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 Front Cover
 Foreword
 Table of Contents
 Introduction
 Occupational trends
 Occupational information on...
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Group Title: Florida. State Dept. of Education. Bulletin 70M-1
Title: Occupational information for Florida schools
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00080779/00001
 Material Information
Title: Occupational information for Florida schools
Series Title: Florida. State Dept. of Education. Bulletin 70M-1
Physical Description: 1 v. (loose-leaf) : illus. ;
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Division of Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education
Publisher: n.p.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Publication Date: 1967
Copyright Date: 1967
 Subjects
Subject: Labor supply -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Occupations -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
General Note: Cover title.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00080779
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AHQ5947
oclc - 01722600
alephbibnum - 001631153

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Foreword
        Page i
        Page i-a
    Table of Contents
        Page ii
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Occupational trends
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    Occupational information on Florida
        Page B-1
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    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text









































--H-- STATE DEPARTMENT
OF EDUCATION



State Superintendent

TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA


BULLETIN 70M-1

MAY, 1967



















for Florida Schools


to I


















FOREWORD


The position of Occupational Information Specialist has been established
in the Vocational, Technical and Adult Division of the State Department
of Education.

One of the functions of this position is to assist vocational educators
and guidance counselors in securing current, pertinent, and usable
occupational information about manpower availability and needs, and job
trends and opportunities as it applies to the local, state and national
situation.

The plans here are to send out to you available information of this
type on a continuous basis. For this reason the material is not bound
in book form. This first enclosure includes the first three sections
of the proposed material in an expandable type portfolio. We hope
that you will keep this folio in a handy place for quick reference;
and as supplemental or updated material is forwarded to you, you will
add it to, or use it to replace the material already in the folder.

Since this office wants to be of maximum assistance to you, as you
work with youth and programs of study, we would appreciate any sug-
gestions you might have, an we invite your requests for further
materials. Your correspondence should be addressed to Rod R. Dugger,
Occupational Information Specialist, Vocational, Technical and Adult
Education, State Department of Education, Tallahassee, Florida.



Carl W. Proehl
Assistant Superintendent
Vocational, Technical and
Adult Education









J3 7570 0'9 7 5-





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*










TABLE OF CONTENTS


Foreword ............................................................ i
Table of Contents ........................ ...............* ... ....... ii
Charts ........................................................... ii
Tables .......................................................* iii

Section I
IlITRODIUCTION ................................................... 1

Section II
OCCUPATIONAL TRENDS ............................................. 1
Industrial Employment Changes and Projections ................. 2
Occupational Changes and Projections .......................... 2
Employment of Women ............................ ............. 4
Mobility of the Labor Force ................................... 4
Technological Change ..................... ..... ....... .... .... 7
Changes in Composition of Labor Force ......................... 7
SSummary ....................................................... 9
If You Join the Labor Force in 1970 -- Chances Are ............ 10
The Southeastern States ....................................... 20
The Southeast A Fast Growing Region ....................... 21
Ranking of Florida and the Southeastern States ............... 24

Section III
OCCUPATIONAL INFORMATION ON FLORIDA .............................. 1
Goods Producing Industries .................................... 2
Service Producing Industries ............................... 2
Florida's Demand for Additional Trained Workers, in Selected
Occupations as Determined in a Survey Conducted by the Florida
State Employment Service .................................... 19
Occupations in Principal Areas of Florida Ranked in Order of
Demand .................................. .. ......... 33
Technicians for Florida Industries .......................... 34
Highlights of the Survey ..................................... 35
The Major Technical Fields ............................... 37
In What Occupations are OuriWorkers Employed? .............. 40
In Florida's Labor Force in 1970 -- Chances Are ............... 43


CHARTS

Section II
Chart I .......................................................... 5
EMPLOYMENT IN MAJOR OCCUPATIONAL GROUPS
Chart II ........................................................ 6
PERCENT CHANGE IN EMPLOYMENT IN MAJOR OCCUPATIONAL GROUPS 1950-60
ESTIMATED PERCENTCHANGE IN EMPLOYMENT IN MAJOR OCCUPATIONAL
GROUPS 1960-1975
* Chart III ..................................................... .. 8
CHANGES IN THE NUMBER OF WORKERS IN EACH AGE GROUP 1950 TO
1960 AND 1960 TO 1970

Tal fCnet a,16


May, 1967


Table of Contents








CHARTS
(Continued)

Section II
Chart IV .......... ...... ....... .................... 14
WHILE TOTAL EMPLOYMENT WILL GO UP BY ONE-FOURTH BY 1975 --
INDUSTRY GROWTH RATES WILL VARY WIDELY
Chart V ........................................... ............ ... 15
JOB OPPORTUNITIES GENERALLY WILL INCREASE FASTEST IN OCCUPATIONS
REQUIRING THE MOST EDUCATION AND TRAINING
Chart VI ............................................... ....... 22
PERCENT CHANGE IN TOTAL NONAGRICULTURAL AND INDUSTRY DIVISION
EMPLOYMENT IN THE SOUTHEAST AND THE UNITED STATES, 1939 TO
1964
Chart VII .............................. ............... 23
SOUTHEASTERN EMPLOYMENT CLASSIFIED BY INDUSTRY DIVISION 1939,
1947, AND 1964

Section III
Chart I ....................... .................................... 3
A CENTURY OF FLORIDA'S POPULATION GROWTH
POPULATION GROWTH -- TEN LARGEST STATES PERCENT INCREASE 1954-64
Chart II ......................... .... ................... . ..... 4
MANUFACTURING EMPLOYMENT FLORIDA AND THE UNITED STATES
CASH RECEIPTS FROM FARM MARKETING FLORIDA
Chart III .......................................... 5
PERCENT CHANGE IN NONAGRICULTURAL EMPLOYMENT
PERCENT CHANGE IN MANUFACTURING EMPLOYMENT
PERCENT CHANGE IN AGRICULTURAL EMPLOYMENT
PERCENT CHANGE IN TOTAL LABOR FORCE 1960-70
Chart IV ............................................ 6
PERCENT CHANGE IN POPULATION
EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT
PERCENT OF STATE'S POPULATION BORN IN ANOTHER STATE
PERCENT OF STATE'S POPULATION MIGRATION BETWEEN 1955-60
Chart V ....................... ........ ............. ..... 7
MOBILITY OF POPULATION FOR FLORIDA AND THE UNITED STATES
Chart VI .................................. ...... . .......... 20
DEMAND FOR OCCUPATIONS IN FLORIDA BY COUNTY OR SURVEY AREA AND
BY SUPERVISORY AREA
Chart VII ................................. ................ 23
OPPORTUNITIES FOR WORK IN PRINCIPAL AREAS OF FLORIDA
Chart VIII ....................................................... 45
FLORIDA'S NEW INDUSTRIAL PLANTS AND EXPECTED EMPLOYMENT, 1965,
BY INDUSTRY
Chart IX ...................... .... ... .. .... ...... 47
FLORIDA HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES 1965


TABLES

Section II
Table 1 ................................ ...................... 11
TOTAL EMPLOYED IN 1964 AND PROJECTED REQUIREMENTS IN 1975, BY
MAJOR OCCUPATIONAL GROUP


Table of Contents


May, 1967









TABLES
(Continued)

Section II
T.ole 2 .......................................................... 12
EMPLOYMENT IN NONAGRICULTURAL ESTABLISHMENTS BY INDUSTRY
.DIVISION, SELECTED YEARS 1929-1963
Table 3 ...................................................... 13
EMPLOYMENT BY MAJOR OCCUPATIONAL GROUPS 1940 AND 1963
Table 4 ...................................... ............ 16
EMPLOYMENT BY MAJOR OCCUPATIONAL GROUPS AND IN SELECTED
OCCUPATIONS, 1964 AND PROJECTED REQUIREMENTS, 1975
Table 5 ...................................................... . 18
PROJECTED GROWTH OF THE UNITED STATES 1960 TO 2000
Table 6 ....................................... ............ 19
SELECTED OCCUPATIONS IN DEMAND IN THE UNITED STATES IN 1965

Section III
Table 1 .................... ...................................... 8
EMPLOYMENT IN FLORIDA NON-AGRICULTURAL ESTABLISHMENTS BY
INDUSTRY GROUP
Table 2 ....................... ................................... 9
EMPLOYMENT IN FLORIDA BY OCCUPATIONAL GROUP 1960 AND 1965
Table 3 ....................... ....... ... .............. .. 10
WORK FORCE IN FLORIDA BY OCCUPATIONAL GROUP
Table 4 .......................................................... 11
WORK FORCE ESTIMATES -- STATEWIDE
Table 5 ............................................... . ..... 12
PROJECTED GROWTH OF FLORIDA'S POPULATION
Table 6 ............................................... ......... 13
POPULATION AND LABOR FORCE FOR FLORIDA AND PROJECTIONS
Table 7 ... .......................................... 14
EMPLOYMENT IN SELECTED OCCUPATIONS, BY SEX AND TOTAL FOR 1960
AND PROJECTED FOR 1970 AND 1980
Table 8 ..................... ................................... 36
DEMAND FOR TECHNICIANS IN FLORIDA'S INDUSTRIES
Table 9 ............... ......................... .......... 44
FLORIDA'S NEW AND EXPANDED INDUSTRIAL PLANTS, 1965, BY INDUSTRY
'LARGEST NEW INDUSTRIAL ILAJiTS AND EXPANSIONS IN FLORIDA, 1965
Table 10 ......................................................... 46
FLORIDA'S NEW AND EXPANDED INDUSTRIAL PLANTS, 1961-1965, BY
COUNTY
Table 11 ........ ........... ............ ..... ........... 48
POPULATION AND LAND AREA STATISTICS BY STATE AND BY COUNTY
Table 12 ................................ ............... ...... 52
FLORIDA'S COMMUTING WORKERS IN 1960 SHOWN BY COUNTIES


Table of Contents


May, 1967










INTRODUCTION


A Panel of Consultants on Vocational Education was convened at President
Kennedy's request to review and evaluate past vocational education
legislation and to make recommendations for its improvement and redirection.
This panel's report in November, 1962 stressed that, "Education for occupa-
tional compentency should be carefully correlated with the possibility of
employment."I The Panel recommended that local, state and Federal employ-
ment service reports and projections be made available to all schools so
that this objective could be achieved.

These recommendations of the panel were eventually incorporated into the
Vocational Education Act of 1963 signed into law by President Johnson on
December 18, 1963. In order for a state to receive its allotment of
Federal funds, it must, under the new Act, submit to the Commissioner
of Education a plan containing policies and procedures which insure that
due consideration will be given to the results of periodic evaluations
of state and local vocational education programs and services in light
of "....information regarding current and projected manpower needs and
job opportunities...." (Sec. 5 (a) (2), Public Law 88-210).

The plan must also provide for a cooperative arrangement with the system
of public employment offices in the state so that the employment offices
will make available to the State Board administering vocational education
and local educational agencies, occupational information regarding rea-
sonable prospects of employment in the community and elsewhere. This
information will be used to assist vocational guidance and counseling for
students and to determine the occupations for which persons are to be
trained,

In turn the schools are to make available to public employment offices,
for use in occupational guidance and placement, information about the
occupational qualifications of those who leave or complete vocational
courses and schools.

By the end of 1965, cooperative agreements had been signed in forty
states by the State Employment Services and the State Boards of Vocational
Education. Negotiations for similar agreements were under way in nearly
all other states.


1Education for a Changing World of Work, Report of the Panel of
Consultants on Vocational Education (Washington: U, S. Department of
Health, Education and Welfare, Office of Education, 1963), OE-80021,
p. 222.

2Howard Rosen, Vocational Education and Manpower Needs, (Washington:
U. S. Department of Labor, Manpower Administration, Office of Manpower,
Automation and Training, December 1964), Reprint No. 5.


May, 1967


Section I










Administration, has been given the responsibility for providing leadership W
and direction to the Department of Labor's manpower research program. In
recognition of the needs of the vocational educators under the new. Act,
OMAT, through its contractual research program, is already sponsoring re-
search projects designed to improve the occupational classification system
and provide new methods and techniques for state and local occupational pro-
jections. Specialists from the academic world and the Department's own
exper s are launching a searching review of the Department's occupational
work.

The Division of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education, State Department
of Education has included the position for an Occupational Information
Specialist in its State Plan. This position was established to assist
in meeting some of these needs pointed out in the Vocational Education Act
of 1963.

The Occupational Information Specialist will work with the directors of
the respective vocational-technical sections, with local directors and
junior college deans of vocational-technical education, and with guidance
personnel in maintaining close working relationships between state and local
offices of the public employment service and local programs of'vocational
and technical education. He will maintain liaison between the vocational
and technical education division, and the pupil personnel services section
of the State Department of Education. He will assist counties in making
periodic assessments of local manpower and training needs to aid in con-
tinuing program evaluation, and will also help to prepare and interpret
occupational information. In short, he will help to weld closer ties
between vocational educators, guidance personnel, and the public employ-
ment service; and will assist in developing and distributing occupational
information reflecting the needs of the local, statewide and national
labor markets.

The success of the country's expanded vocational education program in
preparing students for work will depend, in part, on how'effectively
the manpower specialists of the employment service system, vocational
educators, and guidance personnel work together in carrying out these
agreements.

In the words of the Act, the total objective is that all individuals should
"have ready access to vocational training or retraining which is of high
quality, which is realistic in the light of actual or anticipated oppor-
tunities for gainful employment, and which is suited to their needs,
interest, and ability to benefit from such training."4


3Howard Rosen, Assistant Director for Manpower and Automation Research,
Office of Manpower, Automation and Training. Reprinted from the Occupational
Outlook Quarterly, December, 1964. (Vol. 8, No. 4), published by the Bureau
of Labor Statistics.

4Manpower Report to the President. Transmitted to the Congress March,
1965. p. 109. l


Section I


May, 1967









Before the new Act, how many of the Nation's young people were leaving
school without significant occupational preparation? Although a precise
answer to this question is not possible on the basis of the available
information, rough estimates can be made of the educational status in
1964 of the boys and girls who entered fifth grade in 1956 and should
therefore have graduated from high school in 1964.

These estimates show that for every 100 who were in the fifth grade in
1956, 36 entered college- 4 entered occupational programs of junior colleges
or other- 4 completed high school vocational courses- 7 completed high
school commercial courses and 49 either dropped out of school before gra-
duation or didn't go on to further training and had no vocational prepara-
tion while in high school, and therefore entered the labor market with no
vocational training.5

Secretary of Labor W. Willard Wirtz, in an address delivered in February
of 1967 made comments about the students who-were born in the U. S. A.
during the same year and should have completed high school in 1964. He
said that 8 percent of this group are now unemployed and that many of those
who are working are in unskilled, dead-end jobs, which machines in all
likelihood will take over. Secretary Wirtz pointed out that only one of
every six of these students will get a college education, and that the
education the others get gives them no familiarity with what lies ahead
in the world of work. "Nor is it any exaggeration to suggest that every
serious concern about the human conditions in America today -- must
center on the building of new bridges between American learning and
American doing, bridges that everyone can cross."

Our labor force of approximately 72.2 million people is employed in
21,741 differentjob classifications. According to the Bureau of the
Census, in 1940 and projected to 1975 the labor force is distributed
as follows:

Distribution of Labor Force
in Various Major Occupational
Groups

(United States 1940-1975)

Major Occupational Groups Percent Percent
Projected
1940 1975

Professional, Technical and Kindred Workers 8,0 14.2
Managers, Officials and Propr., except farm 8.1 9.6
Clerical and Sales Workers 16.7 22.9
Skilled and Semiskilled Workers 29.7 29.3


5Manpower Report to the President. Transmitted to the Congress March,
1965. p. 100.

Commencement Address by Secretary of Labor W. Williard Wirtz -
Roosevelt University, Chicago, Illinois, February 6, 1967.


May, 1967


Section.I










Major Occupational Groups Percent Percent
Projected
1940 1975

Farmers, Farm Managers, Foremen and
Laborers 18.5 4.6
Service Workers 11.9 14.4
Unskilled Workers, Except Farm and Mine 7.0 4.4

Note: Because of rounding, column sums do not total 100 percent.

Regardless of what youth tiiri; that they are go*LiZ to do, or what their
parents or counselors think they should do; today's high school youth-
the next generation of workers- will be distributed among the different
occupational groups in approximately the manner shown above. If the
schools, among other things, are to prepare youth for socially useful
employment in the occupations in which they will work as adults, and which
are essential to the economic life of the nation, itfollows that this
distribution should serve as a point of departure in planning educational
programs, especially those relating to vocational education of all kinds.
Frogrwais must be planned for youth with different interests and levels of
ability, and with consideration for the number and type of workers needed.
Moreover, in the operation of such programs it is of utmost importance that
vocational educators, principals and counselors be realistic in their ad-
visement of students with respect to the opportunities and requirements
in the various occupations.

The kind of job that we do, will affect the lives of millions of our
youngsters- their earnings, their employment, their job satisfactions, their
personal happiness, and their contribution to the Nation's advancement.

As President Johnson said, "Our future depends, not on our wealth or our
military strength, but on the training and talent of our people."


May, 1967


Section I










OCCUPATIONAL TRENDS


To state that the world of work is changing rapidly would mean little,
but to say that the work world of today is more different from that of
our grandparents than their world of work was different from that known
by Moses and the Pharaohs, brings into focus the extent of this latter
change.

The days are gone when there were only a few types of jobs to choose from
or to be prepared for. The 1965 Dictionary of Occupational Titles lists
21,741 different job descriptions and new ones are evolved daily.

Tods,- one has the cpr:.r:'tunity to study his interests and abilities and
choose and prepare for an occupation that will fit his particular needs.
With this opportunity available, one must learn as much as possible about
himself, and then learn as much as necessary about the world of work.
He can then prepare for and enter into an occupation in which he should be
able to make satisfactory progress, and at the same time be happy and content
with his chosen means of livelihood.

Until the middle of 1965, unemployment has been a national problem. The
Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, tells us that by the year
2000 the work force of the United States will double the 1965 number, and
in the same period of time automation will make it possible for one man to
do the work that is now done by two men. In the highly skilled, technolo-
gical society of today and the future, one can see how necessary it is for
each individual to choose an appropriate vocation and become skilled and
proficient in it.

Vocational education is preparation for work life and at the same time
enables individuals to become responsible citizens who can participate
in the civic, economic and social life of the community. Itis con-
cerned with meeting the needs of employers and meeting the needs of
persons who are present and potential workers.

The setting in which occupational education operates is complicated by
industrial employment changes, occupational shifts, trends in the employ-
ment of women, mobility of the labor force, changes in composition of
the labor force and technological change. The past trends of these areas
must be analyzed and projections must be made if proper guidance is to
be given that will fit the needs of the future.

In looking at Occupational Information in 1967, it is important to remember
that there were some 72.2 million Americans employed in January of this
year.


Section II


May, 1967









Industrial Employment Changes and Projections

Industrial employment is divided into two groups, the Goods Producing
Industries and the Service Producing Industries. The Goods Producing
Industries are: Agriculture, Mining, Manufacturing and Construction.
The Service Producing Industries are: Wholesale and Retail Trade, Govern-
ment, Service, Finance, Insurance and Real Estate, and Transportation and
Public Utilities.

There has been a significant move away from the goods-producing industries
and to service-producing industries. Between 1947 and 1964 the number of
workers employed in service industries rose by 11,744,000 as compared with
a decrease of 933,000 employees in goods-producing industries. The goods-
prodLiucig industries employed the larger number of people until the year
1949. In 1964 there were some 37 million employed in service-pr:ducin,
industries as compared with 25.8 million working in goods-producing in-
dustries.

The Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics has estimated that
job growth in the economy will continue to be faster in the service-pro-
ducing industries. Over the 1964-75 period, manpower requirements in the
service-producing industries are expected to increase by 36 percent,
reaching 50.6 million by 1975. Between 1964 and 1975 manpower require-
ments in goods-producing industries (excluding agriculture) are expected
to increase by about 15 percent to above 24 million. Production agriculture
is expected to fall by about 22 percent during this period from nearly 4.8
million in 1964 to 3.7 million in 1975, despite an anticipated rise of about
one-fifth in agricultural output.

Occupational Changes and Projections

Because of these shifts occurring in industry employment, we have also
had some sharp changes in the kind of jobs our workers perform. In 1910
about 20 percent of the workers had white-collar (professional, technical,
proprietary, managerial, clerical, and sales) jobs; around 35 percent were
blue-collar workers (skilled, semi-skilled, and unskilled); approximately
35 percent were farm workers, and 10 percent had a.service job.

One of the important changes of the post-World War II period has been the
much greater growth in the number of workers in white-collar and service
occupations as compared with blue-collar workers.


1Manpower Requirements in 1975, (Washington: U. S, Department of Labor,
Bureau of Labor.Statistics, Division of Manpower and Occupational Outlook,
October, 1965) pp. 6-14.






Section I May 196


May, 1967


Section.II










This growth has been especially large both in the number and proportion of
professional and high-level managerial workers. Employment of white-
collar workers rose by more than 50 percent between 1947 and 1964 so that
40 percent of the workers were in the white-collar jobs as compared to the
20 percent in 1910.

A 33 and one-third percent increase is anticipated for white-collar jobs
by 1975. Aii,.:.: the white-collar occupations, the most rapid increase in
requirements will be for professional and technical workers, which may
grow twice as rapid1- as the average for all workers. The employment of
clerical and kindred workers rose almost steadily between 1950 and 1960
with a croijth of over 34 percent. Additional recordkeeping and paper-
work and tihe growth in size and complexity of modern business organiza-
tions and government have contributed to the rise in the employment of cler-
ical workers. Employment requirements for clerical and kindred workers are
expected to increase by about 45 percent during the 1960-75 period.

The requirements for blue-collar workers are expected to rise by approxi-
mately 17 percent between 1964 and 1975. Among the blue-collar workers,
the most rapid growth in requirements will be for craftsmen. Requirements
for operatives will increase more slowly, and little change is expected in
the demand for laborers. Employment requirements for craftsmen, foremen,
and kindred workers are expected to rise by about 25 percent between 1964
and 1975. Industrial growth and increasing business activity are the major
factors expected to increase the need for skilled workers. Employment of
mechanics and repairmen should continue to grow more rapidly than the skill-
ed workforce as a whole. The requirements for airplane and automobile
mechanics are expected to increase significantly during the 1964-75 period.
At the same time, employment requirements for machinists are expected to
decline slightly during this period because of new processes and automa-
tion.

In 1964, employment of semi-skilled workers (operatives) had reached
12.9 million. Large numbers are employed as assemblers, checkers, exa-
miners, inspectors, drivers and packers. The employment requirements for
operatives are expected to rise by only 18 percent between 1964 and 1975.

