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 Report of the committee














Title: Report of the Committee appointed by the Postmaster General to investigate the condition of the postal service on the island of Porto Rico
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 Material Information
Title: Report of the Committee appointed by the Postmaster General to investigate the condition of the postal service on the island of Porto Rico
Physical Description: 37 p., 2leaves : ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Committee to Investigate the Condition of the Postal Service on the Island of Porto Rico
Stuart, James E
Publisher: Office of the Postmaster General
Place of Publication: Washington
Publication Date: 1898
 Subjects
Subject: Postal service -- Puerto Rico   ( lcsh )
Post office stations and branches -- Cuba   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
General Note: James E. Stuart, Chairman of the Committee.
General Note: Excerpts concerning military stations in Cuba, Porto Rico, and Philippine Islands affixed to two leaves between pages 8 & 9.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00080799
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002441315
oclc - 29982977
notis - AME6521

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Title Page
        Page 2
    Report of the committee to investigate postal service in Porto Rico
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Report of the committee
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 8a
        Page 8b
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
Full Text


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REPORT

OF THE

COMMITTEE APPOINTED BY THE POSTMASTER,
GENERAL TO INVESTIGATE THE CONDITION
OF THE POSTAL SERVICE ON THE
ISLAND OF PORTO- RICO.


NOVEMBER 11, 1898.


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R E P 0 1 T

OF THE

COMMITTEE APPOINTED BY THE POSTMASTER-
GENERAL TO INVESTIGATE THE CONDITION
OF THE POSTAL SERVICE ON THE
ISLAND OF PORTO RICO.


NOVEMBER 11, 1898.














REPORT


OF THE

COMMITTEE TO INVESTIGATE POSTAL SERVICE IN PORTO RICO.



ORDER APPOINTING COMMITTEE.

OFFICE OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL,
OR RWashington, D. C., August 27, 1898.
ORDER NO. 368.]
Maj. James E. Stuart, of the inspectors' division; Charles F. Trotter,
of the salary and allowance division; John M. Masten, of the Railway
Mail Service; and William M. Mooney, of the finance division, are
hereby detailed as a committee to proceed to Porto Rico, and investi-
gate and report upon the conditions, operations, and requirements of
the postal service on that island. Major Stuart will act as chairman
of the committee, and M. A. Macdonald, of the contract division, is
hereby designated to accompany the committee as clerk. Instructions
defining the duties and powers of the committee will be issued
hereafter.
CH. EMORY SMITH,
Postmaster- General.


LETTER OF INSTRUCTIONS TO COMMITTEE.

AUGUST 27, 1898.
SIRS: You have been severally detailed, by Order No. 368 of this
date, as a committee to proceed to Porto Rico, for the purpose of examin-
ing into and reporting upon the conditions, operations, and require-
ments of the postal service of that island.
You have been chosen from the various branches of the service in
order that all may be represented, and that the inquiry may be made
complete and comprehensive.
You will examine fully into the postal service of Porto Rico, both as
it has been and still may be conducted under the Spanish system, and
as it has been modified in those portions of the island within the occu-
pation of the American forces. You will inquire into the extent and
efficiency with which it is still operated, into the administration of the
post-offices, the collection and delivery of the mail, the money-order
and registration systems, the carrier and transportation methods, the
number, efficiency, and pay of the employees in the various branches,
and all other matters pertaining to the service. The inquiry will include
an investigation into the sources and amount of the revenue and its
relations to the expenditures.





4 REPORT OF THE PORTO RICO POSTAL COMMITTEE.

You will examine especially into the measures which may be necessary
in making the existing service conform as far as practicable to the rules
and regulations which govern the postal service in the United States.
In the prosecution of your inquiry you may find that the existing
service can be improved by immediate steps which are practicable and
warranted under the law. In that case you are authorized to direct
that the action which you may deem expedient shall be taken, and the
direction will be executed by Mr. H. M. Robinson, who is the postal
superintendent in charge in Porto Rico, and who is to be recognized and
conferred with as such. Any such action will be promptly reported.
It is to be borne in mind that our postal service is established in
Porto Rico only by virtue of military occupation, is subject to military
regulation, and is extended only as additional territory comes into pos-
session of our military forces. It is authorized by the act of Congress
approved June 6, 1898, entitled "An act to authorize the establish-
ment of post-offices at military posts or camps," and by the order of the
President dated July 21, copies of which accompany these instructions.
While the post-offices or stations created under the authority of the
Department are established primarily to handle the mails to and from
the land and naval forces of the United States, they will also carry on
the general postal service of the communities in which they are located.
As the American occupation advances this service will be extended.
In those portions of the island not yet in the possession of the Ameri-
can forces the service presumably continues as heretofore, and it is
expected that all legitimate means will be employed to facilitate
intercommunication.
Major Stuart is designated as chairman of the committee, and all
official communications will come through him. The committee will
report from time to time as may be necessary and will present a com-
plete report on the conclusion of its labors.
Very respectfully,
CH. EMORY SMITH,
Maj. JAMES E. STUART, Postmaster-General.
Mr. CHARLES F. TROTTER,
Mr. JOHN M. MASTEN,
Mr. WILLIAM M. MOONEY.



INSTRUCTIONS TO SUPERINTENDENT OF SERVICE IN PORTO RICO.

OFFICE OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL,
Washington, D. C., August 30, 1898.
SIR: Herewith inclosed I hand you copy of the order of the Post-
master-General and accompanying instructions, recently issued, desig-
nating a committee of Post-Office Department officials who will proceed
at once to Porto Rico.
In these instructions you will notice that the committee will confer
with you as superintendent of the military stations in Porto Rico. If
you find it necessary to temporarily absent yourself from station No. 1,
you are authorized to leave it in charge of an assistant and to visit
San Juan and other stations, spending what time may be necessary, in
your judgment, at each of them for the purpose of satisfactorily organ-
izing the postal service of the island.
You will accept instructions from Major Stuart, chairman of the






REPORT OF THE PORTO RICO POSTAL COMMITTEE. 5

committee, so long as the committee remains upon the island, reporting
as heretofore direct to the Department.
- If you deem it essential to the best interests of the postal service to
make your headquarters at San Juan, you will so advise the Depart-
ment, giving reasons.
You will advise with the committee in reference to the necessary
expenses incurred in carrying out these instructions.
Yours, respectfully,
PERRY S. HEATH,
Mr. H. M. ROBINSON, Acting Postmaster-General.
Superintendent Militi,,ry Station No. 1, Porto Rico.



ORDER APPOINTING ADDITIONAL MEMBER OF COMMITTEE.

OFFICE OF THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL,
Washington, D. C., September 8, 1898.
ORDER NO. 381.]
Ordered, Mr. D. H. Fenton, of the office of the Auditor for the Post-
Office Department, is hereby appointed a member of the committee to
investigate the postal service in Porto Rico. Order No.,368, of August
27, 1898, is modified accordingly. PERRY S. HEATH,
Acting Postmaster- General.
















REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE.


WASHINGTON, D. C., November 11, 1898.
SIR: In compliance with your order of-August 27, 1898, No. 368,
the committee appointed by you therein, consisting of Maj. James
E. Stuart (chairman), Charles F. Trotter, John M. Masten, William
M. Mooney, with M. A. Macdonald as secretary, and D. H. Fenton,
an additional member of the committee appointed by your order of
August 30, 1898, has visited Porto Rico, and has made an exhaustive
inquiry into the postal service of that island, both as it was conducted
under the Spanish system and as it has been performed during the
occupation of the island by the American forces and as it is now being
performed, the entire island being in the possession of the United
States authorities, and has the honor to submit for your consideration
the following report, together with such recommendations as it has
deemed proper to make:
The committee sailed from New York August 31, 1898, on the trans-
port Seneca, and after an uneventful voyage arrived at San Juan on
the morning of September 6, 1898. After landing, a visit was made
to the postal authorities in San Juan, the capital of the island, and an
interview was had with the administrator general de correos, Don
Jos6 Octaviano de Herrera, the officer in charge of the mail and tele-
graph service of the island, who received the committee with all pos-
sible courtesy and volunteered to furnish to the committee, and through
it to the Department, all the information desired, which, we are pleased
to state, was done under his direction, and the information thus obtained
is embodied in this report.
We find that the mail service and the telegraph service were under
the supervision of the same officials, the two services having been con-
solidated in 1886, for the purpose, it is understood, of reducing expenses.
At the capital, San Juan, were the principal offices of the service, and
the officials charged with its general administration consisted, first,
of an inspector-general of telegraphs and administrator-general, the
two offices being combined in one person, and second, an interventor-
general.
The duty of the first-named officer was the general supervision of
the service in all its branches, while the duties of the second were that
of a general executive officer.
The duties of the administration were divided among four bureaus,
termed negociados," each under the charge of a designated official.
To the first bureau was delegated matters relative to the hiring
and discharge of employees, transfers, regulations governing promo-
tions, punishment for insubordination or improper conduct among the
employees, and estimates of expenses; also matters relative to con-
6





REPORT OF THE PORTO RICO POSTAL COMMITTEE.


struction and official and private telephones, the school of apprentices
and examinations for entrance into the service, as well as the custody
of the archives of the bureau.
To the second bureau were delegated matters relating to service,
inspection of telegraph lines and stations, general and partial repairs,
sketches of stations, statistics and relations with the railroad company,
matters relating to the transmission of telegrams, discontinuance and
changes of the service, claims for compensation for extraordinary
service, remedies for defects in the service, telegraphic franchises,
catalogues of stations and post-offices, postal telegraphic conventions
(domestic and international), consideration of claims for losses in the
mails, contracts for the carrying of land and maritime mails, disci-
plining of carriers on postal lines served by contractors, daily reports
and establishment of postal-service schedules for land and maritime
routes, extraordinary service caused by the obstruction of roads, the
use of the mail service for smuggling purposes, the use of stamps
already canceled, the compilation of the annual report, and the custody
of the archives of the bureau.
The matters delegated to the third bureau were the planning and
construction of new lines and branches, the planning and establish-
ment of new stations, examination and purchase of office and line
material, the distribution and the record of the same; the purchase
and distribution of printed matter of all kinds, renting of local offices
and allowances for the payment of the same, advertisements for land
and maritime telegraph lines, advertisements for the purchase of mate-
rials of all kinds, the care and preservation of material of the admin-
istration, office and line material contained in the storehouses of the
general administration, assembling and distribution of apparatus
intended for the stations and of all matters which were intimately
connected with the telegraphic and telephonic systems, repair of mail
equipment, the keeping of a current account with the Auditor's office
of such expenses as occurred in the warehouses, the inspection of
electrical installations, and the custody of the archives of the bureau.
Matters which were under the jurisdiction of the fourth bureau were
those relating to the auditing of accounts generally and to those of a
disbursing officer. This bureau also had custody of its archives.
The annual salary account of the general administration was, as
follows:
Administrator-general .--....---...-------....---- .. ..-...---- ...... ------ $2,500
Interventor-general ....... ......................... .....-.......--.. 2, 000
Chief of bureau (personal) ---........-- ......-----------------..----- 1,500
Official in charge of international business --......-......--------------.--. 1,500
Chief of bureau (service)..--------------... ..---------------....-------- 1, 250
Chief of workshop .-..---......-... .....--- ........----- --.----.-------- 1, 250
Chief of bureau (accounts) ...----.......................................-------..... 1, 000
Chief of bureau (equipments)..--...-----........----...---....--.....----..--..--------......... 750
Three clerks, at $360 ............................................... .... ---- 1,080
Janitor ....................................... ........-- ...........--. ---- -- 300
Messenger ................-- .........------- ...---.........--- .............---- --- 200
Total ...............-----.....-----........--.................---------------...... 13,330
All of the officials and clerks of the service, both mail and telegraphic,
were included in a service corresponding to the classified civil service
of our Government, and vacancies in the higher-salaried places of the
service were filled by promotions from the lower grades on the basis of
length of service and efficiency. In this matter the committee has not
deemed it necessary, nor considered that it was contemplated in your







8 REPORT OF THE PORTO RICO POSTAL COMMITTEE.


instructions, to examine closely into this matter of promotions, but
deems it sufficient to say that the officials were divided into various
numbered classes.
In all there were ninety-one post-offices in operation under the
Spanish Government prior to the occupation of the island by the
American forces, and the salaries of the postmasters ranged from $75
per annum to $1,750 per annum, which latter amount was paid to the
postmasters at San Juan, Ponce, and Mayagiiez. At the larger offices
clerks were employed at salaries ranging from $180 to $1,500 per
annum.
A statement is made below as to the postal receipts of each office on
the island from January 1 to December 31, 1897, in which is also given
the salary of each postmaster and clerk, and the rent paid for quar-
ters leased by the general administration for the use of local post-
offices. The sums stated in this report are in Porto Rican money,
unless otherwise expressly stated.


Pos

Office.
Island. Cuba..



Adjuntas ..... $103.56 $6.56
Agnadilla ?....... 1,232.63 36. 36
Aguas-Buenas...... 311.42 5.04
Aibonito.. ......... 244.80 16.45
Aguada-............ 59.76 1.00
AldeaSaenz........ 17.39 .60
Athasco............. 231.12 9.60
Arecibo V........... 3,772.24 132.51
Arroyo............. 464.86 11.72
Barceloneta......... 183.87 6.20
Barranquitas ....... 82. 00 6. 04
Barros.............. 175.90 2.40
Bayama6n........... 340.21 27.10
Cabo Rojo...... 357.90 13.45
CAguas V.: ......... 865.30 16.20
Camay..............- 328.52 3.20
Candvanas ........ 73.16 3.44
Carolina ............ 159.73 4. 91
Catao ........... 16.40.....
Cayey ........... 821.52 22.97
Ceiba .............. 70.48 ..........
Cialitos ..................... ............
Cidfa ............... 50.80 3.12
Ciales... ...... 143.15 12.08
Coamo ........ 1, 001.16 11.68
Co'lerio............ 199.12 4.26
Corozal........... 114.06 1.25
Coto del Laurel..... 53.31 .80
Culebra ......................-........
Culebrita..................... .........
Dorado .--........ 91.99 .88
Fajardok .......... 1,095.58 8. 68
Florida. ............ ..................
Gfanica............ 5 56.60 1.04
Guaraguao ....... 18.12 .40
Guayama ...... 1,423.20 80.82
Guaynabo .-----................
Gurabo ............. 89.82 2.92
Guayanilla ......... 204.26 4.44
Hatillo ............. 79.87 ..........
Hormiguero' ....... 30.48 1.80
Humacao K......... 1,631.89 157.87
Isabela ............. 171.81 1.24
IsladeViiques -..-.. 262.35 2.84
Jayuya ...........| 242.70 6.04
Juana Diaz........ 462.24 27.00
Juncos ............. 112.10 10.55
Lajas ........... 73.95 .72
Lares:. .....-.. 1,044. 34 15.08


tal receipts.


