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 Main
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Group Title: Florida State Dept. of Education Bulletin
Title: Fact-finding in vocational education
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00080755/00001
 Material Information
Title: Fact-finding in vocational education a handbook for conducting vocational surveys
Series Title: Florida State Dept. of Education Bulletin
Alternate Title: Vocational surveys
Physical Description: 1 l., 24 p. : forms, ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Division of Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Publication Date: 1964
Copyright Date: 1964
 Subjects
Subject: Vocational education   ( lcsh )
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00080755
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AHQ5948
oclc - 01730273
alephbibnum - 001631154
lccn - a 65007107

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page i
    Preface
        Page ii
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Back Cover
        Page 27
        Page 28
Full Text


FACT-FINDING
IN
VOCATIONAL

EDUCATION


A Handbook for Conducting
VOCATIONAL SURVEYS










STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Tallahassee, Florida
THOMAS D. BAILEY, Superintendent







Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education


Bulletin 70H-7


FACT-FINDING
IN
VOCATIONAL

EDUCATION


A Handbook for Conducting
VOCATIONAL SURVEYS









F//orid., Division of
Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education
Walter R. Williams, Jr., Director
G. W. Neubauer, Vocational Research Specialist


March, 1964





375: 0 9 75-7

7~o. -7


PREFACE

It is a commonplace in education that the school should
meet community needs. This is easy to say but not always
easy to do. An example is the difficulty of relating the
school intimately to the occupational life of the com-
munity.

Geographically, how large is the community? For what
community occupations should students be trained? How
should the training be accomplished? The handbook does
not answer these questions. Instead, it suggests proce-
dures which it is hoped will aid administrators, super-
visors, and teachers in finding answers which will be
helpful in resolving such training quandaries. It also pro-
vides a guide for marshalling a broad base of community
understanding and support in conducting surveys which
will help to determine both current and future employ-
ment needs preparatory to modifying occupational
education programs or introducing new ones.

The survey formats at the end of the handbook are ex-
amples only. They may be modified in numerous ways,
depending upon the questions which the survey is
designed to answer.




)A







WHEN TO SURVEY


Vocational and technical education programs are estab-
lished so that youth and adults with the necessary interest
and talents may secure the preparation needed to obtain
employment and to upgrade themselves in jobs. But
deciding upon the jobs for which training should be pro-
vided or continued raises questions such as:

1. What are the geographic boundaries of the labor
market which should be considered in determining
training needs?

2. For what jobs should people be trained?

3. After completing training, will trainees be able to
find work in the fields in which they are trained?

4. Will the demand for trainees in these fields prob-
ably continue?

5. Are people interested in being trained for these
jobs?

6. Do the people who are interested have sufficient
education to profit from the training?

7. If people lack the necessary educational back-
ground, can it be obtained in the community?

." Answers to these and similar questions may often be
Found through surveys.








USING AND MISUSING SURVEYS

Surveys can be a valuable tool in program development,
review, and re-organization if they are conducted prop-
erly and care is taken in interpreting the findings.

1. Surveys should directly and realistically relate to
the goals which they are helping to achieve.
If one or two shops are to be established in one
school in a large community, a complete community
survey may not be needed. If a variety of training
programs is required, a complete survey should be
made to determine what kinds and how many pro-
grams will be needed and where they should be
located.

2. The problem under study should be carefully ana-
lyzed, the information needed clearly identified,
and the survey instrument accurately phrased so
that it secures the data desired.
There may be considerable difference between the
number of journeymen brickmasons, for example,
needed by the construction industry in the geo-
graphic area served by the training program and
the number of graduates of high school Brick Ma-
sonry classes which the industry will employ be-
cause


The school provides 1080 The construction industry
of ull-tme training) tending over 3 years to
o learn the trade




The high school graduate must complete an additional
2% years of on-the-job training before qualifying as a
journeyman brickmason







In some other occupations such as dry cleaning and
laundry work, secretarial practice, and tailoring the
total training program may be completed in the
high school. For certain others such as cosmetology,
however, the training may be taken in high school,
but a state licensing examination must be success-
fully completed before the graduate is eligible for
employment.