In the overall picture the number of white-collar workers will grow more
than twice as fast as the blue-collar workers between 1964 and 1975.

The rate of employment growth during the 1947-64 period for service workers
was exceeded only by that for professional, technical, and kindred workers.
The service worker occupational groups represented about 13 percent of all
employed ipr..i:.. in 1964, and included such diverse groups as private
household workers, protective service workers, and waiters and waitresses.


Section II


May, 1967










Employment requirements in service occupations are expected to increase
by about 40 percent between 1964 and 1975. The greatest growth in require-
ments during the 1964-75 period is expected to be for; policemen and other
protecti.'e service workers; attendants in hospital and in business render,
ing other prof,.'fesio:.ivl and personal services; nurse?' ai,:es; beauty opera-
tors; cooks and waiters and others who preprsre and serve meals outside
private homes.

Chsrt I ohu s tlhe e,:inl.l ,.-lent in major oc'ipat ionli irOciipl in 1964. Chci-rt II
indicates the p:eI-',e.nt c.h,3ii in -inplce,lrierit in na,.jor occi.l1t.ioc ial gio.up.:. from
19:--1960 and estimated :p-i.ent .ri-.ng.e from 19',:'C to 1':'75.

'nmplc ''iienit of T.:.IIieI,

One great change in the employment structure of the country since '.oiid
War II has been the rapid growth in the employment of women. Since 1945
the employment of women has increased almost 50 percent. This is four
times more rapidly than the percentage increase in employment for men during
the same period. Between 1965 and 1970 more women than men will join
the labor force.

In 1965, 50 percent of all American women 7--tr-eiei the a1 -.s of 45-54 were
in the labor force. Thi-i is a dramatic contrast -jiti the situation at the
bei:-.ing of tl1he c'etur-L. Over 25 -er:e-nt of the women empll:c..:'ed-. were in
the clerical and 1i:iJlr-:1. occupations.

Mobiliit of thi L,:.r Forc'e

Person.? concerned with education need to realize tliat many of the young
people that they educate and train will leave their home omrrurni.iiities.

As an indication of this, half of the over 3,000 coitL::ie.;; in the United
States lost population due to outmigration between 1950 and 1960.

A study of the mobility of the population showed that about 15 percent
of the 20 and 21 year olds had moved across a .i-unt; line. The migration
rate for the 22 to 24 year olds was 17 percent., The p-ek migration rate
appnrentl.r occurs among persons in their earl. tuenties..


2I],..,ilit- .f" ti, F .pl, ti-i c:f tihe Unite-.:. S t.t.e.; I.l.r ,h 1963 to
March 17.4 (ii :l- ii tr:. r,: .. S. De..i-.''timei t C.f C. *iiner ~ -., Fi..re.il of the
Census, 0Se.t!i:rbe r 7, 1''-'), Cl.'.rri'nt FP.o:ltion Re.-.:irt Series P. 20,
No. 141.


Section II


May, 1967




CHART I


EMPLOYMENT IN MAJOR OCCUPATIONAL GROUPS
Men

Women


Millions of Workers, 1964

5


Semiskilled Workers

Clerical Workers

Skilled Workers

Professional & Technical

Proprietors & Managers

Service Workers Exc.
Private Household
Sales Workers

Unskilled Workers
Exc. Farm
Private Household
Workers
Farmers & Farm Managers

Farm Laborers &
Foremen


In r.ruWurwwwWUUUUWU8~


=sss


Source: Occupational Outlook Handbook. 1966-67 Edition.


Section II


T I I II1


0


may, 1967




CHART II

PERCENT CHANGE IN EMPLOYMENT IN MAJOR OCCUPATIONAL GROUPS
1950-60
Professional & technical h7//i/i/ i i iJ//77J/7777/ 777/7//// / // 47

Clerical workers 77///7777////////////////1 34

Service workers FZ ZZZZ777777( 27

Sales workers 7777777 19

ALL OCCUPATIONS I/i/////71 1T j 15

Skilled workers //////// 12

Proprietors and managers 77 7

Operatives 6

10 //////7/ Laborers, except farm

42 1117 11n 7/77/1111/177l ll1 / / 1711 Farmers and farm workers

I I i 1 I I l I


-50

Source:


-40 -30 -20 -10 0 10 20 30o u
Percent Change
U. S. Department of Commerce. Taken from "Manpower Report of the President
and A Report on Manpower Requirements, Resources, Utilization, and Training
by the United States Department of Labor." Transmitted to the Congress
March 1963. Washington: Government Printing Office. p. 28.


ESTIMATED PERCENT CHANGE IN EMPLOYMENT IN MAJOR OCCUPATIONAL GROUPS
1960-1975


Professional, Tech, and Kindred workers


Managers, off


Craftsmen, fc

Opera

Labor


Service workers

Clerical and Kindred workers

Sales workers

'icials and prop. except farm

ALL OCCUPATIONS

)remen, and kindred workers

'atives and kindred workers


ers, except


farm and mine
28 1iiy277/mi
1 t *


I


777 l/l777T/ i77777777/7777/7l7lT777/1 6
717if7f7T7i7 ii51tiln/ti/m


////////////////// 45

7111/ 'lz71117112/l-i 34

Zili7//Lii////T1 32

//////////////////i 31


l/l//lli/ l l\ 18

NO CHANGE
Farmers, farm managers, laborers
and foremen '


nn r\ r. -' r ~ fn ?n


L -ju -cU -J-o a V -U :v
------------------------- --""Per'srnt thnange
Source: Adapted from "Manpower Report of the President and A Report on Manpower
Requirements, Resources, Utilization, and Training by the United States De-
partment of Labor" Transmitted to the Congress March 1964. Wash.: Govern-
ment Printing Office. Table E-5, p. 244.
Section II May, 1967 6


0


I I


I0n n n 7










Technological Change

Within the past decade technological change has progressed at an un-
precedented rate. The developments in the years ahead will far exceed
those of the past and will make an impact upon employment and job
content.

Some idea of the dimensions of change in our times, and its accelera-
tion, can be found in such facts as:

1. Half of all the energy consumed by man in the past
two-thousand years has been consumed within the last
one-hundred years.

2. Ninety percent of all the scientists who ever lived are
alive today.

3. The amount of technical information available has doubled
in the last ten years and will continue to double every ten
years for the foreseeable future.

4. By the year 2,000 automation. will have doubled the output
capability of each individual.

Changes in Composition of Labor Force

The total labor force is expected to increase from 72.2 million in
January 1967 to around 86 million by 1970. The age composition will be
distinctly different, with young workers (under 25 years) making up
23 percent of the total. These young workers will account for nearly
half of the labor force growth during the 1960's. More individuals
reached this labor force age of 18 in 1965 than in the entire 14 years
added together. This was the bumper crop of the post-war babies.
From 1960-1970 the percent of change in the number of workers by age
group will be as follows:

Age Group Percent of Change

14-24 years old +45.0%
25-34 years old +10.7%
35-44 years old 1.5%
45 years old and over +18.5%


Section II


May, 1967




CHART III


0


1

o o
I I
O O
GIN 01\
rl r


4,







0






0)O
o QT-















b.*

P4,
, 0



0 *H )
; L

















-,




0
Wr.


Section II


CM




H


May, 1967









SUMMARY


The short review of some economic and social changes which have been
discussed raises vital questions for those concerned with vocational
guidance as well as those who prepare youngsters for the world of work
through our vocational education system.

The changes can be quickly summarized. We have had a massive shift in
employment away from production agriculture to other economic activities.
Jobs in trade, government, service, finance, insurance and real estate have
grown faster than in other activities. White-collar and service jobs have
had the most rapid growth since the end of World War II and will apparently
expand more rapidly than other kinds of jobs in the near future.

Women have become a mainstay in our labor force. There is little likelihood
that any basic change will occur in the pattern of their work careers.

We have a mobile labor force. Many of the young persons will not remain
in the same community after they complete training.

Technological development constantly creates change and calls for the
ability to adapt to new jobs and new skills. Workers who make, on the
average, six job changes during 40 years of working life must be able to
meet job requirements if they are to continue to be productive.

The continuing increase in the educational attainment of American workers
reflects both the growing supply of better educated entrants into the
labor force and the rising demand for workers with high levels of technical
skill and training.

"The strands of evidence suggest that an individual's job
prospects, assuming he possesses some basic minimum of formal
education, depend more upon his relative educational at-
tainment than upon his absolute level of schooling. The high
school dropout may encounter difficulty, however, in finding a
job, not because the job required the training implied by the
completion of high school, but because a growing proportion
of his fellow job seekers will have their diplomas."3

The dropout rate is being reduced dramatically. In 1910, 17 percent of
American youth ages 25-29 had graduated from high school. In 1950 the
percent had risen to 53 and in 1964, 69 percent of the youth in this age
group had graduated from high school. Between 1965 and 1975 there will be
some 30 million young men and women looking for their first jobs. Of
these, it is estimated that 22 million (73 1/3 percent) will have their
high school diplomas,

Each one of the changes referred to above poses a challenge to those who
provide vocational guidance and those who prepare youngsters for work.
The youngsters must be alerted to the kind of world they will face, and the
kind of courses offered by educators must be in tune with current reality.


3Monthly Labor Review, May 1965. "Educational Attainment of Workers"
March, 1964.


Section II


May, 1967

















IF YOU JOIN THE LABOR FORCE IN 1970

CHANCES ARE ....


You will have completed more years of formal education than your
parents completed.

A higher educational level will be required of you than was required
of your parents,

.... You will have SIX different jobs during your working career.

.... ONE out of THREE that you came to the state of Florida after the
year of 1960.

.... FIFTY-FIFTY that you will work in a blue-collar job.

,... ONE in SIX that you will work in a semi-skilled occupation.

.... ONE in EIGHT that you will work in a skilled occupation.

.... ONE in TEN that you will work in a service occupation.

.... You will be working with TWICE as many women as you would have
been if you had been working in 1945,

.. ONE in FOUR that if you are a woman you will work in a clerical
and kindred occupation.

.... ONE in EIGHT that you will work in a professional, technical or
kindred occupation.


Section II


may, 1967








TOTAL EMPLOYED IN 1964 AND PROJECTED REQUIREMENTS IN 1975, BY MAJOR OCCUPATIONAL
GROUP (NUMBERS IN THOUSANDS)


1964 (Actual) 1975 (Projected) Percent
OCCUPATIONAL GROUPS NUMBER PERCENT NUMBER PERCENT Change,
S1964-75

Total, all groups 70,357 100.0 87,300 100.0 24

White-collar workers 31,125 44.2 41,300 47.3 33

Professional, technical, and kindred workers 8,550 12.2 12,400 14.2 45
Managers, officials, and proprietors, except farm 7,452 10.6 9,300 10.7 25
Clerical and kindred workers 10,667 15.2 14,200 16.3 33
Sales workers 4,456 6.3 5,400 6.2 21

Blue-collar workers 25,534 36.3 29,700 34.0 16

Craftsmen, foremen, and kindred workers 8,986 12.8 11,200 12.8 25
Operatives and kindred workers 12,924 18.4 14,700 16.8 14
Laborers, except farm and mine 3,624 5.2 3,800 4.4 5

Service workers 9,256 13.2 13,000 14.9 40

Farmers and farm workers 4,444 6.3 3,400 3.9 -23


Note: Percents assume a 4 percent level of unemployment in 1975.
totals due to rounding.


Individual items may not add to


Source: U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, October 1965.





EMPLOYMENT IN NON-AGRICULTURAL ESTABLISHMENTS
BY INDUSTRY DIVISION, SELECTED YEARS
1929-1963


(Annual Averages*)
Number (000 omitted) Percent Distribution
Industry Division 1929 1940 1 948 1963 1929 1940 1948 1963

Total 31,041 32,0-58 44,448 57,175 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00
Manufacturing 10,534 10,780 15,321 17,035 33.9 33.6 34.5 29.8
Trade 6,401 6,940 9,519 11,864 20.6 21.7 21.4 20.8

Government 3,066 4,202 5,650 9,535 9.9 13.1 12.7 16.7
Service 3,127 3,477 4,925 8,297 10.1 10.8 11.1 14.5
Transportation and Public
Utilities 3,907 3,013 4,141 3,913 12.6 9.4 9.3 6.8

Contract Construction 1,497 1,294 2,169 3,030 4.8 4.0 4.9 5.3
Finance, Insurance and Real
Estate 1,431 1,436 1,741 2,866 4.6 4.5 3.9 5.0

Mining 1,078 916 982 634 3.5 2.9 2.2 1.1


Source: U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Division of
Employment Statistics.







* *


Manpower and


0


*Preliminary annual averages for 1963.




s


EMPLOYMENT BY MAJOR OCCUPATIONAL GROUPS

1940 AND 1963


Number (000 omitted) Percent Distribution
Major Occupational Groups 1940 1963 1940 1963

Total Employed 45,166 68,809 100.00 100.00

Professional Workers 3,345 8,263 7.4 12.0

Farmers and Farm Managers 5,144 2,396 11.4 3.5

Proprietors, Managers and Officials (except
farm) 3,749 7,293 8.3 10.6
Clerical and Kindred Workers 4,612 10,270 10.2 14.9

Salesworkers 2,905 4,356 6.5 6.3

Craftsmen, Foremen and Kindred Workers 5,056 8,925 11.2 12.9
Operatives and Kindred Workers 8,631 12,506 19.1 18.3
Service Workers 5,570 9,031 12.3 13.1

Farm Laborers and Foremen (4848) 3,090 2,219 6.8 3.2

Laborers (except farm and mine) 3,064 3,551 6.8 5.2

Source: Estimates for 1940 are derived from decennial data of the U. S. Bureau of the
Census. Data for 1963 was obtained from Table A-19 of the February 1964 issue
of Employment and Earnings.






CHART IV


WHILE TOTAL EMPLOYMENT WILL GO UP BY

ONE-FOURTH BY 1975 . .



Industry Growth Rates Will Vary Widely

Projected Employment Growth
Less More
Industry No than Average than
Chan e Avera e Avera e

-nment


ices


!act
ructionn

sale and
.1 Trade

ifA TInsluranee


Source: Occupational Outlook Handbook, Career Information for
Use in Guidance, 1966-67 Edition, Bulletin No. 1450.
Bureau of Labor Statistics, U. S. Department of Labor.


Section II


May, 1967





CHART V


JOB OPPORTUNITIES GENERALLY WILL INCREASE

FASTEST IN OCCUPATIONS REQUIRING THE MOST

EDUCATION AND TRAINING . .


1965 1975


Source: Occupational Outlook Handbook, Career Information for
Use in Guidance, 1966-67 Edition, Bulletin No. 1450.
Bureau of Labor Statistics, U. S. Department of Labor.
Chart 7, page 16.


Section II


May, 1967






TABLE 4


EMPLOYMENT BY MAJOR OCCUIATIOiAL GROUPS AND W

IN SELECTED OCCUPATIONS,

1964 AND PROJECTED rE:QUTriRDElf ,3 1975 1/

(In thousands)


Percent
Occupation 1964 1975 Change,
____ ____1964-75

Total 70,357 88,700 26
White-collar workers 31,125 42,800 38

Professional, technical and
kindred workers 8,550 13,200 54
Draftsmen 260 375 44
Engineering and science technicians 620 1,000 .61
Registered professional nurses 582 830 43

Managers, officials, and proprietors,
except farm 7,452 9,200 23

Clerical and kindred workers 10,667 12,600 37
Bookkeeping workers 1,100 1,400 27
Office machine operators 420 900 114
Stenographers, secretaries, and 2,700 3,700 37
typists

Sales Workers 4,456 5,800 30

Blue-collar workers 25,534 29,900 17

Craftsmen, foremen, and kindred
workers 8,968 11,400 .27
Airplane mechanics 95 115 21
Automotive mechanics 760 880 16
Bakers 105 95 -10
Business machine servicemen 70 105 50
Carpenters 2/ 640 670 5
Cement and concrete finishers and
terrazzo workers 2/ 54 75 39
Compositors and typesetters 180 155 -14
Electricians 2/ 162 200 23
Excavating, grading, and road
machinery operators 2/ 185 265 43
Machinists 480 500 4
Painters 2/ 285 305 77
Plumbers and pipefitters j 212 265 25
Stationary engineers 255 275 8
TV and radio service technicians 110 140 27


Section II


May, 1967






TABLE 4
(Continued)


Occupation


1964


1975


Percent
Change,
1964-75


Operatives and kindred workers 12,924 14,800 15
Assemblers 620 675 9
Inspectors 540 615 14
Machine tool operators 500 480 4

Laborers, except farm and mine 3,624 3,700 2/

Service workers 9,256 12,500 35

Farm workers 4,444 3,500 -21


I/ Projections assume an unemployment rate of 3 percent in 1975.
2/ In construction industry only.
3/ Less than 3 percent

Note: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not
equal totals.

Source: News From U. S. Department of Labor -- USDL -- 7349, Sunday
Editions, September 18, 1966.


Section II


May, 1967






FF.' 'JECTEED GROWTH OF THE UNITED STATES

1960 TO 2000


Population

Labor Force

Gross National Product

Per Capita Purchases

Government Expenditures

Industrial Products
Base years 1947-49 = 100

Services

Automobiles

Textile Fibers

Agriculture Products


Source: Richard G. Ford,


1960

180 million

73 million

$500 billion

$1800

$100 billion


150

$170

58

10

$24


index

billion

million

billion Ibs.

billion


Projected
2000

300 million

140 million

$2200 billion

$4000

$500 billion


800

$800

230

22

43


index

billion

million

billion lbs.

billion


_________________________________________________ a


Extension Economist, U. S.


0


Department of Agriculture


0


0


Percentage
Increase

83o

92%

340%

122%

400%


433%

371%

297%

120%

79%







TED CUATIONS DEMAND I THE U ED STATES 1965

SELECTED OCCUPATIONS IN DEMAND IN THE UW=TED STATES IN 1965


O-X6.25 Patrolman

0-X7.,02 Dental Hygienist

Nurse Registered

X-Ray Technician

0-X7.03 Medical Technologist

O-X7.7 Draftsman

1-X2.0 Clerk, General Office

1-X2.2 Clerk-Typist

Typist

1-X2.3 Secretary

Stenographer

1-X5.7 Central-Office Operator

2-X5.6 Nurse, Licensed Practical

Ward Attendant

4-X2.010 Machinist

Tool-and-Die Maker

4-X2.011 Engine-Lathe Operator I

Turret-Lathe Operator


Source: United States Department of Labor


4-X2.012

4-X2.100

4-X2.103



4-x6.181

4-X6.183

4-X6.185

4-X6.217



4-X6.220

4-x6.23

4-X6.28

4-X6.310

4-X6.313

4-x6.348

4-x6.352

4-X6.675

6-X4.213


Milling-Machine Operator

Millwright

Airplane Mechanic

Automobile Mechanic

Electrician

Electrical Repairman

Electronics Mechanic

Pipe Fitter

Plumber

Carpenter

Bricklayer

Welder

Instrument Repairman I

Sheet-Metal Worker

Dental Technician

Tailor

Baker

Automobile-Body,
Repairman, Metal


0


















TIHE

SOUTBEASTERIN

STATES


May, 1967 20


Section II










THE SOUTHEAST*


A FAST GROWING REGION -


Trends in non-agricultural employment, available by broad industrial classi-
fication beginning with 1939 and in greater detail beginning in 1947, indicate
that the Southeastern region is indeed growing and at a rate substantially
faster than that of the United States. From an average of 3,473,300 wage
and salary workers in 1939, the regional total rose, almost without inter-
ruption, to 8,205,300 in 1964. This relative increase of 135.2 percent is
half again as great as the national rate for the same period. Finally, the
average annual rate of growth of employment over the 25 year period is 3.5
percent for the Southeast, as compared to 2.6 percent for the country as a
whole. The significance of these measures maybe better gauged if one
other general statistic is established -- population growth. Here relative
changes in the Southeast much more closely approximate those for the
Nation.



























4"The Southeast -- A Fast Growing Region." Special Regional Report,
December 1965. U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics.

*Defined here as Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina,
South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia.


Section II


May, 1967




CHART VI.


Percent Change in Total Nonagricultural and Industry Division
Employment in the Southeast and the United States,
1939 to 1964


0E
South- United
east States
-------


7-


7


IT


I i i1I~II -I MininT


Finance, Con- Govern- Service
Insurance & struction ment
Real Estate


Trade TOTAL Manu- Trans-
NONAGRI- facturing portation
CULTURAL


Section II


Percent



300


-


250 0-


200 1-


150


100 --


50 1-


en I


5Ibid.


I II ____ _ I__ I_


- I


I ~I


--


.-.6


w


Mining


May, 1967


7-





CHART VII


Southeastern Employment Classified by Industry Division
1939, 1947 and 1964
__ ,:(*.,,-,.i r i_,.1 -'*i ,;, --- __. '_.-_," Fr.:,,iv,:'iij,
E employ nment
thousands


Manu- Con-
facturing striction


Mining Trade Govern- Service Trans- Finance,
ment poitation Insurance &
Real FA.t le


Sect6bido .
Section II


2500







2000







1500







1000







500







0


May, 1967








RANKING OF FLORIDA AND THE SOUTHEASTERN STATES*


This briefly gives the national ranking of Florida and the Southeastern
States on a.number of factors of interest to school personnel. Infor-
mation for the tables included here is derived from "Rankings of the
States, 1967," Research Report 1967-R1, Research Division, National
Education Association, Washington, D, C. (Copyright 1967 by the NEA)

State by state comparisons should be made with extreme caution since
there is not absolute uniformity in definition of terms and statistical
procedures from state to state.

POPULATION

1. Provisional Estimates of Total Resident Population, July 1, 1966


Southeastern States
Rank State


Population


National
Rank


Florida
North Carolina
Virginia
Georgia
Tennessee
Louisiana
Alabama
Kentucky
South Carolina
Mississippi
Arkansas
West Virginia
United States


5,941,000 9
5,000,000 11
4,507,000 14
4,459,000 15
3,883,000 17
3,603,000 19
3,517,000 21
3,183,000 22
2,586,000 26
2,327,000 28
1,955,000 31
1,794,000 33
_ 195,857,000


2. Percent Change..in Total Resident Population, April 1,

Southeastern States
Rank State Percent


Florida
Virginia
Georgia
Louisiana
Arkansas
North Carolina
Tennessee
South Carolina
Alabama
Mississippi
Kentucky
West Virginia
United States


19.9%
13.0
12.4
10.1
9.5
9.1
8.8
7.7
7.4
6.7
4,8
-3.5
9.1


1960, to July 1, 1966

National
Rank

5
12
15
18
19
20
22
24
25
27
33
50


Section II


0


*Considered here as including Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky,
Louisiana, Mississippi,.North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia and
West Virginia.