Spain. Interna-
tional.


$73.20
208.80
20.74
79.74
6.12
3.66
43.92
1,234.64
55.00
8.99
7.26
63.84
83.35
106.11
174.58
25.14
10.26
132.20
3.60
185.94
7.44

14.00
80.39
68.60
15.95
11.64
18.00


$27.06
346.60
6.86
17.18
4.08
2.00
13.66
576.96
52.39
10.04
2.48
3.28
52.37
32.12
124.48
73.48
5.85
10.00
3.20
23.69
2.48
.........
6.87
10.80
26.36
6.72
1.76
1.76


Total.



$210.38
1,824.39
344.06
358.17
70.96
23.65
298.30
5,716.35
583.97
209.10
97.78
245.42
503.03
509.58
1,180. 5
425.34
92.72
307.53
23.20
1,055.14
80.40

74.79
246.42
1,107.80
226.05
128.71
73.87


......... --------- ..... ----------
3.70 2.02 98.59
57. 69 9. 56 1,171.51
....: .. ... .... .... .. s :a. -
4.86 2.48 64.98
4.56 3.84 26.92
241.20 362.02 2,107.24

51.66, 1.68 146.08
63.02 20.24 291.96
9.09 4.80 94.36
8.16 3.08 43.52
1,226.68 240.20 3,256.64
19.23 4.63 196.91
9.42 10.00 284.61
12.47 8.20 269.42
186.06 4.85 680.15
37.62 13.44 173.81
3.90 3.68 82.25
123.30 1 35. 98 1,218.70


a Performs both telegraphic and postal duties. (?)


Expenditures.

Salaries.

Postmas- Rent.
ters. a Clerks. a

$500.00 $180.00 .........
1,250.00 1,930.00 $300.00
500.00 180.00 240.00
750.00 180.00 ......
110.00 .............
75.00 ..................
500.00 180.00 .....
1, 250.00 1,930. 00 (b)
1,000.00 030.00 168.00
500.00 .......... .......
500.00 180.00 .........
500.00 180.00 .........
750.00 180.00 i 300.00
500.00 180.00 ......
1,000. 00 1,430. 00 (a)
1,000.00 180.00 240.00
500.00 ............. ...
500.00 180. 00 240.00
75. 0 ...............
750.00 180. 00 96.00
500.00 .......... .........
75.00 ..................
500.00 I 180.00.
500.00 180.00 .........
500.00 180.00 ....
500.00 180. 00 ....
500.00 180.00 264.00
500.00 180.00 192.00
75.00 ........ .......


...... ...
75.00
1, 000. 00
75.00
75.00
75. 00
1,000.00
75.00
110.00
500.00
110. 00
75.00
1,500.00
500.00
110.00
75.00
500.00
500.00
75.00
500.00


""930. 00 1i68.006


930. 00 1 68. 00

. 80.00.......




180......00..

180. 00 .
180.00 .........

180.00 .........


b Government building.


~




MILITARY STATIONS IN CUBA, OF NEW YORK, N. Y.

By order of the Postmaster-General there will be estab-
lished on January Ist, 1899, the following Military Station
in Cuba, of the Post Office, at New York, N. Y., with facili-
ties for the transaction of money order and registry busi-
ness, the receipt and dispatch of mails, and the sale of
postal supplies:
Military Station No. 25-Cristo, Cuba.
-L. F. 15892. Ext. R. O. 20to
TIILITARY STATIONS IN CUBA, OF NEW YORK, N. Y.

By Postmaster-General's order there have been estab-
lished the following Military Stations in Cuba, of the Post
Office at New York, N. Y., with facilities for the transaction
of money order and registry business, the receipt and des-
patch of mails, and the sale of postal supplies:
On January 5th, Military Station No. 26, Buena Vista,
Province of Havana, Cuba.
On January 6th, Military Station No. 27, Matanzas, Prov-
ince of Matanzas, Cuba.

PORTO RICO MILITARY STATION.

OFFICE OF POSTl\I\STER-GENERAL,
WASIIINGTON, D. C., Dec. 29, IsgS.
Order NVo. 54.
Established on January i, t899, five additional military
postal stations of the post office at Washiniton, 1). C, lo-
cated on the Island of Porto Rico, with facilities fo-" the
transaction of money order and registry business, the sale
of postal supplies and receipt and despatch of mails, as fol-
lows:
Bayamon, Porto Rico.
Camuy, Porto Rico.
Rio Piedras, Porto Rico.
San German, Porto Rico.
Vicques, Porto Rico.
CH. EMORY SMITH, Pos/tmaster-GLeera/.
~l//. 5744.
nlILITARY STATION No. 3 (ILOILO) PHILIPPINE
ISLANDS, OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL.

VW.\SIIIN(;TON, D. C., Dec. 28, 1898. i
Order A'o. 547.
Establish, on January 1, i899, an additional military
postal station in the Philippine Islands, of the post office
at San Francisco, California, with facilities for the transac-
tion of money order and registry business, the sale of
tf al t inii liI ; r11 010t r1-0o i-lf nrl rl- ii ,--ht -.1 ..1. .
PORTO RICO MILITARY STATION.
POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT, J
OFFICE OF GENERAL Sur'T R. M. S.,
WVASHlNGrTON, D. C., Jan. 7, 1899.
In correction of the Postmaster-General's Order No. 549,
of date December 29, 1898, Bulletin No. 5744 (published in
OFFICIAL CIRCULAR 995), establishing five additional Mili-
tary Postal Stations of the post office at Washington, D. C.,
located in Porto Rico, state the fifth office mentioned
therein, as Vieques, instead of Vicques.
JAMES E. WHITE, Gen. Superintendent.
-Bull. 5751.




MILITARY STATIONS'IN CUBA, OF NEW YORK, N. Y.
By Postmaster-General's Ofder No. 471, there was or-
dered established on December Ist, 1898, the following
Military Stations in Cuba, of the post office at New York,
N. Y., with facilities for the transaction of money order
and registry business, the receipt and despatch of mai,,
and the sale of postal supplies, viz.:
Military Station No. 2, Daiquiri, Cuba.
Military Station No. 3, Guantanamo, Cuba.
Military Station No. 4, Baracoa, Cuba.
Military Station No. 5, San Luis, Cuba.
Military Station No. 6, Manzanillo, Cuba.
Military Station No. 7, Gibara, Cuba.
MILITARY STATIONS IN CUBA, OF NEW YORK, N. Y.
By Postmaster-General's Order No. 526, there was or-
dered established on December 21st, 1898, the following
Military Station in Cuba, of the post office at New York,
N. Y., with facilities for the transaction of money order
and registry business, and the receipt and despatch of
mails :
Military Station No. 14, Songo, Cuba.
-Bull. 5735. Ext. R. 0. 3042.

By Postmaster-General's order there was ordered estab-
lished on January i, 1899, the following Military Stations
in Cuba, of the Post Office at New York, N. Y., with facili-
ties for the transaction of money order and registry busi-
ness and the receipt and despatch of mails:
Military Station No. 15, Pinar Del Rio.
Military Station No. 16, Guanajay.
Military Station No. 17, Mariel.
Military Station No. 18, Trinidad.
Military Station No. 19, Las Tunas.
Military Station No. 20, Sancti Spiritus.
Military Station No. 21, Cardenas.
Military Station No. 22, Bayamo.
Military Station No. 23, Mayari.
Military Station No. 24, Palma Soriano.
3 -L. F. 15876-15885. Ext. R. 0. 3048.







MILITARY STATIONS IN CUBA, OF NEW YORK, N. Y.
By order of the Postmaster-General there was established
on January ioth, 1899, the following Military Station in
Cuba, of the Post Office at New York, N. Y., with facilities
for the transaction of money order and registry business,
the receipt and despatch of mails, and the sale of postal
supplies:
Military Station No. 28, Santa Clara, Cuba.
-L. F. 15976. Ext. R. 0. 3060.
-. I" .





1/ ,1 "i3


J sc-)

3 2 ~c /n u ~ o ^ ^







REPORT OF THE PORTO RICO POSTAL COMMITTEE.


Postal receipts. Expenditure

Office. Salaries.
Island. Cuba. Spain. tion Total. Postmas- Clerks
ters.a a

Las Marias......... $100.04 $34.60 $76.26 $5.22 $216.12 $500.00 $180.00
Las Piedras......... 13:3.04 2.48 16.68 16.32 168.52 500.00 180.00
Loiza............... 7. 80 1. 0 5.13 1.86 88.39 75.00 .......
Lnquillo... ........ 131.55 3.90 14.52 10. 10 160.07 500.00 180.00
Manati ... ........ 128.04 3.20 37.62 15.96 1,184.82 1,000.00 180.00
Maricao ............ 185. 16 9. 59 60. 56 22. 14 277. 45 500. 00, 180.00
Mannabo ........... 216.00 4.18 8.28 29.12 257.58 500.00 180.00
Manreyes...... .. ............ ............. ... ..75.00..
Mayaguez ........ 1,674.75 523.00 '2,381.04 1,250.66 5,829.45 1,750. 00 17,610.00
Moca .-.............. 39.96 .80 8.64 1.92 51.32 75.00 -
Morovis ........... 49.90 .......... 7.91 .......... 57.81 500.00 180.00
Naguabo............ 299.52 2.92 13.11 6.99 322.57 500.00 180. 00
Naranjito .......... 94.80 4.80 15.24 .......... 114.84 75.00 .........
Patilla ............. 561.60 7. 52 15.39 19.70 604.21 500. 00 180.00
Peftiuelas .......... 158.50 6.48 10.38 40.22 215.58 500. 00 180.00
Playa de Naugabo.. 97.40 11.56 8.10 88.04 205.10 110.00
Playa de Ponce ..... 1, 471.36 195. 96 1,088.00 792.45 3,547.77 1,000.00 930.00
Playa Myagiiez.... 2, 358.82 1,217.28 2, 159.19 2,474.82 8, 210.11 1,000.00 930.00
PonceA ............. 4,657.06 218.32 1,150.53 1,035.89 7,061.80 1,750. 00 7,610.00
Punta de Santiago- 162. 60 8.00 56.52 4.54 231. 66 110.00 ..........
Quebradillas ....... 217.44 9.72 20.88 5.34 253.38 500.00 180.00
Rincoin...... .. .... 51.18 1.92 12.18 2.80 68.08 110.00
Rio Grande ......... 224.28 1.66 16. 50 2.16 244.60 500.00 180.00
Rio Piddras.........- 418.19 3.45 91.81 16.58 530.03 1, 000.00 930.00
Sbana Grande...... 238. 68 4. 61 16. 14 5. 48 264. 91 500. 00 180.00
Salinas.............. 159.20 8.57 20.70 6.54 195.01 500.00 180.00
San Germaq ........ 1,085.80 15.84 126.06 64.22 1,29)1.92 1,000.00 930.00
San Juan V.. ...... 17, 091.08 1,048.14 7,531.46 6, 132.38 31,803.36 1, 750.00 22, 690. 00
San Lorenzo........ 124.90 4.50 20.94 3.20 153.54 500.00 180.00
San Sebastian...... 262. 56 5. 89 93.60 31.30 393.35 510.00 180. 00
Santa Isabel........ 166.00 12.40 61.20 10.20 249.65 500.00 180.00
Santurce ........... 256.68 17.16 68.13 50.58 392.55 1,000.00 180. 00
Tallaboa............ 24.24 .88 13.26 2.08 40.46 75.00..........
Toa-Alta ........... 235.08 8.14 8.95 2.40 254.57 500.00 ..........
Toa-Baja ......... 76.75 1.92 7.75 2.32 88.74 75.00 ........
12'rjillo-Alto ...... 41.75 ...... 7.83 ......... 49.58 75.00 .
UtuiadoP-........... 760.32 26.40 281.58 115.32 1,183.62 1,000.00 930.00
Vega-Alta.......... 199.40 4.94 8.06 4.12 216.52 110.00 .......
Vega-Baja .......... 173.85 4.16 68.26 27.73 274.00 500.00 180.00
Villalba Arriba.....' 60.00 .76 2.46 4.88 68.10 75.00 ........
Yabucoa............ 757.72 9.36 32.40 17.00 816.48 500.00 180.00
Yauco .: ........ 1,266.75 25.18 274.44 250.72 1,817.09 11,000.00 930.00
Total .........56,060.80 4,151.79 20,770.36 14,017.97 95,000. 2 46,380.00 61,960.00
1 I I


's.


Rent.





$240.00


600. 00




120.00
285. 00
300.00
720.00



264.00

168. 00
I 1,200.00


300.00



300.00



266.00
7, 859.00


a Performs both telegraphic and postal duties.

Mail matter, under the Spanish system, was divided into eight
classes-the first class, letters; second class, postal cards; third class,
newspapers; fourth class, printed matter of all kinds; fifth class, busi-
ness papers; sixth class, samples of merchandise and medicines;
seventh class, letters of declared value; eighth class, postal packages
containing insured articles.
The administration controlled exclusively the carrying of letters,
postal cards, and newspapers, excepting open letters of introduction
carried by interested parties; those carried between two communities
not connected by the postal service; letters sent by a private party by
means of a messenger in his service; correspondence within a town
by hand; correspondence transacted by railroads or land or maritime
express companies pertaining to their own business; letters sent out
from places, where it was not possible to purchase stamps, for convey-
ance to post-offices to be postage paid and mailed; franked matter
taken to post-offices or which may be sent free, and newspapers having
no return address.
Fines were imposed for infraction of these regulations amounting to
five times the proper postage, and of not a less sum than $1, payable
in currency of the standard value. Transportation through the mail






10 REPORT OF THE PORTO RICO POSTAL COMMITTEE.

was denied to matter dangerous to employees handling it, or which might
cause injury to other mail matter; letters or packages which contained
money, precious metals, or valuable stones, which were not previously
insured; articles whose weight or size exceeded the required limits; and,
finally, letters or packages having written on the outside words offensive
to morals or calculated to create disorder. No object could circulate
through the mail. whatever might be its character, origin, or destina-
tion, which exceeded in weight two or four kilograms, according to the
classification to which it was subjected.
The rates of postage for the several classes of mail matter heretofore
mentioned were as follows:

Class. 1. 2. 3. I 4. 5. 0.