3. The findings should be reinforced with evidence
from other sources such as:

U. S. Census Bureau reports

Florida Employment Service reports

Placement data from related training programs

School placement and followup data

The counsel of advisory committee members


4. The findings of a survey of one community should
not be assumed without good cause to fit another of
approximately equal size because of differences in:

Geographic location

Climatic conditions

Local customs and traditions

Natural and human resources

Economic conditions

Educational facilities








OCCUPATIONAL AND
OCCUPATIONALLY-RELATED SURVEYS

Many different kinds of educational surveys may be
carried on in a community, depending upon the kind of
information needed. This booklet is concerned with four.
With some modifications, however, the same procedures
may be followed in others.

The four types are:

1. The survey of a single craft or occupation

2. The survey of selected occupations

3. The survey of an industry

4. The survey of a community


Following is a brief description of these surveys.


Single Craft or Occupation Survey

This is a survey of a single craft or occupation such as
carpentry, sheet metal work, or radio and television re-
pair and servicing.

If, for example, the final purpose of the survey is to de-
termine whether a high school training program is
needed in the specific craft or occupation under con-
sideration, answers to specific questions about that craft
or occupation will need to be found. These questions
should, in turn, be converted into specific objectives.








SURVEY OF


SELECTED OCCUPATIONS

A survey of selected occupations is exactly what the
name implies. It is a survey of a number of occupations
such as stenography, commercial catering, or automo-
tive mechanics for each of which there is reason to be-
lieve training is needed.

It is more comprehensive than the single craft or occupa-
tional survey because it includes several occupations
instead of one, and a greater number and variety of em-
ployers will probably be asked to participate.


Industry Survey

An industry survey is a survey of all the jobs or occupa-
tions within a given industry such as the construction
industry. It is usually more complete than the others for
it covers the employment picture in one industry. It may,
for example, show current employment and the need for
training for brick- and block masons, cabinetmakers,
carpenters, electricians, glaziers, plumbers, tile setters,
and other skilled mechanics associated with the building
trades.

It may also be used to review the appropriateness of cur-
rent training programs in the woodworking trades, metal
trades, and drafting, for example, and may help to iden-
tify different or additional training needs.







Community Survey


A comprehensive community survey may be the most
appropriate for smaller communities. It consists of a sur-
vey of the principal jobs or occupations in which people
of the community are employed. It may, in fact, be the
only reliable way of determining those community occu-
pations in which the need for training is most pressing.

Community occupational surveys may also be coupled
with non-standardized surveys of interest in training.
Interest surveys may be administered to in-school youth,
out-of-school youth, adults, or any combination of these
groups. Such interest surveys-not to be confused with
standardized vocational interest inventories-may vary
considerably in comprehensiveness. They may record
interest in a large number of selected occupations, many
of which are not found in the community. They may be
restricted to determining interest in community vocations
in which a need for training has been established. But
people are mobile and often commute to jobs in neigh-
boring communities, so an interest survey reflecting local
employment opportunities and requirements as well as
those of the larger labor market may be the most in-
formative.








REPRESENTATIVE
SURVEY OBJECTIVES

Following is a list of representative objectives one or
more of which may be accomplished through occupa-
tional or occupationally-related surveys:
1. To determine the number of people in a geo-
graphic area currently employed in an occupation
2. To determine the number of additional people
currently needed in an occupation
3. To determine the number of graduates of high
school occupational training programs who would
be accepted for employment in a community
4. To determine the jobs within an occupation in
which training is needed
5. To determine interest in training for selected oc-
cupations
6. To identify the occupation in which there is
greatest employment demand
7. To determine the need for supplemental training
for people who are already employed
8. To determine new areas in which preparatory
training is needed
9. To determine which training programs should be
expanded or, perhaps, discontinued
10. To determine interest in elementary or high school
completion courses which do not prepare specifi-
cally for jobs, but lead to a certificate or diploma
which may be required for employment.
These, of course, are not all the objectives which may be
realized. They may be joined in many combinations
depending upon the comprehensiveness of the survey
and the purpose which it is to serve. Of utmost impor-
tance, however, is that the specific questions which it is
intended to answer be carefully and accurately identified
and that these be translated into specific survey objec-
tives against which the findings may be tested.