May, 1967


- -








3. Net Total Migration Rate (per 100 Midperiod.Population), 1960 to 1964


Southeastern States
Rank State


Florida
Virginia
Arkansas
Georgia
Tennessee
North Carolina
Louisiana
South Carolina
Alabama
Mississippi
Kentucky
West Virginia
United States


Rate

+8.1
+3.3
+2.4
+1.6
+0.8
-0.2
-0.6
-1.4
-1.5
-1.6
-1.7
-6.6
+0.8


4. Estimated School-Age Population (5-17), July 1, 1966

Southeastern States
Rank State Population


Florida
North Carolina
Georgia
Virginia
Louisiana
Tennessee
Alabama
Kentucky
South Carolina
Mississippi
Arkansas
West Virginia
United States


1,460,000
1,331,000
1,208,000
1,172,000
1,035,000
1,000,000
995,000
851,000
736,000
674,000
510,000
469,000
50,814,000


5. Estimated School-Age Population (5-17)
Population, 1966

Southeastern States
Rank State

1 Mississippi
2 Louisiana
3 South Carolina
4 Alabama
5 Georgia
6 Kentucky
7 North Carolina
8 Arkansas
8 West Virginia
10 Virginia
11 Tennessee
12 Florida
United States


as Percent of Total Resident


Percent

29.0%
28,7
28.5
28.3
27.1
26.7
26.6
26.1
26.1
26.0
25.8
24.6
25.9


National
Rank

3
5
7
9
20
25
28
32
32
34
37
46


Section :iI May 1967--`-


National
Rank


National
Rank


May, 1967


Section II


-- I-


--- --- - -------~-


-


--






6. Percent of Population Aged 65 or Older, 1966


Southeastern States National
Rank State Percent Rank

1 Florida 12.5% 2
2 Arkansas 10.8 12
3 West Virginia 10.2 19
4 Kentucky 9.9 21
5 Mississippi 8.8 30
5 Tennessee 8.8 30
7 Alabama 8.2 36
8 Louisiana 7.5 40
9 Georgia 7.3 41
10 North Carolina 7.2 42
10 Virginia 7.2 42
12 South Carolina 6.7 46
United States 9.4

7. Percent of Population that is Urban, December 31, 1965

Southeastern States National
Rank State Percent Rank

1 Florida 74.1% 12
2 Louisiana 64.1 25
3 Virginia 58.2 31
4 Alabama 57.6 33
5 Georgia 56.5 35
6 Tennessee 54.4 37
7 Arkansas 46,0 41
8 Kentucky 45.9 42
9 South Carolina 41.6 43
10 North Carolina 41.0 44
11 Mississippi 39.9 46
12 West Virginia 39.7 47
United States 70.6

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT

8. Median School Years Completed by Persons 25 Years Old and Older, 1960

Southeastern States National
Rank State Years Rank

1 Florida 10.9 21
2 Virginia 9.9 38
3 Alabama 9.1 41
4 Georgia 9.0 42
5 Arkansas 8.9 43
5 Mississippi 8.9 43
5 North Carolina 8.9 43
8 Louisiana 8.8 46
8 Tennessee 8.8 46
8 West Virginia 8.8 46
11 Kentucky 8.7 49
11 South Carolina 8,7 49
United States 10.6
Section....May, 196


May, 1967


Section II






9. Percent of Pupulation 14 Years Old and Older Illiterate in 1960

Southeastern States National
Rank State Percent Rank

1 Florida 2.6% 33
2 West Virginia 2.7 .34
3 Kentucky 3.3 37
,4 Virginia 3.4 38
5 Tennessee 3.5 39
6 Arkansas 3.6 40
7 North Carolina 4.0 42
8 Alabama 4.2 45
9 Georgia 4.5 46
10 Mississippi 4.9 47
11 South Carolina 5.5 49
12 Louisiana 6.3 50
United States 2.4

10. Public High-School Graduates in 1965-66 as Percent of Ninth-Graders in
Fall 1962

Southeastern States National
SRank State Percent Rank

1 Virginia 74.8% 32
2 Florida 71.7 35
3 South Carolina 70.0 38
4 West Virginia 69.0 39
5 Arkansas 68.7 40
6 Tennessee 68.0 41
7 Louisiana 67.9 42
8 North Carolina 67.3 44
9 Georgia 65.1 45
9 Kentucky 65.1 45
9 Mississippi 65.1 45
12 Alabama 64.7 48
United States 77.3

11. Percent of Selective Service Draftees Failing Preinduction and Induction
Mental Tests, 1965

Southeastern States National
Rank State Percent Rank

1 Arkansas 25.5% 39
2 Florida 26.4 40
3 Kentucky 26,5 41
4 West Virginia 27.9 42
5 Tennessee 32.3 43
6 Virginia 34.0 44
7 Louisiana 36.2 45
8 Mississippi 37.2 46
9 Alabama 38.8 47
10 North Carolina 41.8 48
11 Georgia 41.9 49
12 South.Carolina 48.2 50
.United States 21.4


Section II


May, 1967






FINANCIAL RESOURCES


12. Per-Capita.Personal Income, 1965

Southeastern States
Rank State


Florida
Virginia
Georgia
Louisiana
Kentucky
North Carolina
West Virginia
Tennessee
Alabama
South Carolina
Arkansas
Mississippi
United States


Source: Research Brief -- 23,Division of Research State
Education, Tallahassee, Florida


Department of


Section II


0


Income

$2,423
2,419
2,159
2,067
2,045
2,041
2,027
2,013
1,910
1,846
1,845
1,608
2.746


National
Rank

29
30
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50


- -`~"~II~~' ~I~- ",~ --------- m~--- 1--.-11--.--~T.-- -I_~__~ .


I -


May, 1967










FLORIDA


The State of Florida has experienced an almost unbelievable growth. The
population has more than doubled in the last 15 years. Among the 12
Southeastern states, Florida was the smallest in population in 1940, but
ranks first in 1966. The steady growth has brought the state from
twenty-seventh place among the states in 1940 to ninth place in total
population. The state is gaining permanent residents at the rate of 19,000
a month 630 a day. In 1965 the estimated population of Florida stood
at 5,805,000.

The Florida economy, which moved from the soil to outer space in 100
years, has entered a new phase. This new phase adds a truly exciting
chapter to the history of economic and industrial development. The state
has a very slow beginning, and in 1860 the Federal census placed the
total investment in Florida manufacturing at $1,874,125. Of this,
$886,000 was invested in Santa Rosa County, mostly in saw mills. The
same census put total manufacturing employment in Florida at 2,454. In
the year 1963, total new plant investment in Florida was $185,666,000.
The investment in that one year was exactly 100 times what the total had
been 103 years before. In the same period manufacturing employment
increased from 2,454 to 229,200.

Diversification, especially in the sixties brought a great change. Com-
bined employment in food and kindred products, and lumber and wood pro-
ducts dropped from 31.1 percent of the total in 1954 to 22.9 percent in
1964.

An industry that is a good illustration of the growing independence from
raw materials is electronics. This industry, where labor skills are often
more important than closeness to raw materials, has shown fantastic growth.
Measured by employment, electronics in Florida multiplied by 18 in a single
10-year period.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics non-farm employment in the
U. S. jumped by 11.5 percent between 1960-65 and, during this same period,
Florida jumped by 23 percent or twice the national average. There is every
reason to believe that this phenomenal growth will continue.

The fastest rate of production increase in the United States lies ahead for
Florida. The Department of Labor projections show Florida Producing
$29,810,000,000 worth of goods and services in 1976 compared with $9,490,000,00
in 1957 and $4,360,000,000 in 1947. That would be an increase of 214
percent in 20 years.


1Florida Business Profile, Allen Morris, Tallahassee, Florida, 1965,


Section III


May, 1967










Goods Producing Industries


Manufacturing

In ten years.between 1955 and 1965 manufacturing employment jumped 705
percent to over 250,500 workers and in 1963 the value added to products
by manufacturing was $2,326,000,000 an increase of 65 percent from 1958.
An output of $3,700,000,000 in manufactured goods is predicted for 1970.

Agriculture

Agriculture, which employed approximately 125,000 persons in 1965, is not
expected to increase in number of employees even though the value of the
agricultural products continue to climb. The value of the farm gate was
$935,000,000 in 1960 and $1,000,000,000 in 1965. It is expected to reach
$1,500,000,000 by 1975. The value of citrus alone is over $350,000,000
a year.

Contract Construction

Contract Construction is an activity in which employment fluctuates widely
with changes in general business conditions. In Florida it gained more
than 52 percent in the period 1954-64 as compared to 19 percent for the
national average. A conservative estimate of a 50 percent increase is
predicted for the 1960-75 period.

Service Producing Industries

The service producing industries such as wholesale-retail trade; finance;
insurance; real estate, transportation, and public utilities; and government
service increased 42 percent in the 1954-64 period. In Florida the service
industries can do no less than keep step with the population growth and
when the additional emphasis is given by the increasing flow of tourists in
the period, from 15,000,000 in 1965 to 20,000,000 in 1975, this area is
projected to increase at least 50 percent in the 1960-75 period.

Wholesale and Retail Trade

Wholesale and retail trade contributed a larger proportional amount to
personal income in Florida than in any other state in the Southeast.
The workers in these related industries constitute between 27 and 29
percent of the non-agricultural employment in the state.2 Retail sales
at the end of 1963 were estimated to be $7,721,508,000.3 In 1965
there were over 434,900 workers employed in this industry.

2Florida Trends, Trend Publications, Inc. Tampa, Florida, April 1966.

3Florida, Florida Development Commission, Tallahassee, Florida
*


Section III


May, 1967




0








MANUFACTURING

EMPLOYMENT

FLORIDA
AND THE UNITED STATES


Index: 1953=100


S -W 0 c. t- m Q i m

Sou re: U'.S. Department ol Labor anl Fl'rid'ni lIn'

CASH RECEIPTS

FROM

FARM MARKET TOG

FLORITDA


$ MILLION


384













1945


487
















1950


635





















1955


776


























1960


1, 01?







^==1



^;

=^= ^
==^
==^
-- ^
^^
^1
= I
=^= ^
=== ^
-- ^
-- ^
==1
==1
-- ^

^1
-- ^
---
-- ^
==: ^
55;
1964


Source: Florida Department of Agriculture


I~ __I _ __


_ _~~_






0


PERCENT CHANGE IN NONAGRICULTURAL EMPLOYMENT
FOR THE SOUTHEASTERN UNITED STATES BY
STATE -- 1947-52



SARK.


-LA.




DECREASE

PERCENT INCREASE National Average 26 percent increase
S0o-14.9 I 30.0-44.9
El 15.0-29.9 M 45 and oer

Source: State agencies cooperating with U.S Department of Labor.


PERCENT C4NiGE IN MANUFACTURING EMPLOY
FOR THE E:'T_--.T5I UNITED STATES BY
STATE -- 197-02 -


DECREASE


PERCENT INCREASE
0 -14.9 30.0 -44.9
0150 -29.9 45 and over


PERCENT CHANGE IN AGRICULTURAL ~ -LOMElhT
FOR THE SOUTHEASTERN UNITED STATES BY
STATE -- 1950-62


INCREASE OR NO CHANGE


,,pERENT DECREASE
SLess than -20 300 to 39.9
E3 -20.0 to -29.9 -40 and over


National Average -33 percent decrease


ESTI'..T.' PECNT CHANGE IN TOTAL LABOR FORCE
FOR THE SU~ E AS'PTERN .IT STATES BY
STATE -- 19--7

.,. .. /.?:. .


DECREASE


PERCENT INCREASE


National


Averoge--22 percent increase


o 0o-9.9 20.0 -29.
S 10-1.9 30 and over
Source: U.S. Department of Labor, Sureau of Labor Statististc


aMtional Average 8 perant increase


Source: State agencies cooperating with U.S. Department of Labor.


- -- ----- _P--e_




ESTIMATED PERCENT -LATiGE !N POPULATION 14 YEARS AND
OLDER FOR THE SOUTHEASTERN UNITED STATES BY STATE
1960-70


FEPCELi OF POPULATION 25 YEARS AND 'LTDEP WITH I.3
TH. 4 YEARS OF HIGH SCHOOL FOR T'-C Z- --"7-,
UNITED STATES BY STATE 1960


DECREASE
0
PERCENT INCREASE
So 9.9 [ 20.0 2.9
3 O-19.9 30 and over


National Averge -19 percent increase


Source US. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census


PERCENT OF STATE'S POPULATION IN 1960 BORN IN
ANOTHER STATE





ALA PERCENTAGE





PERCENT


PERCENT
Cl Less than 50 0 55&0-59.9


PERCENT OF STATE'S POPULATION IN 1960 LIVING IN
ANOTHER STATE IN 1955




P....ER N:::. :::
r : : : : :' : '.". . . ..:: : : . .







PERCENT


National Average 59 percent


,50.0 54.9 60 and over

Source: US. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census.


r iLes than IS
S15.0-19.9
20.0-249


0 25.0 -299
M 30.0-39.9
040and ovr


National Average 26 ,rrcent


E l Lss than 5
S5-7.4
E3 7.5-99


100-149
* 15and over


National Average 9 percent


Source: ULS. Depat of Commerce, Bureau of the Census.


Source: US Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Cenwss.


*





*


MOBILITY OF POPULATION FOR FLORIDA AND THE UNITED STATES

Approximately 30 percent of Florida's 1960 Population lived outside of the State in 1955.
Approximately 37 percent of Florida's 1960 Population lived outside of the County in 1955.


Same State
Different


Different State


County



o 20 -- 60 0o 00%
Same State
Different Different
County State



0 20 40 60 80 1o iod


Source: 1960 Census


*


*


FLORIDA






UNITED
STATES




EMPLOYMENT IN FLORIDA NON-AGRICULTURAL ESTABLISHMENTS


BY INDUSTRY GROUP


1955


Nonagricultural Employment
Manufacturing
Lumber and Wood Products
Furniture and Fixtures
Stone, Clay and Glass Products
Primary Metals
Fabricated Metals
Machinery, Except Electrical
Electrical Machinery
Transportation Equipment
Instruments and Related Products
Ordance and Misc. Durable Goods
Food and Kindred Products
Tobacco Manufactures
Apparel
Paper and Allied Products
Printing and Publishing
Chemicals and Allied Products
Other Non-Durable Goods
Mining
Contract Construction
Transportation, Communication, Utilities
Wholesale and Retail Trade
Finance, Insurance and Real Estate
Service and Miscellaneous
Government


965.9
146.9
17.7
5.3
9.2
N.A.
9.9
3.5
1.7
8.8
N.A.
3.9
34.7
8.9
6.7
12.6
11.4
10.2
2.4
6.6
97.3
82.6
278.4
52.1
144.6
157.4


1962


1,387.8
222.2
13.9
7.3
12.4
2.2
14.4
7.4
13.6
23.2
2.3
16.2
40.5
5.3
10.7
14.3
16.1
17.7
4.7
8.5
110.1
100.3
376.5
87.9
234.9
247.4


1963


(in- thousands)
1,447.4
228.5
13.6
7.2
12.7
2.3
14.5
8.2
17.5
23.2
2.4
15.9
40.3
5.2
11.3
14.0
16.8
18.1
5.3
8.8
117.5
101.7
387.1
91.3
250.0
262.5


1964


1,526.5
237.1
13.1
7.4
13.5
2.5
15.1
9.2
18.8
24.8
2.6
15.7
40.6
5.6
S12.0
14.3
17.4
18.4
6.1
9.5
127.2
107.0
407.6
94.3
265.1
278.7


1965


1,625.4
250.5
13.0
7.7
13.7
2.8
16.1
10.1
18.8
28.5
3.2
14.9
43.2
5.2
13.6
15.3
18.1
18.9
7.4
10.0
138.8
111.9
434.9
98.1
283.8
297.4


Leading manufacturing industries in order of employment
size in 1965 are: (1) food and kindred products, (2)
transportation equipment, (3) chemical and allied products,
(4) electrical machinery and equipment, (5) printing
and publishing, (6) fabricated metal products, and (7)
paper and allied products.

Source: Florida Industrial Commission, May, 1966.


1955 1963 -. 1965





0


EMPLOYMENT IN FLORIDA BY OCCUPATIONAL GROUP

1960 AND 1965

1960 Employed Labor Force


Male


Total Employed, 14 years of age and over

Professional, Technical, and Kindred Workers

Managers, Officials and Proprietors,
exc. farmers

Clerical and Kindred Workers

Sales Workers

Craftsmen, Foremen, and Kindred Workers

Operatives and Kindred Workers

Private Household Workers

Service Workers, exc. private household

Farm Laborers and Farm Foremen, Farmers
and Farm Managers

Laborers, exc. farm and mine

Occupations not reported


1,118,681

106,907


-159,361

65,712

90,367

225,914

157,742

2,762

76,433


69,065

95,820

68,598


Female


600,910

69,603


32,251

157,778

48,342

5,953

56,409

74,737

94,531


19,694

3,249

38,363


Total


1,719,591

176,510


191,612

223,490

138,709

231,867

214,151

77,499

170,964


88,759

99,069

106,961


1965 Projected
Employed Labor Force


of Total of Total


100%

10%




13%

80%

13%

12%



10%


5%

6%

6%o


Total


2,098,921

252,762


232,232

290,536

170,057

278,239

239,849

93,463

229,090


84,631

99,069

128,993


100%

12%


11%

14%

8%

13%

11%

41%

11%


These computations assume that the occupational groups will change
rate in Florida as is predicted for the nation, and that Florida's


at approximately the same
Labor Force will continue


to grow at a rate that is twice the rate for the nation. Information on the 1960 Employed
Labor Force was secured from the 1960 U. S. Census.


Percent
of Total


- --


Percent
of Total







WORK FORCE IN FLORIDA

BY OCCUPATIONAL GROUP


Professional, Technical and Kindred

Managerial and Proprietors

Clerical and Kindred Workers-

Sales Workers

Skilled Workers

Semi-Skilled Workers

Service Workers

Farmers and Farm Managers


No. Employed
1960


Rank Order in No. Percent of Change
of EInmoyees 1950-1960 .


176,510

191,612

223,490

138,709

231,867

214,151

170,964

22,349


Rank Order
in Percent
of Change 1950-6(


Source: 1950 Census and the 1960 Census.


0


0


116%

65%

116%

73%

75%



75%

-44%


-


ofCan- ()06


No. Employed
196o











WORK FORCE ESTIMATES -- STATEWIDE

(in thousands)


1950 1955 1960 1965

Total Civilian Work Force 1,080.9 1,426.4 1,874.4 2,197.7


Employed 1,025.3 1,363.2 1,779.9 2,126.0

In Agriculture 106.0 128.9 127.5 139.8

In Non-Agricultural Establishments 704.4 965.9 1,320.6 1,625.4

Other /l 214.9 268.4 331.8 360.8


Unemployed 55.6 63.2 94.5 68.5


Unemployment Rate 5.1 4.4 5.0 3.1





fl "Other" includes self-employed, unpaid family workers and domestic workers.

Source: Research and Statistics Department of the Florida Industrial Commission











PROJECTED


GROWTH OF FLORIDA'S POPULATION

(Shown by Age Groups)


AGE GROUP


Under 5

5-19

20-49

50-64

65 and Over

Total Population


1960 CENSUS
APRIL 1


541,101

1,263,200

1,868,428

725,702

553,129

4,951,560


1965 PROJECTION
JULY 1


JULY 1 .rrrry 1 1 Q~C~.1 O7(~
- -- _____________________________________ -'-~y'--,,.~ --,~;, j


1970 PROJECTION
.Tnr".V 1


ESTIMATED DIFFERENCE
-1 QAn_ O- n


593,090

1,651,154

2,138,219

852,559

701,861

5,936,883


741,835

1,978,677

2,618,780

1,033,037

877,574

7,259,903


200,734

715,477

750,352

307,335

334,445

2,308,343


Source: Bureau of Economic and Business Research, University of Florida.


0


-1


i





0


POPULATION AND LABOR FORCE FOR FLORIDA AND PROJECTIONS

(14 years and over)


MALE


TOTAL


Year Population Labor Force Population Labor Force Population Labor Force

1950 1,356,225 757,620 1,406,640 334,975 2,762,865 1,092,600

1960 2,437,000 1,251,000 2,515,000 636,000 4,952,000 1,887,000

1965 2,829,000 1,665,000 2,976,000 844,000 5,805,000 2,508,000

1970 3,369,000 2,127,000 3,542,000 1,031,000 6,911,000 3,158,000

1975 3,986,000 2,517,000 4,221,000 1,266,000 8,208,000 3,783,000

1980 4,640,000 2,940,000 4,942,000 1,532,000 9,598,000 4,472,000


Population and labor force figures for 1950 and 1960 are. from the Bureau of the Census. Estima-
ted population for future years was made by the Bureau of the Census and recognized many com-
ponents of population changesuch as births, deaths and net migration. It assumed a moderate
decline in fertility and that migration patterns of the 1955-60 period will persist.

Labor force projections for 1965 and 1970 were prepared by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
Labor force projections for 1975 and 1980 were made by first determining the percentage of
the total population that was in the labor force in the years 1950 and 1960, and projected
to be in the labor force, by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 1965 and 1970. The rate of
change in the percentages for these years was determined and an adjustment factor was applied
to determine the percentages to use with the total population figures as projected by the
U. S. Department of Labor for the years 1975 and 1980. The adjusted percentage for the pro-
jected years was then multiplied by the projected population for that year. The product was
then added to the projected population, to determine the projected labor force.