.Weight.. 15 gr. ..... 15 gr. 15gr. 15 gr. 15 gr.
1. Letters------.---------------------------(Weight.> 13 .02 .1)4 .06 r 15 08
1. Letters.. Rate ..... .. .02 .04 .06 .15 .08
s cr ..........Sin.gle. .02 .02 .02 .03 .00 .02
2. Postal card ..-- Doubl.. .03 .03 .03 .05 .10 .03
SWeight.. Oks. .... 10 s. 10 ks. I k.
3. Newspapers- Publishers .............. .. Rate..... .6 ..... .80 2.00 .
lIndividuals ...... .--..--.-- Single... 2 in ..... 4m. .10
.... .. . .Weight- 10 gr .. .. 10 gr. 10 gr. 10 gr.
4. Printed matter (all kinds).............. a...--... ate m. I. .1 n. 3 1n ...r
W.eight. 10gr. ..... 10 r. 10 gr. 10 gr.
aeio.h..:i' 5. Business papers ....... .... --- ------ ..... ..... 1 m. 3 .....
6. Samples of merchandise Weight..........- ..... 20r. ... 20 gr 20 gr. 20 g .r.
6. Samples merchant se Loose or packages. .01 ..... .01 .02 .0
and medicine. 'ate (...0Loose or pakg.
and medicine. late... \ Attached to card .. 5m. .. ... 5 m. .01 .01 .

Explanation < i I -I
(m.=milesimas.

In the above table the first column includes matter mailed at points
on the island for delivery at other points on the island.
The second column includes local matter, or matter intended for deliv-
ery in the same town at which it is mailed.
The third column includes matter destined for points on the island
of Cuba.
The fourth column includes matter destined for the peninsula, Balearic
and Canary islands, and Spanish possessions in northern Africa.
The fifth column includes matter destined for the Philippine Islands
and Fernando Po.
The sixth column includes international mail.
The registry fee was 15 cents, regardless of weight of package or
destination, and the fee for insuring packages was 4 cents for each $20
valuation thereof.
There was nothing in the Porto Rican service which corresponded to
the free-delivery service of this department.
There were one or more persons employed to do general laborer's
work in the principal offices, termed ordenanzas," or orderlies or
messengers, paid at the rate of $180 per annum, who were required to
perform such work as might be required of them in the offices, including
the work of delivering telegrams, and who, in addition, had the monopoly
of delivery of mail matter to the addressees, receiving from the addressees
1 centavo for each letter delivered, except in the case of persons or
firms receiving large quantities of mail, where the ordenanza was paid
a specified sum per month, sometimes as much as $5. He was prohib-
ited from delivering mail in the post-office or on the street.
This service was unsafe and unsatisfactory and was the occasion for
considerable complaint.
There was lacking any system for delivery at the post-offices of let-
ters to the addressees upon personal demand, except in the office at San






REPORT' OF THE PORTO RICO POSTAL COMMITTEE.


Juan, where there were a few call boxes, for which a high rate was
charged.
The regulations provided for three classes of boxes, and the annual
rates charged for their use in San Juan were $16, $14, and $12; in
Ponce, Mayagiiez, Humacao, and Arecibo, $10, $8, and $6, and for their
use in the other offices of the island, $5, $4, mad $3.
Except in San Juan and Guayama the committee found no call boxes.
At San Juan there were placed on the outside of the post-office build-
ing four boxes for the reception of mail matter, while three other boxes
were placed at the principal points of the city, from which a clerk of
the post-office gathered the mail thirty minutes before the hour set for
its dispatch.
There was also in the post-office another box called the "buzon de
alcance" from which the mail was taken ten minutes before the hour
set for its dispatch, but matter mailed in this box required the payment
of 1 centavo additional hostage.
The system of furnishing stamp supplies in vogue in the United
States did not prevail in Porto Rico. All stamps were furnished by
the administrator of customs at the capital to the different custom-
houses,viz: Playa Ponce, Playa Mayagiiex, Arecibo, Punta de Santiago,
Arroyo, Fajardo, and Aguadilla, and from these offices they were fur-
nished to the stamp dealers, no stamps being sold at the post-offices
except in the very small towns where there were no business houses,
and in these instances the postmaster sold the stamps as the agent of
the custom-house.
Persons who sold stamps furnished a bond to the nearest collector of
customs to the amount of the stamps furnished. A commission of from
2 to 4 per cent on sales of stamps was allowed to agents.
Each time a new supply was ordered settlement was made for those
previously supplied, there having been no form of monthly or quarterly
reports.
The bond was made in triplicate-one copy for the central adminis-
tration at San Juan, one for the collector of customs, and the third copy
was retained by the maker.
It is needless to say that this system of furnishing stamps to the
public was very unsatisfactory and productive of a good deal of
complaint.
As the postmasters did not keep any postal supplies on sale, and as
there was no money-order system in operation, no deposit of revenue was
made, no depositories were named, and the regulations made no pro-
vision therefore.
The registry system corresponded in some respects to our own, in
that a receipt was given to the sender by the postmaster. This was
the only receipt he obtained however, except on the payment of an
additional fee of two centavos, in which case areceipt from the addressee
was obtained and forwarded to the sender. The registered articles
(termed certificados) were sent from one office to another wrapped in
an old newspaper and sealed with wax. It was not placed in the mail
bag or mail box with the other mail, but given in the direct custody of
the carrier. A mail bill was sent along with the carrier showing the
number of registered packages and bags of mail in his charge. This
bill was checked and signed at each intermediate point on the route,
and finally at the terminal office, and was then returned to the office of
origin.
These mail bills or lists did not show the destination of the registered
articles, and it was practically impossible to trace a lost package for
that reason.






12 REPORT OF THE PORTO RICO POSTAL COMMITTEE.

An indemnity of $10 was provided for in the regulations, but the
testimony of reliable people, with whom the matter was discussed, was
that it cost more to collect the indemnity than it amounted to, on
account of the manner in which the claim had to be presented and the
resulting delays, and that the Government would not admit responsi-
bility for losses that were not occasioned through negligence on the
part of mail messengers or postmasters. The postmaster received no
fee for certifying a letter.
San Juan, Ponce, and Mayagiiez were designated as exchange post-
offices through which passed registered mails for and from points out-
side of Porto Rico.
There are but two railroads in the island, one in four sections; the
first from San Juan by Santurce, Martin-Peiia (no office), Bayam6n,
Toa Baja, Dorado, San Vincente (no office), Vega Baja, Manati, Barce-
loneta, Camvalache (no office), Arecibo and IIatillo to Camuy, 100
kilometers or 62.12 miles in length, leaving San Juan at 6 a. m., arriv-
ing at Camay by 9.56 a. in., and leaving Camuy at 3.08 p. m., and
arriving at San Juan by 7.06 p. m.
The second, from San Juan, via Santurce, Martin-Peiia (no office), and
Rio Piedras, to Carolina, 22, kilometers, or 13.67 miles, in length, leaving
San Juan at 5 p. m., arriving at Carolina at 6.05 p. m., and leaving
Carolina at 7 a. m. and arriving at San Juan by 8.05 a. m.
The third, from Aguadilla, via Aguada, Rincon, C6rsica (no office),
Tres Hermanos (no office), Aiiasco, Playa-Mayagiiex (no office), and
Mayagiiez, to FHormigueros, 55 kilometers, or 34.17 miles, in length,
leaving Aguadilla at 4.45 p. m., arriving at Hormigueros by 7.27 p. m.,
and leaving Hormigueros at 5.33 a. m. and arriving at Aguadilla by 8.12
a, m.; and the fourth, from Yauco, via Guayanilla and Tallaboa, to Ponce,
35 kilometers, or 21.74 miles, in length, leaving Yanco at 6.30 a. m., ar-
riving at Ponce by 8.08 a. m., and leaving Ponce at 4.30 p. m. and ar-
riving at Yauco by 6.08 p. m.
The second road, connecting San Juan and Rio Piddras, is a narrow
gauge, 3 feet between rails, and is used merely for suburban traffic,
and carries no mail.
The service is performed daily.
This road has been built under a concession from the Spanish Gov-
ernment, the terms of which stipulated that a railroad should be con-
structed around the entire island and that it should be completed
within a certain period of time, which period, it is understood, has
terminated; but it is not known that any legal steps had been taken by
the Spanish Government to declare the concession forfeited, and to
assume control of the property.
One of the terms of concession was that the mail should be carried
free of charge in a special car, together with the person or persons in
charge of the mail, and it has been and is so being carried between
San Juan and Camuy, between Aguadilla and Mayagiiez and between
Yauco and Ponce. The mail is not being carried on the section between
Martin Peia and Carolina.
The road is a 3-foot gauge and of first class construction, but the
rolling stock has been allowed to fall into disrepair. This is said to be
owing to the fact, as it is stated, that for some time past the road has
not been paying expenses.
The distances between post-offices and railroad stations are as fol-
lows: San Juan, 0.25 of a mile; Arecibo, 0.50 of a mile; Camuy, 0.67
of a mile; Aguadilla, 1 mile; Mayagiiez, 1 miile; Yauco, 0.20 of a mile;
Ponce, formerly 0.50 of a mile, now 0.25 of a mile, and Playa Ponce,
1.25 miles.





REPORT OF THE PORTO RICO POSTAL COMMITTEE.


At these places mail messengers were employed to perform the serv-
ice between the office and the station, at the rate of $480 each per
annum, except at Camuy, where he received $450; Aguadilla, $400, and
Mayagiiez, $775, making a total of $4,025 for this service. These mail
messenger routes were let to the lowest bidder, and were for a period
of two years. The contractor furnished a bond equal to 10 per cent of
the amount of the contract.
Following is a description of the various land and water routes (star
routes) of the island, together with recommendations of such changes
as it is thought proper to make.
It was the general opinion of the people with whom the matter was
discussed that the service, as it was designed by the postal authorities,
was all that could be desired, the service being required to be performed
daily under schedules making close connections at every terminal point;
but that the efficiency, as it appeared on paper, was not attained in
practice, the schedules at times requiring an impracticable rate of speed,
and the condition of roads and weather also at times rendering it
impossible to perform the service.
Placid streams will suddenly take the character of raging torrents,
owing to rains in the mountains, and can not be forded with safety at
such times for several hours, sometimes for days, according to the
amount of rainfall.
ROUTE SAN JUAN TO PONCE,

via Santurce, Rio Piddras, Ciguas, Cayey, Aibonito, Coamo, Juana
Diaz, and Coto del Laurel, 130 kilometers (80,72 miles) and back, seven
times a week by coach.
PRESENT SCHEDULE.
Leaves San Juan daily at 11 a. m.;
Arrives at Ponce next day by 11 a. in.;
Leaves Ponce daily at 1 p. m.;
Arrives at San Juan next day by 9 p. in.
The mail lies over at Aibonito from five to six hours each way, or
from 10 p. m. until 4 a. m. The Spanish contractor was Pedro Ubarri,
of Rio Piedras, and his compensation was $9,240 per annum, payable
monthly at the rate of $770.
Since August ( or 7, 1898, on the occupation of the territory south
of Aibonito by our troops, the Spanish contractor has carried the mail
from San Juan to Aibonito only, and the service between Aibonito
and Ponce has been paid for from that date by the military authorities
at the rate of $10 (American money) per diem. Aibonito and Cayey
were occupied September 25, 1898; Clignas, October 6, 1898; Rio Pie-
dras, October 13, 1898, and San Juan, October 18, 1898, which are the
dates from which the United States should be responsible for payment
for mail service between said points and Ponce.
Kilometers. Miles.
San Juan to Santurce ............ ... .. -----..--.--.. ----.-------..... 5 = 3.10
Santurce to Rio Piedras---...--....--....--- ------------------------ 7= 4.24
Rio Piedras to Cdguas ..---------.. .......------------------------- 23 = 14.28
Caguas to Cayey ................--------------------------------------- 25= 15.53
Cayey to Aibonito.......-..-..-....--------------------------------- 20 = 12.42
Aibonito to Coamo.................-------------------------------------- 18 = 11.18
Coamo to Juana Diaz........----.....---...--.----------------------- 20 = 12. 42
Juana Diaz to Ponce --.................--- --------------------------- 12 = 7.45
The road over which this route runs is the best on the island. It
was constructed by the Spanish Government, is macadamized through-
out to a width of 19 feet, with substantial bridges crossing ravines






14 REPORT OF THE PORTO RICO POSTAL COMMITTEE.

and streams except between Juana Diaz and Ponce, between which
points six streams have to be forded, which streams are difficult and
even dangerous to cross during heavy rains in the mountains. This
road crosses three ranges of mountains, one of 2,910 feet and one of
2,250 feet altitude, and winds in and out through the mountains so as
to secure the best grades possible, which, however, are very heavy in
some places.
It is proposed that the schedule of this route be fixed so as to leave
the terminal points early in the morning, say at 6 a. m., and to arrive
at the other termini in fourteen hours, believing this to be practicable
and best suited to the needs of the service. Also, that one additional
trip be made weekly in close connection with the arrival of steamers
at San Juan-say, leave there at 5 p. m., and returning arrive at San
Juan by 12 m., with fourteen hours running time each way.