ORGANIZING
TO CARRY ON A SURVEY

Conducting a survey and reporting and implementing
the findings is a big task. It involves many people in ad-
visory, consultative, and other active capacities. All must
be fully informed concerning the purposes of the survey,
the goals it is hoped to accomplish, and the progress be-
ing made toward achieving them.

The number and size of the committees needed to pro-
vide coordination and counsel will depend upon the
scope and magnitude of the survey. But it is not a task to
be undertaken by one or two individuals working after
school hours or on week-ends without direction or assist-
ance.

In conducting a survey, provision should be made for the
following:

A Coordinating Committee

A General Advisory Committee

A Study Director

Subcommittees (as needed)

Interviewers (if needed)

Clerical Assistance

Financial Support

Each is an important consideration in any successful
study.








Suggested Membership of the Coordinating Committee

County Superintendent of Public Instruction
General Supervisor (Director) of Instruction
Local Director of Vocational Education


Suggested Responsibilities of the Coordinating
Committee

1. Determine if available evidence indicates that an
organized and more intensive study is needed
2. Tentatively determine the nature, occupational
breadth, and geographic scope of the study and
the specific objectives to be accomplished
3. Explore the interest of lay citizens and school per-
sonnel in the study
4. Select members of the General Advisory Com-
mittee for the study who may be recommended
by the County Superintendent for appointment by
the County School Board
5. Identify qualified individuals from among whom
the Director of the Study-a key person in the
project-may be chosen
6. Identify potential sources of interviewers in the
event they will be needed
7. Make provision for necessary clerical assistance
8. Determine potential sources of funds to be
budgeted for meeting study costs
9. Coordinate the activities of the General Advisory
Committee for the Study, the Director of the
Study, and county school personnel while the sur-
vey is in progress
10. Take action as needed to bring the study to a satis-
factory conclusion.







Suggested Membership of the General
Advisory Committee for the Study

The scope and purpose of the study will determine the
membership of the General Advisory Committee. Usu-
ally, however, members will be chosen from the follow-
ing or similar community organizations or services:
Employer Organizations
Employee Organizations
Chambers of Commerce
Committees of 100
Agricultural Organizations
Professional Organizations
Service Organizations
Parent-Teacher Associations
Florida Employment Service
Area Development Organizations
In addition, county staff members, school personnel, and
other individuals having special interest or competence
in the fields being surveyed may be called upon to serve
in consultative capacities.

Suggested Responsibilities of the General
Advisory Committee for the Study

1. Review the tentative purpose, occupational
breadth, geographic scope, and objectives of the
study presented by the chairman of the Coordinat-
ing Committee and assist in their final determina-
tion
2. Serve as sponsoring agency for the study
3. Become familiar with the aims and purposes of
vocational and technical education and with the
programs and courses offered locally







4. Assist in the final selection of the Director of the
Study
5. Assist in determining the kinds of information
needed and advise concerning sources and avail-
ability
6. Assist in planning and conducting a publicity and
public relations program to enlist community co-
operation in the study
7. Assist in determining the population to be sampled
in a pilot study and the total population to be sur-
veyed
8. Assist in developing the survey instruments)
9. Assist in developing survey procedures
10. Assist in modifying the survey instruments) if
findings of the pilot study(ies) suggest revisions
are needed, and assist in evaluating the adequacy
of the instruments) after modifications)
11. Assist (in individual cases as needed) in securing
a response to the survey
12. Advise concerning interviewing techniques which
may be used to advantage and those which should
be avoided
13. Appoint subcommittees as needed to accomplish
specific tasks. Typical responsibilities assigned to
individual subcommittees might include:
Radio and TV publicity Speaking to community
groups
Newspaper publicity Development of survey
instruments)
14. Review and assess findings, make recommenda-
tions, and approve the final report
15. Present the report and recommendations to the
County Superintendent and the County School
Board.







