• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Introduction
 Florida vocational home economics...
 Job analysis and home economics...
 Employment possibilities in...
 Classification of students involved...
 Teacher qualifications and...
 Procedures for implementing a wage-earning...
 Legal responsibilities
 Appendix






Title: Handbook for Florida home economics wage earning programs
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00080747/00001
 Material Information
Title: Handbook for Florida home economics wage earning programs
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Florida Department of Education
Publisher: Florida Department of Education
Place of Publication: Tallahassee, Fla.
Publication Date: June, 1971
 Notes
General Note: Florida Department of Education bulletin 75H-9
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00080747
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Title Page 1
        Title Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Table of Contents 1
        Table of Contents 2
    Introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Florida vocational home economics program description
        Page 3
    Job analysis and home economics wage-earning course descriptions
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Employment possibilities in Florida
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Classification of students involved in vocational programs
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Teacher qualifications and certification
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Procedures for implementing a wage-earning home economics program
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 38a
        Page 38b
        Page 39a
        Page 39b
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
    Legal responsibilities
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 56a
    Appendix
        Page 57
        Page 57a
        Definition of terms
            Page 58
            Page 59
            Page 60
            Page 61
            Page 62
        Copy of sample letter to prospective board member
            Page 63
        Helpful information about advisory committees
            Page 64
            Page 65
            Page 66
        Guidelines in making occupational surveys
            Page 67
            Page 68
            Page 69
        Survey of student interest in home economic occupations
            Page 70
            Page 71
        Survey of student interest in clothing, management, production and services
            Page 72
            Page 73
        Sample copy of a letter sent to parents
            Page 74
        Personal data and student application form
            Page 75
            Page 76
            Page 77
Full Text


















ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS


This handbook has been developed in the Department
of Education through the efforts of Mrs. Jacquelin
Prescott, Wage Earning Consultant for Vocational
Home Economics, with the cooperation of the entire
State Vocational Home Economics Staff.
Mrs. Betty Mann McQueen, former home economics
supervisor of Sarasota County, Florida, and now a
homemaker, was engaged by the Department of
Education to prepare the handbook.
Mr. C. A. Bellum, Assistant Superintendent, Vo-
cational, Technical and Adult Education, Sarasota
County and Mr. John McQueen were invaluable
resource persons and advisors to Mrs. McQueen.
We are appreciative of the work done by Mr. Larry
Todd, Educational Materials Specialist in designing
the cover and in expediting the printing of the
handbook.

The production and distribution of the handbook
would not have been possible without the support
and approval of Dr. Carl W. Proehl, Director of the
Division of Vocational, Technical and Adult Edu-
cation.


DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA
FLOYD T. CHRISTIAN, Commissioner


HANDBOOK

FOR

FLORIDA HOME ECONOMICS


WAGE EARNING PROGRAMS


DIVISION


OF VOCATIONAL,


TECHNICAL, AND ADULT EDUCATION


CARL W. PROEHL,


HOME ECONOMICS


EDUCATION


DIRECTOR


SECTION


ALLIE E. FERGUSON, ADMINISTRATOR


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TABLE OF CONTENTS


PAGE

Introduction, Purpose, Trends and Legislation 1

Florida Vocational Home Economics Program Description 3

Wage-Earning Home Economics Course Titles 3

Job Analyses and Home Economics Wage-Earning Course Descriptions 4

Secondary Programs 4
Post-Secondary Programs 9
Out-of-School Youth and Adults 11

Employment Possibilities in Florida 15

Classification of Students Involved in Vocational Programs 18

Teacher Qualifications and Certification 21

Procedures for Implementing Wage-Earning Home Economics Programs 23

Program Planning Consultants 23
Advisory Committees 24
Occupational Surveys 26
Student Recruitment 27
Curriculum Planning 29
Florida Vocational Home Economics Continuums 29
Course Content 29
Competency Charts Which Relate Subject Area Content
to Occupations 31
Education in Food and Nutrition 31
Education in Food Management, Production and Services 34
Education in Housing and Home Furnishings 36
Education in Human Development 38
Education in Institutional and Home Management and
Supportive Services 39
Education in Textiles and Clothing 40
Home Economics Cooperative Method 42
Florida Vocational Home Economics Wage-Earning Guides 43

Student Selection 44
Class Size 44
Class Credit 44
Schedules 45
Facilities 45
Supplies and Equipment 47
Funding 48
Wage-Earning Youth Clubs 51
Publicizing Wage-Earning Programs 51
Evaluation 51
Job Placement 53
Job Follow-up 54

Legal Responsibilities 55


Appendix







INTRODUCTION


This publication, Handbook for Florida Home Economics Wage-Earning
Programs, replaces the publications, Guidelines for Writing a Project
Proposal and Grant Requests Under the 1963 Vocational Education Act for
Vocational Home Economics Programs1 and Occupational Opportunities'Using
Home Economics Knowledge and Skills, 1965-1966.


Purpose

The combined thinking of county school personnel, area and State
coordinating committees, and the staff of the Home Economics Section of
the Division of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education of the State
Department of Education has resulted in the revision of some policies and
procedures. Policies, procedures, and suggested practices for implementing
wage-earning home economics programs have been compiled in one reference.
An attempt has been made to include many recommendations which have
proved successful in home economics wage-earning programs operating in
Florida. Basic information is included to answer the questions asked
most often by those persons involved in planning.


Significant Trends

The number of women who are assuming the dual role of homemaker and
wage earner is increasing. Many of these women need preparation for both
roles since the proficiency with which a woman can accomplish both roles
will help determine the quality of her home and family life and her effective-
ness as a wage earner.

Many home economists who have been concerned primarily with education
for homemaking are discovering that community and individual needs demand
additional objectives. They are answering the challenge by developing
wage-earning programs centered upon occupations which use home economics
knowledge and skills. These programs are being extended to adults as well
as to youths and to males as well as to females.

Legislation

The Vocational Education Act of 1963 and the Vocational Education
Amendments of 1968 provide opportunities for home economics to emphasize
preparation for employment as well as preparation for homemaking. Both


IFlorida, State Department of Education, Division of Vocational, Technical
and Adult Education, Home Economics Section. Guidelines for Writing a Project
Proposal and Grant Request Under the 1963 Vocational Education Act for
Vocational Home Economics Programs (Tallahassee, Florida: 1965)

2Florida, State Department of Education, Division of Vocational,
Technical and Adult Education, Home Economics Section. Occupational
Opportunities Using Home Economics Knowledge and Skills, 1965-1966
(Tallahassee, Florida: 1965).







acts provide financial assistance in the field of vocational education for
schools under public supervision and control. Funds are to be used to
maintain, extend, and improve the existing programs of vocational education.1
In addition, the Vocational Education Amendments of 1968 stresses the develop-
ment of new programs designed primarily to educate individuals for gainful
employment in recognized occupations.2

Legislation not only provides an opportunity but designates a
responsibility to home economics education by authorizing Federal grants
for specific vocational programs as outlined in the Amendments of 1968:3

...Programs which encourage greater consideration to social and
cultural conditions and needs, especially in economically
depressed areas;

...Programs which encourage preparation for professional leadership;

...Programs which are designed to prepare youths and adults for the
role of homemaker;

...Programs which contribute to the employability of such youths and
adults in the dual role of homemaker and wage earner;

..Programs which include consumer education;

...Programs which are designed for persons who have entered the work
of the home.


1U.S., Congress, "Vocational Education Act of 1963, "Public Law 210,
88th Cong. (1963), 1.

U.S., Congress, "Vocational Education Amendments of 1968," Public Law
576, 90th Cong. (1968), 1.

2"Vocational Education Amendments of 1968,"l.

3Ibid., 22.






FLORIDA VOCATIONAL HOME ECONOMICS PROGRAM DESCRIPTION


Part of Florida's vocational home economics programs is now being
dedicated to educating individuals for earning money in jobs based upon
home economics knowledge and skills. A unified program of instruction has
been organized as the best method of preparing persons for both wage earning
and for family life. Skills considered basic to an individual's employ-
ability which are common to all occupations,inclusive of the occupation of
homemaking,are:

...A positive self-concept;

...The ability to get along with others;

...Competencies in the foods area;

...Competencies in the clothing area;

...Respect and care of environment;

...The ability to manage time, energy, and material resources.

Introduction to the basic employability skills through the subject
matter areas of home economics is considered desirable before delving into
specific job competencies.


WAGE-EARNING HOME ECONOMICS COURSE TITLES


Listed below are the identified courses for wage-earning programs in
home economics in Florida:

...Child Care, Guidance and Services;

...Home Economics Cooperative Child Care, Guidance and Services;

...Clothing Management, Production and Services;

...Home Economics Cooperative Clothing Management, Production and
Services;

...Food Management, Production and Services;

...Home Economics Cooperative Food Management, Production and
Services;

...Home Furnishings, Equipment and Services;

...Home Economics Cooperative Home Furnishings, Equipment and
Services;

...Institutional and Home Management and Supportive Services;

...Home Economics Cooperative Institutional and Home Management and
Supportive Services;






...Orientation to Occupational Home Economics;


...Home Economics Comprehensive Cooperative.

The official course titles, code numbers, and abbreviations are up-
dated and published annually by the State Department of Education in The
Accreditator.1 Current copies are usually available from the principal,
district home economics supervisor, or district vocational director.

The course titles are the same for both the secondary and the adult
education programs although the official code numbers and abbreviations
differ. Local educators may wish to use other course titles for various
reasons such as to increase student appeal. Although courses may be
titled differently on the local level, the official course title and
corresponding code number and abbreviation must be used on report forms and
correspondence with the State Department of Education.


JOB ANALYSIS AND HOME ECONOMICS WAGE-EARNING COURSE DESCRIPTIONS


Quality wage-earning home economics programs are dependent upon job
analyses of the occupations to be included in a specific course. The
information for a job analysis is obtained by carefully studying each job
to determine the following:

...Identification of job by title;

...Tasks essential to job performance;

...How the tasks are performed;

...Conditions under which tasks are performed;

...Requirements and qualifications necessary for employment.

The information can be obtained by a review of the literature or by
one or a combination of survey methods such as the questionnaire, interview,
or observation. Members of the advisory committee as well as county and
State personnel may prove helpful in collecting and interpreting data.
The Dictionary of Occupational Titles2 includes detailed information.

Job analyses data were used by State personnel to develop the follow-
ing wage-earning course descriptions:

Secondary Programs

CHILD CARE, GUIDANCE AND SERVICES This course is designed to
prepare students for employment as aides in the care, guidance, and


IFlorida, State Department of Education, Division of Elementary and
Secondary Education. The Accreditator. (Tallahassee, Florida).

2U.S., Department of Labor. Dictionary of Occupational Titles (Volume I;
Third Edition; Definitions of Titles; Washington, D.C.: Government Printing
Office, 1965).

U.S., Department of Labor. Dictionary of Occupational Titles (Volume II;
Third Edition; Occupational Classification; Washington, D.C.: Government
Printing Office, 1965).







instruction of young children and their management in groups. The
study includes identifying opportunities for employment; the funda-
mentals of child development including ways of meeting the physical,
mental, emotional and social needs of the individual child within a
group situation; and planning, preparing and maintaining an environment
conducive to growth. Students receive supervised work experiences in a
school laboratory or in an appropriate community laboratory situation.

COOPERATIVE CHILD CARE, GUIDANCE AND SERVICES This course combines
home economics instruction with participation on a job involving child
care, guidance and services. Home economics students are involved
in a cooperative arrangement between the school and an employer who
provides a work station for on-the-job experience. Such students
receive instruction in academic courses, job related home economics
courses, and general and specific job skills. All experiences are
planned, conducted and supervised by the coordinators and employers
so that all contribute to the student's education, general employability
and job competence.