FLORIDA


EMPLOYMENT IN SELECTED OCCUPATIONS, BY SEX AND TOTAL

FOR 1960 AND TFR:-'-C ED FOR 1970 AND 1980


Projected Projected
Employed 1960 Employment 1970 Employment 1980
OCCUPATIONS Male Fegmale Total Male Female Tota l Male Female T: t

PROFESSIONAL, TECHNICAL AND KINDRED
Draftsman 3,409 214 3,703 5,841 358 6,199 8,269 507 8,776
Funeral Directors and Embalmers 9 1 37 983 1,592 62 1,654 2,254 88 2,342
Nurses, Professional -395 15,735 16,130 661 26,340 27,001 936 37,292 38,228
Phl--._..rapheirs and Photo Finishers 1,345 217 1,562 2,252 363 2,615 3,188 514 3,702
Radio Operators 1,281 175 1,456 2,144 293 2,1437 3,036 415 3,451
Surveyors 1,997 80 2,077 3,343 134 3,477 4,733 190 4,923
Technicians, Medical and Dental 1,479 2,172 3,6!51 2,476 3,636 6,112 3,505 5,148 8,653
Technicians, Electrical and Electronic 3,734 113 3,847 6,251 189 6,440 8,850 268 9,118
Technicians, Other Engineering and
Physical Sciences 2,641 355 2,99' 4,421 594 5,015 6,259 841 7,100
Technicians 1,212 288 1,500 2,029 482 2,511 2,872 683 3,555

IAHACGERS, OFFICIALS AlD FPRPRIETORS6
Banking and Finance 5,3-32 1,033 6,395 8,976 1,729 10,7,;; 12,708 2,448 15,156
Building Managers and Superintendents 1,636 1,327 2,963 2,739 2,221 4,960 3,877 3,145 7,022
:"Iniers, Salaried
Construction 6,999 229 7,228 11,716 383 12,099 16,588 543 17,131
Manufacturing 11,280 841 12,121 18,883 1,408 20,291 26,734 1,993 28,727
Store Buyers and Department Heads 5,196 1,503 6,699 8,698 2,516 11,214 12,315 3,562 15,877

CLERICAL AND KIDRED WORKERS
Attendants, Physicians and
Dentists Office 32 2,005 2,037 54 3,356 3,410 76 4,752 4,828
Bank Tellers 957 2,588 3,545 1,602 4,332 5,934 2,268 6,134 8,402
Bookkeepers 4,410 23,185 27,595 7,382 38,812 46,194 10,452 54,948 65,400
Cashiers 2,298 14,152 16,450 3,847 23,690 27,.37 5,446 33,540 38,986
Collectors, Bill and Account 889 244 1,133 1,488 408 1,896 2,107 578 2,685









Employed 1960 Projected Employment 1970 Projected Employment 1980
OCCUPATIONS Male Female Total Male Female Total Male Female Total

Dispatchers and Starters, Vehicle 1,312 246 1,558 2,196 412 2,608 3,109. 583 3,692
File Clerks 256 1,861 2,117 429 3,115 3,544 607 4,411 5,018
Insurance Adjusters, Examiners
& Investigators 1,235 138 1,373 2,067 231 2,298 2,927 327 3,254
Mail Carriers 4,820 153 4,973 8,069 256 8,325 11,423 363 11,786
Office Machine Operators 1,112 3,459 4,571 1,861 5,790 7,651 2,635 8,198 10,833
Payroll & Timekeeping Clerks 684 940 1,624 1,145 1,574 2,719 1,621 2,228 3,849
Postal Clerks 4,056 986 5,042 6,790 1,651 8,441 9,613 2,337 11,950
Receptionists 79 3,519 3,598 132 5,891 6,023 187 8,340 8,527
Secretaries 961 40,959 41,920 1,609 68,565 70,174 2,278 97,073 99,351
Shipping and Receiving Clerks 4,050 511 4,561 6,780 855 7,635 9,599 1,211 10,810
Stenographers 289 4,607. 4,896 484 7,712 8,196 685 10,919 11,604
Stockclerks and Storekeepers 6,953 1,296 8,249 11,639 2,170 13,809 16,479 3,072 19,551
Telephone Operators 467 9,161 .9,628 782 15,336 16,118 1,107 21,712 22,819
Ticket, Station & Express Agents 2,260 938 3,198 3,783 1,570 5,353 5,356 2,223 7,579
.'ists 429 9,067 9,496 718 15,178 15,896 1,017 21,489 22,506

SALES WORKERS
Advertising Agents & Salesmen 911 226 1,137 1,525 378 1,903 2,159 536 2,695
Auctioneers 90 4 94 151 7 158 213 9 222
SDemonstrators 48 488 536 80 817 897 114 1,157 1,271
SHucksters & Peddlers 591 716 1,307 989 1,199 2,188 1,401 1,697 3,098
Insurance Agents, Brokers
& Underwriters 11,590 1,620 13,210 19,402 2,712 22,114 27,468 3,839 31,307
Real Estate Agents & Brokers 9,394 3,074 12,468 15,726 5,146 20,872 22,264 7,285 29,549
Stock and Bond Salesmen 868 84 952 1,453 141 1,594 2,057 199 2,256
Salesmen and Sales Clerks 63,838 41,697 L05,535 106,865 69,801 176,666 151,296 98,822 250,118
Wholesale Trade 12,785 650 13,435 21,402 1,088 22,490 30,300 1,541 31,841
Retail Trade 35,346 38,530 73,876 59,169 64,499 123,668 83,770 91,316 L75,086

CRATS Eilu, FOREMEN & KINDRED WORKERS
Airconditioning, Heating &
Refrigeration Mechanic 2,343 9 2,352 3,922 15 3,937 5,553 21 5,574
Airplane Mechanic 8,901 77 8,978 14,900 129 15,029 21,095 182 21,277
Automobile Mechanic & Repairmen 19,550 53 19,603 32,727 89 32,816 46,334 126 46,460
Baker 2,020 675 2,695 3,381 1,130 4,511 4,787 1,600 6,387
S Brickmasons, Stonemasons &
STile Setters 7,325 35 7,360 12,262 59 12,321 17,360 83 17,443
__ _ __ _ __ _ __ _ ______s 1,2 4 ______


-- --





Employed 1960 Projected Employment 1970 Projected Employment 1980
OCCUPATIONS Male Female Total Male Female Total Male Female Total
Cabinetmakers 2,640 28 2,668 4,419 47 4,466 6,257 66 6,323
Carpenters 30,138 113 30,251 50,451 189 50,640 71,427 .268 71,695
Cement and Concrete Finishers 1,971 3 1,974 3,299 5 3,304 4,671 7 4,678
Compositors & Type Setters 3,030 315 3,345 5,072 527 5,599 7,181 747 7,928
Decorators and Window Dressers 924 1,009 1,933 1,547 1,689 3,236 2,190 2,391 4,581
Electricians 9,643 41 9,684 16,142 69 16,211 22,854 97 22,951
Electrotypers & Sterotypers 161 5 166 270 8 278 382 12 394
Engravers, Except Photoengravers 153 48 201 256 80 336 363 114 477
Excavating, Grading and Road
Machinery Operators 8,352 21 8,373 13,981 35 14,016 19,794 50 19,844
Glaziers 656 11 667 1,098 18 1,116 1,555 26 1,581
Jewelers, Watchmakers, Goldsmiths
& Silversmiths 870 28 -898 1,456 47 1,503 2,062 66 2,128
Linemen & Servicemen, Telegraph,
Telephone & Power 8,497 282 8,779 14,224 472 14,696 20,138 668 20,806
Machinists 5,070 84 5,154 8,487 141 8,628 12,016 199 12,215
Millwrights 651 --- 651 1,090 --- 1,090 1,543 -- 1,543
Motion Picture Projectionists 487 4 491 815 7 822 1,154 9 1,163
Office Machine Repairmen 650 4 654 1,088 7 1,095 1,541 9 1,550
Opticians, & Lens Grinders
& Polishers 477 33 510 798 55 853 1,130 X/778 1,208
Painters, Construction & Maintenance 15,182 285 15,467 25,415 477 25,892 35,981 675 36,656
Photoengravers & Lithographers 464 9 476 777 15 792 1,100 21 1,121
Plasterers 3,003 11 4,004 6,684 18 6,702 9,463 26 ~9,489
Plumbers & Pipe Fitters 7,518 38 7,556 12,585 64 12,649 17,818 90 17,908
Pressman & Plate Printers, Printing 976 32 1,008 1,634 54 1,688 2,313 76 2,389
Radio & Tlelvision Repairman 4,023 47 4,070 6,735 79 6,814 9,535 111 9,646
Roofers & Slaters 2,726 4 2,730 4,563 7 4,570 6,461 9, 6,470
Shoemakers and Repairers,
Except Factory 773 49 822 1,294 82 1,376 1,832 116 1,984
Structural Metal Workers 1,122 --- 1,122 1,878 --- 1,878 1,659 -- 2 2,659
Tailors 570 128 698 954 214 1,168 1,351 303 1,654
Tinsmiths, Coppersmiths &
Sheetmetal Workers 3,639 45 3,684 6,092 75 6,167 8,624 107 8,731
Toolmakers and Diemakers and Setters 1,073 8 1,081 1,796 13 1,809 2,543 19 2,562
Upholsterers 1,300 156 1,456 2,176 261 2,437 3,081 370 3,451

OPERATIVES & KINDRED WORKERS
Assemblers 2,011 1,728 3,739 3,366 2,893 6,259 4,766 4,095 8,861


0 2 -





0 0


Employed 1960 Projected Employment 1970 Projected Employment 1980

OCCUPATIONS Male Female Total Male Female Total Male Female Total

Attendants, Auto Service & Parking 10,616 317 10,933 17,771 531 18,302 25,160 751 25,911
02 Bus Drivers 3,061 1,375 4,436 5,124 2,302 7,426 7,255 3,259 10,514
S Checkers, Examiners & Inspectors, Mfg. 1,706 1,489 3,195 2,856 2,493 5,349 4,043 3,529 7,572
S Deliverymen and Routemen 11,186 529 11,715 18,725 886 19,611 26,511 1,254 27,765
S Dressmakers & Seamstresses, exc.
H Factory 95 4,038 4,133 159 6,760 6,919 225 9,570 9,795
SManufacturing
Paper and Allied Products 4,005 803 4,808 6,704 1,344 8,048 9,492 1,903 11,395
Ship and Boatbuilding & Repairing 554 57 611 927 95 1,022 1,313 135 1,448
Meat Cutters, exc. Slaughter and
Packing House 4,389 210 4,599 7,347 352 7,699 10,402 498 10,900
Oilers & Greasers, exc. Auto 1,346 --- 1,346 2,253 --- 2,253 3,190 --- 3,190
Packers & Wrappers, (N.E.C.) 2,956 5,748 8,704 4,948 9,622 14,570 7,006 13,623 20,628
Painters, exc. Construction and
Maintenance 2,466 198 2,664 4,128 331 4,459 5,844 469 6,314
Sailors and Deck Hands 1,124 8 1,132 1,882 13 1,895 2,664 19 2,683
Sewers & Stitchers, mfg. 269 4,982 5,251 450 8,340 8,790 638 11,807 12,445
Stationary Firemen 1,361 4 1,365 2,278 7 2,885 3,226 9 3,235
S Taxicab Drivers & Chauffers 4,207 136 4,343 7,043 228 7,271 9,971 322 10,293
Truck & Tractor Drivers 45,923 358 46,281 76,875 599 77,474 108,838 848 109,686
Welders and Flame Cutters 5,392 87 5,479 9,026 146 9,172 12,779 206 12,985
o\
---I
PRIVATE HOUSEHOLD WORKERS
Babysitters, Private Household 145 6,873 7,018 243 1,505 1,748 344 16,289 16,633
Housekeepers, Private Household 84 4,379 4,463 141 7,330 7,471 199 10,378 10,577
Private Household Workers 2,483 61,607 64,090 4,157 103,130 107,287 5,885 146,008 151,893

SERVICE WORKERS, EXC. PRIVATE HOUSEHOLD
Attendants, Hospital & Other Instit. 2,707 6,824 9,531 4,532 11,423 15,955 6,416 16,173 22,589
Attendants, Recreation & Amusement 1,495 221 1,716 2,503 370 2,873 3,543 524 4,067
Barbers 5,136 277 5,413 8,598 464 9,062 12,172 656 12,828
Bartenders 3,315 619 3,934 5,49 1,036 6,585 7,857 1,467 9,324
Chambermaids & Maids, exc. Private
Household 235 12,481 12,716 393 20,893 21,286 557 29,580 30,137
Charwomen & Cleaners 1,008 2,175 3,183 1,687 3.641 5,328 2,389 5,155 7,544
Cooks, exc. Private Household 7,841 9,585 17,426 13,126 16,045 29,171 18,583 22,716 41,299
Counter & Fountain Workers 793 3,016 1,327 5,049 6,376 1,879 7,148 9,027
Hairdressers and Cosmetologists 1,169 9,343 10,512 1,957 15,640 17,597 2,771 22,143 24,913






Employed 1960 Projected Employment 1970 Projected Employment 1980

OCCUPATIONS Male Female Total Male Female Total Male Female Total

Janitors and Sextons 11,082 926 12,008 18,551 1,550 20,101 26,264 2,195 28,459
Kitchen Workers, (N.E.C.) exc.
Private Household 4,287 5,732 10,019 7,176 9,595 16,771 10,160 13,585 23,745
Nurses, Practical -- 5,046 5,046 --- 8,440 8,440 --- 20,003 20,003
Porters 6,189 79 6,268 10,360 132 10,492 14,668 187 14,855
Firemen, Fire Protection 3,726 12 3,774 6,298 20 6,318 8,916 28 8,944
Guards, Watchmen and Doorkeepers 5,956 189 6,145 9,970 316 10,287 14,116 448 14,564
Policemen and Detectives- 6,617 154 6,771 11,077 258 11,335 15,682 365 16,047
Waiters and Watiresses 4,622 27,095 31,717 7,737 45,357 53,094 10,954 64,215 75,169

FARM LABORERS AND FOREMEN
Farm Foremen 2,488 32 2,520 4,165 54 4,219 5,897 76 5,973
Farm Laborers, Wage Workers 45,094 16,762 61,856 75,487 28,060 103,547 L06,873 39,726 146,599

LABORERS, EXC, FARM AND MINE
Carpenters, Helpers, exc.
Logging and Mining 1,715 28 1,743 2,871 47 2,918 4,065 66 4,131
Gardeners, exc. Farm and
Groundskeepers 10,828 135 10,963 18,126 226 18,352 25,662 320 25,982




As projected by the U. S. Department of Labor, these figures indicate that between 1960 and 1970
the number of employees in the Florida Labor Force will increase by approximately 6.74 percent
each year from growth. Approximately 3.5 percent of the 1960 labor force will leave the labor
force annually due to death and retirement. If these projections are correct, between 1960 and
1970 a number of workers equal to the number employed in 1960 must have been trained and prepared
to enter the labor market.

The employment statistics for 1960 were taken from the 1960 United States Census of the population.
The total labor force for 1970 and 1980 was determined as stated on the previous table of,
"Population and Labor Force for Florida and Projections." The projected number of workers employed in
each occupation in 1970 and 1980 was determined by first calculating the percent of growth of the
total employed labor force for the period 1960-70 and 1960-80. The percent of growth for the
interval was multiplied by the number employed in the occupation in 1960 and the sum was added to
the number employed in the occupation in 1960.


0











FLORIDA' S


DEMAND FOR ADDITIONAL TRAINED WORKERS, IN SELECTED OCCUPATIONS

AS DETERMINED IN A S-QRVE CONDUCTED BY THE FLORIDA STATE EMPLOYMENT SERVICE


Many individuals, organizations, and institutions realized that it was imper-
ative that we have more recent information on our labor force, than could
be secured from the 1960 census, if vocational training programs were to be
realistically planned.

To answer this need the Florida State Employment Service conducted a state-
wide survey in the summer of 1965. The purpose of the survey.was to determine
the number of additional trained workers that would be required by 1967
for replacement and expansion needs in selected occupations. The employment
service selected, for inclusion in the survey, the occupations that it.felt
would require training for a considerable number of personnel.

The statistics gathered through the survey were secured either by personal
contact made with the employer or by mailing a questionnaire to the employer.

Most of the information contained in the tables on the following six pages
was compiled from the findings of this survey. Although the findings are
already becoming out of date, they are more recent than the statistics
given in the 1960 census and should be helpful both in planning vocational
education training programs and for vocational guidance.


Section III


May, 1967




IE)MAN?) POP OCCUPATION', IN P/U)PIDA 1BY COUNTY

Or)H f(1VEYP AREA ANID PY nflIUPVFI,'OPY AREA


Employment Demand Code Projected 1965-670

W Under 15 addlitlonal employees needed for replacement and expansion
X 15-Il additional employees n'eded for replacement nnd expansion
Y 15-75 additional employees neerlod for replaccem!nt and expannion
Z Over 75 additional employees needed for replacement, nrd expnnnsion


Employment Demand Code Projected November-May 1967'

A Strong demand for workers
B Good Job opportunities
C Local supply adequate but occupation is
important in area


- ~ ~~ t I --^------I -~--- ______________-- --------


AIPEA)


Fscembin
Banta Vogn,
Okaloona
Walton
Bay
Franklin
ultf
Jackson
Calhoun
Holman
Liberty
Wahsninton


J)atrson
Wakll la
Taylor
Madison
lafnyette
l)txie
Columbia
litunmlton
uvwannoee
Alachua
Bradford
Gilohrist
Ilnlon
INvaI
Baker
Nassau
Vc By
Putnam
DO, Johns
Fnagler
Pgaion
Citrus

Volustai
Lake
..umter
Seminole

lernando
Pasco
Orange
Oonola
Broevrd
Pinellas
Polk
*lHardee
53linhlnndo
anatee
St. Lucie
Indian River
Martin
Okeechobee
tinrasota
Lee
DeOoto
Charlotte
Collier
Palm Beach
blades
)lendry

Monroe
Broward


mm-- r


--4 I I I ..- I .- .4 4.- 4 41 I '4


H C A C i H 1S A A C C C B B C C n B B A B



M_ Y Y X Y Y Z7, Z Y



C B 1 C A C C A C C JC C C B B cC C C C J C C



X XXx x Y z x w W W


Y Y W X X Y Z X X


: W X Y X YY 7, W X X W X



Z ZZ Z Y Z Y ZXZX ZZYZYX Z ZXZ X z


X X w J w x x Y x w x x x x x


7. X Z Y Y Y XX Y X X Y
.IU It 1 C C A A It A 1 H, CCC C C C C H B C B B C C C C
X X x_ W Y X W W x x w x x
X Y X Z

Si J ,L .. 7, J Jz z _Jz z z 7 Z Z z Z

S z Z 7 Z Z Z Z Y 7, Z Z Z Z Y Y Z z
A (: l A C H A H A I C J C C H C 0 C C LH C A A C C C



Z 7, Y X W Z X Z ,Z X Z Z X Z X Z W
AC B i C AA C JD i C A_ A H B A B B CC



S A A A C A A C A B H H I C B B C B C A C
Y X L X x x



Y Y Z W X W , Z Y


n i i n


B c In


. z I z L. I Z A A 1 Z I Z .. Y l Y Z I g x I.
B B 'B B H C HI B A IJA IfB [ I II B I C I HIBI C [C1 1 BI C I C I C B


Z 1Z


XI Z z


Z Iz


May. 1967 20


COUNTY EIr


OCCUPATTOII3
:, = ;


0Based upon a survey by the Florida Employment Service in the summer of 1965.
"Opportunities For Work in Principal Areas of Florida" November-May 1967. Compiled by the Florida State Employment Bervice.
*Clay County is in Area I1, however, it was combined with Duva4, Baker and Nassau Counties by the Employment Service for this survey.
llardee and Highlands Counties are in Area XII, but were included In with Polk County for the survey.


~-~~lr---------,--t--~---r7--+-+-~--+-C


--t-t-f--)--e-c--c-)-C--c--c-


CHART VI


ScAn'fJon III






CHART VI '
(Continued)


COUNTIES AREAS


0

PP- iJ 9 *m
V
0"
.0 it 3
u ^ 3 in


Escambia
Santa Rosa
Okaloosa
Walton
Bay
Franklin
Gulf
Jackson
Calhoun
Holmes
Liberty
Washington
Leon
Gadsden
Jefferson
Waku3lln
Taylor
Madison
Lafayette
Dixie
Columbia
Hamilton
Suwannee
Alacihuu
Bradford
Gilchrist
Union
Duval
Bakler
Nassau

Putnam
St. Johns
Flaeler
Marion
Citrus
C'ry
Volusin
Lake
Sumter
Seminole
Hillsborough
Hernando
Pasco
Orange
Osceola
Brevard
Plnellas
Polk
Hardee
*Heihlands


Manatee
St. Lucie
Indian River
Martin
Okeechobee
Saracota
Lee
DeSoto ,
Charlotte
Collier
Palm Beach
Glades m
Hen-ry
Dade
Monroe
Brovard


a-.
0
H H,

U)~


OCCUPATIONS
_____ ~ ____,_, -c --T- ----r----t --r 7


SI w ^ I I I-

E -- - -- -- x -


C C A C B B C c D A B C C C C C C C C B B C




r7- Y X


rCC








K7. M I -
L--------------- -------------- -- -_ -- -

csw __-_ -

K-"


,I,


la


C C 1 B ,C C B C C B C C C C C C C C C C
X X w

U,_S __ _i ._ _"_ ------ -- --- --- --
o x x x x __--x



z z _


c A
'--tCtA


C B C C
B B


C C C C C C B C C B C A C D C Cl B C C C C C C C




W Z


z tz X Z


Z I IZ


C s I B 8I D I B I C C C C B A IC B I A I C B C B A
XI=


C C n B C 1 C B C C _
X Z X I I Y I.Y


Section IIf


I. -- 4J 4.Li__4 ---41 -4 -4 -----t---r --T---- T-- -T--T--- -- _


B C I B C C B B C C
B cCIc c cC C c C BC CJ


I bz' I I I I I ^ I I I 1 1 I =I i -, i 1 1 n I U T in


c. Ic c c c
C w x C


XI


May, 1967






CHART VI
(Continued)


COUNTIES ARKAS! OCCUPATIONS

*- ---Y-~ r, jj ^j

Ir I
S42 11- Er wh B )- U 0 i ; y S t /
0. 11 9


ggg~g,. W '01i tA* 0 0 CI 03 |'41 4) 1g M ^ f 5 ; h s & l
S. 4) 0 0 P. 94 d 0: 4 95

41 0 .' p I M 4' do 9. 4 ..il7 4
S4)01U 01 114Il
Eli 4 t" 0. a -d t 0 1,
0 U0 U
0a .0 '7 "' '7 0 U ' F ,


Esoambia
Santa Rosa
Okaloosa
Walton
Bay
Franklin
Oulf
Jackson
Calhoun
Holmes
Liberty
.Washinton
Leon
Gadsden
Jefferson
Wakulln
Taylor
Madison
Lafayette
Dixie
Columbia
Hamilton
Suvannee

Bradford
Oilchrist
Union
Duval
Baker
Nassau
*Clay
Putnam
St. Johns
Fla lcr
Marion
Citrus
Levy
Volusia
Lake
Sumter
Seminole
Hillsborough
Hernando
Pasco
Orange
Osceola
Brevard
Pinelln
Polk
lHardee
'Iliahlands
Manatee_
St. Lucie
Indian liver
Martin
Okeechobec
Sarasota
Lee
DeGoto
Charlotte
Collier
Palm Beach
Glades
lfendry _
Dade
Monroe
nrovwrd


IS B C A A C B C AC C A B -_




Y x



C cl C CC C B C C C C C CC IC C C


w I xl I i w w W w Wi _
SI ,
^~~~- -4 -- -- --


















CC A C_ C CI A 1 C C --C


.- -- -
i


HC C C


Sc clc c c c _Bc n i c I c n ._c__ ____ --





8 C C C C C C B CI C C C C

-'-- 7. X Y I 7 --
L H~ C 1 h' 8 B- C C! C
t-T t-- i T -iT --d :T -xB ac L. __1 _j. .. .7 -


&RS -I Ic CIC c


c C C i C C ._
. '.i lZ _- -T i r


:z:I


Section III


May, 1967















TECHNICIANS


AERONAUTICAL

AIR CONDO. & HEAT & RErRIQ.