The Director of the Study


The Director of the Study should be a person who:
Is familiar or willing to become familiar with the
aims and purposes of vocational and technical
education
Is familiar or willing to become familiar with the
educational structure and program of the county
and community
Is familiar with survey procedures and data inter-
pretation
Is experienced in report writing and graphic pres-
entation of data.

The Director of the Study is often:
A member of the county school system
A local business leader
A Chamber of Commerce member
A member of the faculty or staff of a junior college,
college, or university

Suggested Responsibilities of the Director of the Study

1. Provide general supervision of the study
2. Serve as ex-officio member of all committees and
subcommittees
3. Develop tentative plans and procedures for con-
ducting the study and present these to the General
Advisory Committee for approval
4. Tentatively identify personnel needs of the study
for consideration by the Coordinating Committee
and the County Superintendent
5. Develop a tentative budget for the study for con-
sideration by the Coordinating Committee and the
County Superintendent







6. Supervise gathering of preliminary data
7. Develop detailed study procedures for review and
approval by the General Advisory Committee
8. Develop the survey instruments) for review and
approval by the General Advisory Committee
9. Train personnel to be used in the study
10. Assign responsibilities for and supervise collection
and compilation of data by interviewers and cleri-
cal workers
11. Review individual returns and determine if inter-
view or other followup is desirable
12. Supervise tabulation of data
13. Analyze and interpret data
14. Prepare a preliminary draft of the survey report
15. Supervise the preparation of graphs and tables
16. Present the preliminary draft of the report to the
General Advisory Committee, counseling with
members during their review of the findings
17. Prepare the final report of the study, incorporating
the conclusions and recommendations of the Gen-
eral Advisory Committee.

Things to Look for in Interviewers

Tactfulness in obtaining information

Respect for the ethics of interviewing

Understanding of vocational education

Interest in the procedures and purposes of the study

Vocational teachers may be able to carry out this respon-
sibility effectively.







CHECK LIST OF PROCEDURAL
CONSIDERATIONS IN
PLANNING AND CONDUCTING
A SURVEY

Oj Establish a Coordinating Committee
I Select a General Advisory Committee
]- Appoint a Director of the Study
M Develop a budget for the study
O Establish the specific objectives of the survey
] Identify the groups) to be surveyed or the samples
which represent these groups
O Identify the geographical area of the labor market
served
Community State
County Southeast
Adjoining counties Nation
Region of state
LI Determine the survey and followup procedures
Mailed survey forms Telephone contacts
Personal interviews Combination of devices
L] Establish a specific time schedule for completing the
various stages of the study
Developing the survey instruments)
Contacting prospective respondents
Returning the responses
Followup (if necessary and desirable)
Tabulating and interpreting the data
Writing the report
Duplicating the report
e Releasing the final report







O Arrange for continuing publicity to keep the com-
munity informed of progress
O Assign specific responsibilities to specific individuals
and/or groups
Developing the instruments(s)
Developing the list of contacts
Preparing newspaper publicity
Preparing radio and TV publicity
Speaking
Mailing instruments)
Interviewing (if necessary)
Tabulating responses
Writing the report
Preparing graphs and tables
Typing the preliminary and final drafts of the report
Duplicating the report
Distributing the report
] Conduct a pilot survey
- Conduct the survey
7 Interpret and report the findings, conclusions, and
recommendations
L- Present the final report to the General Advisory
Committee for approval
[] Arrange for the chairman of the General Advisory
Committee, the sponsoring agency, to present the
final report to the County Superintendent and
County School Board for approval and implementa-
tion
] Implement the recommendations
Set in motion machinery for accomplishing the rec-
ommendations upon which immediate action can
be taken
Develop a plan and calendar for implementing the
recommendations which can be accomplished in
the near and longer-range future.