CLOTHING MANAGEMENT, PRODUCTION AND SERVICES This course is designed
to provide the student with the basic knowledge, skills and attitudes
needed for entry level employment in a variety of clothing services.
Students have the opportunity to identify the various types of employ-
ment available in clothing management, production and services;
develop skills in such specific areas as professional dressmaking,
specialty sewing, alterations, fashion design, product knowledge for
merchandizing; the operation and care of domestic and commercial sewing
equipment; pressing techniques as they relate to a variety of fabrics;
routine care of clothing; special care problems in wardrobe maintenance;
design (line, shape, texture and color) as related to clothing selection
and construction, fitting and alterations. Management of human and
material resource will be included in each course in proportion to
objectives set for that course.

ADVANCED CLOTHING MANAGEMENT, PRODUCTION AND SERVICES This course
includes more advanced techniques in construction of clothing, visual
design, consumer education, textile analysis, pressing and alteration.
Through completion of selected projects, students develop advanced
skills needed in the above-mentioned areas in order that participants
may be prepared for employment in clothing related jobs. The student
also learns of job opportunities related to textiles and clothing.
As well as mastering skills, the student recognizes the professional
ethics of a career and learns that continued success depends on the
building of desirable attitudes and relationships with others.

ALTERATIONS In this course, the student learns that the alteration of
garments requires a great proficiency in sewing techniques and
knowledge of the characteristics of fabrics. It includes developing
skills in handling fabrics, fitting problems, altering garments and
pressing techniques. Completion prepares the student to alter ready-
to-wear garments in the home as self employment or for employment in
business or industry. The student analyzes job opportunities which
utilize specific training in the alteration of garments.







PERSONAL WARDROBE MAINTENANCE SPECIALIST This course prepares
the student to keep a person's wardrobe in good condition by
performing such tasks as repairing, cleaning, and storing garments
and accessories.

COOPERATIVE CLOTHING MANAGEMENT, PRODUCTION AND SERVICES This
course combines home economics instruction with participation on a
job involving clothing management, production and services. Home
economics students are involved in a cooperative arrangement between
the school and an employer who provides a work station for on-the-job
experience. Such students receive instruction in academic courses,
job related home economics courses, and general and specific job
skills. All experiences are planned, conducted and supervised by the
coordinator and employers so that all contribute to the student's
education, general employability and job competence.

FOOD MANAGEMENT, PRODUCTION AND SERVICES This course is designed to
teach the student the basic skills and knowledge needed for employment
in a variety of food service positions. Instruction is divided into
five major categories Foundations; Management; Nutrition, Meal
Planning and Service; Equipment and Maintenance; and Quantity Food
Preparation. Students will train in all areas of the laboratory. This
will enable them to decide which area they prefer for specialization
if they desire to continue their education in food services.

FOUNDATIONS This course includes the use and care for equipment;
vocabulary for food service workers; sanitation and safety in the
production and service of quality food in quantity; procedures in
following recipes and directions of work patterns and task completions;
psychology of work; and health requirements for the individual.

EQUIPMENT AND MAINTENANCE This course includes the use of the right
equipment for the job to be done; maintenance of the equipment as well
as the entire laboratory, stressing care, sanitation and safety on the
job.

QUANTITY FOOD PREPARATION This course includes factors relating t.o
the production and service of quality food in quantity; quality food
standards; the production schedule; effective buying and storage
techniques.

MEAL PLANNING AND SERVICE This course includes the study of nutrition,
menu planning, budgeting and correct methods of preparation of foods
to conserve food value, color, texture and flavor; combination of
foods to prepare and serve meals for all types of service and for all
occasions; maintenance of cost control; food purchasing; planning and
preparation of special diets for children, the obese, convalescents,
the aged and others.

MANAGEMENT This course is designed for training for management
positions and includes the study of job duties and responsibilities; job
plans, safety and sanitation procedures to promote efficiency of
operations; pre-preparation and storage of foods; application by
preparing different kinds of dishes; portion control; planning arrange-
ments for serving food; conservation of time and energy for job
performance; methods of keeping records including stock inventory,
issuance of supplies and others.







COOPERATIVE FOOD MANAGEMENT, PRODUCTION AND SERVICES This course
combines home economics instruction with participation on a job
involving food management, production and services. Home Economics
students are involved in a cooperative arrangement between the school
and an employer who provides a work station for on-the-job experience.
Such students receive instruction in academic courses, job related
home economics courses, and general and specific job skills. All
experiences are planned, conducted and supervised by the coordinator
and employers so that all contribute to the student's education,
general employability and job competence.

HOME FURNISHINGS, EQUIPMENT AND SERVICES This course is designed to
provide specific information to students who are preparing to work in
the home furnishings industry. Specific information relative to
textiles and other products used in home furnishings, the design of
home furnishings and equipment, and sources of product information are
studied. A basic understanding of textiles and design, techniques for
construction of draperies, bedspreads, pillows and slipcovers are
included. Reupholstery techniques may be included in this course or
taught as a separate course.

DECORATOR'S AIDE This course is designed to develop judgment needed
for creating a livable home for the individual and family. Student
learning experiences are planned to develop consumer knowledge of
housing, understanding of desirable arrangements for various living
areas and an ability to select equipment and furnishings within a
budget. Attention is given to employment opportunities and qualifications
for work in this area.

COOPERATIVE HOME FURNISHINGS, EQUIPMENT AND SERVICES This course
combines home economics instruction with participation on a job
involving home furnishings, equipment and services. Home economics
students are involved in a cooperative arrangement between the school
and an employer who provides a work station for on-the-job experience.
Such students receive instruction in academic courses, job related home
economics courses, and general and specific job skills. All experiences
are planned, conducted and supervised by the coordinator and employers
so that all contribute to the student's education, general employability
and job competence.

INSTITUTIONAL AND HOME MANAGEMENT AND SUPPORTIVE SERVICES This course
is designed to provide students with knowledge, skills and attitudes
for jobs in the management of homes and institutions. Students have
the opportunity to identify the various types of employment available
in this area; to develop skills in handling household emergencies and
those involving human relations; in providing adequate care for the
elderly and disabled; in using and caring for household equipment; in
caring for children; in planning, buying, storing, preparing and serving
food; and in performing laundry and cleaning tasks.

COOPERATIVE INSTITUTIONAL AND HOME MANAGEMENT AND SUPPORTIVE SERVICES -
This course combines home economics instruction with participation on
a job involving institutional and home management and supportive
services. Home economics students are involved in a cooperative
arrangement between the school and an employer who provides a work
station for on-the-job experience. Such students receive instruction
in academic courses, job related home economics courses, and general







specific job skil.ls. All experiences are planned, conducted and
supervised by the coordinator and employers so that all contribute
to the student's education, general employability and job competence.

ORIENTATION TO OCCUPATIONAL HOME ECONOMICS This course is designed
to acquaint students with the home economics related world of work
and the personal characteristics that will help them succeed in
career choices. Students have the opportunity to explore such topics
as: who works and when, why people work, job trends and opportunities,
choosing a career, personal attitudes and appearance on the job,
the ability to relate positively to other persons, education and skill
training required for various jobs, minimum physical requirements, laws
and regulations related to employment and working conditions, how to
find a job, job interviews, the dual role of homemaker and wage earner,
and management of resources.

HOME ECONOMICS COMPREHENSIVE COOPERATIVE EDUCATION This course
combines home economics instruction with job participation. Rather
than only one cluster of jobs being taught, each student may study for
the job of his choice in home economics. Home economics students are
involved in a cooperative arrangement between the school and an
employer who provides a station for on-the-job experiences. Such
students receive instruction in required academic courses, job
related home economics courses and general and specific job skills.
All experiences are planned, conducted and supervised by the coordinators
and employers so that all contribute to the student's education, general
employability and job competence.

WAGE-EARNING HOME ECONOMICS COURSES FOR STUDENTS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS -
These courses are designed to offer learning opportunities for
students with identified academic or social needs. Offerings include
personal development; family relationships; consumer education;
selection and maintenance of clothing; nutritional needs and the
preparation of food. Orientation to the world of work emphasizes
roles of men, women and youth in the labor force; job opportunities,
benefits and requirements; personal requirements for job success,
including appearance, attitudes and relationships; pertinent legislation
and labor laws; management of human and material resources; coopera-
tive work experience opportunities; and skills for specific jobs for
individuals with special needs or handicaps.

MIDDLE AND JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL HOME ECONOMICS These courses are
directed toward two major goals: assisting students in developing
those employability skills that are basic to job performance in any
given occupation; and providing students with knowledge, attitudes and
skills thac are essential to family living, including homemaking tasks.
Major concepts included are characteristics of transescents; values
and goals; self-concept; peer relationships; grooming and dress;
personal nutrition; selection, planning, preparation and serving of
food; family roles, relationships and responsibilities; respecting and
caring for environment; and management of personal resources. Emphasis
is placed on student-oriented experiences and laboratory activities.
Consumer education is taught as an integral part of the course.







COMPREHENSIVE HOME ECONOMICS I The course is comprehensive in scope
and encompasses all subject areas of home economics. It is designed
to provide junior and senior high school students with the basic
knowledge, skills and attitudes for the occupation of homemaking.
Concepts, content and experiences are appropriate to the developmental
tasks of both boys and girls. All subject areas emphasize instruction
in homemaking, consumer education and employability skills.

ORIENTATION TO THE WORLD OF WORK This course is designed to aid the
student in developing a positive self-concept and understanding his
role in the family organization (dependence-independence relationship
with family members).


Post-Secondary Programs
(Course descriptions from Community and Junior College catalogs)


Clothing Production and Manufacturing

A study of the organization, structure, and problems of the garment industry and a
close examination of regional markets producing ready-to-wear.


Commercial Garment Construction

The construction of garments using factory techniques. Course stresses quality
workmanship and mass production procedures currently used in the trade.


Fashion Retailing

A survey of the basic principles and activities involved in the distribution of
fashion products to the ultimate consumer. Factors that motivate consumer demand,
selling techniques and promotional practices are studied. The function and activities
of fashion coordinators and buyers in retail organizations are emphasized.

Personal Improvement for Career Women

Self improvement for the woman who plans to enter the business or professional world.
Included are: Posture, figure control, personal grooming, cosmetics, visual poise,
wardrobe coordination, and personal preparation for the interview. The lecture-
demonstration technique is used. Not open to fashion modeling majors.


Fashion Modeling I

Fundamental techniques of fashion modeling. Designed to teach posture, walking, figure
control, facial expression, and other fundamentals of visual poise. Basic pivots and
elementary modeling techniques are included.


Fashion Modeling II

Instruction and practice in advanced modeling techniques. Includes diversified pivots,
detailing, fashion vocabulary, handling of fashion accessories, basic photography, and
all types of fashion presentation.





fashionn Modeling III

Provides instruction and field-experience in specialized modeling techniques. Radio
and television commercial script reading, television and photography modeling, closed
circuit TV, studio and location photography, and participation in fashion shows are
included.

Fashion Modeling IV

Jives an overview of fashion show production and teaches basic techniques.of
fashion show coordination and commentary, Practical experience in various types of
fashion shows constitute the major portion of this course. A formal graduation-
fashion show is the final presentation.


Fashion Modeling Careers

Introduces various opportunities in the professional fashion fields. Students are
taught professional ethics, requirements, and standard financial compensations.
The local fashion market is explored and basic information on the national market is
included.


Meal Planning and Quantity Food Preparation

Stressing meal planning for larger groups--consideration of the element and type of
food service to be given. This is a course for cafeteria and lunchroom workers.


Elementary Food Preparation

Production and the use of food and materials, development of standards of food
preparations; the effect of these factors upon economics, nutritive value and aesthetic
appeal of food materials.


Layout and Equipment

The knowledge and skills needed in these areas for more efficient production, service
and controls in a food and beverage operation. Planning is stressed; time and motion
principles employed and layout and design analysis methods are utilized.