ROUTE RIO PIEDRAS TO FAJARDO,

via Carolina, Can6vanas, Rio Grande, and Luquillo, 54.50 kilometers
(33.71 miles), and back, 11 kilometers (6.83 miles) to Carolina, 8.50
kilometers (5.28 miles) to Can6vanas, 8 kilometers (4.96 miles) to Rio
Grande, 14.50 kilometers (9 miles) to Luquillo, 12.50 kilometers (7.64
miles) to Fajardo, seven times a week on horseback.
PRESENT SCHEDULE.
Leave Rio Piedras daily at 12 noon;
Arrive at Fajardo by 10.55 p. m.;
Leave Fajardo daily at 6 a. in.;
Arrive at Rio Piedras by 4.55 p.m.
The Spanish contractor was Juan B. Blanco, and his compensation
$1,920 per annum.
The schedule of this route connects with the schedule of route from
San Juan to Pouce, and, if the schedule of that route be changed, as
proposed, this schedule will have to be changed as follows:
PROPOSED SCHEDULE.
Leave Rio Piedras daily at 7.30 a. m.;
Arrive at Fajardo by 6.30 p. m.;
Leave Fajardo daily at 6 a. m.;
Arrive at Rio Piedras by 5 p. m.
This road is good from Rio Piedras to near Rio Grande, but from
there to Fajardo it is bad.
Fajardo was occupied September 29, 1898.

ROUTE CAGUAS TO HUMACAO,
via Gurabo, Juncos, and Las Piedras, 29 kilometers (17.99 miles) and
back, seven times a week by horseback.
To Gurabo, 8.50 kilometers (5.28 miles); to Juncos is 6.50 kilometers
(4.03 miles); to Las Piedras, 8 kilometers (4.96 miles), and to Humacao,
6 kilometers, or 3.72 miles.
Humacao was occupied September 22, 1898.
This road is very bad and is almost impassable for any kind of vehi-
cle, and can only be traveled with any degree of success on horseback.
Five streams have to be forded, there being no bridges on the road.
PRESENT SCHEDULE.
Leave Caguas daily at 3.30 p. m.;
Arrive at Humacao by 10.20 p. m.;
Leave Humacao daily at 6 a. m.;
Arrive at Caguas by 12.50 p. m.





REPORT OF THE PORTO RICO POSTAL COMMITTEE.


This schedule connects with that on the route from San Juan to
Ponce, connecting with and receiving mails from both San Juan and
Ponce the same day. As the mail from Ponce for Humacao will be
dispatched via Guayama and Yabucoa under proposed schedules, we
deem it unnecessary to have the carrier wait at Caguas for the mail
from Ponce, and therefore recommend the following schedule:
PROPOSED SCHEDULE.
Leave CGguas daily at 11 a. m.;
Arrive at Humacao by 5 p. m.;
Leave Humacao daily at 3.30 a. m.;
Arrive at Cdguas by 9.30 a. m.

ROUTE CAYEY TO GUAYAMA.

There are no intermediate offices on this route, and the distance is
26 kilometers (16.15 miles), the service being performed seven times a
week each way on horseback.
PRESENT SCHEDULE.
Leave Cayey daily at 6.25 p. m.;
Arrive at Guayama by 9.25 p. m.;
Leave Guayama daily at 7.30 a. mi.;
Arrive at Cayey by 1.30 p. in.
The contractor was Gabriel Capo, of Guayama, and his compensa-
tion was $1,200 per annum.
Cayey was occupied by our forces September 25, 1898, and Guayama,
August 4, 1898.
The schedule should be changed, so as to leave Cayey at about 2
p. m., on arrival of mail from San Juan and Ponce.
This road is well constructed, and of the same character as the mili-
tary road from San Juan to Ponce, but with a very heavy grade from
Guayama. Service is not now being performed.

ROUTE PONCE TO GUAYAiMA,

via Santa Isabel and Salinas, 62 kilometers (38.50 miles), and back; 26
kilometers (16.15 miles) to Santa Isabel, 19 kilometers (11.80 miles) to
Salinas, and 17 kilometers (10.56 miles) to Guayama. The service is
performed seven times a week by coach.
PRESENT SCHEDULE.
Leave Ponce daily at 4.25 a. m.;
Arrive at Guayama by 1.45 p. m.
Leave Guayama daily at 4 p. m.;
Arrive at Ponce next day by 1.25 a. m.
The contractor was Francisco Rovira, and his compensation was
$2,800 per annum.
The above service has been terminated, and temporary service
between Ponce and Santa Isabel is being performed daily, the carrier
being paid by the alcalde of Santa Isabel, while service from Guayama
to Ponce, three times a week, is being performed by carrier provided
by the military authorities, at a cost of $140 per month (Porto Rican
money), who also supplies Salinas. The road is very bad, being crossed
by several unbridged streams, difficult to ford after rains, and in places
runs close to the sea, which washes over it in heavy weather, rendering
traveling dangerous at such times.


A






16 REPORT OF THE PORTO RICO POSTAL COMMITTEE.

The schedule of this route should be:
Leave Ponce daily at 6 a. m.;
Arrive at Guayama by 6 p. m.
Leave Guayama daily at 6 a. in.;
Arrive at Ponce by 6 p. m.

ROUTE GUAYAMA TO HUMACAO,

via Arroyo, Patillas, Maunabo, and Yabucoa, 55 kilometers (34.14 miles),
and back, seven times a week by horseback.
To Arroyo, 8 kilometers (4.96 miles); to Patillas, 10 kilometers (6.21
miles); to Maunabo, 14 kilometers (8.69 miles); to Yabucoa, 9 kilome-
ters (5.59 miles), and to Humacao, 14 kilometers (8.69 miles).
The contractor was the municipality of Humacao, and the compen-
sation $3,000 per annum. Service is now being provided by the alcaldes
of the towns, except between Maunabo and Patillas, which is being
provided by the army.
PRESENT SCHEDULE.
Leave Humacao daily at 5 a. m.;
Arrive at Guayama by 3.50 p. m.
Leave Guayama daily at 1.55 p. m.
Arrive at Humacao next day by 12.45 a.m.
PROPOSED SCHEDULE.
Leave Humacao daily at 6 a. m.;
Arrive at Guayama by 5 p. m.
Leave Guayama daily at 6 a. m.;
Arrive at Humacao by 5 p. m.
This road is very bad for any kind of vehicle whatever, and between
Maunabo and Yabucoa a mountain has to be crossed by a mere bridle
path, prohibiting the passage of any kind of vehicle, and renders a slow
schedule absolutely necessary, and the performance of the service dur-
ing daylight.
ROUTE HUMACAO TO FAJARDO,

via Punta de Santiago, Punta Naguabo, Naguabo, and Ceiba.
To Punta Santiago, 6 kilometers (3.72 miles); to Playa Naguabo, 6
kilometers (3.72 miles); to Naguabo, 5 kilometers (3.10 miles); to Ceiba,
15 kilometers (9.31 miles); to Fajardo, 11 kilometers (6.83 miles); a total
distance of 43 kilometers (26.68 miles) and back, seven times a week on
horseback.
The contractor is Francisco Alvarez Gonsales, and his compensation
is $990 per annum.
PRESENT SCHEDULE.
Leave Humacao daily at 10 p. m.;
Arrive at Fajardo by 5.55 a. m.;
Leave Fajardo daily at 11.05 p. m.;
Arrive at Humacao by 6.55 a. m.
PROPOSED SCHEDULE.
Leave Humacao daily at 6 a. m.;
Arrive at Fajurdo by 2 p. m.;
Leave Fajardo daily at 6 a. m.;
Arrive at Humacao by 2 p. m.
The road is bad, with three unbridged streams to cross, while a cir-
cuit through the surf has to be made to avoid two other streams.





REPORT OF THE PORTO RICO POSTAL COMMITTEE. 17

ROUTE PONCE TO PLAYA PONCE,

3 kilometers (1.86 miles) and back, thirteen times a week.
This service was formerly a part of the routes from San Juan and
Guayama, but as the main office is now located in the city of Ponce the
service performed should be made a separate route and be performed at
hours conforming to the needs of the business interests of Ponce and
the Playa. Playa Ponce is the port of Ponce, and the custom-house
and more important wholesale business houses are located there. There
is telephonic connection between the two towns. Mail should leave
Ponce at 8 a. m. and 3.30 p. m., and leave the Playa at 9 a. m. and 4.30
p. m., thirty minutes running time to be allowed each way, the Sunday
trip to be in the morning.

ROUTE PONCE TO ARECIBO,
by Guaraguao, Adjuntas, and Utuado.
To Guaraguao, 18 kilometers (11.18 miles); to Adjuntas, 12 kilometers
(7.45 miles); to Utuado, 30 kilometers (18.63 miles), and to Arecibo, 15
kilometers (9.32 miles); total, 75 kilometers (46.59 miles) and back,
seven times a week, by wagon to Adjuntas and by horseback from
Adjuntas to Arecibo.
The contractors are Leopold B. Strube, Arecibo to Adjuntas, at
$1,095 per annum; Enstaquio Callazo, Utuado to Adjuntas, at $100,
and Santiago Alvarez, Adjuntas to Ponce, at $600 per annum; total,
$1,795 per annum.
Arecibo was occupied by our forces October 9, 1898; Utuado, August
30, 1898, and Adjuntas, August 30, 1898.
PRESENT SCHEDULE .
Leave Ponce daily at 5. a. m.;
Arrive at Arecibo next day by 12.15 p.m.;
Leave Arecibo daily at 9.30 a. m.;
Arrive at Ponce next day by 12 m.
In going from Ponce, mail lies over at Utuado from 6.10 p. m. until
6 a. m., and in going from Arecibo mail lies over at Adjuntas from
9.35 p. m. until 5 a. m.
The road is good between Ponce and Adjuntas, but very bad between
Adjuntas and Arecibo. That portion between Adjuntas and Utuado
having been recently constructed by the military authorities to meet
military necessities. Several serious landslides have recently occurred
on this portion of the road. The committee recommend that three
routes be substituted for this route, one from Pouce via Guaraguao to
Adjuntas on a schedule to leave Ponce daily at 1 p. m. and arrive at
Adjuntas by 8 p. in., and returning leave Adjuntas at 5 a. m. and arrive
at Ponce by 12 m. One from Utuado to Arecibo, 15 kilometers (9.31
miles) and back, seven times a week, as follows:
Leave Utuado daily at 5.30 a. in.;
Arrive at Arecibo by 8.30 a. m.;
Leave Arecilo daily at 10 a. m.;
Arrive at Utnado by 1 p. m.
The other, from Adjuntas to Utuado, 30 kilometers (18.63 miles) and
back, seven times a week, with a schedule as follows:
Leave Adjuntas at 6.30 a. mi.;
Arrive at Utuado by 12.30 p. m.;
Leave Utuado at 1.30 p. m.;
Arrive at Adjuntas by 7.30 p. m.
-2






18 REPORT OF THE PORTO RICO POSTAL COMMITTEE.

It is believed that the service three times a week on the last-named
route will be sufficient for the transportation of the small quantity of
mail which will in all probability pass between these points.

ROUTE YAUCO TO MAYAGtUEZ.

via SAbana Grande, 17 kilometers (10.56 miles); San German, 7 kilo-
meters (4.34 miles); Cabo Rojo, 8 kilometers (4.96 miles); and Maya-
giiez, 12 kilometers (7.33 miles) a total distance of 44 kilometers
(27.19 miles) and back seven times a week on horseback.
The contractor is Feliz Ortiz Renta, and his compensation is $2,988
per annum.
PRESENT SCHEDULE.
Leave Yauco daily at 6.38 p. m.;
Arrive at Mayagiiez by 2.38 a. m.;
Leave Mayagiiez daily at 7.22 p. in.;
Arrive at Yanco by 3.22 a. m.
Mayagiiez was occupied by our forces on August 12, 1898.
This route also extends to Playa Mayagiiez, 1 kilometer (0.62 mile),
but as the post-office at that point was closed by authority of the
alcalde about September 15, 1898, the route has been terminated at
Mayagiiez.
The road between Mayagiiez and Cabo Rojo is excellent, but for the
remainder of the distance it is very bad and almost impassable except
on horseback. Extra trips to carry the heavy mail to and from the
Eleventh Infantry, stationed at Mayagiiez, have been made with ox
carts on a schedule of about twenty-four hours each way. We recom-
mend that the schedule be extended so as to arrive at Mayagiiez at
5 a. m., in time to connect with the mail train at 6 a. m., and returning
to arrive at Yauco at 6 a. m., in time to connect with the mail train at
6.30 a. m.
This service was performed under two contracts, one from Mayagiiez
to San German, the other from San German to Yauco.
It is an important route, connecting the railroad running from Ponce
to Yauco with the railroad from Mayagiiez to Aguadilla, and is a part
of the through route from Ponce to San Juan around the western end
of the island. This last-named railroad extends as far south as Hormi-
gueros, but as that office is of very little importance, this committee
does not deem it advisable to recommend that the railroad service be
extended beyond Mayagiiez nor that it be embraced in the Mayagiiez
and Yauco route, because of its unimportance and because it is some
distance (about 1 mile) from the road now traveled by the mail.

ROUTE CAMUY TO AGUADILLA,
via Quebradillas and Isabela.
To Quebradillas, 11 kilometers (6.83 miles); to Isabela, 12 kilometers
(7.45 miles); and to Aguadilla, 17 kilometers (10.56 miles), a total dis-
tance of 40 kilometers, or 24.84 miles and back, seven times a week by
coach.
Francisco Escalona, agent, is the contractor, and the compensation
is $3,000 per annum.
PRESENT SCHEDULE.
Leave Caniuy daily at 10.19 a. in.;
Arrive at Aguadilla by 4 p. mi.;
Leave Aguadilla daily at 8.27 a. m.;
Arrive at Camuy by 2.15 p. in.