KINDS OF ASSISTANCE WHICH THE DIVISION
OF VOCATIONAL, TECHNICAL, AND ADULT
EDUCATION CAN AND CANNOT PROVIDE
IN OCCUPATIONAL STUDIES

Conducting surveys of local occupations is primarily a
local responsibility. But the Division of Vocational, Tech-
nical, and Adult Education of the State Department of
Education will, upon request, cooperate in every possi-
ble way to insure the success of such surveys.

Upon request, divisional personnel will:
Counsel and advise with the Coordinating Com-
mittee in establishing the General Advisory Com-
mittee
Assist in planning the study
Assist in defining the responsibilities of the General
Advisory Committee
Assist in analyzing the preliminary data
Assist in defining the responsibilities of the Director
of the Study
Assist the Director of the Study in planning survey
procedures
Counsel and advise with the Director of the Study
in developing the survey instruments)
Arrange for the machine processing of data if the
instruments) permits)



(If it is planned to process the data by machine in Tallahassee,
the divisional Survey and Research Specialist should be con-
sulted in designing the instruments) and scheduling machine
time. If the county possesses data processing equipment which
may be used in the study, the instruments) should be designed
in consultation with county data processing personnel.)








Counsel and advise with the Director of the Study,
the General Advisory Committee, and the Coordi-
nating Commmittee on matters relating to the
study while the survey is in progress
Review the interpretation of data

Divisional personnel cannot assume responsibility for:

Serving on committees or subcommittees
Selecting committee or subcommittee members
Selecting the Director of the Study
Preparing publicity materials
Preparing the survey instruments)
Interviewing or collecting data
Tabulating data
Interpreting data
Writing the preliminary draft of the report
Preparing conclusions and recommendations
Writing the final report
Preparing graphs and tables
Typing the report
Duplicating the report
Distributing the report
Presenting the report








FROM STUDY TO PROGRAM


If the study shows that:
Jobs will probably be available in the occupations)
surveyed
High school students, out-of-school youth, and/or adults
are interested in obtaining these jobs
The jobs will not be available to them unless they have
completed appropriate training programs and are able to
meet employer hiring requirements

an effective training program
can probably be established.
For the program to be successful, however, certain pro-
cedures should be followed and certain provisions made.
These include:
Appointment of Occupational Advisory Commit-
tee(s)
Provision of appropriate facilities and equipment
Provision for adequate program financing
Appointment of a qualified instructor
Preparation or acquisition of appropriate course
and instructional materials
Establishment of criteria for student selection
Familiarization of guidance counselors with training
and employment requirements
Provision of adequate instructional and program su-
pervision
Provision for periodic program evaluation, includ-
ing placement and followup.
All the above require careful consideration and close
cooperation between school authorities and employers.
Again, representatives of the Division of Vocational,
Technical, and Adult Education can, upon request, ren-
der valuable consultative service.







KEEPING UP TO DATE

A final caution should be emphasized. Survey findings
should be checked periodically and programs adjusted
accordingly because communities change as:

New industries move in

Established industries mechanize or move elsewhere

Employment needs change

Job requirements change

New jobs develop

If constant attention is directed to relating vocational
education to changing employment needs and require-
ments, an effective program will result.