Food and Beverage Management

Basic principles of food and beverage management and merchandising as related to the
hospitality industry. Detailed study of wines and spirits, their countries of origin,
manufacturing processes and other related information. Management functions in purchasing
pricing and cost control of the food -and beverage operation.


Introductory Volume Food Management

The various types of large volume food service institutions, with emphasis on
operational differences, varied menu construction, raw material estimates, large volume
preparation techniques, and the use of institutional food service equipment.






Advanced Food Preparation

Estimates of raw materials needed, preparation of foods in volume, and the use of
institutional food service equipment. A study of work organization of food preparation
processes.


.Opportunities in the Home Economics Field

Personal and professional qualification for successful homemaking or gainful employment.
The scope of the home economics field.


Out-of-School Youth and Adults


CLOTHING MANAGEMENT, PRODUCTION AND SERVICES This course is designed
to provide the student with the basic knowledge, skills and attitudes
needed for entry level employment in a variety of clothing services.
Students have the opportunity to identify the various types of employ-
ment available in clothing management, production and services;
develop skills in such specific areas as professional dressmaking,
specialty sewing, alterations, fashion design, product knowledge for
merchandizing; the operation and care of domestic and commercial sewing
equipment; pressing techniques as they relate to a variety of fabrics;
routine care of clothing; special care problems in wardrobe maintenance;
design (line, shape, texture and color) as related to clothing selection
and construction, fitting and alterations. Management of human and
material resource will be included in each course in proportion to
objectives set for that course.

ADVANCED CLOTHING MANAGEMENT, PRODUCTION AND SERVICES This course
includes more advanced techniques in construction of clothing, visual
design, consumer education, textile analysis, pressing and alteration.
Through completion of selected projects, students develop advanced
skills needed in the above-mentioned areas in order that participants
may be prepared for employment in clothing related jobs. The student
also learns of job opportunities related to textiles and clothing.
As well as mastering skills, the student recognizes the professional
ethics of a career and learns that continued success depends on the
building of desirable attitudes and relationships with others.

ALTERATIONS In this course, the student learns that the alteration of
garments requires a great proficiency in sewing techniques and
knowledge of the characteristics of fabrics. It includes developing
skills in handling fabrics, fitting problems, altering garments and
pressing techniques. Completion prepares the student to alter ready-
to-wear garments in the home as self employment or for employment in
business or industry. The student analyzes job opportunities which
utilize specific training in the alteration of garments.

PERSONAL WARDROBE MAINTENANCE SPECIALIST This course prepares
the student to keep a person's wardrobe in good condition by
performing such tasks as repairing, cleaning, and storing garments
and accessories.





HOME FURNISHINGS, EQUIPMENT AND SERVICES This course is designed to
provide specific information to students who are preparing to work in
the home furnishings industry. Specific information relative to
textiles and other products used in home furnishings, the design of
home furnishings and equipment, and sources of product information are
studied. A basic understanding of textiles and design, techniques for
construction of draperies, bedspreads, pillows and slipcovers are
included. Reupholstery techniques may be included in this course or
taught as a separate course.

DECORATOR'S AIDE This course is designed to develop judgment needed
for creating a livable home for the individual and family. Student
learning experiences are planned to develop consumer knowledge of
housing, understanding of desirable arrangements for various living
areas and an ability to select equipment and furnishings within a
budget. Attention is given to employment opportunities and qualifications
for work in this area.


CHILD CARE, GUIDANCE AND SERVICES This course is designed to prepare
students for employment as aides in the care, guidance, and instruction
of young children and their management in groups. The study includes
identifying opportunities for employment; the fundamentals of child
development including ways of meeting the physical, mental, emotional
and social needs of the individual child within a group situation;
and planning, preparing and maintaining an environment conducive to
growth. Students receive supervised work experiences in a school
laboratory or in an appropriate community laboratory situation.

FOUNDATIONS OF QUANTITY FOOD PREPARATION AND FOOD SERVICE This course
is designed to assist employees in finding and solving problems of
quantity food service. It includes characteristics of a good food
service, and its place in the total education program with compre-
hensive overview of the principles of menu planning, purchasing, food
preparation and service, equipment use and care, sanitation and safety,
personal cleanliness and grooming, the value of a good working
relationship within the organization. Emphasis is placed upon the need
for greater knowledge in operating food services for the public.

BASIC PRINCIPLES REQUIRED FOR NUTRITION AND FOOD SERVICE This
course includes a study of the basic principles of good nutrition
and the relation of food selection to health. The aim is to interpret
nutrition in terms of its practical application in the planning,
preparing and serving of meals and relating these meals to the other
food for the week. It also aims to develop an understanding of daily
dietary allowances for various age groups and the responsibility for
providing these. It includes information on foods with maximum
nutritive value and how to purchase, store and prepare them in order
to retain these values to the maximum.

QUANTITY COOKERY This course is designed to improve quality and
quantity cf food served. It includes principles and techniques of
quantity food production. Actual preparation of foods in quantity
provides on-the-job experiences using principles and techniques
learned. Trainees learn proper use and care of equipment, use of
available serving tools to assure adequate portions and gain exper-
ience in calculating and recording quantities of food used, adjusting
and standardizing recipes for numbers to be served.






EQUIPMENT USE AND CARE This course is designed to enable employees
to use quantity food equipment in the easiest, safest and most
effective way, and to properly care for equipment as an aid in
providing superior food. Participants learn simple repair tech-
niques and preventive maintenance, cleaning methods and record
keeping as it relates to equipment.

ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT This course is designed to teach
managers the fundamentals of organization (i.e., the characteristics
of desirable organization, development of a functional organizational
plan, establishment of a line of responsibility and authority, the
various environmental factors which influence the organization, the
measures of successful organization and management). The work plan,
the relation of personnel to the organization, the difference in laws,
regulations and policies and where responsibility lies in carrying
them out; and the relationship of records to management control are
all handled in detail.

ACCOUNTING AND REPORTING (RECORD KEEPING) This course is designed to
teach food service managers and accountants the principles involved in
recording and reporting the activities of any quantity food service
business. It includes a study of what constitutes a sound record
keeping and reporting system, and provides daily practice in maintaining
adequate records and reporting information clearly and accurately.

PURCHASING This course is designed to give the student an understanding
of the general principles of purchasing, knowledge of the different
grades of food, how these grades are determined and their importance
in specifying quality and controlling costs. Also included is the
study of marketing functions, laws, regulations, purchasing procedures
and necessary purchasing records.

SUPERVISED FOOD SERVICE WORKER This course includes instruction in
the preparation and serving of food in institutions such as hospitals,
homes for the aged, nursing homes,.children's homes and day-care centers.
Skills taught are: hygienic practices in preparing food for cooking,
during the cooking process, serving and storing; safety regulations
in use of all types of equipment and the handling of hot foods; basic
skills required in preparation of standard large quantity recipes;
food service at table or on trays according to the situation;
organization of work in relation to work space and within time
limitations.

FAMILY DINNER SERVICE SPECIALIST This course includes instruction in
preparing and serving dinners for employed homemakers, retired persons,
or families desiring such service. Skills which are taught include
menu planning within designated cost limits to meet the requirements
of the family; food shopping techniques; preparation of standard
recipes; table setting and service. Health rules in handling food
and sanitary practices in storing food, washing dishes and cleaning up
kitchen are stressed.

CATERING This course is designed to give a basic knowledge of all
types of foods for special occasions. Included is preparation and
serving of hot and cold hors d'oeuvres, buffet foods, cake decorating,
petit-fours, glazes, molded salads and desserts, and vegetable garnishings.
The current methods and techniques of catering prepares the student for
self employment or for employment in catering services.







DIETETIC AIDE This course is designed for the student to acquire the
knowledge and skills necessary to perform duties effectively in a
dietary department of hospitals, nursing or convalescent homes.
Classroom teaching and clinical supervision is provided by registered
American Dietetic Association dietitians. Community institutions
cooperate to provide for the clinical experience under supervision of
the instructor.

FOOD SERVICE SUPERVISOR (INSTITUTIONS) This course instructs students
in methods of supervising employers in serving food in hospitals,
nursing homes, school or college food service departments and similar
institutions, and in maintaining cleanliness of food service areas and
equipment; performing duties and assignments and coordinating work to
promote efficiency of operations; serving of meals in dining room;
cleaning of kitchen and dining areas and washing of kitchen utensils
and equipment, according to sanitary standards. The student learns to
keep records, such as amount and cost of meals served and hours worked
by employees; to requisition supplies and equipment to maintain stock
levels; and to direct preparation of foods and beverages.

DIRECTOR, SCHOOL LUNCH OR INSTITUTIONAL FOOD SERVICE PROGRAM This
course provides the techniques necessary for the student to: direct
and manage school lunch programs; coordinate activities of workers
engaged in preparing quantity meals; plan menus of nutritional value;
supervise employees engaged in preparing and serving meals; purchase
foods and supplies; develop policies and procedures for operating
kitchens and cafeterias; conduct research program to improve existing
practices and services; keep records required by other governmental
agencies regarding subsidies and surplus foods; hire employees and
assign them to duties; and prepare budgetary reports.

INSTITUTIONAL AND HOME MANAGEMENT AND SUPPORTIVE SERVICES This
course educates students to: direct institutional housekeeping program
to insure clean, orderly, and attractive condition of establishments;
establish standards and procedures for work of housekeeping staff
and plan work schedule that insures adequate service; inspect and
evaluate physical condition of establishment and submit to management
recommendations for painting, repairs, furnishings, relocation of
equipment, and reallocation of space; inventory supplies and equipment
and investigate new and improved cleaning instruments; coordinate
activities with those of other departments; organize and direct
departmental training programs and resolve personnel problems; hire
new employees and evaluate records to forecast department personnel
requirements.

HOUSING PROJECT MANAGER OR AIDE This course instructs students in
techniques necessary to: assist in orienting residents in housing
projects to living in a new environment; to make effective use of
personal resources and the facilities and services provided in the
project and the community; and to achieve satisfying family life.






VISITING HOMEMAKER This course instructs students in techniques
necessary to assist in maintaining normal family life when the mother
must be away or the family is under the stress of an emergency;
maintains family routines and activities; supervise the play and
rest of children; prepare or assist family members in preparing simple
and nutritious meals; do the laundry; and keep house clean and
orderly.

HOUSEKEEPING AIDE FOR BUSINESSES AND INSTITUTIONS This course
instructs students in techniques necessary to develop knowledge and
skills involved in keeping businesses and institutions clean, orderly
and ready for use, including correct procedures in handling cleaning
materials and equipment. Emphasis is placed on acquiring and using
knowledge of business schedules and employing good public relations.



EMPLOYMENT POSSIBILITIES IN FLORIDA


A particular community may have employment opportunities in sufficient
demand to educate a large number of workers for a specific occupation with
specialized skills, but often the need is for limited numbers of workers
in a wide variety of occupations. In the latter situation it is not
feasible in terms of time, money, and availability of specialized teachers
to organize one course for a specific job; therefore, it is recommended that
courses be taught according to a cluster concept.

Some examples of possible jobs have been listed below under the
identified Florida course titles. Many of the jobs listed within one
course may have many common skills which could be introduced by the cluster
technique. It is important to be aware of which jobs are available in the
community, but at the same time, remember that the population is mobile
so employment may be available elsewhere at a later date to a particular
individual.

Titles of the following jobs may differ from locality to locality
and from employer:


Child Care, Guidance and Services and
Home Economics Cooperative Child Care, Guidance and Services

Nursery school attendant or aide.
Kindergarten worker.
Church school worker.
Child day care center worker.
Headstart assistant.
Child care worker for handicapped children.
Department store babysitter.
Playroom attendant.
Playground worker.
Recreation assistant.
Handicrafts helper.
Family day care aide (infants to pre-school; 1-5 in number within home)
Cottage parent helper.
Post-natal care assistant in home.
Infant care assistant in home.