CHEMICAL

CIVIL & BLDG. CONST.

DATA PROCESSING

DRAFTING & DESIGN

ELECTRICAL

ELECTROMECHANICAL

ELECTRONICS

GRAPHICS ART

INDUSTRIAL ENG.

INSTRUMENTATION

MECHANICAL

TOOL & DIE DESIGN


e


0 U
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E E


E E


B B B B E D D B E C A A C B E B C C C C

E E E E E E E E E E E E E B E E C C D D

D C E C C E E E E E D C D E E D E B C D

E ED C B E A D E A B B D D B E D B B C D

B B D B C C E C B C C C C B E C B B C B

E E E C E A D D E C D C D C D D C C

E C E C E E E E E E A B D C E B D D C C

B B E A E A D E E E B C D B D B C Bi B C

E E D C E E E E E E E D E E E E E E E E

E D E C E E E E E E D D E D E E C E E E

D C E B E B E E E B D D E C E E E E C E

D E E C E E E E E E A D D C E D C C C c

A E D B E D E E E E C D D E E D C C C C


0


*


E E E E I E


SI E




urruLJm, II lLb rUr( WUr IPN FrKINCIlAL AREAS OF FLORIDA," ,'i I7-1 .-.--- .. -I[

THIS CHART HAS PREPARED TO INDICATE THE DEMAND FOR WORKERS IN FLORID THE 20 CITIES LISTED ARE REPRESENTATIVE OF THE VARIOUS& AS OF THE
STATE. ALL OCCUPATIONS COULD NOT BE LISTED; THEREFORE, IF AN OCCUPATION IS NOT LISTED IT MAY BE ASSUMED THAT IT IS NEITHER A SHORTAGE NOR SJRPLU5
OCCUPATION.

SHORTAGES ARE FOR WELL QUALIFIED PERSONS, AND OTHERS SHOULD NOT ASSUME JOBS WILL BE EASILY OBTAINED. NO INDIVIDUAL CAN BE DEFINITELY ASSURED OF
OBTAINING A JOB, EVEN IN THE SHORTAGE OCCUPATIONS. MANY EMPLOYERS WILL NOT HIRE WITHOUT A PERSONAL INTERVIEW. WE STRONGLY URGE PROSPECTIVE
WORKERS NOT TO COME TO FLORIDA SEEKING EMPLOYMENT UNLESS THEY HAVE SUFFICIENT MONEY TO MAINTAIN THEMSELVES AND RETURN HOME IF THEY SHOULD BE


UNSUCCESSFUL IN FINDING WORK.

A, STRONG DEMAND FOR WORKERS. SERIOUS SHORTAGE OF QUALIFIED APPLICANTS.
B GOOD JOB OPPORTUNITIES. LOCAL SUPPLY OF QUALIFIED APPLICANTS INADEQUATE.
c. OCCUPATION IS IMPORTANT IN AREA, BUT LOCAL SUPPLY OF WORKERS 18 ADEQUATE.


PROFESSIONAL & MANAGERIAL
OCCUPAT I ONS


ACCOUNTANT, CERTIFIED PUBLIC

ACCOUNTANT, COST

ACCOUNTANT, GENERAL

ARTIST, COMMERCIAL

BIOLOGIST

BUSINESS EXECUTIVE

CHEMIST

CHEMIST, ASSISTANT

CHEMIST, PAINT

CHEMIST, WOOD

CONTROLLER

DENTAL TECHNICIAN

DENTIST'S ASSISTANT

DIETITIAN

DRAFTSMAN, ARCHITECTURAL

DRAFTSMAN, ELECTRICAL

DRAFTSMAN, MECHANICAL

DRAFTSMAN, STRUCTURAL

ELECTRONICS TECHNICIAN
ENGINEER, AERONAUTICAL


x
o U
Li

z
00. I-
0 < >


ai
-j
0



S-
*


SOME JOB OPPORTUNITIES, BUT SUPPLY OF QUALIFIED
WORKERS EXCEEDS THE DEMAND.
FEW OR NO JOB OPPORTUNITIES IN THE AREA.


I-
t-

0
4 u
Z <
z z
4 L
0. cl


a
Cr




i 0
4
a-


a-
re z
4-

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C D C C D C D C C E D E B B C D B C C C

C D E C D D C D B C D D B B C D C C C C

C D C C B C C B C D B B B C C C C C C

E D E D E E E E E E E D E E E E E E E E

E D E E E D E E E E E C E E D E D E E E

D E E D D E E E D E E E D D D D D D D D

E E E E E C E E C B E D E B E E C C E D

E E E E E D D E C C E C E C E E C D E C

E E E E E E E E D E E E E E C E E E E E

E E E E E E E E D E E E E B D E E E E E
D D E C E D E E D E D D E E D D C P D D

C D C C C D C D D E E C B D E C C E C C

C C C B C D C B D E D B C C C D D C C C

B D E C D D D C C E E C D B C E D B D C

C D C B B B C B B E E C C B D C B C C B

B B C B E B C B B C C B C B C D E C C B

B B C B C B C C B B B B C C C C E C D B

C D E B E C C C B B B B C D C E C C C B

SEE LAST PAGE

E B I E E D E E D E D D E E E E D D


i I r -1 I I I I I I I I I I I I r





A. STRONG DEMAND FOR WORKERS. SERIOUS SHORTAGE OF QUALIFIED APPLICANTS. D. SOME JOB OPPORTUNITIrS, BUT SUPPLY OF QUALIFIED
B. GOOD JOB OPPORTUNITIES. LOCAL SUPPLY OF QUALIFIED APPLICANTS INADEQUATE. WORKERS EXCEEDS THE DEMAND.
C OCCUPATION IS IMPORTANT IN ARES, BUT LOCAL SUPPLY OF WORKERS IS ADEQUATE. E, FCW OR NO JOB OPPORTUNITIES IN THE AREA.
LIW 0
m- J .. U l y
O u < I u
S ,< Sw .J i w COQ '
W z u r z -.I J 0- U
u z co o -0 0 u -
I- L Q 1 -- 0 > 0 < u -J ". ,
4 4 < L. .J > 0 Z 0: 0 I- F- < <4
Sz >- < U) 3 5 u 4 U a 0 :
S< 4 O J w >L 0 o E < 0 L < U
PROFESSIOtJAL & MANAGERIAL w 8o Z -9 1 4 11 Z -
OCCUPAT IONS ou < 0 < < < u
U L. 0.. U) Q" I uI- ( f--


ENGINEER, CHEMICAL

ENGINEER, CIVIL

ENGINEER, ELECTRICAL

ENGINEER, ELECTRONICS

ENGINEER, INDUSTRIAL

ENGINEER, MECHANICAL

ENGINEER, SALES

ENGINEER, STRUCTURAL

LIBRARIAN

MANAGER, HOTEL

MANAGER, MOTEL

MANAGER, OFFICE

MANAGER, PERSONNEL
MANAGER, PRODUCTION
MANAGER, RESTAURANT

MANAGER, RETAIL

MANAGER, TRAFFIC

MANAGER, TRAINEE

MARKET RESEARCH ANALYST

MATHEMATICIAN
MEDICAL TECH4NOLOIST

METALLURGIST

NURSE, LICENSED PRACTICAL
NURSE, REGISTERED

PHARnACB REGISTERED


S E E E E E E C B E E B D E E E B E


F,


C C E C D D E E B E D B C B C E C C C B

C B E E E C E E B B C B BE B C E E C C C

A A E A E B E E C E A C B C C E ,l C A C

C B E C E E E E C E D C D C C E E B B D

C B C C E D E D B B B B C B C E E B B C

D E E E E E E E D E E E D C E E E E E E

D D E D E E E D C B D B D E D E D_ C P' C
D D C C E E E D E E D C C E E C A [r C
E E D D D E E D D E E C C E D C E D C Dl

D D C D D E C D D E E C C D D C D E C D

D ID E D D E D E D E E D C D D D D C FD: D

E D E E D E E E C E D E C E D D C C D D

D E E C E E E E D E E C D E EE E E E E CDC
D D C C D E D D C E D C C D C D E D C

D E C C C D C D C E E C C E C D D E D C

E E E E E E E E D E E E E E E E E E E D

A C B C C C C C B C B D C C E C C C C
D E EE E E E E E E E C E E E E E E E

E B E E E B E E C E E E D D E E D E D
A E B B C B B B E E B F B B C B B C E

E E E EF E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E1

A C C A B D B A C B C C B B B A B A A A

A B B A A C A A C A C B A A B A B A A

A C C C C B E C E C C C C C E C A


i r


I











STRONG DEMAND FOR WORKERS. SERIOUS SHORTAGE OF QUALIFIED APPLICANTS.
GOOD JOB OPPORTUNITIES, LOCAL SUPPLY OF QUALIFIED APPLICANTS INADEQUATE.
OCCUPATION is IMPORTANT IN AREA, BUT LOCAL SUPPLY OF WORKERS IS ADEQUATE.


PROFESSIONAL & MANAGERIAL
OCCUPATIONS

PHOTOGRAPHER

PHYSICAL THERAPIST

PHYSICIST

PILOT, AIRPLANE

PROGRAcMER

PSYCHOLOGIST, CLINICAL

PUBLIC RELATIONS MAN

PURCHASING AGENT

RADIO ANNOUNCER

RADIO OPERATOR

SOCIAL/WELARE WORK

SUPERINTENDENT, CONSTRUCTION

SURVEYOR

TEACHER, COLL. OR UNIV.
TEACHER, GRAMMAR SCHOOL

TEACHER, HIGH SCHOOL

TEACHER, VOCATIONAL SCHOOL
TLONNICIAN

X-RAY TECHNICIAN


LI
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D. SOME JOB OPPORTU:.lITIES, BUT SUPPLY or QUAL.IrCD
WORKERS EXCEEDS THE DEMAND.
E. FEW OR NO JOB OPPORTUNITIES IN THE AREA
x
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E B E E E C E E E E D E E E E E C E E D

E E D E E E E D E E C E E E E E E E E
C B C B B C D D A E C C E C E E B A B C

C E E C E E E E D E D D E E E E C E D C

D E E D E E E E D E E E E E E D C D D D
D D E C D D E E C E E C E E E C C C D E

E E C D D D D E D E D E C C D D C E D C
E E E D D E D E D E C D C C D D C E D C

A D C C C C C C C A E A A A D D C A B A

D E E C C D E D D E E C C D D D C E C C

B C E C C C D C B E E B E B C C C B B C

D C C C D C C E D C E C C B D D D B C B
C B C C C B C C A C C C A C D D D C C B
C B C C C B E C B C C C A C D D D C C B

C C C C C E E D C E E C A C C D D C C B

SEE LAST PAGE

A D E B C C E B D E E B B C C D C C C A


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1 I ---r --I--1---~ i ----. i -


D E


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TD I E i D E


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"OPPORTUNITIES FOR WORK IN PRINCIlfI REAS OF FLORIDA," MAY 1967 NOVEMBER 1967
THIS CHART HAS BEEN PREPARED TO INDICATE THE DEMAND FOR WORKERS IN FLORIDA. THE 20 CITIES LISTED ARE REPRESENTATIVE OF THE VARIOUS AREAS OF THE
STATE. ALL OCCUPATIONS COULD NOT BE LISTED; THEREFORE, IF AN OCCUPATION IS NOT LISTED IT MAY BE ASSUMED THAT I IS NEITHER A SHORTAGE NOR SURPLUS
OCCUPATION.

SHORTAGES ARE FOR WELL QUALIFIED PERSONS, AND OTHERS SHOULD NOT ASSUME JOBS WILL BE EASILY OBTAINED. NO INDIVIDUAL CAlN BE DEFINITELY ASSURED OF
OBTAINING A JOB, EVEN IN THE SHORTAGE OCCUPATIONS. MANY EMPLOYERS WILL NOT HIRE WITHOUT A PERSONAL INTERVIEW, WE STRONGLY URGE PROSPECTIVE
WORKERS NOT TO COME TO FLORIDA SEEKING EMPLOYMENT UNLESS THEY HAVE SUFFICIENT HONEY TO MAINTAIN THEMSELVES AND RETURN HOME IF THEY SHOULD BE
UNSUCCESSFUL IN FINDING WORK.


A. STRONG DEMAND FOR WORKERS. SERIOUS SHORTAGE OF QUALIFIED APPLICANTS.
B. GOOD JOB OPPORTUNITIES. LOCAL SUPPLY OF QUALIFIED APPLICANTS INADEQUATE.
C. OCCUPATION IS IMPORTANT IN AREA, BUT LOCAL SUPPLY OR WORKERS IS ADEQUATE.


CLERICAL & SALES
OCCUPATIONS
AD.RSS30GRAPH, MULTILITH,
MULTiGRAnPH
APPRAISER, REAL ESTATE

AtNK TELLER

BOOKKEEPER

BOOKKEEPING MACHINE OPERATOR

CASHIER

CLAIM ADJUSTER

CLERK, ACCOUNTING

CLERK, CREDIT

CLERK, FILE

CLERK, GENERAL

CLERK, GENERAL OFFiCE

CLERK, HOTEL

CLERK, PAYROLL
CLERK POST OFFICE

CLERK, RECEIVING & SHIPPING

CLERK, STOCK

CLERK TYPIST

COLLECTOR
(ISPATCHER


SOME JOB OPPORTUNITIES, BUT SUPPLY OF QUALIFIED
WORKERS EXCEEDS THE DEMAND.
FEW OR NO JOB OPPORTUNITIES IN THE AREA.


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' E E T D E E E C E E D E C D D C D D E
E 1* C B E C B E D C A E C C C B C B E

C C E C C C B B C El B B C C C B C B B

C D C A C C C B C C D B B C C C C B B B

B B C B C T C B C F' C .' C D" B C B C L' C

C E D L Li L E E E' E D l C C C P C C C C

C D C C C D C B B C E D D L' C C P D C

B E C B D D C B B D E B D C C D B D C C

E E E D D E D E C E E C D D D E D D D D
D C C E D D C D C D C D D C D C D D D D

A B B D C D C C A C C A D C C C B D B C

C D C C D D D C A E D C B D C D C D C D



E E E D D E E E E E E E EE C E C P E E
C C C B D D C C D B E A C C C D C C C

C ,' C A E C B B B C A C C C C C C B C

S A 1 E B C D C E A A B A D C C C B A A B

P P C PB B C C C _B BE A C C F B B C B
E D E C D E E C C E E L E E E D C I P E







A. STRONG DEMAND FOR WORKERS. SERIOUS SHORTAGE OF QUALIFIED APPLICANTS,
B. GOOD JOB OPPORTUNITIES. LOCAL SUPPLY OF QUALIFIED APPLICANTS INADEQUATE.
C. OCCUPATION 13 IMPORTANT IN AREA, BUT LOCAL SUPPLY OF WORKERS IS ADEQUATE.


CLERICAL & SALES
OCCUPATIONS


FOOD & BEVERAGE CHECKER
GROCERY CHECKER
MACHINE OPERATOR, ADDING
MACHINE OPERATOR, BILLING
MACHINE OPERATOR, CALCULATING
MACHINE OPERATOR, KEY-PUNCH
MACHINE OPERATOR, TABULATING
PARTS CLERK
RECEPTIONIST
SALES CLERK
SALESMAN (OTHER THAN STRAIGHT
COMMISSION)
SALESMAN, COMMISSION
SALESPERSON
SECRETARY
STENOGRAPHER
STENO-BOOKKEEPER
SUPERVISORMACH INE-RECORDS UNIT
TELEPHONE OPERATOR
TELEPHONE SOLICITOR
TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATOR
TYPIST
UNDERWR TER


a


D, SOME JOB OPPORTUNITIES BUT SUPPLY OF
QUALIFIED WORKERS EXCEEDS THE DEMAND,
E. FEW OR NO JOB OPPORTUNITIES IN THE AREA.


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C C C C C D B C C D C C C C C C B D C C
E E D D D E E E C E D C E E E E D C D C
C EC D CD D C D D B D D E D D D D C
C E D D r D D C B E D B D E E D D C CE
D E B B D C D C C D E B C C D D B C C B

C E C D DI P D D D C E E C E C D E B D C B
C E C B D D C C C C C A C C C B C Dr B C
,,,- --i
D D C D C D D D C D D C D D D D D C D D D

C C B C C D C B C C C B C C C C B. C D D
C C C D D B D D C E 0 C C C C D C C C C
A B B A A B B B B D C A C B C C B B C B

B B B C C D B C C C C B C C B C B C C C
A B A A B B B A A A B A B B B B A A A A

A A A A B B B A B A B A B B B B B A A A
A B B A B C B A B B C A B B B B B A A A
E C E D E E E E E E E C E E D E D C D D
C C C 0 C E C B C E C C D C D C C D C C
B C D A B E C B C E C B D D C E C D C C
B D C B C D D C B B D A E C D C C B B B
B B C B C C C B B A C A D C C C C A B B

E C C A D E D C C E E A C E E C D C C E
- - - - - - - - - - - -


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OPPORTUNITIES FOR WORK IN PRINCIPAL *S OF FLORIDA MAY 1967 r:ovcnc 1567

THIS CHART HAS BEEN PREPARED TO INDICATE THE DEMAND FOR WORKERS IN FLORIDA. THE 20 CITIES LISTED ARE REPRESENTATIVE OF THE VARIOUS AREAS OF
THE STATE. ALL OCCUPATIONS COULD NOT BE LISTED; THEREFORE, IF AN OCCUPATION IS NOT LISTED IT MAY BE ASSUMED THAT IT IS NEITHER A SHORTAGE NOR
SURPLUS OCCUPATION.

SHORTAGES ARE FOR WELL QUALIFIED PERSONS, AND OTHERS SHOULD NOT ASSUME JOBS WILL BE EASILY OBTAINED. NO INDIVIDUAL CAN BE DEFINITELY ASSURED
OF OBTAINING A JOB, EVEN IN TIHE SHORTAGE OCCUPATIONS. MANY EMPLOYERS WILL NOT HIRE WITHOUT A PERSONAL INTERVIEW. WE STRONGLY URGE PROSPECTIVE
WORKERS NOT TO COME TO FLORIDA SEEKING EMPLOYMENT UNLESS THEY HAVE SUFFICIENT MONEY TO MAINTAIN THEMSELVES AND RETURN HOME IF THEY SHOULD BE
UNSUCCESSFUL IN FINDING WORK.

A, STRONG DEMAND FOR WORKERS. SERIOUS SHORTAGE OF QUALIFIED APPLICANTS. D. SOME JOB OPPORTUNITIES, BUT SUPPLY OF QUALIFIED
B, GOOD JOB OPPORTUNITIES. LOCAL SUPPLY OF QUALIFIED APPLICANTS INADEQUATE. WORKERS EXCEEDS THE DEMAND.
C, OCCUPATION IS IMPORTANT IN AREA, BUT LOCAL SUPPLY OF WORKERS 8I ADEQUATE. E. FEW OR NO JOB OPPORTUNITIES IN THE AREA.


SKILLED & SEMI-SKILLED
OCCUPATIONS


ALTERATION MAN/WOMAN

AUTO-BODY REPAIRMAN

BAKER

BLOCK MASON

BRICKLAYER

BULLDOZER OPERATOR

CAB IETHAKER

CARPENTER

CEHMCT FINISHER

CONSTRUCTION HELPER

DIE MAKER

DRAGLINE OPERATOR

DRY CLEANER

DRYWALL FINISHER

ELECTRIC-MOTOR,REPAIRMAN

ELECTRICAL APPLIANCE SEfVICEC

ELECTRICIAN

ELECTRICIAN, AIRCRAFT

ELECTRONICS ASSEMBLER
ELECTRONICS MECHANIC


B C C B B C C C B C C C B C B B C C C B

B C B A B B B B B C B B B A A A C A B A
C C C C C C D C C C C C B E B D C C C B

C C C C C D B E C C. B C B C C D C C C B

C C C C C D B E C C B C B C D D C C C C

C C- D C D D C D C D C D C C D D C C C C

B B C B D C C C B D C B B A B C C C B B

C C C C C B C C B C C C B C C C B C C B

C C C C D C C E I, C B C B C C D C C C B

C D C C C D B B B C D B B C B C C D C B

B E C B E E E D B E B B B E D E E B C D
C C D C C C C D C C C C C B C L C C C C

B C C C D B C C B C C B B E C r C C E, B

D C C E CE C C E D C I r C C E C C C C C
C B C A D i C E C E C B B A D B C A C C

B B B A B C C C B C C B B A B B D A ? B

C C C C C C B- C C B C C R B C C C E C B

L E E E E B E E C E ED B E A C E E D E

C C C B E E C E E C E E E C E C B B

C E E ',l 1 B i- E .T E, C r E A C i E A I


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STRONG DEMAND FOR WORKERS. SERIOUS SHORTAGE OF QUALIFIED APPLICANTS.
GOOD Joe OPPORTUNITIES. LOCAL SUPPLY OF QUALIFIED APPLICANTS INADEQUATE.
OCCUPATION IS IMPORTANT IN AREA, BUT LOCAL SUPPLY OF WORKERS IS ADEQUATE.


D. SOME JOB OPPORTUNITIES, BUT SUPPLY OF QUALIFIED
WORKERS XCCEEDS THE DEMAND.
E. FEW OR NO JOB OPPORTUNITIES IN THE AREA.


I-


SKILLED & SEMI-SKILLED
OCCUPATIONS


u
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ELECTRONICS SOLDERER


FACTORY WORKER


GALVANIZER

GARMENT CUTTER

GAS APPLIANCE SERV.& REPAIRMAN

GLAZIER

LATHE OPERATOR

LINEMAN

MACHINIST

MAINTENANCE MAN, BLDG.