DETERMINING TRAINING NEEDS


In developing an Occupational Survey Instrument, con-
siderable attention should be directed to:
Making it as brief as possible
Including only items or questions which secure
needed information
Phrasing or organizing items or questions so that
answers may be exact and specific
Arranging items and positioning response spaces for
ease in key-punching (if the data is to be machine
processed).
A cover letter should accompany the instrument, ex-
plaining its purpose and identifying the sponsoring
agency. It should also describe important considerations
applying to training for any of the occupations being
surveyed. For example, the amount of training remain-
ing to be completed by graduates of high school training
programs in certain industrial occupations before they
become eligible for journeyman status should be indi-
cated.
A pilot survey should also be conducted. Without an
analysis of the evidence which it provides, it is very
difficult to determine if the survey instruments) will
furnish the information needed.
Following are sample formats of three Occupational Sur-
vey Instruments. They differ only in the occupational
areas which they survey. The occupations included have
been selected at random from industry, the clerical field,
and sales and distribution.
Fewer occupations could be surveyed, additional ones
included, or others substituted in each occupational area,
depending upon the information needed. It may well
be necessary to use more than one sheet or card in sur-
veying the occupations in a particular occupational area.
A similar format could also be used in surveying agri-
cultural, managerial, technical, service, and other oc-
cupational areas. Again, the instrument format will de-
pend finally upon the objectives which the survey is
helping to achieve.




THE OCCUPATIONAL SURVEY INSTRUMENT


(Name of Company)


(Address of Company)


(Name of person completing form)


1. For each INDUSTRIAL OCCU-
PATION in the chart on the right,
indicate the number of people which
you now employ, the number which
you now need, and the number which
you expect to need in the years
indicated. (PLEASE DO NOT
COUNT THE SAME PERSON
TWICE.) Check also if graduates
of high school occupational training
programs would or would not be
employed in these occupations.
2. Does your firm provide training for
these workers?
...- Yes _-... No
3. Would your firm be interested in
additional training for these work-
ers during their non-working hours
in a public school or college within
commuting distance?
.... Yes .....No
4. What are the principal products,
activities, or services which your
firm manufactures, maintains, or
provides?

-........... ................................. .


Occupation


01.
02.
03.
04.
05.
06.
07.
08.
09.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.


Now
Employed


Do Not Count Same Person Twice
Additional People Needed


Now


196...... 196.....


Employ Graduates of
High School Occupational
Training Programs?


Aircraft Mechanics
Auto Mechanics
Brick and Stone Masons
Carpenters
Concrete and Cement Finishers
Draftsmen
Electricians
Machinists
Painters
Plasterers
Plumbers
Radio and TV Repairmen
Other (Write in)
Other (Write in)


REPLIES WILL BE KEPT CONFIDENTIAL AND REPORTED ONLY IN SUMMARY TOTALS







THE OCCUPATIONAL SURVEY INSTRUMENT


(Name of Company)


(Address of Company)


(Name of person completing form)


1. For each CLERICAL OCCUPA-
TION in the chart on the right, in-
dicate the number of people which
you now employ, the number which
you now need, and the number
which you expect to need in the
years indicated. (PLEASE DO
NOT COUNT THE SAME PER-
SON TWICE.) Check also if gradu-
ates of high school occupational
training programs would or would
not be employed in these occu-
pations.
2. Does your firm provide training for
these workers?
___ Yes .. No
3. Would your firm be interested in
additional training for these work-
ers during their non-working hours
in a public school or college within
commuting distance?
..._ Yes No
4. What are the principal products,
activities, or services which your
firm manufactures, maintains, or
provides?


Occupation


01. Bookkeepers
02. Bookkeeping Mac
03. Cashiers
04. File Clerks
05. General Clerks
06. General Office Cl


07.
08.
09.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.


Now
Employed


Do Not Count Same Person Twice
Additional People Needed


196R


Employ Graduates of
High School Occupational
Training Programs?