REPORT OF THE PORTO RICO POSTAL COMMITTEE. 19

This is a part of the through route from San Juan to Ponce by rail-
road, and is therefore of importance. Camuy was occupied by our
forces September 29, 1898.
The road is extremely bad, but the present schedule is made with
tolerable regularity, and it is necessary to continue it on the same
schedule.
ROUTE AGUADILLA TO UTUADO,

via Moca, San Sebastian, and Lares; and

ROUTE AGUADILLA TO ARECIBO,

via Lares and Pajuil (no office).
Aguadilla to Moca, 7 kilometers (4.34 miles); to San Sebastian, 15
kilometers (9.30 miles); to Lares, 16 kilometers (9.93 miles); to Utuado,
42 kilometers (26.09 miles); total, 80 kilometers (49.67 miles). Distance,
Lares to Arecibo, 50 kilometers (31.06 miles). Total distance, 130 kilo-
meters (80.73 miles).
The road from Aguadilla to within 2 miles of San Sebastian is macad-
amized. The remainder of the road-that is, from 2 miles west of San
Sebastian to Utuado, on the lower branch, and Arecibo, on the upper
branch-can only be traveled on horseback, and then with the greatest
difficulty.
PRESENT SCHEDULE.
Leave Aguadilla daily at 9 a.m.;
Arrive at Lares by 6 p. m.;
Leave Lares daily at 5 a. im.;
Arrive at Arecibo by 1.30 p. m.;
Leave Arecibo daily at 10 a. m.;
Arrive at Lares by 6 p. m.;
Leave Lares daily at 5 a. in.;
Arrive at Aguadilla by 2.10 p. m.;
Leave Lares daily at 5 a. in.;
Arrive at 1tuado by 4 p. in.;
Leave Utnado at 5 a. in.;
Arrive at Lares by 4 p. m.
As the road is in such a condition as to render travel practically
impossible, and the quantity of mail during the unsettled condition of
affairs very small, the committee deems it unnecessary that there should
be any direct service between Lares and Arecibo, and between Lares
and Utuado, and recommends, therefore, that it be dispensed with, the
means of communication via Aguadilla being deemed sufficient.

ROUTE MANATI TO UTUADO,

via Ciales, Cialitos, and Jayuya, 56 kilometers (34.57 miles) and back
seven times a week.
MJanati to Ciales, 12 kilometers (7.45 miles); to Cialitos, 12 kilometers
(7.45 miles); to Jayuya, 20 kilometers (12.22 miles), and to Utuado 12
kilometers (7.45 miles).
It appears that this route was advertised, but for some reason it was
never let. It is thought that the lowest bid received was considered
too high, and service was provided only from Manati via Ciales to
Cialitos, 24 kilometers (14.90 miles). It was performed by two carriers,
at a cost of $720 per annum. The amount of postal business done at
Ciales during the year ended December 31, 1897, was $242.46, and the
telegraphic business $275.60, while the postmaster's salary was $500
per annum, with an ordenanza, or messenger, at $180. The town is






20 REPORT OF THE PORTO RICO POSTAL COMMITTEE.

said to have a population of 4,000, and is in the midst of a section of
the country producing coffee and valuable woods.
The reports indicate that no postal business was done at Cialitos, but
the postmaster received a salary of $75 per annum. It was not a tele-
graphic station.
It is recommended that a route.be established, Manati to Ciales, a
distance of 12 kilometers (7.45 miles), and back seven times a week,
under the following schedule:
Leave Manati daily, at 9.30 a. mi.;
Arrive at Ciales. by 11.30 a. m.;
Leave Ciales daily, at 6 a. im,;
Arrive at Mamnti, by 8 a. inm.
It is also recommended that Cialitos be given special supply pending
satisfactory returns of business.
Jayuya is a town 11 kilometers (6.83 miles) southeast of Utuado, and
is an important point in the coffee and tobacco producing region, the
tobacco being claimed to be superior to any produced in the island.
The postmaster at this point receives a salary of $75 per annum and
the postal business during the year ended December 31, 1897, amounted
to $269.42. The office was supplied from Utuado by a carrier furnished
by the municipal authorities of Jayuya.
It is recommended that a route be established for its supply from
Utuado to Jayuya, 11 kilometers (6.83 miles), and back seven times a
week under the following schedule:
Leave Utuado daily, at 2 p. m.;
Arrive at .aynya by 4 p. im.;
Leave .Jaynya daily, at 4.30 p. in.;
Arrive at Utuado by 6.30 p. m.

ROUTE PUNTA SANTIAGO TO ISLA DE VIPQUES;

15 kilometers (9.32 miles) and back, three times a week, by sailboat.
The contractor is Antonio Zaragoza, and his compensation is $900
per annum.
PRESENT SCHEDULE.
Leave Punta Santiago Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday at 8.15 a. il.;
Arrive at Isla de Vidques by 12.50 p. m.;
Leave Isla de Vidques Monday, Wednesday, and Friday at 8 a. m.;
Arrive at Punta Santiago by 12.35 p. m.
Punta Santiago, the base of supply for Isla de Vi6ques, is about 4
miles from Humacao, of which town it is the port, having within its
precincts the custom-house of the Humacao district. The Island of
Vidques (post-office and island having the same name) has a population
of about 5,000. Its principal industries are the raising of horses and
the production of sugar and tobacco. The postmaster receives a salary
of $110 per annum, and the postal receipts for the year ended December
31, 1897, amounted to $264.61.
The island is now garrisoned by a company of United States infantry
and was occupied September 19, 1898.
The present contractor has performed the service for years and is
desirous of continuing the service. He is the owner of two schooners,
one of 28 tons, the other of 80 tons. The smaller vessel is used in the
service ordinarily, and is apparently sound and seaworthy. The other
boats which were seen in the bay at the time of the visit of two mem-






REPORT OF THE PORTO RICO POSTAL COMMITTEE.


bers of the committee were small, single-masted, open boats, called
"goletas," rigged with a jib and triangular sail. It appears that
Zaragoza is the only person in that vicinity sufficiently well equipped
to properly perform the service. He has made a proposition to perform
the service for the sum of $2, American money, per round trip, which
proposition is filed herewith. After the receipt of the proposal referred
to, the postal agent at Humacao was instructed by a member of the
committee to say to the contractor that he should continue the service,
and that the question of the payment for service performed since the
time of the American occupation of Vicques would be laid before the
Department.
ROUTE VILQUES TO CULEBRA,

12 kilometers (7.45 miles) and back, three times a week.
PRESENT SCHEDULE.
Leave Vieqnea Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday at 2 p. m.;
Arrive at Culebra by 4 p. m.;
Leave Culebra Monday, Wednesday, and Friday at 4 a. m.;
Arrive at Vi6ques by 7 a. m.
Six hundred dollars ($600) per annum was assigned by the Govern-
ment as the expense for this service.
The carrier, Pedro Marquds, has forwarded a statement, however, to
the effect that he receives $49.16 per month for his service, which would
be at the rate of $589.92 per annum. He also states that he receives
$16 per month for services between Culebra and Culebrita, but it is not
known by whom this sum is paid, since it does not appear that it was
provided for by the Government.
The annual report of the Government gives Culebra and Culebrita
as post-offices, but the committee has no information as to any postal
business having been done at those offices or as to the salaries of the
postmasters.
This completes the account of the land and water routes of the island.
There were a number of offices which were not located on any route
under contract, but which were authorized to receive supplies from
designated offices on regular routes. This service was not paid for by
the general administration, but by the local authorities, usually at the
rate of $15 to $20 per month.
A statement is herewith given of these offices and recommendations
made as to their future supply.
Cataiio is authorized to receive supplies from Bayam6n, 7 kilometers
(4.42 miles) distant. The postal receipts for the year ended Decem-
ber 31, 1897, were $23.20, and the salary of the postmaster was $75 per
annum. This office is situated at the end of a spur track of the railroad
and is connected with San Juan by ferry, a distance of about 0.75 of a
mile. It is suggested that this office be given special supply from San
Juan pending further returns of business.
Toa-Alta is 8 kilometers (4.96 miles) from Bayamon, and Naranjito
is 12 kilometers (7.45 miles) from Toa-Alta. lBoth offices are supplied
from Bayaulmn.
Postal business at Toa-Alta for the year ended December 31, 1897,
$245.57; telegraphic business for the same period, $184.80. The post-
master's salary was $500 per annum.
The postal business at Naranjito was $114.84. There was no tele-
graphic business. The salary of the postmaster at this office was $75






22 REPORT OF THE PORTO RICO POSTAL COMMITTEE.

per annum. A route is recommended from Bayam6n via Toa-Alta to
TNaranjito, 20 kilometers (12.41 miles) and back seven times a week
under the following schedule:
Leave Bayam6n daily at 8 a. m.;
Arrive at Naranjito at 11 a. m.;
Leave Naranjito daily at 12 mi.;
Arrive at Bayam6n by 3 p. m.
Vega-Alta is 7 kilometers (4.42 miles) from Vega-Baja, and Corozal
is 6.50 kilometers (4.03 miles) from Vega-Alta, and Mor6vis is
8 kilometers (4.96 miles) from Corozal, the three offices being sup-
plied from Vega-Baja. The postal business at Vega-Alta was $216.52.
for the year ended December 31, 1897; there was no telegraphic
business. The postmaster's salary was $110. The postal business at
Corozal was $128.71, and the telegraph business $171.74. The post-
master's salary was $500 per annum, with $180 for clerk hire and $192
for rent. The postal business at Mor6vis was $57.87, and the tele-
graph business $234.48. The postmaster's salary was $500 per annum,
with $180 for clerk hire.
We recommend a route from Vega-Baja via Vega-Alta and Corozal
to Mor6vis, 21.50 kilometers (13.41 miles) and back, seven times a week,
under the following schedule:
Leave Vega-Baja daily at 8.30 a.m.;
Arrive at Morivis by 12.30 p. m.;
Leave Mordvis daily at 1.30 p. m.;
Arrive at Vega-Baja by 4.30 p. m.
Florida is an office near Barceloneta, in a southerly direction; dis-
tance not known. There is no report of any business done at this office,
but the postmaster's salary is stated to be $75 per annum.
It is recommended that Florida be given special supply from Barce-
loneta pending returns of business.
Guaynabo is an office in a southeasterly direction from Bayam6n; dis-
tance not known. There are no returns of business, but the post-
master's salary is $75 per annum. It is recommended that this office
be given special supply from Bayam6n pending returns of business.
Trujillo-Alto is an office authorized to receive supply from Rio
Piedras. The postal business for the year ended December 31, 1897,
amounted to $49.56. There was no telegraphic business. The postmas-
ter's salary was $75 per annum. It is four kilometers (2.58 miles) from
Carolina, over a fair road, and it is recommended that it be given
special supply from Carolina pending better returns of business.
Loiza receives supply from Canovanas, 8 kilometers (4.97 miles) south,
over a fair road. The postal business for the year ended December
31, 1897, was $86.32. There was no telegraphic business. The post-
master's salary was $75 per annum.
It is recommended that a route be established from Loiza to Can6-
vanas, as follows:
Leave Loiza daily, except Sunday, at 10 a. m.;
Arrive at Canuvaias by 11.30 a. m.;
Leave Canivanas daily, except Sunday, at 12.30 p. m.;
Arrive at Loiza by 2 p. m.
San Lorenzo is 10 kilometers (6.21 miles) from Caguas, from which
point it receives supplies. The road is very bad. The postal business
at San Lorenzo for the year ended December 31, 1897, amounted to
$153.54, and the telegraphic business $255.21. The postmaster's salary
was $500 per annum, with an allowance of $180 for clerk hire.






REPORT OF THE PORTO RICO POSTAL COMMITTEE.


We recommend a route from CAguas to San Lorenzo and back daily,
under the following schedule:
Leave Cigunas daily at 10 a. mi.;
Arrive at San Lorenzo by 12 in.;
Leave San Lorenzo daily at 1 p. in.;
Arrive at Caguas by 3 p. m.
Aguas-Buenas was authorized to receive supplies from COguas.
The postal business for the year ended December 31, 1897, amounted
to $344.06, and the telegraphic business $308.28. The postmaster's
salary was $500 per annum, with an allowance of $180 for clerk hire
and $240 for rent.
Comerio was authorized to receive supplies from Aibonito.
The postal business at this office for the year ended December 31,
1897, amounted to $2.76.05, and the telegraphic business $308.50. The
postmaster's salary was $500 per annum, with an allowance of $180 for
clerk hire and $264 for rent.
Aguas Buenas is 9 kilometers (5.58 miles) and Comerio is 10 kilo-
meters (6.21 miles) from Aguas-Buenas.
We recommend the establishment of a route from COguas, via Aguas-
Buenas, to Comerio, 19 kilometers (11.79 miles), and back, seven times a
week, under the following schedule:
Leave CAguas daily at 10 a. m.;
Arrive at Comerfo by 12.30 p. mi.;
Leave Comerio daily at 1.30 p. mi.;
Arrive at Caguas by 4 p. m.
The road is in fair condition, a portion of it between Caguas and
Aguas-Buenas being macadamized.
Cidra was authorized to receive supplies from Caiguas. The postal
business for the year ended December 31, 1897, amounted to $74.79.
There was no telegraphic business. The postmaster's salary was $500
per annum, with an allowance of $180 for clerk hire. It is evident that
Cidra has decreased in importance as a post office, and that it should
have been reclassified. It is located in a very fertile and productive
country in the La Plata Valley.
We recommend the establishment of a route from Cayey to Cidra, 8
kilometers (4.97 miles), six times a week, under the following schedule:
Leave Cayey daily, except Sunday, at 2 p. in.;
Arrive at Cidra by 3 p. in.;
Leave Cidra daily, except Sunday, at 10.30 p. m.;
Arrive at Cayey by 12 midnight.
The road is fair, but upgrade to Cayey.
Barranquitas was authorized to receive supply from Aibonito, 8 kilo-
meters (4.97 miles) distant.
The postal business for the year ended December 31,1897, was $97.78,
and the telegraphic business $205.07. The postmaster's salary was
$500 per annum, with an allowance of $180 for clerk hire.
Barros was authorized to receive supply from Aibonito. It is 12
kilometers (7.45 miles) from Barranquitas.
The postal business for the year ended December 31, 1897, was
$245.45, and the telegraphic business $386.19. The postmaster's
salary was $500 per annum, with an allowance of $180 for clerk hire.
We recommend the establishment of a route from Aibonito via Bar-
ranquitas to Barros, 20 kilometers (12.42 miles), seven times a week,
under the following schedule:
Leave Aibonito daily at 3 p. in.;
Arrive at Barranquitas by 7 p. m.;
Leave Barranquitas daily at 7 a. m.;
Arrive at Aibonito by 11 a. m.