MAINTENANCE MECHANIC

MEAT CUTTER

MECHANIC, AIRCRAFT ENGINE

MECHANIC, AIRCRAFT JET

MECHANIC, AIRCRAFT-RADIO

MECHANIC, AUTOMOBILE

MECHANIC, CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMT*

MECHANIC, DIESEL
MECHANIC, REFRIGERATION &
AIRCONDITIONING
MECHANIC, TRUCK

MILLWRIGHT

MOTOR-GRADER OPERATOR

OFFICE-MACHINE SERVICEMAN

OFFSET-PRESS MAN

PAINTER


D C B


B E


E E D


E E


C D


C IB


C E E C D E E C B D D A E C C E D D D B

E E E E E E E E E E E B E E E E E D E E

A E E E E D E E E E D B B E C E E B D E

C C C C C C D E B C C C B B C C C C B C

C D C C C D E E C E D A D E E D C D D B

B D D C E E E C B E C B D E B E C C C B

D C C E D D C E C C D E D B D E C C E E

B B B A D C B C A B B A C A A D C A A A

D C D C D D C C C C E C C C C C D D C C

C C C C E C E D B C D B C A E D B C C C

C C B C C D C C B C B B B B B C C C B B

E E E E E B E E D E E B D B C E E E D E

E E E E E C E E E E E C C B B E E E E E

E D E E E C E E E E E E C A C E E E E E

B B B A B B B B A C B A A A B B B A A A

C B C B B D C C A C C A C B C D C A B B

E C C C B D C D A B B B C B C E C B C B

B A B C B B D B A C B B B A B B C B B B

3 B C B B D C C A B C B B B B B C A A A

E E E D E E E E B E E E D D D E E D D E

D E D C C D E E C E D C D C D D E Dl C C

E B E D D C E E C E B C C B C C C C C B

B C E C C E E D C C C B C E C C C C C B

C C C C D C C C D D D C B C C C C CC B


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PAINTER, S 0

PHOTOLITHOGRAPHER

PIPE FITTER

PLUMBER

PRESSER SILK & WOOL
PRINTER

PUNCH-&-DRILL PRESS OPERATOR

RADIO REPAIRMAN

ROOFER

ROUTEMAN

SERVICE STATION ATTENDANT

SEWING MACHINE OPERATOR

SEWING MACHINE REPAIRMAN

SHEET-METAL WORKER

SHEET-METAL WORKER, AIRCRArT

SHOE REPAIRMAN

STATIONERY ENGINEER

TERRAZZO WORKER
TILE SETTER

TIRE RECAPPER

TOOL MAKER

TOOL & DIE MAKER

TRUCK DRIVER

TURRET-LATHE OPERATOR

TV SERVICE & REPAIRMAN

UPHOLSTERER

WATCHMAKER

WELDER


C C C C D C E C D C B C C C C D B C

B C E D1 E E E E E E C D E E C E C C E E
C C E D E D C E B E C D C C E D C D C C
B B C C B C C C C E C C C C C C C A C B

B C B A B B D C B C D B C B D B C C C B

C E E C D E E D C E D B D E C E C C C B

C E E C E D E C C E D B B D C C C C C C

C E D D D D C E C E D C C B D D E E C D

C C C B B L C C B B C C B B C C C A C B
C B C C C C B B B C C C D B C C B B C B

C B B B B C C B A B C B B A B C B A B B

C E D C B D E A B E E A A E B B B B C C
C E E E E E E D E E C C E D C D E E D E

B B C B B B C C A B C B C B B B C C C B

B D E D E B E E C E C B E A B E E E C E

C L E E C E E E C E E C E E B C C C D E
E D E E E E E E B E E E E E E D C B C E

C C C C C E D E E E C C C C D C C C C B

C C C C C E C E D C C C C C D D C C B
E D C C B C D D D B D B C B E D C C C C
B D C B E D D E B E C A E E B D C B B C

B C A E D E C B E B A E E B D C B B A
C C C C Dl C C B A C D A B C C C C B C D

C Di E B E E E C C E C B E E B D C C C C
B C C B B B C B A B B D B A B B B C A B
B C C B B B E C A E B A B B B B C B A A

C D E E D E E D E E C C E E D C C C E
C C C C C C C C C B E B B C C C C C C B


OCCUPATIONS NOT LISTED ADOVC
CITRUS PICKER WINTER PARK (ORLANDO) A
LABORER MIAMI D
PLASTERER CLEARWATER B





OPPORTUNITIES FOR WORK IN PRINC O AREAS OF FLORIDA," MAY 1967 NOVEMBER 1967

THIS CHART HAS BEEN PREPARED TO INDICATE THE DEMAND FOR WORKERS IN FLORIDA. THE 20 CITIES LISTED ARE REPRESENTATIVE OF THE VARIOUS AREAS OF THE
STATE. ALL OCCUPATIONS COULD NOT BE LISTED; THEREFORE, IF AN OCCUPATION IS NOT LISTED IT MAY BE ASSUMED THAT IT IS NEITHER A SHORTAGE NOR SURPLUS
OCCUPATION.

SHORTAGES ARE FOR WELL QUALIFIED PERSONS,AND OTHERS SHOULD NOT ASSUME JOBS WILL BE EASILY OBTAINED. NO INDIVIDUAL CAN BE DEFINITELY ASSURED OF
OBTAINING A JOB, EVEN IN THE SHORTAGE OCCUPATIONS. MANY EMPLOYERS WILL NOT HIRE WITHOUT A PERSONAL INTERVIEW. WE STRONGLY URGE PROSPECTIVE
WORKERS NOT TO COME TO FLORIDA SEEKING EMPLOYMENT UNLESS THEY HAVE SUFFICIENT MONEY TO MAINTAIN THEMSELVES AND RETURN HOME IF THEY SHOULD BE
UNSUCCESSFUL IN FINDING WORK.


STRONG DEMAND FOR WORKERS. SERIOUS SHORTAGE OF QUALIFIED APPLICANTS.
GOOD JOB OPPORTUNITIES. LOCAL SUPPLY OF QUALIFIED APPLICANTS INADEQUATE.
OCCUPATION IS IMPORTANT IN AREA, BUT LOCAL SUPPLY OF WORKERS IS ADEQUATE.


SOME JOB OPPORTUNITIES, BUT
WORKERS EXCEEDS THE DEMAND.
FEW OR NO JOB OPPORTUNITIES


SUPPLY OF QUALIFIED

IN THE AREA.


SERVICE OCCUPATIONS


BARMAID
BARTENDER

BEAUTY OPERATOR

BELLMAN

Bus BoY

CABANA BOY

CAR HOP

CHAMBERMAID(HOTEL & MOTEL)

CHEF

CHEF, PASTRY

COOK

COOK, SHORT ORDER

COUNTERGIRL

COUNTERMAN

DISHWASHER

FIREMAN

HOSTESS

HOUSEKEEPER(HOTEL & HOTEL)

HOUSEMAN (HOTEL & MOTEL)
JANITOR


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C D C DI D B C D B C C D B C D C E C D C

C C C C C C C C C B C B B C C C C D B B

S C D C D D D C C E C C A D D C C B C E

B B C C C C B B C B C C A C B B C C C B

E E- E E E E E D E E E C E E D E E E D E

A A C D B B B D B B C D A A B C C C C A

B A A B C C C B D D C C A B B B C C D C

C C C D C B D D B D C C A C C C C B C C

C E C E D C D C B E E D B E C E D C D D

B B B B C B B B B B C B A B A C C C C B

B A B B B B B B C B C B A B A B C B C B

B B C A C C D B A B C B B B A B C C C B

C D C B D D D D A B C B B C C C C B B B

A C C B B B B B C A C A A C B C C B D A

D D C E D D E E E A E B C E D E D D D E

C D C C D D D D C E D C A B C C C D C C

E D D D D D C D B E D C A D C D D D D C

D D D B D E E B C E E A E E C D E B D A
B C A B C C C C B C A B B C C C B C C





A. STnONG DEMAND FOR WORKERS. SERIOUS SHORTAGE OF QUALIFIED APPLICANTS. D. SOME JOB OPPORTUNITIES, BUT SUPPLY OF QUALIFIED
B. COOD JOB OPPORTUNITIES. LOCAL SUPPLY OF QUALIFIED APPLICANTS INADEQUATE, WORKERS EXCEEDS THE DEMAND,
C, OCCUPATION IS IMPORTANT IN AREA, BUT LOCAL SUPPLY OF WORKERS IS ADEQUATE. E. FEW OR NO JOB OPPORTUNITIES IN THE AREA.
U 0 L
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KITHN iLPER C C B B
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SERVICE OCCUPATIONS u U- D L i '

KITCHEN HELPER cB C C B B B C A C A Ac


LIFEGUARD D D C

MAssEUR E E E

NURSes A oe B C C

ORDERLY C C B

POLICEMAN B D B

PORTEn B D B

SALAD GIRL B C A

SALaomAN C C B
SANDWICH MAN C C E

SODA DISPENSER D C B

STEWARD E E

WAiTrR C C D
WAITRESS A A A

WATCH AN AND/OR GUARD E C C

HOUSEKSCPCR, WORKING (DOn, SER.) 306.878 B


a


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E

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C D


C
A


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B


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C C


C B C A C B C C B C D B L B C


C C D E D B A D B C A


A B D D B C B C A A C

B C D D C B C C C A C
B C E D C B E D C A E


E E D D D B A D C A


B C D C B


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D


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B

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C


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D
C


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C
C


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E
A


C

E
C


C

C

B
B

D
B

D
B


E C

C C

B C
C C

E E

B C

E E
C B


A
B

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B

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D

D
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B B A A B A B A A B A A B A


A- I m---- I I I I II I Ip. rU I nB I I A


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D E
C C


A B

C B

C C
C C

C E

C C

D E
C E


1


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A


a I n I n J~ I r! I H I I: r n I L'


---


R


C D D Uu ..


E I C C


I -I I


-


D C


'I


I


1


I


1


j


E


I


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C B B c
c---- I
B _D_


D










OCCUPATIONS IN PRINCIPAL AREAS OF FLORIDA


RANKED IN ORDER OF DEMAND


The local offices of the Florida State Employment Service, in the larger
cities, gather statistics on occupations that are in their area of the
state. Twice a year this information is compiled into one publication
on a state level. The publication "Opportunities For Work in Principal
Areas of The State,' covering a six month period. The following infor-
mation was compiled from the state release covering the period May
1966-November 1966.


Occupation


Rank Order
of Demand


Rank Order
of Demand


Occupation


Waitress
Mechanic, Automobile
Stenographer
Secretary
Nurse, Registered
Draftsman
Auto Body Repairman
Steno-Bookkeeper
Service Station Attendant
Mechanic, Refrigeration
and Air-Conditioning
Machinist
Cook, Shortorder
Nurse, L. P.
Upholsterer
Salesman, Commissioned
Mechanic, Truck
Cook
Sheet-metal Worker
Clerk Typist
Electrical Appliance
Serviceman
Welder
TV Service and
Repairman
Typist
Carpenter
Cabinetmaker
Mechanic, Construction
Equipment
Alterationist
Bank Teller
Plumber
Medical Technologist


Bookkeeping-Machine
Operator
Electrician
Roofer
Bookkeeper
Diesel Mechanic
Salesperson
Clerk, General Office
Clerk, Store
Block Mason
Routeman
Cashier
Transcribing-Machine
Operator
Truck Driver
Sales Clerk
Beauty Operator
Bricklayer
Parts Clerk
Sewing Machine Operator
Machine Operator,
Key Punch
Chef
Baker
Dragline Operator
Electric-Motor Repairman
Gas Appliance Service
and Repair
Meat Cutter
Painter
Offset-Press Man
Tool and Die Maker


Section III


May, 1967

















TECHNICIANS FOR FLORIDA

INDUSTRIES


The Technical Education Section of the Vocational, Technical and Adult
Division, State Department of Education, Tallahassee, Florida conducted
a survey in January, 1967 to determine the demand for Technicians in
Florida.

The following pages present the highlights of the survey and summarize
the number of technicians employed in 1964 and 1967 and projects the
anticipated need for technicians in major technologies over the next
twelve months.


May, 1967


Section III










HIGHLIGHTS OF THE SURVEY


1. The Technical Education Survey of 1967 reports over 29,000 technicians
employed in fourteen technical fields.

This represents an increase of over 100 percent during the last three
years. Rank order of the top six fields and the number of technicians
employed were:

Electronics 7300
Mechanical 4000
Civil and Construction 3400
Drafting and Design 3300
Graphic Arts 2400
Data Processing 2000


2. Firms report substantial increases anticipated in the need for technicians
during 1967.

The number of technicians in Florida will need to be increased by more than
25 percent to meet the needs for present vacancies, replacements, and filling
of new positions during the next twelve months. The greatest need appears
to be:

Electronics 2400
Drafting and Design 1500
Mechanical 1100
Civil and Construction 1000
Data Processing 900


3. The survey identifies eleven counties as having the highest anti-
cipated demand for additional technicians.

In order these are: Dade, Brevard, Hillsborough, Pinellas, Orange, Polk,
Duval, Palm Beach,.Broward, Okaloosa, and Escambia.


Section III


May, 1967







TABLE 8


DEMAND FOR TECHNICIANS

IN

FLORIDA'S INDUSTRIES


Technician


Number
Employed
1964


Number
Employed
Jan., 1967


Percent
Increase
1964-1967


Additional
Technicians
Needed**
1967


Percent
Increase
Anticipated
During 1967


*Not surveyed in 1964
**Includes present vacancies, replacements, and


anticipated expansion.


Source: Technicians for Florida Industries. A survey conducted by the Technical
Education Section of the Vocational, Technical and Adult Division, State
Department of Education, Tallahassee, Florida in January, 1967 to determine
the demand for Technicians in Florida. The survey included 3,210 selected
industries, hiring ten or more employees.

Section III May, 1967 36


Aeronautical 139 477 243% 243 51%

A/C, Heating, and
Refrigeration 464 171 37%

Chemical 757 1,043 37% 293 28%

Civil and Construction 2,269 3,407 50% 980 28%

Data Processing 594 2,029 241% 908 44%

Drafting and Design 2,836 3,371 19% 1,512 45%

Electrical 815 1,866 129% 389 21%

Electromechanical 1,082 332 30%

Electronics 2,709 7,322 170% 2,387 32%

Graphic Arts 1,146 2,446 113% 616 25%

Industrial Engineering 523 269 51%

Instrumentation 426 196 46%

Mechanical 1,414 4,065 187% 1,110 27%

Tool and Die Design 244 508 1092 286 6

TOTAL 12,923 29,029 124% 9,692 33%


I










THE MAJOR TECHNICAL FIELDS


Aeronautical

Aeronautical Technology appears to be increasing rapidly in Florida. Employ-
ment is up 243 percent since 1964 with an increase from 139 to 477 techni-
cians employed. This growth is expected to continue. Major employment
opportunities appear to be in Brevard, Dade, Orange, and Palm Beach
counties.

A/C, Heating, and Refrigeration

Air Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Technology ranked as one of
the smallest areas of employment among the technologies surveyed. The
need was sparsely spread over a number of counties, but the greatest op-
portunity for employment appears to be in Brevard, Broward, Dade, Duval
and Polk counties.

Chemical

The employment of Chemical technicians increased by 37 percent since 1964
and is expected to show a 28 percent increase during the next twelve months.
Counties showing the greatest need are Brevard, Dade, Duval, Escambia,
Hillsborough and Polk.

Civil and Construction

Half of the counties in Florida showed some need for Civil and Construction
technicians during 1967. Those requiring 15 or more during the next twelve
months are: Brevard, Broward, Dade, Duval, Hillsborough, Lake, Leon, Marion,
Orange, Palm Beach, Pinellas, Polk and Volusia.

Data Processing

Data Processing Technology,(Computer Programming) is one of the most rapidly
expanding fields in the state with a 240 percent gain since 1964. Another
900 employees are needed this year. Major areas of employment are in the
following counties: Brevard, Dade, Duval, Hillsborough, Orange, Palm Beach,
Pinellas and Polk.

Drafting and Design

Employment of Drafting and Design technicians is expected to increase by about
1500 during 1967, if the supply is available. This should bring the employ-
ment level to about 5000 in the state.

The greatest need appears to be in Bradford, Brevard, Broward, Dade,
Duval, Hillsborough, Indian River, Marion, Okaloosa, Orange, Palm Beach,
Pinellas, Polk, and Sarasota counties.


Section III


May, 1967










Electrical

As expected, this technology has shown considerable growth since 1964.
At that time approximately 815 technicians were employed; this has in-
creased to over 1800. A continued demand is expected in Brevard, Dade,
Duval, Orange, Pinellas, and Polk counties. Opportunities also exist
in Bradford, Hillsborough, Marion, and Volusia counties, but to a lesser
degree.

Electromechanical

Electromechanical technology was surveyed for the first time and appears
to be a field of some importance in Florida, having over 1000 technicians
presently employed and a need for 400 anticipated. At the present time
there are no programs to prepare these individuals.

Greatest opportunity for employment will be in Bradford, Brevard, Broward,
Dade, Hillsborough, Okaloosa and Pinellas counties.

Electronics

The electronics field in Florida continues to need technicians as new in-
dustries move to the state and existing companies are undergoing major
expansions. According to survey projections, about 200 job vacancies will
occur each month.

Major areas of employment will be in the following counties: Brevard,
Broward, Dade, Duval, Hillsborough, Okaloosa, Orange, Palm Beach, Pinellas,
Sarasota and Seminole.

Graphic Arts

This technology showed impressive gains in employment (over 100 percent)
during the last three years and shows considerable employment increase
for the future. Most of this increase is expected to take place in seven
counties Brevard, Dade, Duval, Escambia, Leon, Orange and Pinellas.

Industrial Engineering

Industrial Engineering technicians are being utilized more by industry as
evidenced by more than 500 presently employed in the state,yand a need
for an additional 269 projected for the end of 1967.

At the present time substantial employment opportunity exists in several
counties Brevard, Broward, Dade, Orange, and Polk.

Instrumentation

Instrumentation is the smallest of the technologies with less than 500
employed in the industries surveyed. A need for an additional 200, and
increase of 46 percent, is projected. Greatest demand is in Brevard,
Broward, Dade, and Polk counties.


Section III May, 1967 38











Mechanical

In terms of percent growth, this technical field shows a dramatic increase
of almost 200 percent. A number of counties will need additional mechanical
technicians during 1967. Those counties which project 30 or more new job
openings during the next twelve months are: Bradford, Brevard, Broward,
Dade, Duval, Hillsborough, Orange, Palm Beach, Pinellas, Polk, and Sarasota.

Tool and Die Design

Although still a relatively minor technology in Florida, Tool and Die
Design has shown an increase of 109 percent since 1964. Present indica-
tions are that it will continue to be one of the faster growing fields.
Employment will be highest in five counties Broward, Dade, Orange,
Palm Beach, and Pinellas.


Section III


May, 1967










IN WHAT OCCUPATIONS ARE OUR


WORKERS EMPLOYED?


The largest occupational group of workers in Florida is the Craftsmen,
Foremen, and Kindred Workers (skilled workers). In 1960 there were 231,867
skilled workers employed in the state. This represented over 13 percent
of the total employed labor force and was a 75 percent increase over the
number of skilled workers in the labor force in 1950.

The next largest occupational group in the state is that of Clerical and
Kindred Workers. There were 223,490 workers in 1960 and the group ex-
perienced the largest percent growth rate of all the occupational groups.
Clerical and Kindred Workers had a 116 percent growth during the 1950-60
decade.

Operative and Kindred Workers (semi-skilled) is the third largest group
of workers in Florida. In 1960 there were 214,151 workers employed in the
semi-skilled occupations. This group increased by 60 percent between
1950 and 1960.

The employees in the Service Workers group totaled 170,964 in 1960. This
group had a 75 percent increase in the decade between 1950-60.

Information from the 1960 Census of Population showed the five occupations
with the greatest number of male employees in Florida as:

PERCENT GROWTH
OCCUPATIONS 1950--1960 1960 EMPLOYEES

Truck and Tractor Drivers 73% 45,923
Sales-Retail Trade 40:o 35,346
Carpenters 24, 30,138
Construction Laborers 47% 24,571
Auto Mechanics and Repairman 47' 19,550

The five occupations which had the greatest proportionate growth for
male workers during the 1950-60 period were:

PERCENT GROWTH
OCCUPATIONS 1950--1960 1960 EMPLOYEES

Draftsmen 272 % 3,489
Banking and other Finance
Managers (Salaried) 223 % 5,362
Managers (const., salaried) 216 % 6,999
Foremen (Manufacturing) 211% 8,597
Excavating, Grading and Road
Machine Operators 210 % 8,352


Section III


May, 1967










The 1960 Census listed 34 occupations in Florida that employ the majority
of working women. It was found that in 1950 there were 130,339 female
employees in these occupations and in 1960 there were 269,035. The growth
over the decade was over 100 percent, which indicates a doubling of the
work force of women in these occupations during this period.

Of the occupations listed, the five which employed the largest number of
women are:

PERCENT GROWTH
OCCUPATIONS 1950--1960 1960 EMPLOYEES

Secretaries 252% 40,050
Sales-Retail Trade 61% 38,530
Waitresses 76% 27,095
Bookkeepers 127% 23,185
Cashiers 147% 14,152

These five occupations account for 53 percent of all females who were employed
in all occupations that were listed.

The work force in five of the female occupational categories grew at a
rate more than double the mean rate for all female occupations which were
listed. These are:

PERCENT GROWTH
OCCUPATIONS 1950--1960 1960 EMPLOYEES

Receptionist 383% 3,519
Bank Tellers 366% 2,588
Hospital and Institutional
Attendant 360% 6,824
Stock Clerks and Storekeepers 319% 1,296
Office Machine Operatives 314% 3,459

Occupations that experienced the greatest percentage loss of workers
during the 1950-60 period were:

PERCENT CHANGE
OCCUPATIONS 1950--1960 1960 EMPLOYEES

Farm Laborers (unpaid family
workers) -78% 1,941
Laundry and Dry Cleaning
Operators -68% 3,761
Farmers (owners and
tenants) -46% 21,193
Sawyers -45% 1,271


4The Florida Study of Vocational-Technical Education, Florida State
Department of Education, Tallahassee, Florida.


Section III


May, 1967










OCCUPATIONS


PERCENT GROWTH
1950--1960


1960 EMPLOYEES


Blacksmiths
Fisherman and Oystermen
Telegraph Operators
Lumbermen, Raftsmen and
Woodcutters


-42%
-41$%
-30%

-25%


7,360
3,675
473

3,572


0


May, 1967


Section III











IN FLORIDA'S LABOR FORCE IN 1970

CHANCES ARE ....


.... ONE person in EIGHT will be employed in a clerical or kindred
occupation.

.... ONE in FOUR working women will be employed in a clerical or kindred
occupation.

ONE worker of every TEN will be in a service occupation.

.... ONE out of every SEVEN male workers will be working in a semi-
skilled (operative) occupation.

ONE out of every TWELVE workers will be working in a sales
occupation.