- ____i__ I-


1 B .


..... ..... l.
19 1 6.


hine Operators





erks


Office Machine Operators
Reception Clerks___
Secretaries
Stenographers
Timekeepers and Payroll Clerks
Typists
Other (Write in)
Other (Write in)


P REPAIES WILL BE KEPT CONFIDENTIAL AND REPORTED ONLY IN SUMMARY TOTALS-




THE OCCUPATIONAL SURVEY INSTRUMENT


(Name of Company)

(Name of person completing form)


(Address of Company)


1. For each SALES and DISTRIBU-
TIVE OCCUPATION in the chart
on the right, indicate the number of
people which you now employ, the
number which you now need, and the
number which you expect to need
in the years indicated. (PLEASE
DO NOT COUNT THE SAME
PERSON TWICE.) Check also if
graduates of high school occupa-
tional training programs would or
would not be employed in these
occupations.
2. Does your firm provide training for
these workers?
... Yes ___ No
3. Would your firm be interested in
additional training for these work-
ers during their non-working hours
in a public school or college within
commuting distance?
-__ Yes ... No
4. What are the principal products,
activities, or services which your
firm manufactures, maintains, or
provides?


Occupation


Now
Employed


Do Not Count Same Person Twice
Additional Peoole Needed


__________ITraining___ _________ ______


Employ Graduates of
High School Occupational
Training Programs?


Now 196..... 196...... Yes No
01. Buyers
02. Checkers
03. Counter Sales Clerks
04. Credit Clerks
05. Decorators and Window Dressers
06. Hostesses
07. Insurance Salesmen
08. Routemen
09. Sales Representatives
10. Shipping and Receiving Clerks
11. Stock Clerks
12. Waiters and Waitresses
13. Other (Write in)
14. Other (Write in)


REPLIES WILL BE KEPT CONFIDENTIAL AND REPORTED ONLY IN SUMMARY TOTALS













DETERMINING INTEREST
IN VOCATIONAL CLASSES
The survey of employment need will identify
the occupation(s) in which the greatest need
for training exists. But an important aspect of
the survey is to verify the vocational education
interests of people within the survey area.
Establishing a training program without insuring
that people are interested in securing the train-
ing if it is provided is questionable practice.

Before expressions of interest or disinterest in
training for particular occupations may be con-
sidered reasonably valid, however, people must
be familiar with the occupations about which
they are deciding. With high school students
this may be accomplished through the provision
of occupational information and individual coun-
seling in cooperation with parents. The same
help may be obtained by adults from counselors
of the Florida State Employment Service. In
addition, after interest has been expressed, it may
be well to verify individual student fitness to
profit from the instruction by administering a
standardized aptitude test.

Following is a sample interest inventory which
will help to identify the vocational education
interests of high school students, out-of-school
youth, or adults. It is only an example. The
particular instruments) developed must reflect
the specific needs and interests of the community
conducting the survey.




VOCATIONAL EDUCATION INTEREST INVENTORY

PURPOSE: Information obtained from this inventory will be used by local vocational educators in establishing courses and classes which will help to meet employment needs and
interests of people in the community.
DIRECTIONS: Place a 1 and/or 2 to indicate your first and/or second choice in the space to the left of any of the following vocational courses for which you would like to enroll. If you
are not interested in any of the courses listed, place an "X" in the space at the left of "No Interest."


..-- a. Auto Mechanics

.--- b. Business Machines Operation

c. Cosmetology


If you have placed a 1 and/or 2 opposite any of the listed courses and you are-
A FULL-TIME STUDENT
Please provide the following information
Miss
(Circle Mrs... _______
one) Mr. kName)


(Name of school attending)

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Ungraded
(Circle grade in which enrolled)


(Age in years at last birthday)


. d. Electronics

. e. Practical Nursing

Sf. Secretarial Practice


NOT A FULL-TIME STUDENT
Please provide the following information
Miss
(Circle Mrs...--- -______ .._........_.._..___
one) Mr. (Name)


(Address)


---- g. No Interest




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For additional copies contact the VOCATIONAL RE-
SEARCH SPECIALIST DIVISION OF VOCA-
TIONAL, TECHNICAL, AND ADULT EDUCATION
ESTATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION *
Tallahassee




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