternatives can be designed into this
type of schedule.


a. Each day, the last hour class is
rotated, with the exception of the
fourth period.


Period M T W T F


I 1 2 3 5 6
II 2 3 5 6 1
III 3 5 6 1 2
IV 4 4 4 4 4
V 5 6 1 2 3
VI 6 1 2 3 5



b. A seven-period day in a traditional
six-period day, including one or
more activity periods.

Period M T W T F

I 1 7 6 5 4
II 2 x 7 6 5
III 3 2 1 7 6
IV 4 3 2 1 7
V 5 4 3 y 1
VI 6 5 4 3 2




c. Use of a rotating schedule with
variable time blocks.


Per Period M T W T F

45 1 6 5 4 1
45 2 1 6 5 3
60 3 2 1 6 4
60 4 3 2 1 5
90 5 4 3 2 6









d. Traditional schedule can be made
more flexible by combining class
periods on various days instead of
rotating.



Period M T W T F

I 1 1 1 2 2
II 2 2 2
III 3 3 3 3
IV 4 4 4 4
V 5 5 5 5
VI 6 6 6 6







Period M T W T F


I1 1 2 2 1
II 2
III 3 3 4 3 4
IV 4
V 5 6 5 5 6
VI 6
VII 7 8 7 7 8
VIII 8


Block Modular Schedule


Framework: Modular schedule

It is possible to combine an alternate day schedule
with variable blocks of time and modules. Sections
of 100 students are organized so that different
course offerings can be made within a grade. Basic
courses offered daily-others every other day.


Turn Page











15 Minute Grade 7 Grade 8 Grade 9
Modules I II III IV I II III IV I 11 III IV



1 Lang. Health Math English
2 Math P.E. Occ. Humanities S.S.
3 Science Lang. Type
5 English Science
6 English
S. S. Humanities p. E. Occ. Ma thh
7 Lang. Type S. S.
8 Science S.S.
9 Health Lang. English Scnhce
11 English S. Typ Lang. P.E. Occ. Humanities
12 Math s I
13 Lang. Health Math
14 1 Humanities P. E. Occ.
15 Science Typ Lang. English S. S. Science
16
17
18 Clubs Choir Clubs Choir Clubs Choir
19 Orchestra I. S. Orchestra I S. Orchestra I. S.
20 Band Lunch Band Lunch Band Lunch
21
22 Math
23 Health Lang. English Science
24 E. Occ. Humanities English Typ
25 S.S. TypeI Lang.
26 Math S. S. M
27 Health Lang. Math
28 Humanities P. E. Occ. Science L T English Science
29 Lang. Type
_________ ___________ S.S. _____


Alternate Day Schedule




15 Minute Grade 7 Grade 8 Grade 9
Modules I II III Iv I II III IV I II III IV



SEnglish
1 Lang. Type Math S.S.
2 Math Occ. P. E. Humanities
3 Science Lang. Health
4 English Science
SS Lang. Type English
7 S.. Humanities p.E. Occ. E i
8 Lang. IHealth Science S.
9 Math
10 Type Lang. English English Science
11 S.S. Health Lang.
12 Math S.S.
13
13 Lang. I Type Math
14 Science Humanities p.E. Occ.
16 S.S.
17
18 Clubs Choir Clubs Choir Clubs Choir
19 Orchestra I. S. Orchestra I.S. Orchestra I.S.
20 Band Lunch Band Lunch Band Lunch
21
22 Math
23 Occ. P.E. Humanities English Englih
25 S.S. Health |
25 S.S.
26 Math Type Math
27 Maie
28 Humanities Occ. P. E. Science
29 ng Health English Science
29 Lang. Health S.S.











Flexible Modular Schedule


Framework: Modular schedule

Schedule allows for varying size of groups
according to the needs of a teaching mode with
appropriate amount of time. Provides opportunity
for large class activities, small group discussion and
independent study. Schedule is difficult to
generate manually and usually involves the use of a
computer. Generally, no class meets five days a
week and often no two days are alike. Some classes
are longer than others. A portion of the student's
day is unscheduled. This time is used for
independent study, meetings with counselors and
teachers, research and "open labs."


Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday


World World Biology 2 World
Geography Geography Small Group Geography English 3
Small Group Small Group or Small Group Small group
Room 110 Room 110 Lab Room 110 Room 111
Room 126
I.S. I.S. I.S.
I.S.
(Pupil Options) I.S.
Open Lab Art I Physical Science Art I
I'M.C. Room 118 Large Group Room 118 Physical Science
Lounge Le Gou Small Group
Art Room 203 or Lab
etc. I.S. I.S. Room 206
I.S.
Lunch Lunch Lunch Lunch

I.S. I.S.
Lunch Language .S.
Math 2 Math 2 Lab
Large Group Large Group _
Room 119 Room 119 English 3 Small
Small Group
I.S. English 3 Small Group Room 201
Physical Large Group Room 111 World Geography
Science Room 121
Small Group --- I.S. I.S. Large Group
or Lab Biology 2 Room 126
Room 206 Small Group
o br an Biology 2p e
I.S. or Lab Large Group I.S.
Room 126 Room 126

French I Math 2 French I Math 2 French I
Room 109 Small Group Room 109 Small Group Room 109
Room 201 Room 201



Go back to page 12 and design your own time patterns.













YES


Are you familiar with alternative
staffing arrangements?


NO


Paraprofessional

Volunteer Help

Team Teaching


Differentiated Staffing
Horizontal Differentiation


Vertical Differentiation


Interns


On page 26 are some inexpensive
references you may receive to help
you in developing the appropriate
staff organization to meet the needs
of your curriculum.


PLAN
STAFFING
ARRANGEMENTS












YES


Are you familiar with
alternative space arrangements?


NO


Resource Center


Large Group Activity Areas


Seminar Rooms


Open Lab


Media Center


On page 26-27 are inexpensive
references you may review to
develop appropriate space
arrangement to meet the needs of
your curriculum.


PLAN SPACE
UTILIZATION






Take it away!


YOU ARE READY


Get the show on the road!"


Right On!


to begin making these needed changes


OPERATIONALIZE'!!


Go man, go!


Get with it, then!


YES


YES


YES
Turn to page 24


TEACHERS!


1. Consider these activities for yourself
a. Modifying your time pattern.
b. Rearranging furniture.
c. Grouping your students according to


UP with the curtain"


F/1 Stea ahead,







interest or readiness.
d. Using the more capable students to help
the less capable.
e. Moving freely about the room as one of
the resources to the groups.
f. Letting your students use the media.
g. Giving students unstructured time.
h. Obtaining and use more varied materials
and media.
i. Letting your students keep you plan
units of study and/or activities.
j. Developing small discussion groups
within each class
k. Developing inquiry activities

2. Talk to your colleagues.
3. Talk to your team leader.
4. Talk to your administrators and supervisors.
5. Talk to yourself-Honestly!


TEAM LEADER!


1. Obtain support from your administration to
gather resources suggested in the Bibliography
and work through the Guide with your
team-get a commitment for action.

2. Discuss the Guide with administrators and
supervisors and obtain commitment for
support for:
a. A -school-wide curriculum study
committee.
b. Teaming with your colleagues to develop
your plan for implementation.

3. Look at the teacher's page, item 1,-can your
team implement some of those ideas!

4. Request:
a. Consultants
b. Inter-school visitations
c. Staff development activities









SCHOOL ADMINISTRATOR!



1. Initiate a faculty steering committee to study how the concepts in
the Guide might be applied to your school. The committee should
be made up of the inexperienced, representative of all the subject
areas and grade levels.


The following items are suggested
discussions.

How much flexibility?

Student participation?

Curriculum changes?

Changed roles of student teachers?

Community expectations?


as possible topics for committee



Staff development activities?

Community school planning?

Support Services?

Inventory faculty skills?

Evaluation?


2. Look at the teacher's page Item 1. Can you encourage your
teachers' individually and/or collectively to consider
implementing any of these ideas?

3. Talk to central staff.

4. Talk to your colleagues.

5. Talk to yourself-honestly!

6. Offer continuous encouraging positive and dynamic leadership!















If you have read this far in the Guide then
you must have identified some area that need
change in your classroom and/or school.

Use the Guide as a vehicle to plan and
organize for change.




















This Guide will be of greater value when accompanied by written,
audio, video, and human resources not included in the package itself.
Before you go through the Guide in a work session you should identify
resources which will be of most use in the particular format you have
adopted. If you are working in a group you may wish to acquire films
or slide-tape presentations to complement this package. The services of
a consultant to participate in the activity might also be of some worth.
If you are working alone or in a small group you will probably want to
use monographs, journal articles, and position papers as additional
sources.









Here are some additional resources you may find useful!