24 REPORT OF THE PORTO RICO POSTAL COMMITTEE.

Villalba Arriba was authorized to receive supply from Juana Diaz,
distance 10 kilometers (6.21 miles). It is in a northeast direction from
Juana Diaz.
The postal business for the year ended December 31, 1897, was $68.10,
and the postmaster's salary $75 per annum.
We recommend the establishment of a route from Juana Diaz to
Villalba Arriba, six times a week, under the following schedule:
Leave Juana D)iaz daily, except Sunday, at 8 a. m.;
Arrive at Villalba Arriba by 10 a. m.;
Leave Villalba Arriba daily, except Sunday, at 11 a. m.;
Arrive at Juana Diaz by 1 p. Im.
Pefiuelas was authorized to receive supply from Tallaboa, 5 kilometers
(3.10 miles) distant. The postal business for the year ended December
31, 1897, was $215.58, and the telegraphic business $219.59. The post-
master's salary was $-00 per annum, with an allowance of $180 for
clerk hire and $120 for rent.
We recommend the establishment of a route from Peiiuelas to Talla-
boa, seven times a week, under the following schedule:
Leave Pefinelas daily at 6.30 a. mi.;
Arrive at Tallaboa by 7.15 a. m.;
Leave Tallaboa daily at 5.30 p. m.;
Arrive at Pefiuelas by 6.15 p. m.
Gfianica was authorized to receive supply from Yauco, 7 kilometers
(4.35 miles) distant.
The postal business for the year ended December 31, 1897, was
$64.98. There was no telegraphic business. The postmaster's salary
was $75 per annum.
We recommend the establishment of a mail route from G(ianica to
Yauco, six times a week, under the following schedule:
Leave Giianica daily, except Sunday, at 4.45 p. m.;
Arrive at Yanco by 5.45 p. in.;
Leave Yauco daily, except Sunday, at 6.30 p. ni.;
Arrive at Glianica by 7.30 p. m.
A company of United States engineers is located at this point,
which is the port of Yauco.
Lajas was authorized to receive supply from San German, 7 kilo-
meters (4.34 miles distant, in a northerly direction. The postal busi-
ness for the year ended December 31,1897, was -'.-... There was no
telegraphic business. The postmaster's salary was $75 per annum.
We recommend the establishment of a route from San German to
Lajas on the following schedule:
Leave San German daily, except Sunday, at 6 a. mi.;
Arrive at Lajas by 7 :. Im.;
Leave Lajas daily, except Sunday, at 8 a. mi.;
Arrive at San German by 9 a. im.
Hormigueros was authorized to receive supply from Mayagiiez, 9
kilometers (5.58 miles) distant. The postal business for the year ended
December 31, 1897, was 843.52 per annum. It was not a telegraphic
office. The postmaster's salary was $75 per annum.
We recommend that Hormigneros be given special supply from Maya-
giiez pending the showing of'a better postal business.
Maricao was authorized to receive supply from Mayagiiez, 15 kilo-
meters (9.32 miles) distant, in a westerly direction. The postal business
for the year ended December 31, 1897, was $277.45, andI the telegraphic
business, $583.20. The postmaster's salary was $500 per annum, with
an allowance of $180 for clerk hire.






REPORT OF THE PORTO RICO POSTAL COMMITTEE.


We recommend the establishment of a route from Mayagiiez to Mari-
cao, seven times a week, on the following schedule:
Leave Mayagiiez daily at 7 a. m.;
Arrive at Marican by 10 a. m.;
Leave Maricao daily at 3 p. m.;
Arrive at Mayagiiez by 6 p. im.
This town is located in the midst of a fine coffee-producing country.
Las Marias was authorized to receive supply from Mayagiiez, 20 kilo-
meters (12.42 miles) distant, in a northwesterly direction. It is located
in a fine coffee section.
The postal business for the year ended December 31, 1897, was
$216.12. and the telegraph business, $318.52. The postmaster's salary
was $500 per annum.
We recommend the establishment of a route from Mayagiiez to Las
Marias, daily, on the following schedule:
Leave Mayagiiez daily at 7 a. in.;
Arrive at Las Marias by 11 a. m.;
Leave Las Marias daily at 1 p. in.;
Arrive at Mayagiiez by 5 p. m.
This road is very good as far as the Marias River, but beyond that
point it is mountainous and very bad. The country produces coffee
and tobacco.
Aldea Sanz was authorized to receive supply from Mayagiiez. It is
situated in a northeasterly direction, but the exact distance is not
known. The postal business for the year ended December 31, 1897,
was $23.63, and the postmaster's salary $75 per annum.
We recommend that it be given a special supply until sufficient busi-
ness is developed to justify a regular route.
Consideration of the business transacted at many of these offices
makes it doubtful whether service should be provided for every day of
the week, but as service has generally been furnished on Sunday,
whether paid for by the government or by the municipal authorities,
that frequency has been accepted by this committee, and is submitted
on that basis. It is to be determined by the Department whether this
frequency shall be continued or the routes established on a basis which
will abandon the Sunday service, except on the few regular contract
routes now in operation, and leave the question of Sunday service open,
and where needed to be petitioned for as would be required for any
new service. It is to be said, in passing, that the receipt of Sunday
mails at an office does not compel the observance of the usual week-
day office hours, as a limited number of hours will accommodate the
business and private interests.
The character of the roads in Porto Rico and the heavy rains which
prevail for one-half of each year render travel both difficult and dan-
gerous, and the regular connection of mail routes practically an impos-
sibility. The principal towns are located on the coast and the most
feasible means of communication is by water. No regular lines of coast
steamers are maintained at the present time, but it is our opinion that
an endeavor should be made to secure such facilities, and we are confi-
dent that the advertisement for bids for the performance of mail service
around the island by steamboat will be met by suitable proposals.
The distance from San Juan to Ponce, the two principal towns, is
about 140 miles around either end of the island, and can be made in
one day by a suitable steamer of 10 knots per hour, stopping at the
principal towns. A trip around the entire island can be made by one
steamer three times per week, the route to be stated from San Juan,







26 REPORT OF THE PORTO RICO POSTAL COMMITTEE.

via Arecibo, Aguadilla, Mayagiiez, Ponce, Arroyo, Punta de Santiago,
Playa-Naguabo, Isla de Vidques, Fajardo, and Luquillo, to San Juan,
three times per week, distance about 290 miles, on the following schedule:
Leave San Juan Monday and Friday, via Mayagiiez, at 6 a. m.;
Leave Ponce Tuesday and Saturday, via Mayagiiez, at 6 a. m.
Leave San Juan Wednesday, via Fajardo, at 6 a. m.;
Leave Ponce Thursday, via Fajardo, at 6 a. im.

It being impracticable to come to a dock at any of the above ports, a
requirement should be inserted that the contractor shall receive and
deliver the mails on shore. It is believed that such a service will sup-
plement the star service and make it possible to rearrange it on a
more economical basis. While the committee does not specifically
recommend the establishment of the steamboat service, these facts are
submitted for the information and consideration of the Department.
The information obtained by the committee as to the receipts and -
expenditures for the entire service in Porto Rico is both interesting
and instructive. The total revenues of both telegraphic and postal
services for the year ended December 31, 1897, were $197,083.01, and
the expenses $286,620, leaving a deficit of $89,536.99, or 31 per cent.
The salaries of postmasters and allowances for clerks amounted to
$108,340 per annum, or 38 per cent of the expenses; the star-route
service to $33,670, or 9 per cent of the expenses; the transatlantic
and intercolonial mail service to $79,406, or 35 per cent of the
expenses. The San Juan office furnished $76,994.60, or 26 per cent of
the revenue, and cost $23,690, or 12 per cent of the expenses.
The second following table gives the different items in detail, and
is preceded by a table showing total receipts and expenses of each
office on the island.


Office.


Adjuntas-....--- ........-............
Agiada.
Aguadia ........ .... ......................
Aguadilla ..................................
Aguas- Buenas -----.......--..-------....--..
A Lonito----------- ---- ---
Aldea San ...............................
Aracbo ............................. ..
A recibo -------------------- --------.-- ------
Arro yo.. .................................
Barceloneta .................................
Barranquitas ........... .................
Barros ....................................
Ba amon ........... .......................
Cabo Rojo.................................
Cagbas ...................................
Camy ............................... .....
Canovanas ..................................
Carolina............................ ........
Cataflo ...---...............................
Caoey .............-------...............



Ciales...
C ialitos.... ............................ *

Coaonlo ....................................
Cialer -...... ........ .....................
C ialitos ------ - -- - -- -


Corozal.................................
Coao do] Laurel .............................
Culebra .................................

Fajardo ....................................
Floriado ............................. ........
Gfianica....................................
Gauragunao..................................
Guayama ...............................
Guayanilla ........ ....................
Guaynabo..-...............................


Postal.


$210. 30
70.96
1,824. 39
344.96
368.17
23.63
298.30
5,716.35
563.97
209.10
97.78
245.42
503. 03
509.58
1,180.56
425.34
92.72
307.53
2:1. 20
1,055.14
80.40
246.42
74.79
1, 17.80
226.05
128.71
73.87

98.59
1. 171. 51
64. 98
26.92
2,107.24
291.66


Receipts. I
No. of Total ex-
Tele- clerks, pens of
graphic. Total. office.

$919.79 $1,130.09 1 $680.00
... 70.69 ..... 110.00
2,598.04 4,422.43 3 3,880.00
308.28 652.34 1 920.00
721.53 1,089.70 1 930.00
...- 23.63 .....75. 00
315.96 604.26 1 680.00
3, 361.46 9,077.81 3 366. 00
852.74 1,416.71 2 2,098.00
411.44 620.54 ........ 500.00
205.07 302.85 1 680.00
386.19 631.61 1 680.00
459.02 962. 05 1 1, 230. 00
170.12 977.70 1 680.00
1,330.44 1,511.00 3 2,430.00
711.41 1,136.78 1 1,870.00
61.76 154.48 ...... 500.00
358.54 666.07 1 920.00
...23. 20 ........ 75.00
682.24 1,737.38 1 1,326.00
S 239.53 319.93 ........ 5 00
275.60 532.02 1 680.00
..... ...... ......... ........ 75.00CO
... ... 74.79 1 680.00
1,467.78 2,575.68 1 680.00
308. 50 534.55 1 944.00
171.64 300.35 1 872.00
---------- 73.87 .. :.. ... 75.00

...... ... .. 8.59 ........ 75.00
1,095.23 2, 266. 74 2 2, 098. 00
75.00
........ 8 ... 75.00
26. 92 ....... 75.00
2,752.83 4,860.07 ...... 2,098.00
411.61 703.57 1 680.00







REPORT OF THE PORTO RICO POSTAL COMMITTEE.


Office.


Postal.


Gurabo .......... ..... .................. ..... $146.06
Hlatillo .. ......... ........ .. ........ ........ 94.36
Hornigueros ............................... 4:. 52
Hunmacao.................................... 3. 256. 64
Isablla ..................................... 196. 91
Isla de Vilues ......................-....... 264.61
Jaynlya........ ..................... .... 269.42
Juana Diaz................................. 680.16
Junceos ................................... 173.71
Laas ......................................... 82.25
Las M arias .................................1 216.12
Las iedras ................................. 18. 52
Lares ..................................... 1,218.70
Loiza............... .......... ... -- ..... ..... 88.39
Luquillo ..................................... 160. 07
Mannati ................................... 1,184.82
M aricao ......................... ........... 277.45
M aunalio......................... ......... 257.58
Maureyes ............................................
Mayaguez ................. ......... .. .I 5, 82). 45
M oca...........................--- ...... ..- 51. 32
M or6vis. ............................ ..... 57.81
Nagsabo .................................... 322.57
N aranijito ...................... ............ 114.84
Patilla .................................... 604.21
Pefieulas ................................... 215. 58
Playsi Mayagiiz ...............-- .... 8, 210.11
Play a Naguabo ............................ 205.10
Playa de Ponce.............................. 3 547. 77
Ponce ...................................... 7,061.80
Punta tie Santiago .......................... 231.66
Quebradillas................................ 253.38
Riinc n.. .................................... 68.08
Rio Grande ................................. 244.60
Rio Piedras ................................. 530. 03
SAbana Grande. ............................ 264.91
Salinas ................................- ... 198.01
San German................................ 291.92
San Juan .................................... 31,803.36
San Lorenzo ................................. 153.54
San Sbrotinco----------------------------------15.354
San Sebastian............................... 393.35
Santa Isabel ................................ 249.65
Santurce .....-.............................. 392.55
Tallaboa ..................................... 40. 46
Toa-Alta .................................... 254.57
Toa-Paja .................................... 88.74
Trnjillo-Alto .......................... .... 49.56
Utnado ..................................... 1,183.62
Vega-Alta ................................. 210. 52
Vega-Paja ............................... 274.00
Villalba Arriba ............................ 68.10
Yabucoa .................................... 816.48
Yauco ..................................... 1,817.09

Total.................... ............. 95,000.92


Receipts.

Tele-
graphic.


............
-- ---- -

S$2,649.78
197.42
............

611.52
336.31

318.52
249.01
1,101.04

220.74
7109.33
583.20
335. 83

3, 968. 22
------------

234.48
415.42
.... .......
500.00
219.59
5.455.32

3,384. 46
5,869.48

604.64
............
219.29
345.77
412.80
262.09
761.20
45,191.24
255.21
689.80
317.94
189.75

184.80
............
:::.:...... i
1,490. 83

784.78

747. 15
1,369.55


Total ex-
No. of pense of
Total. icclerks. e.


$146.06 .......
94. 36 ........
43.52 ........
5,906. 42 5
394.33 ........
264.61 .......
269.42.
1,291.68 1
510.02 1
82.25 .......
534.64 1
417.53 1
2,319.74 1
88.39 1.......
380.81 1
1,994.15 1
960.65 1
593.41 1

9,797 07 9
51.32 ........
292.29 1
737.99 1
114.84 ........
1,104.21 1
435.17 1
13, 665.43 2
205.10 ........
6, 932 23 2
12,931.28 10
231.66 ........
858.02 1
68.08 ........
463.89 1
875. 80 2

677.71 1
460.10 1
2,053.12 2
76,994.60 31
408.75 1
1,082.15 1
577.59 1
582.30 1
40.46 ........
439.37 ........
88.74 ........
49.56 ........
2,674.45 2
216.52 ........
1,058.78 1
68.10 .....
1,563. 63 1
3,186.64 2


102, 082.09 197. 083. 01 222 120, 234. 00


SUMMARY.

Total expenses of the postal and telegraphic service in Porto Rico.