Homemaker's assistant.
Babysitter.
Salesclerk for children's wear.
Salesclerk for toys.
Toymaker.
Amusement park worker.
Sight-seeing guide for children.


Clothing Management, Production and Services and
Home Economics Cooperative Clothing Management, Production and Services


Dressmaker (specialty worker).
Custom dressmaker.
Factory dressmaker.
Dressmaker's helper or assistant
Garment assembler.
Draper.
Fitter.
Hand sewer.
Costumer.
Pattern Maker.
Alterationist.
Alterations ripper.
Repair worker or helper.
Costume repair worker.
Clothing maintenance specialist.
Home clothing maintenance specialist.
Seamstress.
Buttonhole maker.
Stitcher (embroidery).
Reweaver.
Garment factory worker.
Sewing machine operator.
Cutter.
Garment examiner.
Clothing inspector.
Fashion coordinator.
Demonstrator's helper.
Model.
Fashion commentator.
Wardrobe mistress.
Wardrobe assistant.
Theater wardrobe helper.
Drycleaning attendant.
Laundress.
Launderette attendant.
Hand presser.
Machine presser.







Food Management, Production and Services and
Home Economics Cooperative Food Management, Production and Services

Host or hostess.
Receptionist.
Waiter or waitress.
Cook
Assistant Cook.
Cook's helper.
Second cook.
Fry cook.
Grill cook.
Short order cook.
Broiler cook.
Kitchen helper.
Salad maker.
Sandwich maker.
Vegetable preparation worker.
Baker.
Baker's helper.
Bakery assistant.
Cake decorator.
Pastry cook.
Food service supervisor.
Food service worker.
Soda fountain worker.
Pantry worker.
Counter worker.
Cafeteria worker.
Bus boy or girl.
Cleaning person.
Pot and pan washer.
Dishwasher.
Dishroom worker.
Purchasing agent.
Stock worker.
Storeroom comptroller.
Dietary worker.
Hospital dietetic aide.
Special occasions caterer.
Home caterer.
Food demonstrator.
Home baker.
Family dinner specialist.
Household management worker.


Home Furnishings, Equipment and Services and
Home Economics Cooperative Home Furnishings, Equipment and Services

Reupholsterer.
Slipcover specialist.
Slipcover aide.
Drapery maker.
Drapery measureman and estimator.
Custom bedspread maker.
Pillow maker.
Sewing machine operator.




Furniture refinishing specialist.
Furniture refinishing aide.
Appliance or equipment demonstrator.
Lighting specialist assistant.
Flower arranger.
Florist's assistant.
Floor covering consultant.
Decorator aide.
Household accessories specialist.
Redecoration worker.


Institutional and Home Management and Supportive Services and
Home Economics Cooperative Institutional and Home Management and Supportive Services


Housing project management aide.
Apartment house manager.
Housekeeper's aide for hotel or motel.
Hostess.
Receptionist.
Motel or hotel maid.
Housekeeper.
Assistant housekeeper.
Linen supply room attendant.
Companion aide to elderly.
Nursing home employee.
Companion to disabled.
Homemaker's assistant.
Visiting homemaker.
Assistant to dinner meal specialist.
Home health aide.
Personal shopper.



CLASSIFIuATION OF STUDENTS INVOLVED IN VOCATIONAL PROGRAMS


Vocational programs are usually developed for students grouped
within an organizational structure of the school system. The disadvantaged
or handicapped student may be included in any grouping or placed into
classes for special needs students. The most common types of groupings
are as follows:

KINDERGARTEN THROUGH GRADES FIVE OR SIX Learning experiences are
planned to familiarize the students with the ways people earn a
living. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of the world-of-work
to the on-going instructional program.

GRADES SIX THROUGHEIGHT OR SEVEN THROUGH NINE Introductory courses
are provided which, again, emphasize the world-of-work but in greater
detail. Content includes the many kinds of work people do and the
interrelationship of such work in producing goods and services.
Occupational exploratory experiences may be provided, including
vocationally oriented home economics. Direct job-related instruction
may be available for potential school dropouts.







GRADES NINE OR TEN THROUGH TWELVE Exploratory courses in grades nine
and ten are available which consist of laboratory instruction which
include the following goals:

...To give students firsthand experiences with the kinds and levels
of work performed in a broad range of occupations for which special
skills are required;

...To inform students of the requirements and qualifications for careers
in such occupations;

...To acquaint students with the significance of involving technologies
in these occupations;

...To instill in students an understanding and appreciation for the
dignity and worth of honest labor;

...To assist students in making informed and meaningful occupational
choices.


Three kinds of instruction can be provided in grades ten through twelve:

...Direct job-related instruction for students planning to graduate
and for students who may leave school before graduation;

...Pre-technical vocational education for those planning to enroll in
an advanced or highly skilled vocational or technical program at
the post-secondary level;

...Occupational proficiency courses which include instruction in a
specific occupation or cluster of closely related occupations.

The nature and scope of the programs are planned to provide a career
base for individuals who have the capacity and motivation to advance in an
occupational area. The program is an integral part of the total high school
schedule; thus it allows students to complete academic credit requirements
for graduation. Instruction is combined and coordinated with laboratory
and/or work experience, all three of which are appropriate to the vocational
objectives of the student. The course can be of sufficient duration to
develop competencies necessary for actual employment.

Students should be advised that they can graduate from high school with
a saleable skill and also meet requirements for college entrance if the
students' high school schedules have been carefully planned.


Post-Secondary Programs

These programs are offered to students enrolled full-time for 900 hours
or more. Most of the courses are offered in community or junior college
programs although some are available in vocational technical schools. A
high school diploma is optional.

The purpose of the program is to prepare persons to enter employment
in semi-skilled service, technical, and semi-professional occupations. It
is not designed as a means of obtaining credit for a baccalaureate or higher
degree but as a means to immediate employment.







These programs may be offered in adult and evening classes, an area
vocational school, a technical school, or a community or junior college.
The curriculum will include a sequence of home economics and related
courses designed to develop the knowledge, skills, techniques, and
understandings a student needs for a career in a chosen field. The courses
may be job-related instruction or occupational proficiency instruction.


Out-of-School Youth and Adults


These programs are designed for students who are not enrolled in a
high school, although they may not have a high school diploma. The purpose
of the program is to help those who:

...Have ability with additional education to advance in the occupational
area in which they are employed;

...Need to improve skills used in present jobs;

...Need new or additional abilities to adjust to technological
changes in their occupational area;

...Are presently employed in jobs which are becoming limited or
obsolete as a result of changes in production methods, international
markets, consumer demands, and/or economic conditions.

Courses may be offered in adult or evening classes, in an area
vocational school, a technical school, a community or junior college,
or in special divisions of colleges and universities. Programs are usually
less than 900 hours but are planned to be of any duration needed to achieve
specific job skills. They are offered at times and places convenient to
encourage those needing training or retraining.


Special Needs Students


The purpose of the programs is to provide remedial education which will
help persons who are socially, culturally, or economically deprived. The
courses are varied to meet the needs of the individuals within the group;
consequently class enrollments are limited to provide as much individual
attention as possible. Some examples of special needs students are:

...Physically handicapped;

...Emotionally handicapped;

...Academically limited or disinterested;

...Potential drop-outs;

...Unwed and teenage mothers;

...Minority groups;

...Disadvantaged adults.







TEACHER QUALIFICATIONS AND CERTIFICATION


No person who does not hold a valid Florida certificate can be
employed in any instructional capacity as a regular or part-time teacher
in the public schools of Florida.1 Detailed certification information is
available in the publication, Florida Requirements for Teacher Certification.2
The county personnel office has persons qualified to interpret and
recommend certification requirements.

Although a person may fulfill all the certification requirements,
additional qualifications need to be evaluated for potential teachers of
wage-earning courses. Energetic, confident, and eager teachers are needed.
Since wage-earning programs are relatively new, the teacher will need
flexibility, initiative, and resourcefulness. Being able to organize time
in and out of school is vitally important to the success of the program
because much time is needed outside the classroom to cooperate with
community businesses and agencies.

It may be necessary to upgrade and expand professional abilities with
in-service training. It is strongly recommended that consideration be given
to enrolling in a State Department of Education or county workshop, a home
economics adult education skills course or a university extension of summer
course. It is advisable before enrolling in workshops to check whether
extension of certificate credit is available through the county Master Plan.
If not, an amendment to the Master Plan can be filed through the appropriate
channels requesting permission to include specific workshops for credit.
Knowledge and experience in the business or industrial world is invaluable;
consequently, a teacher may wish to work part-time at a related job to
become occupationally competent.


Secondary Programs3

The accepted State teacher certification for each identified home
economics wage-earning course is as follows:

Child Care, Guidance and Services
Home Economics Cooperative Child Care, Guidance and Services
Vocational Home Economics
Early Childhood Education

Clothing Management, Production and Services
Home Economics Cooperative Clothing Management, Production and Services
Vocational Home Economics
Vocational Homemaking Education
General Home Economics


IFlorida State Department of Education, Florida Statues. Florida School
Law (Tallahassee, Florida: 1969), Sec. 231.14, p. 1109.

2Florida, State Department of Education. Florida Requirements for
Teacher Certification (Tallahassee, Florida: 1968).

3The Accreditator. Vol. IX, No. 2 (1970-71), 55.




Home Economics Cooperative Food Management, Production and Services
Vocational Home Economics
School Food Service
Quantity Food
General Home Economics

Home Furnishings, Equipment and Services
Home Economics Cooperative Home Furnishings, Equipment and Services
Vocational Home Economics
Vocational Homemaking Education
General Home Economics

Institutional and Home Management and Supportive Services
Home Economics Cooperative Institutional and Home Management and Supportive
Services
Vocational Home Economics
Vocational Homemaking Education
General Home Economics

Orientation to Occupational Home Economics
Home Economics Comprehensive Cooperative
Vocational Home Economics
Vocational Homemaking Education
General Home Economics


Adult Education Programl

Child Care, Guidance and Services
Vocational Home Economics
Early Childhood Education
General Home Economics

Clothing Management, Production and Services
Vocational Home Economics
Vocational Homemaking Education
General Home Economics

Food Management, Production and Services
Vocational Home Economics
School Food Service
Quantity Food
General Home Economics
Vocational Homemaking Education

Home Furnishings, Equipment and Services
Vocational Home Economics
Vocational Homemaking Education
General Home Economics

Institutional and Home Management and Supportive Services
Vocational Home Economics
Vocational Homemaking Education
General Home Economics

Orientation to Occupational Home Economics
Vocational Home Economics
Vocational Homemaking Education
General Home Economics

lIbid., 102.







PROCEDURES FOR IMPLEMENTING A WAGE-EARNING HOME ECONOMICS PROGRAM


Some suggested guidelines have been developed for implementing a home
economics wage-earning program at any level. Detailed information on some
of these procedures will be discussed after the following checklist:

Make an evaluation of the current total home economics program.

Accumulate ideas for home economics wage-earning programs by reading
current publications, talking with knowledgeable people, and visiting
operating programs.

Request help from wage-earning program planning consultants.

Organize an advisory committee.

Collect and analyze occupational survey data.

Collect and analyze student-interest survey data.

Develop relevant curriculum.

Establish criteria for selecting students.

Determine class size.

Determine class credit.

Plan class schedules.

Plan facilities.

List supplies and equipment.

Apply for available funds.

Organize a wage-earning youth club program

_ Organize a publicity campaign.

Evaluate the implemented program.

Place graduates in jobs.

Conduct follow-up studies.


PROGRAM PLANNING CONSULTANTS

Each of the following persons can be of assistance in any phase
of planning a wage-earning program: (If they cannot give the specific
help requested, they will make a reference to another source of help.)