PAMPHLETS

Time

Flexible Scheduling, Educational Research Council of America, Cleveland

The Flexibly Scheduled School of 1980. I/D/E/A Occasional Paper, Box 446,
Melbourne, Florida

Providing for Flexible Scheduling and Instruction, Swenson and Keys, Successful
School Management Series, Prentice-Hall, Inc.
Space

Educational Change and Architectural Consequences, Educational Facilities
Laboratories, Inc., 477 Madison Avenue, New York

Schools Without Walls, Educational Facilities Laboratories, Inc., 477 Madison
Avenue, New York

Staff

How to Organize an Effective Team Teaching Proaram. Harold S. Davis,
Successful School Management Series, Prentice-Hall, Inc.

Planning A Team Teaching Program, Educational Research Council, Cleveland

Team Teaching, A Selected Bibliography, Educational Research Council,
Cleveland

Organization for Instruction, Alexander, Project Ideals; Florida, Educational
Research and Development Council, Gainesville

Staff Selection. Education and Utilization, Cunningham, Project Ideals, Florida
Educational Research and Development Council, Gainesville

Curriculum

Independent Activities for Creative Learning. Darrow and Van Allen, Teachers
College Press, Columbia University

Curriculum and Instruction Practices for Continous Learner Progress, Haas,
Project Ideals, Florida Educational Research and Development Council,
Gainesville

Use of Organized Knowledge, Rogers, Project Ideals, Florida Education Research
and Development Council, Gainesville.







Environment

Man, Media and Machines, NOTE, NEA, Washington, D. C.

Organizing a Learning Center, Education Research Center of America, Cleveland

Instructional Materials Center, An Annotated Bibliography, Educational
Research Council, Cleveland

Resources for Learning, Breivogel, Project Ideals, Florida Educational Research
and Development Council, Gainesville

Students

Learning in Small Groups, Glatthorn, I/D/E/A Reprint Series, Box 446,
Melbourne, Florida

Independent Study, An Annotated Bibliography, Educational Research Council,
Cleveland

Independent Study. Bold New Venture, Beggs and Buffie, Indiana University
Press

General

Teaching Innovations. Educational Research Council of America, Cleveland

How to Organize a Non-Graded School, Howard and Bardwell, Successful School
Management Series, Prentice Hall

How to Enhance Individuality in Learning. I/D/E/A Occasional Paper, Box 446,
Melbourne, Florida

Innovations in the Elementary Schools, I/D/E/A Occasional Paper, Box 446,
Melbourne, Florida

Administrative Organization, Kimbrough and Andes, Project Ideals, Florida
Educational Research and Development Council, Gainesville

Educational Applications of Instructional Computer Systems, Hansen and Jamor,
Project Ideals, Florida Educational Research and Development Council,
Gainesville

A New Design for High School Education, Assuming a Flexible Schedule, Bush
and Allen, McGraw-Hill Book Company

Focus on Change, J. Lloyd Trump, NEA, Washington, D. C.


BOOKS

Innovations at Claremont High School, Dr. Halsey P. Taylor, An Approach to
Flexible Scheduling, Claremont School District, Claremont, California 1966










Individualizing Learning Through Modular-Flexible Programming, Gaynor
Petrequin, McGraw-Hill Book Co., New York

The Flexibly Scheduled High School. W. Deane Wiley & Floyd K. Bishop, Parker
Publishing Co., Inc., West Nyack, New York

Flexible Schedulina. Donald C. Manlone & David W. Beggs, III, Bold New
Venture, Indiana University Press, Bloomington, Illinois

The Appropriate Placement School, B. Frank Brown, Parker Publishing Co., West
Nyack, New Jersey

Providing for Flexbilitv in Scheduling and Instruction, Gardner Swenson &
Donald Keys, Prentice-Hall, Inc., Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey 1966

Innovations in Secondary Education. Glenys G. Unruh & William M. Alexander,
Holt, Rinehart and Winston, Inc., New York, New York 1970

Changing Classroom Behavior. Merle T. Meachum, Allen E. Wiessen.
International Textbook Co., Scranton, Pa. 1969. (200 pages)

Individualizing Educational Systems. Lloyd K. Bishop. Harper & Row, Publishers
New York. 1970. (270 pages)

Developing Attitude Toward Learning. Robert F. Mager. Fearon Publishers, Palo
Alto, California (104 pages)

The Schools Within A School Program. Robert D. Ramsey, Owen M.
Jenson, Harold T. Hula. Parker Publishing Co., Inc. West Nyack, New York.
1967. (242 pages)

FILMS

"Make a Mighty Reach"

"Team Teaching in the Elementary School"

"Learning Through Inquiry" IDEA, P. O. Box 446, Melbourne, Florida 32901

How to Provide Personalized Education in the Public Schools (5 Film Series),
Special Purpose Films, 26740 Latigo Shore Drive, Malibu, California




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