Section III


May, 1967




TABLE U

FLORIDA'S NEW AND EXPANDED INDUSTRIAL PLANTS, 1965, BY INDUSTRY
(4 employees or more)


Industry (SIC Code)


Ordnance (19)
Food and kindred products (20)
Tobacco manufactures (21)
Textile mill products (22)
Apparel and related products (23)
Lumber and wood products, except
furniture (24)
Furniture and fixtures (25)
Paper and allied products (26)
Printing, publishing and allied
products (27)
Chemicals and allied products (28)
Products of petroleum and coal (29)
Rubber products (30)
Leather and leather goods (31)
Stone, clay and glass products (32)
Primary metal industries (33)
Fabricated metal products (34)
Machinery, except electrical (35)
Electrical machinery, equipment
and supplies (36)
Transportation equipment (37)
Instruments, photographic goods,
watches and clocks (38)
Miscellaneous manufacturing
industries (39)
All Manufacturing (19-39)
Mining (10-14)
Industrial engineering and research
Other industries related to
manufacturing and mining
TOTAL


Number of New Plants


Less than
25
Employees


28
5
3
50

36
26
3

27
15
3
13
4
38
2
32
30

18
25

5

29
_391
4
8


More than
25
Employees



1
9


14
1
4
5

3
3

3
4
4
2
13
10

7
12


6
100

2


120 J>io


Number of
Major
Expansions

1
12


4
4
4
3
5
7

2
1
7
4
9
9

10
14

3

1
101
4
3

17
124


Number of
New 1'lants
and
Expansions

1
49
5
3
68

41
34
11

35
25
3
18
9
49
8
54
49

35
51

8
36
6592_
13
13

42
660


*Employment as reported to the Florida Industrial Commission for establishments covered
station Law.


Expected
Number of
Employees

400
1,460
39
26
1,799

1,058
531
668

743
918
29
204
505
980
253
2,463
1,640

1,815
4,477
151

694
20,853
743
448

1,607
23,651


Employment
in Existing
Plants.
December,
1964*

11,606
46,429
5,524
1,190
12,821

12,445
7,497
14,383

17,198
18,788
698
2,531
1,811
13,206
2,534
15,257
9,066

18,390
25,364

2,574

3,271
242,583
8,753


Number of
IEmployces
as a % of
Existing
Employment

3.4
3.1
.7
2.2
14.1

8.5
7.1
4.6

4.3
4.9
4.1
8.1
27.9
7.4
10.0
16.1
18.1

9.9
17.6

5.9

21.2
8.6
8.5


by the Florida Unemployment Compen-


LARGEST NEW INDUSTRIAL PLANTS AND EXPANSIONS IN FLORIDA, 1965
(in order of expected number of employees)


Name of Company


Aerodex

Frank M. Murphy Div. of
Dorr-Oliver
Tampa Ship Repair & Drydock
Piper Aircraft Corp.
Radio Corp. of America

General Bronze Corp.

Fairchild Hiller Corp.

The Martin Company
Republic Aviation Corp.

Georgia-Pacific Corp.

Radiation Incorporated




Celotex Corporation

Lee Tydewater Cypress Div. of
J. C. Turner Lumber Co.
Rover Shoe Co.


City

Miami

Bartow

Tampa
Vero Beach
Palm Beach
Gardens
Medley

St. Augustine

Orlando
Crestview

Chiefland

Palm Bay




Tampa

Perry

Bushnell


New Plant
or
Expansion

expansion

expansion

expansion
expansion
expansion

new

expansion

expansion
new

new

expansion




new

expansion


Principal Product

industrial plating & parts, jet &
reciprocating engine overhaul, mfg.
pipe fabrication

ship repair
small aircraft
data processing Systems

windows, curtain walls & architectural
bldg. components
overhaul & modification of Navy flying
boats
missiles & electronic devices
modification & repair'of Republic
F-105 jet fighter-bombers
hardwood lumber mill & southern pine
plywood plant
telecommunications engaged in develop-
ment, production & service of in-
formation management equipment &
systems encompassing data collection,
processing, transmission, reception,
storage, display, command & control
building board composition; hdqtrs.
office
lumber

canvas & vinyl shoes


Source: Florida Development Commission, Tallahassee, Florida


May, 1967


Section III


0


Expected
Number of
Employees

1,000

900

600
600
600

500

500
400
350-400

300-400
350


300

300

285


0


T----- ---r---------------




CHART VIII



FLORIDA'S NEW INDUSTRIAL PLANTS AND EXPECTED

EMPLOYMENT, 1965, BY INDUSTRY


s8 60 40 20 0 0 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000

MINING

ORDNANCE

FOOD
TOBACCO
TEXTILE MILL
PRODUCTS
APPAREL

LUMBER

FURNITURE

PAPER

PRINTING

CHEMICALS

PETROLEUM AND COAL

RUBBER

LEATHER

STONE, CLAY & GLASS

PRIMARY METALS

FABRICATED METALS

MACHINERY

ELECTRICAL MACHINERY
TRANSPORTATION
EQUIPMENT
INSTRUMENTS

MISC. MFG. IND.
.INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING
& RESEARCH

OTHER INDUSTRIES
RRIATED TO MINING
& MANUFACTURING

Number of new plants and major Expected number of em-
expansion. ployees.


Source: Florida Development Coimraission, ITallahassee, Florida

Section III May, 1967 45





TABLE 10


5-YEAR SUMMARY
FLORIDA'S NEW AND EXPANDED INDUSTRIAL PLANTS, 1961-1965, BY COUNTY
Number of New Plants and Expansions Expected Number of Employees
County 5-Year 5-Year
1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 Summary 1961 1902 1963 1964 1965 Summary
1961-1965 '1961-1965


Alachua 5 9 5 5 4 28 110 368 76 65 173 792
Baker 1 3 4 --- .... 6 17 23
Bay 6 4 5 2 4 21 105 107 125 27 24 388
Bradford 2 1 1 ... 1 25 13 2 4 .... 18 37
Brevard 14 26 31 25 18 114 866 833 2,067 1,506 617 5,889
Broward 40 64 62 47 48 261 1,199 1,420 989 1,496 1,439 6,543
Calhoun 1 .... 2 .... 1 4 15 .... 190 .... 6 211
Charlotte 3 1 2 2 .... 8 96 25 10 28 .... 159
Citrus 1 1 2 1 2 7 25 25 44 23 35 152
Clay 1 1 2 3 1 8 30 30 341 605 73 1,079
Collier ---.. 1 1 1 9 12 .... 5 18 18 82 123
Columbia 4 .. 1 3 .... 8 268 .... 670 241 1,179
Dade 205 221 260 98 209 993 4,691 5,263 4,850 2,532 6,376 23,712
DeSoto .. .... 2 2 ....9 9
Dixie .... 1 2 5 7 15 ... 20 20 70 37 147
Duval 35 19 34 26 22 136 1,482 342 1,713 597 356 4,490
Escambia 5 7 1 2 1 16 163 234 5 39 15 456
Flagler
Franklin 1 4 1 .... 4 10 15 92 30 ... 70 207
Gadsden ... 2 2 4 2 10 ... 17 40 289 60 406
Gilchrist .... 1 ... .... 1 2 .... 5 .... .... 10 15
Glades 1 .. 2 3 250 -- 40 .... .... 290
Gulf 2 .... ... 1 2 5 40 ... .... 25 14 79
Hamilton 1 1 1 1 4 8 4 14 35 150 270 473
Hlardce 2 .. ... ..- 2 4 60 --- .... .... 11 71
Hendry 1 .. 2 2 2 7 110 .. 111 19 69 309
IIernando 1 1 1 1 4 80 5 25 .... 4 114
Highlands 2 2 ... 4 .... 8 56 15 .... 129 .... 200
Hillsborough 27 33 33 54 58 205 814 725 1,106 4,141 2,107 8,893
Ilolmes 1 1 .. 1 2 5 5 4 ... 50 140 199
Indian River 2 1 2 2 2 9 25 6 35 127 625 818
Jackson 5 6 4 2 2 19 95 532 69 111 160 967
Jefferson 2 .... 3 1 1 7 88 --. 33 200 4 325
Lafayette ... 2 .. .. 2 ... 20 ... .... 20
Lake 5 6 4 4 5 24 202 119 59 153 138 671
Lee 3 3 9 9 7 31 28 21 67 98 86 300
Leon 3 4 5 5 6 23 16 23 39 71 181 330
Levy ... 2 2 4 ---- -... ... 12 354 366
Liberty -
Madison 7 2 3 1 13 .... 45 34 133 4 216
Manatee 8 13 7 5 7 40 139 826 385 195 439 1,984
Marion 3 7 5 8 8 31 25 137 142 127 248 679
Martin 15 1 3 1 20 .... 375 150 60 100 685
Monroe 2 ... .... 3 5 .... 27 .... .... 27 54
Nassau 2 1 2 2 1 8 60 15 18 10 100 203
Okaloosa 4 2 3 3 3 15 64 37 290 86 605 1,082
O k e e c h o b e e -- - -. ..- - - - - - - - -
Orange 22 26 20 22 25 115 681 1,240 284 607 736 3,548
Osceola 3 3 1 .... 1 8 111 62 8 .... 4 185
Palm Beach 34 30 26 8 35 133 2,557 627 1,697 107 1,260 6,248
Pasco 1 -.. 1 -.. 3 5 5 7 .... 24 36
Pinellas 45 43 32 34 47 201 2,571 1,828 1,613 984 1,534 8,530
Polk 28 26 19 28 34 135 1,091 2,925 563 1,439 2,676 8,694
Putnam 6 .... 5 7 5 23 96 .... 87 251 55 489
St. Johns 1 5 1 1 4 12 350 236 27 4 637 1,254
St. Lucie 2 2 1 4 6 15 61 150 35 67 72 385
Santa Rosa 3 3 1 1 1 9 81 109 4 320 130 644
Sarasota 7 12 10 14 14 57 179 267 182 237 147 1,012
Seminole 6 7 10 12 5 40 334 518 143 219 142 1,356
Sumter 2 5 5 3 2 17 29 103 100 156 355 743
Suwannee 2 2 2 2 2 10 14 90 37 60 10 211
Taylor 1 2 1 2 6 8 16 35 315 374
Union 2 3 1 .. 6 19 27 50 .. 96
Volusiaon 13 11 14 9 13 60 479 1,771 267 1,126 417 4,060
Wakulla 13 1 1 3 ... ... 17 60 9 86
Wakulla 1 4 20 17 ... 25 62
Walton .. 1 -- 4 9 34 ... 43
Total 57 650-- 58 485 660 3,027 19,887 21,721 18,981 19,161 23,651 103,401

SData appearing in this report have been adjusted to reflect only those plants employing four or more persons and are therefore
not comparable with reports for 1961 through 1963.


Source: Florida Development Commission, Tallahassee, Florida


May, 1967


Section III







CHART IX


FLORIDA HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES 1965


JNumber Percent

High School Reporting 345 ---

Total Number of Graduates Reported 62,079 --

Entered Public Junior Colleges 15,858 25.54

Entered Private Junior Colleges 930 1.50

Entered Public Universities in Florida 7,076 11.40

Entered Private Colleges in Florida 2,271 3.66

Entered Out-of-State Colleges 5,825 9.38

Entered Technical, Trade, or other 3,371 5.43

Did not go on to further education or
training immediately 26,751 43.09



Source: Research Report 45, Division of Research of the Florida
State Department of Education, Tallahassee, Florida,


Section III


May, 1967





TABLE 11


Provilsonal Estimated Percent of Average
Mid-Year Percent of Estimated Land Area Population
Population Population Population (Square 1964 Per
estimate Change from Classified as Miles) Square
1965 April 1960 to Non-white Mile
July 1, 1965 1964


Nunbjr Rank Percent Rank Percent Rank Number Rank Number Rank_
Alachua 88,300 (13) 19.2% (21) 23.35% (20) 892 (22) 98.4 (16)
Baker 8,000 (56) 8.1 (48) 22.79 (25) 585 (48) 13.5 (53)
Bey 68,400 (19) 1.9 (62) 15.12 (45) 753 (29) 90.4 (17)
Bradford 12,800 (47) 3.2 (58) 23.26 (21) 293 (65) 44.0 (27)
Drevard 192.200 (10) 72.5 ( 1) 9.98 (60) 1.031 (15) .166.2 (10)_
Urovard 423,800 ( 5) 26.9 (10) 16.83 (39) 1,218 ( 7) 333.7 ( 5)
Calhoun 7,700 (58) 4.1 (55) 16.00 (41) 557 (52) 13.5 (53)
Charlotte 19,700 (37) 56.3 ( 3) 4.17 (67) 705 (33) 27.2 (36)
Citrue 11,800 (49) 26.9 (10) 14.16 (51) 570 (49) 19.8 (46)
Clay 20.700 (36) 6.2 (52) 13.47 (53) .98 (44) 3-2.3 (33.--
Collier 25,200 (31) 59.5 ( 2) 12.78 (55) 2,032 ( 2) 11.2 (57)
Columbia 23,400 (33) 16.4 (26) 31.00 (11) 786 (25) 29.1 (35)
Dade 1,089,200 ( 1) 16.5 (25) 15.59 (43) 2,054 ( 1) 533.1 ( 3)
De Soto 13,600 (44) 16.2 (27) 21.05 (32) 718 (32) 18.5 (47)
Dixiet 4.900 (63) 8.9 (46) 14.58 (48) 688 (35) 7. (64)
Duval 511,500 ( 2) 12.3 (34) 22.92 (24) 777 (28) 657.4 (2)
Secambie 192,400 ( 9) 10.7 (40) 21.34 (29) 657 (39) 291.0 ( 7)
Plagler 5,700 (61) 23.9 (15) 30.19 (13) 483 (61) 11.0 (58)
Franklin 7,500 (59) 13.6 (30) 20.55 (34) 544 (54) 13.4 (55)
Gadeden 44.000 (24) 4.8 (54) 60.32 ( l) 508 (59) 86,0 (19)
Gilchrist 3,200 (65) 10.3 (42) 12.50 (56) 339 (63) 9.4 (61)
Gladea 3,600 (64) 20.0 (20) 42.42 ( 5) 746 (31) 4.4 (66)
Culf 9,500 (54) 4.0 (66) 23.16 (22) 557 (52) 17.1 (48)
Hamilton 8,000 (56) 3.9 (56) 45.57 ( 4) $14 (57) 15.4 (51)
Hardee 13.400 (45) 8.1 (48) 9.92 (61) 630 (41) 20,8 (44)
Hendry 11,300 (52) 39.5 ( 5) 27.27 (17) 1,187 ( 8) 9.3 (62)
Hernando 12,900 (46) 15.2 (28) 21.77 (28) 488 (60) 25.4 (39)
Highlands 25,000 (32) 17.4 (23) 20.82 (33) 1,041 (12) 23.5 (38)
Hillsborough 441,900 ( 3) 11.1 (38) 14.27 (50) 1,040 (13) 416.4 (4)
Holmes 11.400 (51) 5.6 (53) 4.46 (66) 483 (61) 23 (42)
Indian River 31,800 (30) 25.7 (13) 21.15 (31) 512 (58) 60.9 (23)
Jackson 36,400 (26) 0.6 (64) 30.81 (12) 932 (20) 39.7 (30)
Jefferson 9,700 (53) 2.1 (61) 59.79 ( 2) 598 (44) 16.2 (49)
Lafayette 2,900 (66) 0 (65) 13.33 (54) 543 (55) 5.5 (65)
Lake 62,600 (20) 9.1 (44) 19.81 (36) 996 (17) 62. (22)-
Lee 71,800 (17) 31.7 ( 7) 15.37 (44) 786 (25) 86.9 (18)
Leon 83,000 (14) 11.9 (37) 31.72 ( 8) 685 (37) 120.6 (13)
Levy 11,500 (50) 10.6 (41) 31.03 (10) 1,103 (10) 10.5 (60)
Liberty 2,900 (66) 6.5 (67) 14.29 (49) 838 (23) 3.3 (67)
don 4.600 (41) 2.8 (5) 48.30 (3) 702 (34) 20.9 (43)
Oanatee 78,100 (16) 12.9 (33) 14.91 (47) 688 (35) 13.1 (15)
Marion 62,200 (21) 20.5 (19) 32.18 ( 7) 1,6 (5) 7.5 (31)
Martin 22,900 (34) 35.5 ( 6) 18.30 (38) 559 (51) *40. (29)
Honroe 59,500 (22) 24.2 (14) 10.37 (59) 994 (18) 57.2 (24)
Nassau 19.300 (38) 12,2 (35) 23,16 (22) 650 (40) 29.2 (34)
Okaloosa 78,500 (15) 28.3 ( 8) 7.06 (65) 944 (19) 78.1 (20)
Okeechobee 9,000 (55) 40.6 ( 4) 16.28 (40) 780 (27) 11.0 (58)
Orange 302,200 (6) 14.7 (29) 15.04 (46) 916 (21) 326.6 (6)
Osceola 21,300 (35) 12.1 (36) 10.43 (58) 1,325 (6) 15.9 (50)
Palm each 279.900 (7) 22.7 (16) 22.03 (27) .978 (3) 138.6 ()
Pasco 40,800 (25) 10.9 (39) 11.39 (57) 751 (30) 52.6 (26)
Pinellas 425,500 ( 4) 13.6 (30) 9.25 (63) 264 (66) 1,589.0 ( 1)
Polk 214,300 ( 8) 9.8 (43) 18.75 (37) 1,861 ( 4) 114.9 (13)
Putnam 32,800 (28) 1.9 (62) 31.69 ( 9) 803 (24) 40.5 (28)
St. Johns 2700 (29) 90 (5) 24.84 (9) 60 (43) (2
St. Luci 46,700 23) 18.8 (22) 33.33 (6) 588 (47) 76.5 (21)
Santa Race 35,800 (27) 21.4 (17) 7.21 (64) 1,024 (16) 32.5 (32)
Sarasota 92,800 (12) 20.7 (18) 9.38 (62) 529 (56) 175.4 (9)
Seminole 69,800 (18) 27.1 (9) 21.31 (30) 321 (64) 209.0 ( 8)
uter 13.900 (42) 16.8 (24 27. 18) 56 (50) 25.0 (41)
Suvannee 17,000 (39) 13.3 (32) 27.49 (16) 677 (38) 25.3 (40)
Taylor 13,700 (43) 3.8 (57) 22.46 (26) 1.032 (14) 13.4 (55)
TUnon 6,500 (60) 8.3 (47) 28.13 (14) 240 (67) 26.7 (37)
nVoluia 157,900 (11) 26.0 (12) 15.75 (42) 1,115 (9) 134.3 (12)
Wojull.a 5.700 (61) 7.5 (50) 27.78 (25) 614 (42) 8.8 (63)
Walton 16,000 (40) 2.6 (60) 13.84 (52) 1,046 (11) 5.2 (52)
Washington 2.00 (8) 7.1 (51) 20.17 (35) 597 (46) 19.9 (45)
TOITAL 5,805,000 17.2. 17.717 54,252 105.2

Source: Research Report -- 46 Division of Research, State Department of Education
.....4B


Mayv, 1.9 7


Section III


0
























6





TABLE 11
(Continued)



SEnrollmtnt llumher of Percent [? Percent of Percent of
Grades 1-1.2 Hllgh School 1965 Grnduatea 1965 Uraduates 1965 Grnduaten
1964-65 Graduates Who Entered Who Entered Who Did Not
Counties 1965 College in Trade & Voca- Continue Formal
1965-66 tionnl Training Education in
1965-66 1965-66