...The School Principal;


...The County Supervisor of Home Economics Education;

...The County Director of Vocational Education;

...The State Department of Education Home Economics Area Supervisor;

...The State Department of Education Home Economics Occupational
Consultant.

The number of persons involved in planning at the county level is
dependent upon the structure of the county personnel system. It is advisable
to contact all county and school personnel who will be involved or will
be affected by a wage-earning home economics program, but they will be more
willing to give their cooperation and approval if they have received
information periodically.

It is necessary for the wage-earning home economics teacher to be
involved in all phases of planning.


ADVISORY COMMITTEES


Advisory committees provide a vital communication link between the
community and the school. The membership is composed of educators and
representative laymen who are recognized experts in their own fields of
business. They help school personnel plan education programs based upon
the needs of the community.

Purposes

An advisory committee serves in a consultative capacity. The members
do not determine education policy or make educational decisions. Some
purposes of an advisory committee may be:

...To recommend the occupations for which training programs should
be offered;

...To assist in planning curriculum based upon competencies required in
the job;

...To review course plans and recommend up-dating procedures;

...To help with course evaluation;

...To recommend proper equipment and materials;

...To give information about local codes, laws, and regulations;

iThe State Department of Education personnel can be contacted by
addressing them at the Knott Building, Tallahassee, Florida 32304.








...To assist in clarifying and strengthening relationships with
potential employers;

...To assist with placement of students for on-the-job training and
of graduates;

...To assist in interpreting the program to the general public;

...To protect the program from community pressure and criticism;

...To actively support the program.


Membership


The committee members are selected by the school personnel. It is
important to obtain a list of the county policies for organizing advisory
committees. If there are no county policies, the following procedure is
suggested:

...Secure the names of persons who are important as employers, managers,
and employees in the field to be represented by the advisory committee;

...Submit a list of recommended names to the principal for approval.
(A county may require school board approval for appointment.);

...Write a letter for the superintendent's, vocational director's,
or principal's signature inviting each individual personally to
serve as a member of the advisory committee.1

...Compile a list of those persons who have accepted membership.

It is advisable to ask school guidance personnel and curriculum
specialist to serve as members, but the principal is usually used as an
advisor rather than a committee member.

Individuals may be asked to serve a specified length of time. Member-
ship should be rotated in some manner. If at the end of a year members have
not attended or have not served effectively, a letter thanking them for
their help should be written and someone secured to replace them. When
any new person is to be added, the same procedure should be followed as
when the committee was originally formed. If a member has been active and
performed satisfactorily, they may be continued on the committee by mutual
agreement or by writing a letter asking them to serve another year.

Meetings

At the first meeting, clarify the role of a committee member. Schedule
meetings as needed to keep the members informed of the progress of the
program and to seek their advise in the areas in which they are capable of
rendering service. A written record of minutes of the meetings should be
filed for future reference. The wage-earning teacher often acts as the
secretary. A progress report should be prepared and distributed to the
committee members at the end of each year.2

ISee Appendix 2 for Sample of Letter to Prospective Advisory Committee
Members.
2See Appendix 3 for Checklist for Organizing Advisory Committees.







OCCUPATIONAL SURVEYS


Wage-earning programs should be established only when studies indicate
that employment opportunities are available. However, since the population
tends to be mobile, consideration should also be given to the possibility
of qualified workers finding employment in other communities upon completion
of a wage-earning course. An occupational survey is essential to secure
information on the local level which can be used to verify the need for
vocational programs as well as to serve as a basis for program planning.
Occupational survey data are also included in an area or State summary
to be used for program planning on a broader basis. With the increased
emphasis on justification for vocational funding by the State Legislature,
supportive evidence of community needs is a necessity.

A questionnaire is used to obtain occupational data.1 It can be
mailed to an individual or a business with an accompanying cover letter
which explains its purpose and identifies the sponsoring agency. A
telephone call in advance of mailing can be helpful because employers
may be beseiged with so many requests of this kind that the questionnaire
may be ignored or answered in a limited manner.

It may be preferable to use a personal interview rather than a
mailing. The interviewer schedules an appointment with the employer.
Since the interviewer is able to explain fully the purposes of the survey
and the kind of information desired on the questionnaire, the data are
usually more accurate and complete than obtained when the questionnaire
is mailed. Although the interview involves less work for the employer, it
involves more time for the school system. Also it can be expensive if the
interviewers receive reimbursement for their time and travel.

The question should be worded carefully so each employer interprets
them in the same manner. Care should be given not to request information
which will never be analyzed, but it is also important to include all the
necessary information so that employers will not be subjected to more than
one survey. The format of the questionnaire should lend itself to tabulation
with a minimum of secretarial work.2

The information considered necessary usually can be divided into four
categories:

...Present and potential employment opportunities for occupational
categories including replacement and growth needs;

...The number and type of employed workers who need training to up-date
and/or upgrade skills and knowledge;

...The knowledge, skills, abilities, and personal qualities needed
by the worker for employment and/or promotion;


1A recommended source of information is Olive A. Hall's Research Handbook
for Home Economics (Minneapolis, Minnesota: Burgess Publishing Company, 1967).

2See Appendix 4 for Sample of Occupational Survey Questionnaire.







...The requirements, qualifications, policies, practices, and
conditions of the job.

Various agencies and businesses in the community may have already
collected data which they will make available to the school system. Contact
health and welfare agencies, representatives of business and professional
groups, organized business and professional associations, the Chamber of
Commerce, and the local industrial development council. Local and State
employment agencies may have an occupational analyst who will assist with
determining necessary data to be sought, analyzing data to establish
need for programs, and organizing the findings to make them useful in
program planning. Members of the advisory committee may be willing to
assist in conducting surveys, or they may have surveys available from their
businesses. Also, the local newspapers may have employment information.
The telephone directory is useful in making a compilation of businesses.

Blank survey forms offer a simple means of tallying the data. Tally
sheets may be prepared using the outline from the questionnaire.

The school administrators, home economics personnel, and the advisory
committee members should study the information compiled from the
survey and then determine whether home economics wage-earning programs
are needed by the community and, if so, which kinds of programs would best
fulfill the community's needs.

Their decisions should be based upon the following considerations:

...Size of community;

...Population mobility;

...Economic conditions;

...Needs of businesses and industry;

...Job opportunities;

...Needs of special groups;

...Availability of qualified teachers;

...Facilities;

...Resources;

...Available funds;

...Public attitudes;

...Interested students.


STUDENT RECRUITMENT

Once the occupational survey data establish employment opportunities,
effort can be concentrated upon student recruitment. The success of any
wage-earning program is related to the interest, aptitude, and attitude







of the students. One means of securing information about these three
factors is through pupil-interest surveys. Potential trainees may be
screened and recommended for a wage-earning program by persons such as
home economics teachers, guidance counselors, principals, deans, special
needs teachers, vocational rehabilitation personnel, cooperative
education coordinators, or employment office personnel. An interest survey
in questionnaire form could be given to these prospective students.1

At the secondary levels it is often necessary for interested home
economics teachers to participate in active recruitment in order to interest
students in enrolling in a beginning wage earning program. Some methods
of recruitment which have been used successfully are:

...Home economics classroom discussion;

...Coordinated efforts with a sympathetic teacher of a subject area
which includes boys as well as girls;

...An active campus publicity campaign;

...Flyers explaining the course objectives and activities distributed
before student registration;

...Assembly programs;

...School and. local newspaper articles;

...Presentations to parent groups;

...The use of application forms, as applying for a job;

...Field trips to nearby programs.

Recruitment for out-of-school persons may need to be conducted
through various forms of publicity which state a place to make an appointment
for the interest survey. High school senior classes, post-secondary
classes, adult classes, employment agencies, government sponsored programs,
newspaper files, flyers in grocery stores, vocational newsletters and
program announcements may be possible sources for recruitment of out-of-
school persons.

The interest-survey information may be discussed during an interview
with the person to determine if the potential student can meet the require-
ments and qualifications for enrollment. By analyzing the data gathered
from the interest survey, a teacher can develop curriculum content which will
best fulfill the students' interests and needs.




1See Appendix 5 for Samples of Student-Interest Survey Questionnaires.

See Appendix 6 for Sample Copy of Letter Sent to Parents.

See Appendix 7 for Sample of Student Application Form.







CURRICULUM PLANNING


A plan for each training course or program to be offered should be
developed by school personnel with assistance from the advisory committee
so that the scope and emphases of the program will meet the unique needs
of the community and students as well as the requirements of the specific
occupation(s) and fit into the organizational structure of the school.
In developing a curriculum the advisory committee will usually need to
be supplemented by specialists in the curriculum area under consideration.

Steps in planning the curriculum:

...Identify the job by title;

...State the desired course objectives in terms of clear-cut behavioral
objectives based on the performance requirements of the job;

...Identify a block of time in the school schedule which will provide
entry level competencies. 180 hours should be a minimum with a
maximum of 400 or more hours;

...Plan relevant course content and teaching procedures;

...Select appropriate work experience situations and provide for
supervision of these experiences;

...Select and collect teaching materials and resources references,
films, visual aids, field trips.


Florida Vocational Home Economics Continuums


Curriculum flow-charts and continuumslhave been developed for each of
the five major home economics subject matter areas: Human Development,
Management and Family Economics, Food and Nutrition, Housing and Home
Furnishings and Textiles and Clothing. After careful study of each
continuum, it will become apparent that the ultimate goal is employability.
Since some students need wage-earning skills sooner than others, five levels
of development have been outlined for student progress through the home
economics program.

Resource guides have been developed to supplement the continuums
and are available free of charge from the Home Economics Section of the
Vocational, Technical and Adult Education Division upon request.2


Course Content

The course content for the occupational courses should be based upon


lFlorida State Department of Education, Division of Vocational, Technical
and Adult Education, Home Economics Section. Happenings in Florida Home Economics,
(Tallahassee, Florida: February, 1971), Issue 3, Volume 2.)

2See Appendix 10 for Order Blanks.








the tasks to be performed on the job. Much of the content which should be
provided is inherent within the home economics courses now being offered.
For example: on the semester level, it is possible to incorporate the
occupational skills by modifying course objectives.

The charts which follow are included to show the scope of
education in each of the subject areas and to identify the knowledge and
skills needed for the occupations which are now included in the current
curriculum. The commonalities are easily identified.






EDUCATION IN FOOD A '. NUTRITION


OCCUPATIONS

Provides competencies which include knowledge and skills H ( H + -
i 5 ( P, W
desirable for the identified occupations. &( P P





C OMPETENC IES
I. Human Relations and Communications
I.D Il' 0 ---
1, 1 P, 0 Pe


I. Human Relations and Communications


1, Acquires usuable nutritional knowledge such as:
Sthe foods needed by the body daily
Sthe classification and use of food nutrients
Nutrients provided by foods
Energy needs of the body
factors affecting nutrient needs and utilization

2. Identifies the relationship of nutrition to appearances,
health and general longivity.

3. Applies knowledge of nutrition to menu planning for:
the individual (ethnic, cultural and age difference
Sthe family ethnici, cultural and age differences)
Sfor large groups ethnici, cultural and age differ-
ences)
for specific occasions (ethnic, cultural and age
differences)

4. Identifies employment opportunities in the field of
food service.

5. Demonstrates skill in communications with representative:
of the home or institution concerning food service and
the program tasks.

6. Identifies and practices health and sanitation laws at
the local and state level which are concerned with food
production and service.

II. Equipment and Maintenance

1. Identifies the names of equipment and utencils used in
a kitchen.

2. Demonstrates efficient use of equipment and utencils
necessary in the production of food.

3. Employs safety in the use of equipment.

4. Cleans equipment by standard procedure after each use or
on an established schedule.


III.