General administration:
Salaries................................................................................ $13, 330. 00
Rent...................................---...............--........................----------------------------------------.....---------. 380. 00
Postmasters and clerks' salaries............................................................ 108,340.00
Rent of post-offices ................. .................-.................................... 7, 859.00
Railroad messengers (6 at $500) ............................................................. 3,000.00
Mail messengers (depots to post-offices) ............................................ ...... 4,035.00
Star-route contractors ................................ ...................................... 33, 670.00
Maritime contractors (to Vi6ques and Culebra) ........................................... 1,500.00
Transatlantic mail service .................. ........ .... ............ ..................... 67, 406.00
Intercolonial mail service (Cuba, San Domingo, and Porto Rico)...............---............---12, 000. 00
M material, etc ............. .................................... .......................... 24,000.00
M mounted linemen (33 at $300) ............................................................... 9, 90 000
Universal Postal Union expenses....-...................-........---....................... 200.00

Total expense .................. .................................................... 286, 620. 00
Total revenue-
Postal ................................................................. $95,000.92
Telegraphic............................................................ 102,082.09
-- 197, 083.01

D eficit.................................................... ................... 89,536.99


$110. 00
110.00
75.00
6,100.00
500.00
110.00
75.00
680.00
680.00
75.00
680.00
680.00
680.00
75.00
680.00
1,420.00
680.00
680.00
75.00
10.735. 0
75.00
680.00
680.00
75.00
680. 00
800.00
2,230.00
110.00
2,695. 00
10,560.00
110.00
680.00
110.00
680.00
2,204.00
680.00
680.00
2,098. 00
24.370.00
680.00
680.00
680.00
1,480.00
75.00
500.00
75.00
75.00
2,230.00
110. 00
680.00
75.00
680.00
2,676.00


I





28 REPORT OF THE PORTO RICO POSTAL COMMITTEE.

We recommend the appointment of a chief postal supervisor, or
with some such distinguishing title, with a suitable number of assist-
ants, inspectors, and clerks, and suggest that the following organiza-
tion will accomplish the desired results:
One chief postal supervisor, with a salary of $2,500 per annum, and
allowance of actual and necessary traveling expenses.
This officer, it is intended, will be the direct representative on the
island of the Postmaster-General, possessing, so far as the postal serv-
ice on the island is concerned, the same authority as is now vested by
law in the assistant postmasters-general of the present organization of
the Post-Office Department.
One chief clerk to the chief postal supervisor, with a salary of $1,800
per annum.
One bonded clerk, with a salary of $1,200 per annum, who shall act
as postal card and postage stamp agent.
One stenographer, with a salary of $1,000 per annum.
One post-office inspector, with a salary of $1,600 per annum and a
per diem allowance of $3 for actual and necessary traveling expenses,
for'mail depredations, and inspection of post-offices, and contract
mail service.
One messenger, with a salary of "_'i2 per annum.
It is needless to say that all of these officers and clerks should be
conversant with the Spanish language.
It is suggested further that there be appointed for duty at the postal
headquarters at San Juan a clerk of the office of the Auditor for the
Post-Office Department, with a salary of $1,600 per annum, for the
preliminary examination of postal and money-order accounts, as well
as the verification of mail contractors' accounts, as certified to by the
Chief Postal Supervisor, thus furnishing an additional check against
the possibility of error.
The committee recommends the establishment of post-offices at such
points as they were located under the Spanish administration.
In some places the records show that post-offices were in existence
under the Spanish regime which could be maintained only by reason of
the fact that telegraph service was operated in connection with the
postal service, the two services combined making it possible to employ
persons at reasonable salaries to perform the duties.
The same rules which govern the establishment of post-offices in the
United States should govern the establishment of proposed new offices
in Porto Rico which may hereafter be applied for. It will be necessary,
especially at the larger offices, viz: San Juan, Ponce, Mayagiiez, Agua-
dilla, Arecibo, Guayama, and Humacao, to have Americans as post-
masters, but, in the judgment of the committee, suitable natives should
be appointed as clerks in such offices and postmasters in the smaller
offices, and no one should be considered suitable unless he can read
and write the English language and is possessed of sufficient intelli-
gence to enable him to perform his duties without the constant assist-
ance of an American.
We recommend that the same rules governing the appointment and
pay of postmasters as are in vogue at the present time in the Depart-
ment be applied to the appointment and pay of postmasters in Porto
Rico, with this addition-that the bond executed by the postmasters
should be in duplicate, one copy to be forwarded to the Department,
upon which the commission will issue, the other to be filed with the
chief postal supervisor of the island. All bonds, before being sent to
Washington should be approved by him as to the character and finan-
cial responsibility of the bondsmen, and he should be empowered by law





REPORT OF THE PORTO RICO POSTAL COMMITTEE.


to take legal steps at once upon the bond in the event of any prospec-
tive loss to the Government by reason of defalcation of or sudden finan-
cial reverses to either or both of the bondsmen, so as to fully protect
the Department. In case of the necessity for the execution of a new
bond, by reason of the death of or sudden financial reverses to any of
the sureties, he should be empowered to require new bonds to be exe-
cuted in due form, and should forward a copyof them to the Department.
Another reason which makes this course essential is that it enables
the chief postal supervisor to be advised as to the sufficiency of the
bond to cover the amount of business done at each office. That officer
should also be advised of all establishments, discontinuances, etc., of
post-offices, and should be consulted relative to all matters of that
character.
Porto Rico is an island situated 1,250 miles from the nearest port in
the United States, and 1,400 miles from New York. It is now con-
nected with this country by a line of War Department transports, with
sailings arranged from New York direct to San Juan, sailing time
about five days; but, returning, these steamers go via Cuba, making the
time from any port of the island to New York ten to twelve days. It
is also connected by a merchant line (the Red I)"D Line) of twice-a-
month service, with alternate landings at San Juan and Ponce.
When affairs in the island shall have again returned to their normal
condition, it is very improbable that there will be any greater fre-
quency of steamship service than twice a month, thus rendering the
means of communication between the United States and the island
slow and liable to interruptions of considerable duration.
This consideration, together with the facts that the people of the
island speak no other language than Spanish and are extremely poor,
has led your committee to form tile conclusion that the postal service
of the island should, to a certain degree, be administered by a corps
of clerks located at San Juan, the capital.
Under the Spanish system the mail contractors were paid monthly
through the custom-house for their services, it being required that they
should present bills for their services which had been approved by one
of the alcaldes of the terminal offices of the route on which the service
was performed.
All the revenues of the postal service were received by the custom-
house, and all salaries and other expenses incident to the service were
paid by that branch of the Government.
In the administration of the service in this country all direct
expenses of the post-offices are paid from the revenues of each separate
post-office, mail contractors only being paid by warrant on the treasury.
In Porto Rico it should be the aim to pay all the expenses of the serv-
ice direct from the revenues of the post-offices, and, to enable this to
be done, it will be necessary that certain changes be made in the sys-
tem to meet the different conditions caused by the distance from this
country, the infrequent communication, the difference of language, and
the extreme poverty of the laboring classes.
The committee is of the opinion that a system should be devised
under which payments to mail carriers for service performed should be
made monthly, or as frequently as salaries are paid to officials and
clerks, the necessities of the first-named class being more immediate
than those of the latter class.
It is our opinion that the postmasters at San Juan and Ponce should
be instructed to pay the bills for mail service performed upon the dif-
ferent routes on the certificates of the postmasters at the terminal
offices that the service was properly performed, when such certificates





30 REPORT OF THE PORTO RICO POSTAL COMMITTEE.

have been examined and found correct and certified to by the chief
postal supervisor, the accounts for such payments to be audited in the
same manner as at present provided for all other such accounts before
being paid by the branch of the Auditor's Office for the Post-Office
Department at San Juan.
It is recommended that the surplus revenues of each office of the
island be deposited with the postmasters at San Juan and Ponce, but,
as the surplus revenues will not furnish sufficient funds for the pay-
ment of mail messengers and contractors, it will be necessary that a
sum sufficient to cover the amount of the probable disbursements at
San Juan and Ponce be deposited at the said offices by drafts of the
Postmaster-General drawn upon the request of the Auditor for the
Post-Office Department.
One of the clerks provided for in the above scheme of organization is
given duties of a postal card and postage-stamp agent, and should
provide postal supplies for the whole island.
In ordering supplies from this agent the postmaster should make the
order in duplicate, one copy to be sent to the stamp division of the
office of the Third Assistant Postmaster-General, and the other copy to
the stamp agency at Sain Juan. Duplicate receipts for supplies received
should also be given by the postmaster to the stamp division and stamp
agency, thus furnishing a check on the latter independent of reports
made by him.
This agency can also be utilized for the distribution of all postal sup-
plies provided by the division of post office supplies of the office of the
First Assistant Postmaster-General
We recommend that the registry system of the United States be
introduced into the island under the present regulations in place of
the system of certifying letters, which has hitherto been in vogue, and,
as the bulk of registered matter will be exchanged between not more
than six or seven offices of the island, we recommend the establishment
of brass-lock exchanges between San Juan and Ponce, San Juan and
Mayagiiez, San Juan and Humacao, Ponce and Mayagiiez, Ponce and
Guayama, and between Guayama and Humacao.
We also recommend the establishment and extension of the money-
order system in the island in place of the Spanish system of sending let-
ters of declared value, and of insurance of contents of letters of declared
value, at the offices doing a yearly business of more than $200, as shown
by the table on pages 7 and 8 of this report, and recommend that offices
| doing a yearly business of $1,500 or more, as shown in the said table,
Sbe designated as iiiteriational money-order offices.
'- We also recommend that the free-delivery system be introduced into
the service of the island wherever allowable under the existing law,
and that, in computing revenues, Ponce and Playa de Ponce be consid-
ered as one office, and that Mayagiiez and Playa de Mayagiiez be
considered also as one office.
As has already been shown, a system of delivery was furnished under
the Spanish regime, the service of which was paid for by the citizens.
The Government paid the carriers a salary of $180 per annum for their
services in delivering telegrams and for general work about the office.
This system prevailed at a great many of the offices of the island, and
has been permitted to continue wherever the question has been brought
to the attention of the committee, the carriers having been required to
file in the military postal station a request signed by the citizens to the
effect that the carriers be permitted to continue to deliver mail matter
to them. We perceive no reason why these carriers should not be per-





REPORT OF THE PORTO RICO POSTAL COMMITTEE.


mitted to continue to deliver mail matter at offices where the free-
delivery service shall not be introduced.
We think that the special-delivery system can be introduced into the
service with satisfactory results, and recommend that it be done.
The private letter carriers cal be utilized in making these deliveries,
or suitable special-delivery messenger boys can be employed at any
office at very low wages as compared with the scale prevailing in the
United States.
Mail-messenger service will have to be provided at the offices named
on pages I and 12 of this report, points at which it has hitherto been
maintained, and we suggest that at San Juan, Ponce, and Mayagiiez
the duties of the mail messenger be extended so as to embrace the de-
livery to and from the steamship landings of mail as often as required,
but which would ordinarily be not oftener than once a week.
In this connection we have to state that two proposals for service
between Ponce and P'laya Ponce, thirteen times a week, and five pro-
posals for service between Ponce and Yanco, are submitted.
Proposals for star service have also been received by the committee
and are filed herewith.
In the table given on pages 7 and 8 of this report is indicated the
rental paid for offices at such places where it was authorized.
We recommend that the question of continuing these rentals by
making new leases be taken up by the Department.
At San Juan a public building was occupied by order of General
Brooke, for which it is understood that no rental is to be paid.
At Ponce a portion of a building on the Calle de la Marina has been
occupied by the post-office since September 17, 1898.
The municipality of Ponce has agreed to pay the rent, $50 per month,
to December 31, 1898, the lessee of the building having further agreed,
in his agreement with the alcalde, that the Post-Office Department
should have the option of continuing to occupy the premises as a post-
office at the same rate from January 1, 1899, upon condition that five
incandescent electric lights which were in the office be bought and paid
for at the rate of $5 each.
At Mayagiiez three rooms were occupied in the municipality build-
ing, after an agreement between Captain Buchanan, the collector of
the port, and the alcalde of the city, without any understanding as to
what rental would be charged. It is our opinion that a rental of $25
per month should be paid to the city for the rental of these quarters.
At Aguadilla new quarters were occupied on the lower floor of a
building situated directly on the plaza, very convenient to the citizens,
and much superior to the building formerly occupied. The rental
agreed upon was $17 per month from December 1,1898, of which amount
$12 per month was considered to be the proper proportion to be paid
by the Post-Office Department, and $5 by the War Department, a por-
tion of the space being occupied by the United States Signal Service
Corps.
At Guayama the post-office occupies a building assigned for the
purpose by the military commander of the district. It is situated
directly on the plaza, and is more convenient to the citizens than was
the site formerly occupied by the Spanish post-office, which was some
distance down a side street, for which a rental of $168 per annum was
allowed by the general administration.
The building now occupied was formerly occupied by the Spanish
military commander, so it is understood.
At Humacao the building formerly occupied by the Spanish post-





32 REPORT OF THE PORTO RICO POSTAL COMMITTEE.

office and telegraph service was first taken possession of by the United
States Signal Service, and that portion of it devoted to the uses of the
post-office is now used by the military postal station established there,
under an agreement with a sergeant of the United States Signal
Service, who is in charge of the telegraph service, by which it is agreed
that the sum of $10 per month, United States currency, shall be paid
by the Post-Office Department to the signal sergeant for the use of four
rooms in the building.
The agreement referred to is herewith submitted.
The sum assigned for rental at Humacao under the Spanish regime
was $420 per annum.
In the cities of Yauco, Oayey, and Camuy, where military stations
have been open, no changes have been made in the amount of rental to
be paid, but as the rental has been reduced in other places where an
effort has been made, it is believed that a saving can be effected at
these three places.
At Playa Ponce the office is in the custom-house, and no rental is
being charged.
The furniture and fixtures in the Spanish post-offices were of the
plainest and poorest character, totally unfit, as we view it, for the pur-
poses for which they were intended.
Special efforts have been made to interest the military authorities to
provide new outfits at such stations as were opened up in the cities
where garrisons of troops were maintained; and this could ordinarily
be done by carpenters attached to the quartermaster's department, but
at Mayagiiez a bill of $34.50 was incurred for carpenter work, which
was ordered by the committee to be paid by the postal agent. At
Ponce the carpenter work had not been completed at the time of the
departure of the committee. It was understood by members of the
committee that this work was being done at the order and expense of
the military authorities of that district.
The mail bags formerly in use were made of jute and were closed by
cords tied around the necks of the bags, the knots of which were sealed
with sealing wax. Their quality was poor and those coming under our
observation were very much worn.
On the horseback routes two boxes covered with zinc were used, one
on either side of the horse, the carrier riding seated on a pad placed on
the horse's back between the boxes. These boxes were locked, but the
carrier had the key in his possession.
Sufficient mail equipment has been received from this country to pro-
vide for exchanges of newspaper mails between the military stations,
but the letter mails must still be exchanged in sealed bags, owing to
the fact that a supply of keys has not been received with which to
supply each office.
We recommend that the mail equipment used in this country, bags,
sacks, locks, and keys, except that the locks be made of brass, or a non-
corroding metal throughout instead of steel, be provided for use in
Porto Rico, and that for the horseback routes the new form of horse
mail bags made of heavy duck with leather trimmings be used. In
fact it would be preferable that no all-leather pouches be furnished, as
the cotton bags will give better satisfaction in that country where the
rainfalls are very heavy and continuous.
In regard to the ocean mail service very little information of value
could be secured, because of the interruption caused by the exist-
ing war.