N eNumber Rank ubor Rank Percent Rank Percent Rank Percent Rnnk
Alachua 19,971 t13) 952 (14) 51.797. (21) 1.797. (60) 46.42% (37)
Baker 2,257 (57) 109 (55) 32.1.1 (61) 2.75 (53) 65.14 ( 4)
Bay 17,581 (15) 937 (15) 58.59 ( 5) 4.48 (43) 36.93 (58)
Bradford 3,858 (42) 176 (41) 42.61 (43) (65) 57.39 (10)
Bevard 501,92 (9) 6 (2. )2t9
Broward 88,548 ( 4) 4,373 ( 5) 54.93 (11) 5.49 (34) 39.58 (54)
Calhoun 2,102 (58) 97 (57) 41.24 (46) 309 (49) 55.67 (1.8)
Charlotte 2,953 (51) 148 (47) 43.92 (40) 13.51 ( 3) 42.57 (48)
Citrus 2,803 (53) 134 (51) 41.79 (45) 5.97 (30) 52,24 (27)
1 ~62 !_ 3?_L.? -_ 2o_ 33. I J ..
Collier 5,889 (34) 243 (35) 47.74 (32) 4,53 (42) 47.73 (33)
Columbia 6,432 (31.) 337 (29) 54,60 (14) 4.75 (39) 40.65 (51)
Dade 210,760 ( 1) 10,651 ( 1) 57.07 ( 8) 6.30 (24) 36.63 (59)
De Soto 2,793 (54) 132 (52) 37.12 (54) 6.06 (28) 56.82 (12)
Dixie _1 ....A6 (6 ...._40 (-..-.9)..6, (26) 5-1 X_2.._
Duval 123,702 ( 2) 5,767 (2) 42.43 (44) 3.47 (47) 54.10 (19)
Escambia 47,890 (10) 1,980 (10) 49.29 (27) 2.98 (52) 47.73 (33)
Flagler 1,386 (62) 34 (66) 73.53 ( 1) 5.88 (31) 20.59 (67)
Franklin 1,743 (59) 48 (63) 35.42 (58) 8.33 (13) 56.25 (14)
Gadoden ___2. 11^ .....t2 49.2.__ .9--. ...----35 .7 7 5C -.I__.34) ----- 5 ...89 -)---
GilchriaLt 88 (66) 52 (62) 38.46 (52) 1.92 (59) 59.62 ( 8)
Glades 900 (64) 37 (65) 27.03 (65) 18.92 ( 1) 54.05 (20)
Gulf 3,008 (48) 162 (44) 43.83 (41) 9.88 ( 6) 46.29 (40)
Hamilton 2,340 (56) 131 (53) 42.74 (42) 1.53 (61) 55.73 (17)
Ha rdeo 3, 08 .---.1AL L4L_ 45.39
Hendry 2,959 (50) 107 (56) 33.64 (59) 9.35 ( 8) 57.01 (11)
Hernando 3,209 (46) 112 (54) 50.00 (25) 13.39 ( 4) 36.61 (60)
Highlanda 6,082 (33) 283 (32) 36.40 (56) 7.42 (15) 56.18 (15)
Hlllsborough 98,687 (3) 4,810 ( 3) 44.'89 (36) 5.07 (37) 50.04 (30)
Holm 3 .064 (7 L7J ? 41 4 (4), 6) _5, 7_2--- 1
Indian River 7,347 (29) 336 (30) 52.98 (17) 9.52 (7) 37.50 (56)
Jackson 9,288 (26) 513 (22) 44.06 (37) 4.48 (43) 51.46 (29)
Jefferson 2,896 (52) 135 (50) 45.19 (35) 1.48 (62) 53.33 (25)
Lafayette 732 (67) 42 (64) 23.81 (67) 7.14 (18) 69.05 (3)
L~4ke 14,95 12) _64a _(21) 5,__(L ..... 1J 16 3739.r 1 71..
Lee 15,883 (18) 779 (19) 52.37 (18) 1.03 (63) 46.60 (36)
Leon 19,718 (14) 987 (13) 63.02 ( 3) 2.74 (55) 34.24 (65)
Levy 3,004 (49) 161 (45) 31.68 (62) 14.28 ( 2) 54.04 (21)
Liberty 884 (65) 34 (66) 29.41 (64) (65) 70.59 ( 1)
Madison 4 197 _(4.) -.182 ~.40) 40 _-5___30__1.... __.7.._(53) 48. 90_ _.__2.
Manatee 15,385 (20) 876 (16) 52.17 (19) 4.57 (41) 43.26 (47)
Marion 15,602 (19) 798 (17) 54.01 (16) ,50 (64) 45.49 (44)
Martin 4,975 (36) 183 (39) 51.91 (20) 6.01 (29) 42.08 (49)
Monroe 10,052 (24) 364 (27) 50.27 (24) 4.67 (40) 45.06 (45)
Nase au 5 ,447 35_ ID(3... 38,._ .1 3_______ 7,9 7.1. j 532,96 22)_
Okaloosa 20,715 (12) 795 (18) 68.93 ( 2) 5.79 (32) 25.28 (66)
Okeechobee 2,661, (55) 97 (57) 29.90 (63) 6.18 (27) 63.92 ( 5)
Orange 73,375 ( 5) 3,860 ( 6) 50.80 (22) 7.20 (17) 42.00 (50)
Osceola 4,728 (37) 209 (38) 39.23 (51) 9.09 ( 9) 51.68 (28)
Panm a ..A 6__( ,____ .546 ( 7) 651__ 4) 385 _3(4 __) 34,64 (
Pasco 8,761 (27) 405 (25) 32.84 (60) 10.37 ( 5) 56.79 (13)
Pinellas 70,842 ( 6) 4,420 ( 4) 58.03 ( 7) 6.88 (20) 35.09 (61)
Polk 52,085 ( 8) 2,432 ( 8) 47.08 (33) 6.58 (21) 46.34 (39)
Putnam 9,340 (25) 367 (26) 48.77 (29) 2.18 (57) 49.05 (31)
tEtJobhna 69L.94.2 2L__3__(. .. 1)6 J9_.L.9,__ 9.2!___ 1) -_34,39 9 (6
St. Lucie 11,067 (23) 477 (24) 48.85 (28) 3.77 (46) 47.38 (35)
Santa Rosa 8,308 (28) 358 (28) 36.87 (55) 2.51 (56) 60.62 ( 6)
Sarasota 16,690 (17) 1,024 (12) 58.20 ( 6) 7.03 (19) 34.77 (62)
Seminole 17,133 (16) 674 (20) 44.81 (37) 9.05 (10) 46.14 (41)
Sut.n t 4.43). 14(4. 4AJ. (I ___38) tL___5-8_ __ 1,.__231_
suwannee 4,416 (39) 233 (36) 41.20 (47) 3.01 (50) 55.79 (16)
Taylor 4,110 (41) 170 (43) 54.71 (13) 6,47 (23) 38.82 (55)
Union 1,303 (63) 62 (60) 40.32 (50) (65) 59.68 ( 7)
Voluuta 31,279 (11) 1,523 (11) 54.17 (15) 5.52 (33) 40.31 (52)
AkA lsto_.53.;i_5L2 L...L___()__ ) ________ 26 .23 ..66) ___ 3,?3. L481. 70!9 L2)
alton 4,506 (38) 233 (36) 50.64 (23) ----- 3---(5) 6 ()
'laMhinRto- n -----3__n. 3 _..5.. __. 5- 1.42 -- 3--_----(J ....23 3 (5--__ L___0) 460. (3 ). _
TOTAL 1,280,675 62,095 51.487. 5.43% 43.097
Source:
Research Report-h6, Division of Research, State Department of Education,
Tallahassee, Florida.


Section III


May, 1967





TABLE 11
(Continued)





Percent of Population 14-17 Percent of Population 25 Years and Median School
Years of Age Enrolled in School Older with Leos Than 5 Years Years Com-
CountieL of Schooling pleted, Persons
25 Years Old
and Over

1950 1960 1950 1960 1960
Percent Rank Percent Rank Percent Rank Percent Rank Years Rank
Alachua .8%.8% (24) 84.8. (46) 19.007 (35) 13.617 (32) 11.5 ( 7)
Baker 79.5 (46) 84.7 (49) 32.39 ( 7) 22.89 (11) 8.3 (56)
Bay 83.1 (21) 83.2 (55) 15.28 (45) 10.16 (47) 11.1 (11)
Bradford 80.8 (40) 88.4 (25) 24.49 (22) 15.73 (29) 8.8 (44)
Breverd 89,5 ( 1) 87.2 (35 _12.57 (57) .5.23 (65) 12.1 ( 1)
Broward 83.3 (16) 89.4 (18) 11.54 (59) 6.04 (63) 11.9 ( 3)
Calhoun 81.7 (34) 86.6 (38) 25.16 (20) 22.23 (12) 8.2 (60)
Charlotte 84.3 (12) 84.6 (52) 16.51 (39) 5.00 (66) 10.8 (16)
Citrus 78.2 (51) 91.1 ( 8) 15.90 (41) 9.74 (49) 9.3 (35)
Clay 79.8 (45) 80.5 (,9) 13.29 (54) 11,70 (41) 10.2 (24)
Collier 63.8 (67) 76.3 (63) 28.16 (16) 11.31 (42) 10.7 (19)
Columbia 79.4 (47) 87.7 (29) 23.88 (25) 19.23 (20) 8.8 (44)
Dade 86.9 ( 5) 88.6 (24) 8.02 (66) 7.49 (58) 11.5 ( 7)
De Soto 83.2 (17) 78.4 (62) 14.44 (49) 11.23 (43) 9.2 (36)
Dixie 78.3 (50) 79.9 (60) 31.12 (11) 24.01 ( 7) 8.3 (56)
Duval 82.8 (24) 85.4 (43) 12.56 (58) 9.55 (51) 10.8 (16)
Escambia 83.2 (17) 89.1 (20) 14.84 (48) 9.63 (50) 10.7 (19)
Flagler 64.7 (66) 72.8 (65) 31.75 (10) 22.10 (13) 8.9 (40)
Franklin 79.3 (48) 81.3 (571 32.C0 ( 9) 17.87 (22) 8.6 (47)
Gadeden 65.5 (65) .0 (_54)_ 30,69__...3) 31,05 ( 3) 7.5 (67)
Gilchrist 81.4 (36) 91.5 ( 6) 22.29 (2/) 16.42 (25) 8.6 (47)
Glades 84.4 (11) 27.73 (17) 27.56 ( 5) 7.8 (65)
Gulf 88.3 ( 3) 92.0 ( 3) 26.00 (19) 17.13 (24) 9.6 (30)
Hamilton 78.0 (52) 89.7 (&6) 43.12 ( 2) 31.14 ( 1) 7.7 (66)
Pardee 72.7 (61) __..57Z__(64) 10,37 ___i62J) 14.11 (31) 8,8 (44)
Hendry 74.3 (60) 78.9 (61) 19.59 (32) 19.12 (21) 8.9 (40)
Hernando 80.5 (42) 85.9 (42) 15.19 (40) 13.07 (34) 8.9 (40)
Highlands 83.2 (17) 90.6 (11) 15.56 (43) 11.77 (40) 9.5 (32)
Hillsborough 83.1 (21) 85.2 (44) 13.22 (55) 10.26 (46) 10.1 (27)
Holmes 75.3 (58) 87,8 (_2._)______ 31.12 (11) 21,45 (15) 8.0 (63)
Indian River 79.9 (44). 85.2 (44) 16.54 (38) 8.75 (54) 10.9 .(14)
Jackson 81.0 (39) 86.1 (40) 32.80 ( 8) 23.55 ( 8) 8.5 (50)
Jefferson 76.8 (56) 86.7 (37) 'i4.27 ( 1) 31.08 ( 2) 8.1. (62)
Lafayette 75.0 (59) 91.1 ( 8) 24.58 (21) 17.22 (23) 8.4 (53)
Lake 82,6 (27) 84.8 (46) 15,00 (47) 9.40 (52) 10.3 (23)
Lee 84.6 (10) 82.4 (56) 13.65 (51) 9.78 (48) 10.8 (16)
Leon 85.0 ( 9) 88,7 (23) 20.56 (30) 12.79 (35) 11.9 ( 3)
Levy 81.8 (32) 90.6 (11) 29.78 (14) 19.37 (19) 8.5 (50)
Liberty 82.5 (29) 80.9 (58) 27.56 (18) 21.53 (14) 8.5 (50)
Madteon 72,2 (63) 89,8 (15) 36,27 (3) 30.59 ( 4) 8,0 (63)
Manatee 83.0 (23) 87.3 (32) 12.95 (56) 7.23 (59) 10.2 (24)
Marion 86.6 ( 7) 90.8 (10) 19.31 (33) 16.33 (26) 9.5 (32)
Martin 80.2 (43) 87.3 (32) 15.75 (42) 8.16 (56) 10.6 (21)
Monroe 77.3 (55) 72.5 (66) 8.56 (64) 7.63 (57) 10.9 (14)
_aaosau 83.5 (13) 90.0 (14) 20 89 (29) 16.00 (7) 9,0 (38)
Okaloosa 77.4 (54) 86.6 (38) 13.97 (50) 6.52 (61) 12.1 ( 1)
Okeechobee 76.7 (57) 91.8 ( 4) 20.28 (31) 13.47 (33) 9.2 (36)
Orange 82.8 (24) 87.4 (31) 10.27 (63) 7.00 (60) 11.8 ( 5)
Osceola 83.2 (17) 88.9 (22) 11.52 (60) 8.29 (55) 9.6 (30)
alm Bemh 81,1 (38) 87.2 (35) 13.39 (53) 9,40 (52) 11.3 (10)
Pasco 82.2 (30) 89.6 (17) 13.51 (52) 10.56 (45) 8.9 (40)
Pinellas 885 ( 2) 87.3 (32) 7.29 (67) 4.55 (67) 11.1 (11)
Polk 1.8 (32) 84.8 (46) 15.43 (44) 12.30 (38) 9.7 (29)
Putnam 80.6 (41) 86.0 (41) 21.43 (28) 15.64 (30) 9.4 (34)
S J 84 (36) 90.2 (13) 16,75 (37) 12.54 (36) 10. (22)
St. Luciae 72.5 (62) 89.2 (19) 15.08 (46) 12.34 (37) 10.0 (28)
Santa Rosan 83.5 (13) 84.7 (49) 19.07 (34) 11.81 (39) 10.2 (24)
Saraota 86.8 ( 6) 87.6 (30) 8.29 (65) 5.87 (64) 11.6 ( 6)
Seminole 81.7 (34) 88.0 (27) 23.47 (26) 10.84 (44) 11.0 (13)


Volusa 86.4 (8) 89.0 (21) 10.49 (61) 6.42 (62) 11.5 ( 7)
Wakla_ 87.7 (4) .97L _1._- 33.71 (6) 23.49 (9) .62
Wa ton 77.6 (53) 91.3 (7) 24.20 (24) 15 8) 8.6 (47)
ua-h-n-tSo 823. ,40 5 2 6L..6 2 Iii_ _?_2_,45 .(1) 8.4 (531)
TOTAL 82.7o 87.07 13.70%. 9.19 10.9
bot Reported
Source:
Research Report-16, Divi.ion of Research, State Department of Education
Tallahassee, Florida


Sprtin~ TTT






TABLE 11
(Continued)


Median Percent of Percent of Personal Public School
Family Famillen with Pamlllen vith Income, 1963, Revenue from
Income an Annual Income an Annual Income Per Pupil (K-12) Local Sources
Counties 1960 of $10,000 and of Leso Tlun in ADA 1963-64, as a
Over, 1960 $3,000, 1960 1963-64 Percent of
Personal
Income
For 1963
Amount Rank Percent Rnnk Percent Rank Amount Rank Percent Rank
Alachua $4,471 (17) 11,2% (11) 31.41 (46) $ 9,013 (25) 1.28% (45)
Baker 3,227 (50) 6.3 (38) 45.9 (19) 5,105 (57) 1.24 (46)
Bay 4,413 (20) 9.1 (20) 28.8 (54) 8,002 (33) 1.08 (55)
Bradford 3,797 (35) 5.7 (44) 37.7 (34) 4,789 (59) 1.66 (30)
A1Bradr 77 (3- -85).6 .5.7 t1L..h.z 7.? Q ?.12 7)Ll._ _. _. L 2) I, L
Broward 4,996 ( 7) 12, ( 6) 24.8 (60) 10,459 (14) 2.31 (11)
Calhoun 2,673 (63) 5.2 (49) 54.9 ( 7) 4,107 (65) .88 (61)
Charlotte 3,918 (32) 7.6 (29) 33.2 (39) 10,082 (15) 5.80 ( 1)
CitruN 3,217 (51) 4.2 (56) 45.7 (20) 5,939 (53) 3.21 (4)
lY_.. 4.202 6).. _ 7. 31 30 6__ ) 4.33 ___(L 6 __.L. .L.-
Collier 4,673 (13) 13.8 ( 4) 29.9 (52) 12,389 ( 9) 2.74 6)
Columbia 3,607 (39) 6,1 (41) 41,5 (27) 6,443 (50) 1.36 (39)
Dade 5,348 (2) 14.0 (2) 22.8 (63) 14,179 (6) 1.91 (23)
De Soto 3,542 (42) 5.6 (45) 40.8 (29) 8,125 (32) 1.10 (52)
Dixe .210_ 2)2.5 (65t) 2-46.0 (18) ,15 (35). .1.1.1 (
Duval 5,345 ( 3) 12.4 (7) .22.4 (64) 11,616 (10) 1.02 (57)
E.csmbia 5,174 ( 5) 10.4 (12) 23.9 (62) 9,262 (23) 1.68 (29)
Flagler 3,375 (44) 5.5 (46) 46.2 (16) 8,251 (31) 2,69 ( 7)
Franklin 2,699 (61) 1.5 (66) 56.7 ( 4) 7,397 (40) 1.57 (34)
.d ........ 2.866 (56) 6b.9 (42) .5___ .._._.4. ~_~_ (_S) 41.36'_ (32).
Gilchriet 2,563 (66) 4.5 (54) 60.0 ( 2) 7,038 (43) 1.48 (36)
Glades 3,625 (38) 5.5 (46) 39.6 (32) 14,765 ( 4) 1.35 (41)
Culf 4,858 ( 9) 6.4 (37) 30.0 (50) 7,694 (36) 1.66 (30)
Hamilton 2,687 (62) 4.2 (56) 56.0 ( 5) 7,401 (39) .57 (65)
Hardee 3.602 (40) 6.9 (3l4) 4.1.0 (28)_.,__ 9.... 90 L (24__). 2...112
Hendry 4,127 (28) 6.9 (34) 33.2 (39) 20,730 ( 1) .78 (62)
Hernando 3,338 (47) 6.3 (38) 45.3 (22) 6,700 (48) 4.94 ( 2)
Highlands 3,735 (36) 6.3 (38) 37.6 (35) 8,292 (30) 2.18 (17)
* illnborough 4,616 (15) 9.1 (20) 28.4 (55) 11.109 (13) 1.32 (43)
jolmec 2,137 (67)_ 2.5 (64) 664 ( 1) ..543 (60) '.J0_ _2 _..
Indian River 4,218 (24) 9.9 (15) 32.5 (41) 9,666 (17) 2.50 (10)
Jackson 2,865 (57) 4.3 (55) 52.3 (12) 6,296 (51) .65 (64)
Jeffreron 2,741 (60) 4.9 (51) 54.4 ( 8) 4,438 (61) 1.24 (46)
Lafayette 3,342 (46) 5.9 (43) 45.7 (21) 11,272 (12) .53 (66)
Lake ,680 (37) 7.9 (27) .40.2 (30) 9.57 2.,20 (6)
Lee 4,286 (23) 9.9 (15) 32.2 (43) 9,383 (22) 2.17 (18)
Leon 5,173 ( 6) 13.6 ( 5) 27.3 (59) 9,462 (19) 1.11 (51)
Levy 2,886 (55) 4.1 (59) 52.2 (13) 6,775 (46) 1.33 (42)
Liberty 3,277 (49) .5 (67) 46.2 (16) 5,356 (56) 1.09 (54)
diaso 2,614 (65). 3.0 (62) 57.1 ( 3j) 6._____ 6..__. ....96 (58)
Hanatee 3,814 (34) 7.6 (29) 37.2 (36) 8,430 (29) 2.66 ( 8)
Marion 3,572 (41) 6.6 (36) 42.0 (26) 6,967 (44) 1.95 (22)
Martin 4,295 (22) 9.5 (18) 30.7 (48) 8,672 (27) 3.94 ( 3)
Honroe 4,660 (14) 8.3 (26) 24.6 (61) 15,588 ( 2) 1.39 (38)
aLss-a --. 46 (18) 9,L (8) 32~(42) 7.147 (42) __1_58___M)_
Okaloosa 4,901 ( 8) 12.1 ( 9) 22.0 (66) 8,885 (26) .49 (67)
Okeechobee 4,096 (30) 7.7 (28) 28.2 (56) 4,024 (66) 2.65 ( 9)
Orange 5,222 ( 4) 14.0 ( 2) 22.3 (65) 11,377 (11) 1.57 (34)
Osceola 3,368 (45) 5.1 (50) 44.1 (24) 7,755 (35) 2.94 ( 5)
Al mPB_ .... ,4784 (10) 12.1 9) 28,2 (56) __ 14,571 ( 5) 2.25 .(13
Panco 3,307 (48) 5.4 (48) 45.3 (22) 6,769 (47) 2.27 (12)
Pinellas 4,359 (21) 10.2 (13) 31.4 (46) 13,991 ( 7) 2.09 (19)
Polk 4,476 (16) 10.1 (14) 29.2 (53) 9,346 (21) 2.05 (20)
rutnam 3,559 (31) 7.1 (32) 38.4 (33) 6,925 (45) 1.83 (25)
_stJ.a)!rM_- .- .A2.__ C1U__L _i99J.35.) 0 (37)L e 4_,,62 ((2_)9) 1.59 (32)
St. Lucre 4,211 (25) 8.9 (22) 32.1 (44) 8,578 (28) 1.99 (21)
Srnta Ros~ 4,692 (11) 7.1 (32) 30.0 (50) 7,401 (38) .90 (60)
Saratota 4,688 (12) 12.2 ( 8) 27.6 (58) 14,794 ( 3) 1.77 (26)
Seminole 4,446 (19) 8.7 (23) 31.9 (45) 6,597 (49) 1.77 (26)
s t :._02_ .___ 4.6 ( j j_ 1. L .1 __~d_. AL LL0.__..?L. ____L4o
Suvanneo 2,767 (59) 3.7 (60) 54.0 (10) 7,911 (34) 1.07 (56)
Taylor 3,844 (33) 8.5 (25) 39.9 (31) 7,254 (41) 1.73 (28)
Unton 3,379 (43) 4.6 (52) 42.8 (25) 7,6.0 (37) .77 (63)
volu ita 4,114 (29) 8.7 (23) 34.4 (38) 9,972 (16) 1.86 (24,
""---- 8-O __.._ __.1^9___________in~_!~~ r9
W tlton 3,138 (53) 4.2 (56) 48.2 (15) 3,960 (67) 1.21 (50)
ToAL $4~,722 11.1t 28.4% $11,033 1.73%


Source:
Research Report -- 46 Division of Research, State Department of Education


Section III M,"a 1 651
51






TABLE 12


FLORIDA'S COMMUTING WORKERS IN 1960 SHOWN BY COUNTIES

Percent
Number Working
Working Outside
Total ..Outside County of
Workers County of Residence
COUNTY 1; I" Residence 1960

Alachua 25,790 716 2.78
Baker 2,163 414 18,68
Bay 23,572 528 2.24
Bradford 4,001 1,171 29.27
Brevard 41,3211 685 1.66
Broward 114,111 13,849 12.14
Calhoun 1,972 341 17.29
Charlotte 3,511 251 7.15
Citrus 2,968 276 0.30'
Clay 6,566 1,741 26.52
Collier 5,857 146 2,49
Columbia 7,056 372 5.27
Dade 356,364 9,228 2.59
DeSoto 3,676 330 8.98
Dixie 1,457 166 11.39
Duval 171,867 4,116 2.39
Escambia 60,090 2,569 4.28
Flagler 1,646 200 12.15
Franklin 2,065 128 6.20
Gadsden 13,212 930 7.04
Gilchrist 987 167 17.12
Glades 1,228 99 8.06
Gulf 3,130 149 4.76
Hamilton 2,616 278 10.63
Hardee 4,370 508 11.62
Hendry 3,120 393 12.60
Hernando 3,374 309 9.16
Highlands 6,937 349 5.03
Hillsborough 142,500 7,141 5.01
H.ALe-' 2,795 666 23.83
Indian River 8,359 528 6.29
Jackson 11,295 528 0.29
Jefferson 2,984 248 8.31
Lafayette 1,070 145 13.55
Lake 18,442 1,258 6.82
Lee 18,735 824 4.40
Leon 27,927 706 2.53
Levy 3,585 367 10.24
Liberty 930 235 25.27
Madison 4,791 433 10.86
Manatee 21,214 2,303 550
arion 17,630 969 5.50


May, 1967


Section III







TABLE 12
(Continued)


Source: 1960 Census of Population, Volumn I, Part
Bureau of the Census.


IT, Florida U. S,


Section III


Martin 5,648 51 9.76
Monroe 20,335 224 1.10
Nassau 5,415 676 12.47
Okaloosa 21,754 627 2.88
Okeechobee 2,153 209 9.71
Orange 96,761 3,591 3,71
Osceola 5,649 987 17.47
Palm Beach 85,243 2,117 2.48
Pasco 10,939 1,535 14.04
Pinellas 112,790 4,021 3.57
Polk 68,018 2,120 3.12
Putnam 10,474 587 5.60
St. Johns 10,198 995 9.76
St. Lucie 14,306 1,335 9.33
Santa Rosa 10,401 2,432 23.38
Sarasota 25,383 1,328 5.23
Seminole 18,828 5,349 28.41
Sumter 3,487 537 15.00
Suwannee 4,947 341 6.89
Taylor 4,087 102 2.50
Union 1,383 419 50.30
Volusia 40,549 1,997 4.92
Wakulla 1,498 453 30.24
Walton 4,584 1,329 28.99
Washington 2,8904 562 19.45


May, 1967












































TALLAHASSEE FLORIDA




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