X


5. Maintains equipment for optimum use. X X

6. Keeps files of equipment information, instruction and
warranties. X X

Consumer Practices

1. Keeps up-to-date on developments in consumer information j
and food technology X X

2. Demonstrates the practical use of consumer information
in selection and purchase of food. X X

3. Purchases food in appropriate quantity for groups to be
served. X X


XIX




x X


x x

X X


x X


X X X

X X X


X X X



X X X









X X X










X X X
x x x







x X X


X X X









X X X
x x x
jii

X j X I


I
















CONTINUED EDUCATION IN FOOD AND NUTRITION


IV. Food Principles and Techniques

1. Demonstrates effective use of terms and abbreviations
related to food preparation.

2. Demonstrates ability to measure basic ingredients
accurately.

3. Demonstrates the ability to read and follow a variety
of recipes.

4. Demonstrates the ability to utilize appropriate food
preparation techniques and cooking temperatures based
on the principles of food preparation.

5. Estimates amounts of food to prepare for various size
groups.

6. Uses convenience foods when practical and appropriate.

7. Utilizes foods in season.

8. Exhibits creativeness in using left over foods, commodity
foods and other food products which might be donated.

V. Menu Planning and Food Service

1. Plans varied menus so that food is appetizing and
attractive.

2. Plans varied menus to demonstrate use of time and energy|
in food preparation.

3. Demonstrates the ability to set a table correctly

4. Demonstrates the ability to arrange food attractively
for serving

5. Demonstrates the ability to serve a table correctly

6. Demonstrates skill in serving food attractively in a
variety of settings for different occasions, groups
and numbers.

VI. Management

1. Practices safety habits in the production and service
of quality foods

2. Arrange equipment, utencils and supplies for convenience
to work rhythm

3. Uses equipment, utencils and supplies appropriate for
specific job

4. Plans work in sequence of tasks

5. Assesses own work methods and modifies them in keeping!
with work simplification principles

6. Plans shopping trips to best utilize time and energy

7. Keeps essential records

8. Arranges dry food storage for convenience, according to
criteria for safety and sanitation

9. Arranges refrigerated foods for convenience, according
to criteria for safety and sanitation
L
10


t (D tY
(D IPDP

11 PI
at IHH -'

M
) CD
iH* a

m (n
r
on r
c+ rit
(D


X X




X x





X X




x x



x x
X x


X x


X X X X X X X


X X X X X X XX






D c+ P (DHC D 1 CJc 00
SCONTINUEDD EDUCATION IN FOOD AND NUTRITION
5 $ P- r r H (1 Pi H
P i P, F, t II- H- C 1- a (D




SPlans the use of time so both persona, family and job ,





needs are met. X X X X X X X X
VII. Employability and Job Opportunitieso
Identifies personal qualities which contribute to success X X X X X X
P U, (D 0 B D I
3. Analyzes employment opportunities in relation to hours,




















4. Identifies dress appropriate for persons working in food
c+- (D 0 1D Nc+p
CONTINUED EDUCATION IN FOOD AND NUTRITION



10. Plans the use of time so both personal, family and job
needs are met. X X X X X X X X

VII. Employability and Job Opportunities

1. Identifies personal qualities which contribute to success X X X X X X X X

2. Identifies available employment opportunities in food and
nutrition using home style kitchen equipment X X X X X X X

3. Analyzes employment opportunities in relation to hours,
responsibilities, facilities, wages and benefits X X X X X X X X

4. Identifies dress appropriate for persons working in food
service .X X X X X X X

5. Exhibits positive employee-employer and employer-employee
relationships X X X X X X X

6. Prepares for job interview X X X X X X X


/ I i








EDUCATION IN FOOD MANAGEMENT, PRODUCTION AND SERVICES


Provides competencies which include knowledge and

skills desirable for the identified occupations in

programs using quantity food services.




C OMPETENC IES

I. Human Relations and Communications

1. Acquire usable knowledge and skills in Food Management
Production and Services to make one more employable

2. Applies knowledge and skills gained in seeking
employment

3. Demonstrates effective use of vocabulary for food
service workers

4. Practices safety habits in the production and service
of quality foods in quantity

5. Demonstrates health and sanitation laws at the local
and State level which are concerned with food
management, production and service

6. Demonstrates skill in communications with fellow
employees, supervisors and employers

7. Demonstrates work skills as prescribed by the tasks

II. Equipment and Maintenance

1. Demonstrates efficient use of equipment necessary in
the production of food in large quantities

2. Employs safety in use of equipment

3. Cleans equipment by standard procedures after each
use or on an established schedule

4. Maintains equipment for optimum use

Keeps files of equipment information, instructions
and warranties

III. Quantity Food Preparation

1. Estimates amounts of food to prepare for various size
groups

2. Displays skill in preparing quality food in quantity

3. Demonstrates the ability to utilize appropriate food
preparation techniques based on principles of food
preparation

4. Exhibits creativeness in using leftover foods, commo-
dity foods and other food products which might be
donated

IV. Meal Planning and Services

1. Plans varied menus so that food is appetizing and nu-
tritionally suitable for different clientele

2. Exhibits skill in the use of methods-or preparation
and cooking time to conserve food value, color, texture
and flavor in a variety of foods
I


X X


X X


X X


X X



X X


XIX

X X





X X

X X


X X

X X


x
X






x
X X



X X



X X



X





x1


X


X


X


X





X

X

X



X



X
X

X





X



X


X


Lx


OC CU PAT ION S

o ao -jnw oa N
S03 0 0 P POP
IF c o (D 7 0 H_ 3 & Pr
0(1 (D P' c+ O P 0 00o
ji 0-. (D 0 y 0 t 0o
(D (D O c1 0) + PcD (D H (D H(D
S o P '. D o 0 o i
0 ( 0 h( c 0 -11
o 0 O PH. D M U 0
S 0 H-' c+0 H &'d&0
0 H. I 0 c C+ 0C

( P- 0 (D
to
___ __ p- __ !' m __ H _















CONTINUED EDUCATION IN FOOD MANAGEMENT, PRODUCTION AND SERVICES


___ -I __ _


5. Exhibits positive employee-employer
employee relationships


and employer-


I


Fl. 0 P.'


(D
00 a


o0 H


0
(D' to
HC?.
F


0 0 P0 o0

a 0 00
o a) o i

H 0 H



1'g g or


3. Demonstrates skill in maintaining cost control records
for special diets

Management

1. Analyzes employment opportunities in relation to hours
responsibilities, facilities,wages and benefits

2. Uses equipment & supplies appropriate for specific job

3. Utilizes foods in season

4. Plans work in sequence of tasks

5. Arranges equipment & supplies for convenience to work
rhythm

6. Assesses own work methods and modifies them in keeping
with work simplification principles

7. Keeps records essential to job operation

8. Plans the use of time so that both personal & job
needs are met

9. Plans varied menus to demonstrate use of time and
energy in food preparation

10. Demonstrates efficiency in pre-preparation and prepar-
ation of a variety of dishes

11. Arranges dry food storage for convenience, according
to criteria for safety and sanitation

12. Arranges refrigerated foods for convenience, according
to criteria for safety and sanitation

13. Employs portion control in food service

14. Arranges food attractively for serving

15. Arranges food dishes attractively on table, buffet or
serving line

16. Demonstrates ability to keep records including stock
inventory and others

17. Demonstrates ability to issue stock and keep records

18. Schedules tasks & activities according to stated
criteria or workload

19. Supervises & coordinates activities of workers engaged
in preparing, cooking and serving food

20. Estimates daily or weekly needs & orders food supplies
and equipment

Employability and Job Opportunities

1. Identifies personal qualities which contribute to succ
ess in the field of Food Management,Production & arvi

2. Identifies available employment opportunities in Food
Management, Production and Service

3. Analyzes employment opportunities in relation to hours
responsibilities, facilities, wages and benefits
4. Identifies dress appropriate for persons working in
food service


e X X X X X X X

X X X X X X Y X


X X X X X
x! x x1 xI x x

xi X x x x X


''


Is~---tf~tpb=


i i = '


xIx







EDUCATION IN HOUSING AND HOME FURNISHINGS


OCCUPATIONS

Provides competencies which include knowledge and skills 4 U > u B > IH 0a
desirable for the identified occupations.
desirable for the identified occupations. IO '-kI C)


COMPETENCE I ES


I. Human Relations and Communications

1. Acquires usable knowledge of family, community and
national housing problems and how they are being met

2. Identifies the relationship of housing to one's own
needs, and needs of others

3. Identifies employment opportunities related to the
broad field of housing and home furnishings

4. Identifies local, state and federal roles in housing
codes and regulatory legislation

5. Demonstrates skill in communications with representative
of the housing and home furnishings industry

II. Selection of Housing

1. Analyzes factors which influence the form and use of
housing selected by individuals and families
size of family
age of family members
income
Roles
values and goals
Environment
Mobility of people

2. Applies this knowledge to a variety of life. styles and
resources.

3. Relates these analyses of housing needs to a variety of
opportunities available in housing and home furnishings
occupations


nome Finance

1. Seeks reliable information to better understand the
decision-making processes as related to the financing
of housing. !

2. Acquires some knowledge of financial policies, procedures
and costs. X

3. Develops an interest in continuous learning in relation
to housing costs and methods of financing X

4. Keeps up to date on current building construction
techniques as related to cost and durability of housing X

5. Demonstrates the practical use of consumer education
information X


1. Identifies the factors involved in selecting equipment
and furnishings for a variety of life styles





36


x
X



X



X






x


x
x
x
x
X
X
X


X




X


X


' x


x x
X X
x x
x x
x X
x x
X X


X X



x X






X x


X X X X


X X XI X


X X X X X X





X X X X X X X
I


III.


T~~ "~~"~


IV. Equipment and F s


"r 7







So0 o a
C c0 ( 0 H.( .4 p


(COIUED EDUCATION IN HOUSING AND HOME FURNISHINGS 0 ( c .
choices of equipment 1 furnishings X X X X
H_ UP ( S d- H>
0 4. Develops an interest in cu (rrent styles, trends, improved
through (the+ use of consumer education X X X
S 0 0 (B


arrangements and accessories to harmonize with the use
CONTINUED EDUCATION IN HOUSING AND HOME FURNISHINGS C


2. Applies an understanding of factors which influence the
choices of equipment and furnishings X X X X X X X X

3. Demonstrates effective use of the elements and art
principles of design and color as related to equipment
and furnishings X X X X X X X X

4. Develops an interest in current styles, trends, improved
features and durability of equipment and furnishings


5. Develops the ability to plan background areas, furniture
arrangements and accessories to harmonize with the use
of given rooms, resources and life styles X X X X X X X

V. Home Management and Maintenance

1. Applies management principles in maintenance and use
of housing X X X X X X X X

2. Recognizes the relationship of use and care to the
appearance and safety of housing and to the cost of
maintenance and repair. X X X X X X X

VI. Skills in Constructing Home Furnishings

1. Demonstrates skill in measuring for and applying apropi-
ate methods and techniques of construction for:
.draperies and curtains X X X X
.bedspreads' X X X X X
*slipcovers X X X X
7 reupholstery X X X
.accessories X X X X

2. Demonstrates the ability to identify,select, manage,
manipulate and care for fabrics, tools of the trade,
and equipment X X X X

3. Demonstrates the ability to operate and care for power
machines in making cording, seams, pleats, hems, lining
and weights X X X X

4. Demonstrates skill in pressing techniques and use of
pressing equipment X X X X

5. Employs safety in the use of power and steam equipment X X X X

6. Recognizes the importance of good workmanship X X X X X X

7. Figures the cost for job orders in relation to time,
skill and materials needed. X X X X X

VII. Employability and Job Opportunities

1. Identifies personal qualities which contribute to
success in the field of housing and home furnishings X X X I X X XX

2. Identifies available employment opportunities in the
housing and home furnishings field X X X X X X X

3. Analyzes employment opportunities in relation to hours,
responsibilities, facilities, wages and benefits X X X X X X X