REPORT OF THE PORTO RICO POSTAL COMMITTEE.


The Spanish Trans-Atlantic Company made bimonthly trips from
Cadiz, by San Juan, to Havana and return, and another company, that
of Ramon Herrera, performed bimonthly service between Havana and
other Cuban ports, and Ponce, Mayagiiez, and Aguadilla, but the
service by these two lines has not been performed since the commence-
ment of hostilities in the present war.
The general administration appropriated the sum of $12,000 for the
intercolonial service.
The French Trans-Atlantic Company has a line of steamers sailing
monthly from Havre, via St. Thomas and San Juan, to San Domingo
and Jacmel and connecting with an annex steamer making monthly
trips from Fort Pierre, via St. Thomas, Ponce, and Mayagiiez, to San
Domingo and Jacmel.
The Hamburg-American Company had a line of steamers which made
bimonthly trips between Hamburg and Havana, touching at Mayaguez
and Ponce on the first trip and at Aguadilla, Mayagiiez, Ponce, and
Santiago de Cuba on the second trip.
For service by mail steamers the general administration appropriated
$67,406 per annum.
As has already been indicated in this report the postal and tele-
graphic services were under the supervision of the same officials, and
the work of both services was performed by the same employees.
Your committee has considered the advisability of recommending
that the telegraphic service be continued to be performed in connection
with the postal service, but has decided to make no recommendation
relative thereto.
There is no authority under the existing law for the conduct of tele-
graph service by the Post-Office Department in connection with the
postal service, and to combine the telegraphic with the postal service
would render necessary in every case the appointment of skilled teleg-
raphers as post-office clerks, which fact alone would tend to greatly
increase the salary expense account without increasing the efficiency of
the postal service in any degree; and it is not believed, further, that
the revenues would be increased sufficiently to warrant the additional
expense of the operation of the service.
The telegraph service is now operated for military purposes by the
United States Signal Service, and it can continue to be so operated by
that branch of the Army at a much less expense than would be incurred
by the Post-Office Department in operating it. There being no private
lines, the telegraphic business of the Army, most of which is urgent
and does not admit of the risk that is necessarily incurred when the
mails are used, of making connection at relay and connecting points,
must be done on lines which can be controlled by it. The transporta-
tion facilities which are provided for an army, or in connection with it,
furnishes the means of hauling supplies, materials, workmen, etc., which
would be an enormous expense to any other department.
Your committee recommends that the domestic rates of postage, 2
cents per ounce for first-class matter, etc., be established between the
United States and Porto Rico, and the continuance of that rate of post-
age between all points in the Island, thus applying to Porto Rico the
domestic rates of postage of this country.
In this connection it is well to state that at the present time the rate
of exchange in the custom-houses and military postal stations is two
Porto Rican pesos for one dollar, American, by order of the military
authorities, so that from the point of view of the Porto Rican citizen
-3





34 REPORT OF THE PORTO RICO POSTAL COMMITTEE.

he is required to pay 4 cents postage on first-class matter where, before
the war, he paid but 3 cents.
During the war and before the American occupation, in addition to
the regular postage, he paid 2 cents postage as a war tax.
The rates of exchange given by the merchants varies throughout the
island from $1.75 to $1.40. The rates have been steadily declining,
owing, it is said, to the demand for Porto Rican money with which to
gather and move the crops, and to the fact that the Spanish Govern-
ment has declared the Porto Rican peso to be at par with the Spanish
peso.
The question of the relative value of the American and Porto Rican
money is one which deserves immediate settlement.
In its present aspect it affects most injuriously the interests of the
American soldiers and civilians in the island, who are compelled to
accept whatever rates the Porto Rican banks and merchants think fit
to offer for the American money which they have.
The custom-houses and military postal stations exchange money at
the rate of two for one for soldiers and post-office employees, but not
enough Porto Rican money is received to satisfy the demand for it.
In this connection it is proper to speak of the per diem allowance to
postal employees on the island, which was fixed by you at $1.25,
United States currency, upon the report of this committee. At the
time that this rate was decided upon the rate of exchange at San Juan
and Ponce was $1.75; at Guayama and Humacao, $2, and at Mayagiiez,
$1.60, while the military postal stations and custom-houses were able
to supply Porto Rican money at $2, but the receipts of Porto Rican
money have decreased at the custom-houses and military postal sta-
tions, and the rates of exchange have declined throughout the island,
being $1.50 for bank notes and $1.40 for silver in Pouce at the time of
our departure.
This fact has caused some complaint from post-office employees, but
the committee is of the opinion that the amount allowed is ample under
the present conditions for the payment of the actual living expenses of
the employees; that is, the cost of suitable shelter and proper food, and
recommends that no greater allowance be made until the rate of exchange
shall have greatly decreased or disappeared entirely.
It has been found necessary to employ interpreters at various offices.
Prior to the arrival of the committee in Porto Rico, W. F. Lee had
been employed as interpreter in Military Station No. 1, Ponce, at a salary
of $40 per month, United States currency, and is now performing efficient
service in the office, combining the duties of general-delivery clerk with
those of interpreter.
He is in every way competent, and the committee recommends that
his compensation be increased to $60 per month, United States currency.
Louis Antonsante was employed as an interpreter, to take effect from
September 22, 1898, at a salary of $30 per month, United States cur-
rency, for duty in the office at Arecibo, with the understanding that
he would also perform the duties of a post-office clerk. From the date
of his employment up to the date of the opening of the office at Arecibo
he performed service in the office at Aguadilla. He has given good
satisfaction in the performance of his duties.
J. G. Lopez was employed as an interpreter for service in the office
at Aguadilla, with a salary of $25 per month, United States currency,
taking effect from October 5, 1898.
Tomds C. Vera was employed as an interpreter for service in the
post-office at Mayagiiez, at a salary of $60 per month, United States
currency, from September 11, 1898.





REPORT OF THE PORTO RICO POSTAL COMMITTEE.


He is a well-educated man and has been employed in the Mayagiiez
office for many years. IHe furnishes good and efficient service. The
rate of his compensation was stated so that in United States currency
it would be equal to what he received for his services under the Spanish
administration.
The committee arrived at Ponce September 7, 1898, and found the
office in operation in the custom house at Playa Ponce, with H. M. Rob-
inson in charge, the post-office force having arrived the latter part of
July with General Brooke's expedition, and the office having been opened
August 1, 1898.
The office was in good working order, and the postal service was being
as efficiently performed as was possible under the circumstances, the
fixtures having been improvised in almost every instance, while the
post-office equipment was inadequate and lacking in many respects.
The clerical force found in the office at the time of arrival was most
efficient, and deserves a great deal of credit for the work it did and the
obstacles in the way of a successful performance of the service which
it sought to overcome.
One fact which rendered the service doubly difficult was the constant
changing of the stations of troops, the arrival of fresh troops, and the
return of soldiers on the island to this country.
Mr. H. M. Robinson, appointed clerk in charge at military station
No. 1, Ponce, Porto Rico, and designated afterwards by you as super-
intendent of the military stations in Porto Rico, has proved himself a
man of resources and great executive ability, and has been indefatiga-
ble in the performance of his duties.
Notwithstanding the fact that the clerical force was almost daily
changed, owing to the necessity for detailing experienced clerks to offices
opened in newly acquired territory, to the sickness and return to this
country of a great many clerks, and to the arrival of a great many
clerks by every transport, rendering it necessary to constantly instruct
clerks in their duties, Mr. Robinson performed his duties in a manner
highly satisfactory to the military authorities and to the citizens who
received their mail from that office, and is entitled to a great deal of
credit for his work.
The other clerks now stationed on the island are entitled to com-
mendation for the enthusiasm and manner in which they are performing
their work, with the exception of those concerning whom special reports
have been made to you.
At the time of the arrival of the committee in Porto Rico there was
but one American office in operation on the island, Ponce, while at the
time of its departure seventeen offices were in full operation, viz:
Ponce, Mayagiiez, Utuado, Coamo, Juana Diaz, Playa Ponce, Guay-
ama, Aguadilla, Humacao, Vi6ques, Fajardo, Arecibo, Oayey, Ciguas,
Aibonito, and San Juan, opened in the order named.
Instructions were issued through Superintendent Robinson Septem-
ber 18, 1898, to the postal agent at Mayagiiez to employ Jos6 Benagas
y Gotal as the mail messenger between Mayagiiez and Aguadilla at the
rate of $800 per annum, United States currency, to carry the mails on
the railroad between Mayagiiez and Aguadilla, and with the under-
standing that he would provide for the transportation of the mail be-
tween the railroad station and the post-office at each terminus, and
that he would perform whatever service should be required of him in
the Aguadilla post-office between 8.30 a. m. and 3.30 p. m.
Arrangements were made October 12, 1898, by Messrs. Fenton and
Mooney, of the committee, in response to telegraphic instructions from
the chairman of the committee, with John Dimas and John de Choudens





36 REPORT OF THE PORTO RICO POSTAL COMMITTEE.

to perform service as mail messengers on the railroad between San
Juan and Camuy, alternately accompanying the mails on the railroad,
and, when not so engaged, performing such duties as were required of
them in the San Juan post-office. The compensation of each is at the
rate of $50 per month, United States currency. One salary should be
charged to the appropriation for clerk hire, while the other should be
charged to the mail-messenger appropriation.
From October 18, 1898, Ventura Marin was employed as a mail mes-
senger between the station and the post-office at San Juan, at a com-
pensation of $25 per month, United States currency.
For the permanent administration of the postal service of the island,
we recommend to the consideration of the Department the question of
the advisability of dividing the territory into seven sections or dis-
tricts, the boundaries of which should correspond to the seven political
divisions, as they existed under the Spanish regime, with one central
post-office, the other offices within that district to be stations or sub-
stations of the central office.
The salaries of the clerks in charge of the several stations should be
fixed at a sum not exceeding what the commissions on cancellations
would be if computed in the manner as is done in the case of the
fourth-class offices of the United States, said salaries to be fixed in
even hundreds of dollars, except in cases where commissions will be
less than $100, when the salary should be $50.
The salaries should be based on the receipts for one year, and should
be readjusted each year, commencing with July 1, the readjusted salary
to be based on the receipts for four quarters ended March 31 of each
year.
The seven principal offices of the island, viz, San Juan, Arecibo,
Aguadilla, Mayagiiez, Ponce, Guayama, and Humacao, should be made
Presidential from the time the permanent organization shall take effect.
In the first district there would be one central office (San Juan) and
eighteen stations, viz: Bayamon, Can6vanas, Carolina, Catailo, Coro-
zal, Dorado, Guaynabo, Loiza, Maureyes, Naranjito, Rio Grande, Rio
Piedras, Santurce, Toa-Alta, Toa-Baja, Trujillo-Alto, Vega-Alta, Vega-
Baja.
In the second district, one central office (Arecibo) and eleven sta-
tions, viz: Barceloneta, Camuy, Ciales, Cialitos, Florida, Hatillo,
Jayuya, Manati, Mor6vis, Quebradillas, Utuado.
In the third district, one central office (Aguadilla) and six stations,
viz: Aguada, Isabela, Lares, Moca, Rincon, San Sebastian.
In the fourth district, one central office (Mayagiiez) and nine stations,
viz: Aldea Sanz, Afiasco, Cabo Rojo, Hormigueros, Lajas, Las Marias,
Maricao, STibana Grande, San German.
In the fifth district, one central office (Ponce) and sixteen stations,
viz: Adjuntas, Aibouito, Barranquitas, Barros, Coamo, Coto del Laurel,
Giianica, Guaraguao, Guayanilla, Juana Diaz, Pefiuelas, Playa de
Ponce, Santa Isabel, Tallaboa, Villalba'Arriba, Yauco.
In the sixth district, one central office (Guayama) and ten stations,
viz: Aguas-Buenas, Arroyo, Caguas, Cayey, Cidra, Comerio, Gurabo,
Juncos, Salinas, San Lorenzo.
And in the seventh district, one central office (Humacao) and thir-
teen stations, viz: Ceiba, Culebra, Culebrita, Fajardo, Isla de Vidques,
Las Piedras, Luquillo, Maunabo, Naguabo, Patillas, Playa Naguabo,
Punta de Santiago, Yabucoa.
Your committee went on the mission appointed by you with the sole
objects of inaugurating an efficient postal service for Porto Rico and





REPORT OF THE PORTO RICO POSTAL COMMITTEE. 37

of advancing the interests of the Government at every point coming
under its jurisdiction. While the committee was imbued with a desire
to make the service on the island self-supporting so far as possible, it
is hoped that this condition will be attained in the near future.
The members of the committee have at all times worked in harmony
with each other, and they are agreed on all recommendations contained
herein.
In concluding this report the members of the committee, as well as
the secretary, desire to acknowledge to you their appreciation of your
appointment of them in connection therewith, and sincerely hope that
they have, in your opinion, successfully performed the work designated
by you in your instructions to them.
We have the honor to be, very respectfully,
JAMES E. STUART, Chairman.
CHASE. F. TROTTER,
JOHN M. MASTEN,
W. M. MOONEY,
D. H. FENTON,
MARTIN A. MACDONALD, Secretary.
Hon. CHARLES EMORY SMITH,
Postmaster- General.




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