4. Identifies contribution of home and family to one's
employability X X X X X X X

5. Exhibits positive employee-employer and employer-
employee relationships X X XIX X XI X

6. Prepares for job interview X X X X X X X






EDUCATION IN HUMAN DEVELOPMENT


OCCU PAT IONS

(D Ii Fi I F J
) Pi cf- 0 (D ,4 1t;
p 1 tj p "4 a < t (D i O Pt0 n
Provides competencies which include knowledge and skills t M R 0 1

desirable for the identified occupations. H 0


SOMPE
COME T E N C I E S c+


I. Human Relations and Communications

1. Keeps up to date on developments in early childhood
education

2. Demonstrates cognitive skills regarding the develop-
mental tasks of young children

3. Identifies factors that affect, and principles that per-
tain to child growth and development

4. Exhibits ways of helping children develop emotional
security

5. Identifies employment opportunities in the field of
child care services

6. Demonstrates skill in communications with representa-
tives of the home concerning the children and the
program tasks

7. Relates factors that effect, and principles that pertain
to child growth and development to self.

II. Skills In Child Care, Guidance and Service

1. Uses equipment and supplies appropriate to child care
activities

2. Demonstrates the use of safety precautions in child
care activities

3. Schedules tasks and activities according to stated
criteria

4. Arranges equipment according to the special needs of
the children, the various activities, and the existing
facility

5. Uses criteria for evaluating self and observing children

6. Keeps relevant and accurate records essential to the
operation of a child care program

7. Prepares food for the children and provides direction
and assistance while they are eating

8. Assists children as they meet their needs for clean-
liness, resting and toileting

9. Dresses children or assists them as they dress them-
selves

10. Provides proper aid for children'who become ill or
injured

11. Demonstrates skills in reading and telling stories
to children


X X' X X













CONTINUED EDUCATION IN HUMAN DEVELOPMENT
12. Directs children in painting, drawing and other hand- -













13. Provides direction for children to develop good habits
in caring for clothing, toys and environment X X X R
14. servesonits play a s X X X D 4
H .U PI (D K ODCI(DP
15. Performs clean-up in carng for facilities and equip-0
cmt X X X

+small children X X X

CONTINUED EDUCATION IN HUMAN DEVELOPMENT C+



12. Directs children in painting, drawing and other hand-
works X X X X X X X X

13. Provides direction for children to develop good habits
in caring for clothing, toys and environment X X X X X X X X

14. Observes, organizes and monitors play activities X X X X X X X X

15. Performs clean-up in carLng for facilities and equip-
ment X X X X X X X X
16. Keeps records concerning behavior and progress of
individual children X X X X X X

17. Maintains discipline X X X X X X X X

III. Employability and Job Opportunities

1. Identifies dress appropriate for persons working with
small children X X X X X X X X

2. Lists reasons why it is important that persons working
with small children comply with local and state health
regulations X X X X X X X X

3. Demonstrates verbal and non-verbal communication skills
that are desirable when working with young children X X X X X X X X

4. Relates contribution of one's home and family to one's
employability X X X X X X X X

5. Demonstrates skill in managing both personal income and
business funds X X X X X X X X

6. Plans the use of time so that both personal and job nees
are met X X X X X X X X

7. Exhibits both verbal and non-verbal skill during a job
interview X X X X X X X X

8. Exhibits positive employer-employee and employee-employ r
relationships X X X X X X X X

9. Prepares for job interview X X X X X

























38B
J _____








EDUCATION IN INSTITUTIONAL AND HOME MANAGEMENT AND SUPPORTIVE SERVICES


OCCUPATIONS


i o ^ Co SW s
Provides competencies which include knowledge and skills W' o 5

desirable for the identified occupations. c (- "N
U O0 c -
^C 5 C H' (B3-i(
H P
(D P- (D
COMPETENCIES o


I. Human Relations and Communications

1. Acquires usable knowledge of family, community and
national housing problems and how they are being met. X X X X X X X X

2. Identifies the relationship of decision-making and the XI X X X X X X
establishment of priorities to management of housing problems

3. Identifies employment opportunities in the field of
institutional and home management and supportive services X X X X X X X

4. Demonstrates skills in communications with employers and
co-workers. X X X X X X X

II. Housekeeping Technology

1. Demonstrates skills in making the environment more
attractive X X X X X X X

2. Acquires usable knowledge and skills in the use of
various cleaning agents for identified housekeeping
tasks. X X X X X X X

3. Acquires usable knowledge and skills in the care and
use of various cleaning tools and equipment for iden-
tified housekeeping tasks X X X X X X

4. Keeps up to date on developments of improved cleaning
agents through consumer education information X X X X X X

III. Management of time and resources

1. Identifies management problems that relate to housekeeping X X X X X X

2. Establishes a routine procedure for various cleaning
tasks X 'X X X X X

3. Organizes a housekeeping work schedule in sequence of
tasks to be performed for efficient use of time and
resources X X X X x X X

4. Selects cleaning tools appropriate to the tasks and
organizes them for convenience of use X X X X X X X

5. Demonstrates safety procedures and practices in perform-
ing housekeeping tasks X X X X X X X

6. Assesses own work methods and modifies them in keeping
with work simplification principles. I X X X X X X X

IV. Basic Laundry Procedures

1. Identifies the procedures for home laundry X X X X X X

2. Demonstrates technique of spot and stain removal on a
variety of fabrics X X X X X X

3. Makes minor repairs before laundering XI X X X X

4. Demonstrates washing and ironing techniques for a
variety of fabrics and garments X Ii X X X X
39 A






0 0 0


c+ 0n e i d

V. Child Care During Mother's Absence en en







mental tasks of young children X X


2. Identifies factors that affect, and principles that
security X









4. Demonstrates the use of safety precautions in child care
0 Activities











5. Assists children through their daily routine of activi-
ties and maintains discipline X X

VI. Food for the Family
Applies knowledge of nutrition to menu planing
CONTINUED INSTITUTIONAL AND HOME MANAGEMENT AND SUPPORTIVE SERVICES P HP













2. Demonstrates sanitar y practices for washing garments by handling X X X X X

3. Keeps the During Mother's Absequient and utensils clean and












sanitary X I X I X X
1. Demonstrates cognitive skills regarding thtilize appropriate food













preparation techniques and cooking temperatures based on
the principlental tasks of young childreparation X X

2. Serves meals attractively affect, and principles that
VII. Providing g C are for the Elderly and Disablednt

3. AcquExhibits ways of helping characterisn devtics associated with
security X














2. Identify physical and emotional needs of the aged and
disabled X X X X
Demonstrates the extent of help needed by the agin child care
disabled in daily activities X

5. Acquire skts chills needed in providing care for thoutine elderlof activi-
and ties and maintains discipline X X

VI. ployability and Job Oppod ortuitiesor the Family
















1. Identifies personal qualities which contribute to success
1. App lie s knowledge of nutritional and homenu planagement and X X X
supp2. D demonstrate sanitary practices in handling food X X X X

2. Identifies available, employment and uopportunities icean the















field of institutional and home management and sup-
sanrtive services X X X X X

Demonstrates employmthe ability to uti lize appropriate foodurs,
reparation technique s and cooking temperatures based on
the. Identifies contribution of home and fami X
5. Serves meals attractively and on schedule X X X X X
VII. Providing Care for the Elderly and Disabled

1. Acquire knowledge of the characteristics associated with I
aging X X X X













Idenhibits positive eal loyee-eloyer and employotional needs of the aged and
disabled X X X X

3. Analyze the extent of help needed by the aging and










disabled in daily activities relationships X X X X X
4. Acquire skills needed in providing care for the elderly
and disabled X X X X X

VIII. Employability and Job Opportunities

1. Identifies personal qualities which contribute to success I
in the field of institutional and home management and j







6. Prepares for job inte X X X X X X X










39 B
2. Identifies available employment opportunities in the I
field of institutional and home management and sup-
portive services X X' X X X i X X

3. Analyzes employment opportunities in relation to homrs,
responsibilities,-facilities, wages and benefits X X X X X X X


employability X' X X X X X X

5. Exhibits positive employee-employer and employer-
employee relationships X X X X X X

6. Prepares for job interview X X X X X X ; X


39 B I i







EDUCATION IN TEXTILES AND CLOTHING


OCCUPATIONS

0 C ) 2 n y o 0 22C

Provides competencies which include knowledge and skills P c M
S- P U PE (N + S (1-
desirable for the identified occupations. r W (D a a 02 0
a a j I- a P Il-H



C OM P E T E N C I ES S a 01 "


I. Human Relations and Communications

1. Acquire usable knowledge and skills in textiles and
clothing to improve ones self image

2. Applies knowledge and skills in textiles and clothing
to employment opportunities

3. Demonstrates skill in communications with those
employed in the clothing services trade and industry

II. Textile Identification

1. Defines, classifies and identifies fibers

2. Defines fabric and identifies quality

3. Identifies various kinds of fabric construction

4. Identifies coloring processes of fabric and tests for
color fastness

5. Identifies labeling laws pertaining to fibers and
fabrics

6. Identifies fabric finishes

7. Identifies desirable ways for testing, using and car-
ing for a variety of fabrics

III. Function of Design and Color

1. Identifies the use of functional and decorative design
in selected clothing

2. Demonstrates use of art principles in design

3. Defines color and analyzes the role of color in
clothing

IV. Wardrobe Selection

1. Relates the effects of clothing to behavior

2. Reacts to the role of fads and fashion

3. Formulates a wardrobe buying plan

V. Textile Care and Maintenance

1. Demonstrates technique of spot and stain removal on
a variety of fabrics

2. Demonstrates washing and ironing techniques for a
variety of fabrics and garments
3. Determines needed repairs, alterations, or recondition-
ing of constructed items

4. Demonstrates skills in repairs, alterations, and remod-
eling of garments,and other constructed items

5. Demonstrate storage methods suitable for a variety of
wearing apparel


X i X





Hd CD 0 F; 0M -d sC


rt I
fl (B O P(I 0 P C W
30.) E U e b d ;m a a v o a
Ca Ue bod e r n tasX


CONTINUED EDUCATION IN TEXTILES AND CLOTHING i (D & P n H l
1 .* (E f m h of c+i o t i Xm XB

t 0 Dm P a






1. Identifies figure types X X x X X

2. Takes accurate bodymeasurementX X X X X X X











VII. Construction Techniques



2. Demonstrate skil in use f pattern, cutting, stay-X X X X X X X
3V Pess body measureents o t X X









4. Demons trbody measuremte use of a variety of pressing toolarments X X X X X X

2. Demonstrates press as you sew technique X X X

Demonstratifies key grain linchniques in pressing X X X X X X X
VI. Construcanagement & Economics


















1. EUses equipment & supplies appropriate for specific job X X x x X
2. smplays acetoy methods of ting nt tin X X X X X X X













4. Keeps up to date on conume r information X X X X X X
5. Demonstrate skill in supplies ptteron, vincutt sta
6. stithingsesses aown worse methods & & sea mo finishesz them in keepracings,












with wor fasi ificaion X X X X X X X

VII P aluate s cst of Techn sains in onstrti
armentts the se o r of lapressig X X X X X X X













8. Keeps records essential to job operation X x X
2. Demonstrates pskil in u semaai pterschn inoiu e
us3oness fnste nie in eing X X X X X X X













10. Plans the use of time so that both personal & job need
are met prx a xo s X X X
2. Displays safety in use of equipment X X X X X X X X

3. Plans work in sequence of tasks X X X X X X X X

4. Keeps up to date on consumer information X X X X X X X X












2. ArraIdentifies available employment spplopportunities inconvenience to work
clothing & textiles field X X X X X X
3. Analyzes e employment opportunity ies in relation keepingto hours
respw ith work simplification principles and benefit X X X X X X X

4. Identifies contribution of home and family to one'sring
garments or cost of labor X X X X X X X X
8. Keeps records essential to job operation X X X X X X X

9. Demonstrates skill in managing personal income &
business funds X X X X X X X X

10. Plans the use of time so that both personal & job need;
are met x X X X X X X X

X. Employability and Job Opportunities

1. Identifies personal qualities which contribute to
success in t-he field of clothing & textiles X X X X X X X

2. Identifies available employment opportunities in the
clothing & textiles field X X X X X XI X

3. Analyzes employment opportunities in relation to hours, i i
responsibilities, facilities, wages and benefits X1 X X X X

4. Identifies contribution of home and family to one's
employability Xi X X X X! X X








Home Economics Cooperative Method
= LIII


The cooperative home economics program provides effective on-the-job
training correlated with related and supplemental classroom instruction.
It is an integral part of the school curriculum which utilizes the
business and industrial establishments of the community as training agencies.
The student receives instruction which includes academic courses and related
home economics instruction coupled with a job in a home economics related
occupation. The experiences must be planned and supervised by the school
personnel and employers so that each contributes to the student's education
and employability. The teacher teaches how, and the coordinator teaches
why.

As with other types of wage-earning programs, the cooperative
education program aids in developing student interests, attitudes, aptitudes,
and abilities; consequently it aids in preventing dropouts. Other advantages
are:

...It provides for educational experiences relevant to planned
life-work;

...It aids in the integration of academic work with vocational training;

...It creates self-respect for students by providing earning
opportunities;

...It provides for growth and development of students because of work
association with adults;

...It prevents the necessity of building many expensive laboratory
facilities and buying equipment;

...It provides an opportunity for good public relations.

The employer finds it advantageous that the student comes to the job
with basic skills. It is economical for the employer if he needs part-time
help; plus, the student is a prospective full-time employee who has been
trained within his business establishment. The program aids in tying
students to the community as well as helping supply a work force.

Employment possibilities in cooperative education programs are
obtained from occupational surveys as in other wage-earning programs.
The advisory committee is essential for successful programs based upon
community and business and industrial needs. A student's individual
career objectives are always considered in planning related study of
academic and home economics courses with the accepted training station.
The step-by-step approach is used to present a logical skill development
pattern.

The coordinator should:

...Obtain work permits for all students under eighteen years of age;








...Check with the State Department of Labor representative about
hazardous jobs;

...Request permission to place student if a sub-minimum wage is paid;l

...Consult a labor representative about just wages for students;

...Consider the employer of cooperative students as a fellow teacher.

Florida State guidelines for implementing home economics cooperative
methods programs may be obtained free of charge from the Home Economics
Section of the Vocational, Technical and Adult Education Division.2


Florida Vocational Home Economics Wage-Earning Guides


The following curriculum guides are available from the Home Economics
Section of the Vocational, Technical and Adult Education Division free of
charge for any Florida teacher wishing to implement a wage-earning program
in Florida:2

...Child Care Services: A Suggested Guide

...Clothing and Home Furnishings Services: A Suggested Guide

...Supervised Food Service: A Suggested Guide

...Homemaker Services: A Suggested Guide

...Orientation to the World of Work: A Suggested Guide

These guides will help curriculum planners write desired learning in
terms of behavioral objectives based upon the performance requirements of
the job. The guides also include details for selecting course content,
teaching procedures, work experiences, teaching materials and resources,
and evaluation techniques.


2See Appendix 10 for Order Blanks.


IWrite to U.S. Department of Labor, Wage and Hour and Public Contracts
Divisions, 1371 Peachtree Street, N.E., Room 331, Atlanta, Georgia 30309.





STUDENT SELECTION


The interest-survey information will prove valuable in determining
if a potential student can meet the requirements and qualifications for
enrollment.



Some suggested criteria for student selection are listed here.
The student should:

...Have the ability to complete the course assignments;

...Have the need for this type of education and training;

...Have the level of education needed as background for training;

...Accept the responsibility of completing the course;

...Meet the minimum age requirement for entrance into employment;

...Display interest, aptitude, and maturity necessary to succeed
in the occupation;

...If a minor, have his parents' consent to participate in wage-
earning program;

...Be willing to secure health certificate and school insurance if
required;

...Have the physical, emotional, and moral character needed for
employment upon completion of program.

Written tests should not be used as an only criterion for student
selection although the school's academic standards of passing or failing
may give indications of a student's potential progress. Vocational
counselling should be an integral part of the program both for student
selection and success after enrollment.

Students may be permanently removed from a wage-earning home economics
class at the end of a probationary period of two to four weeks or at the
end of the semester if it is recommended by the home economics teacher in
charge.


CLASS SIZE


It is suggested that classes be limited to sixteen to twenty students,
preferably a combination of boys and girls. The enrollment needs to be
small enough that the teacher has sufficient time daily to provide
individual instruction in skill development and to give adequate supervision
of work experience.

Classes for special needs students may be lowered to ten or fewer
students due to the increased demand of individualized attention per student.


CLASS CREDIT

Credit should be awarded for wage-earning home economics courses upon
the same bases used for determining credit for other courses offered
within the school system.







SCHEDULES


It is recommended that a block of time in the school schedule be
provided for the development of entry level competencies. 180 hours
should be a minimum with a maximum of 400 or more hours.

In the secondary program and full-time adult education program
the teacher is expected to devote at least four class periods daily to
classroom or laboratory instruction. The remainder of the day will be
filled with a variety of necessary activities such as:

...Planning;

...Supervising work experiences;

...Working with advisory committees, school administrators, and
local employment personnel;

...Developing curriculum, teaching procedures, and materials;

...Determining qualifications needed by trainees;

...Assisting in job placement;

...Evaluation and follow-up of trainees;

...Filing reports.

Since it is recognized that wage-earning home economics classes require
extra time, it is permissable to request a full vocational unit for a
wage-earning teacher who teaches four periods and has two planning periods.

The part-time teacher is expected to devote at least two class periods
daily to classroom or laboratory instruction and at least one hour daily
to the same activities expected of a full-time teacher.

The cooperative education teacher in home economics wage-earning
programs needs two periods daily for coordination and visitation of
students on the job. Three periods of classroom instruction and one
planning period are recommended with the two periods of coordination.


FACILITIES


Regular classrooms may be used for orientation programs, cooperative
programs, teaching basic principles, and planning related work experiences.
If a new fully equipped laboratory is not feasible at the present time, a
portable classroom or a home economics laboratory may be converted with
careful planning.

Renovation is the responsibility of the county and cannot be federally
funded. However, with a few minor changes there are a number of possibilities.
In a food laboratory one unit kitchen could be converted into a commercial
unit for quantity or fast food service. Additional electrical wiring








could make it possible to add commercial sewing machines to teach either
a clothing or home furnishing wage-earning cluster in the present sewing
laboratory. A little-used living room area could be successfully used
as it is for a homemaker's aide course or it could be converted into a
child care center laboratory.

Facilities for wage-earning home economics programs can be built with
funds appropriated for construction of secondary schools and area vocational-
technical centers. If funds for facilities for wage-earning programs on
other campuses are included in the county capital outlay funds, they will
have been consolidated into the county-wide building construction budget.
If a school plant survey indicates the need for construction, a request is
presented with the school's annual budget requests through the appropriate
county channels.

Although the architect and school administrators, with the school
board's approval, have the major responsibility for planning facilities,
the home economics teacher, with the county home economics supervisor, is
in the best position to know what is required as a facility to accomplish
the desired goals of the wage-earning program. It is the responsibility
of the home economics personnel to supply the school administrators the
information as to program function and desirable facilities. They must be
prepared to present a picture of the program by explaining the content and
objectives of the wage-earning program, the needs and interests of the
students, and the needs of the employers and community, as well as to defend
the needs and functions of specific space allocations.

This information should be presented in the form of educational
specifications which provide the architect with a clearly written descrip-
tion of the program together with the facilities needed. The specifications
should furnish a basis for working drawings for the architect. They need
to be in sufficient detail to leave no unanswered questions of an educational
nature.

The facility is a means to an end; thus it is expected that the
educational program has been planned before the preliminary planning stage
for the facilities. An educational specification precedes the
architectural plan and design.

It is important to involve key people in the planning. Members of
the advisory committee and other knowledgeable people in the community will
prove helpful in promoting creative thinking concerning present and
future needs of the department.

Professional assistance in planning may be secured from the Home
Economics Section of the Department of Education1 or from teacher educa-
tion institutions. For best results, requests for help should be made in
the initial stages of planning.


IThe Department of Education personnel can be contacted by
addressing them at the Knott Building, Tallahassee, Florida 32304.







Visiting facilities in other schools and in commercial installations
will furnish worthwhile suggestions. Other counties with wage-earning
facilities usually are willing to share copies of their educational
specifications.

A word of caution is necessary. Facilities are considered in terms
of the contributions they make to education in a wage-earning program
rather than the personal likes and dislikes of a teacher. The teacher
involved in planning must realize that other teachers will be using this
facility--perhaps over a period of fifty years! Flexibility and adaptibility
of space are important.


SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT


If additional supplies and equipment are necessary for a wage-earning
program, they must be chosen carefully to help the student develop skills.
It is imperative that careful planning be done well in advance of the date
set for the program to begin, as financial proceedings of funding and
purchasing are involved and time consuming. It is most important to use
current catalogues and price lists which are available from wholesale
companies upon request. Each supply and piece of equipment must be listed
with the unit cost, total cost, vendor (with complete address), and a
description of specific characteristics of the item if a brand is requested.
This list will expedite project writing and purchasing procedures.

Suggested equipment lists have been compiled by the Home Economics
Section of the Vocational, Technical and Adult Education Division personnel
who will also give assistance if requested.1

It is critical in financial accounting that supplies and equipment
be differentiated. The following criteria are listed to assist in
classifying an item as a supply or as equipment.

Criteria for Supply Items

A supply is an article or material which meets any one or more of the
following conditions:

...It is consumed in use;

...It loses its original shape or appearance with use;

...It is expendable; that is, if the article is damaged or some of its
parts are lost or worn out, it is usually more feasible to replace
it with an entirely new unit rather than repair it;

...It is an inexpensive item having characteristics of equipment whose
small unit cost makes it inadvisable to capitalize the item;

...It loses its identify through incorporation into a different or
more complex unit or substance.


1See Appendix 10 for Order Blanks.







Criteria for Equipment Items

An equipment item is a moveable or fixed unit of furniture or
furnishings, an instrument, a machine, an apparatus, or a set of articles
which meets all of the following conditions:

...It retains its original shape and appearance with use;

...It is non-expendable; that is, if the article is damaged or
some of its parts are lost or worn out, it is usually more
feasible to repair it rather than replace it with an entirely
new unit;

...It represents an investment of money which makes it feasible
and advisable to capitalize the item;

...It does not lose its identity through incorporation into a
different or more complex unit or substance.


FUNDING


Funding processes--whether local, State, or Federal--involve much
time. If a teacher expects to have adequate facilities, equipment, and
supplies when the first student enters the classroom, proposal requests
must be submitted well in advance of the opening date for class. It is
important to prevent delays by using the correct forms, following all
instructions carefully, and meeting all deadline dates.

If funds are needed for a home economics wage-earning program, the
school principal should request that a proposal be written into the
County Plan which is due in the State Department of Education annually in
March. The proposal must list a total sum for the program for each of the
following:

...Salaries;

...Travel;

...Equipment;

...Instructional supplies;

...Other expenses.

The county home economics supervisor, vocational director, and area
home economics supervisor should be informed of this proposal. If assistance
is needed in any preparation of proposals or projects, these persons are
available.

All proposals are reviewed by the Area Vocational Committee which is
composed of a representative of each of the seven vocational disciplines
and the area coordinator. If a proposal is approved by the Area Committee
and the Vocational Division of the State Department of Education, an
invitation is issued to the county to submit a project.






The project is submitted on Form VTAD-2 which has complete
instructions. Detailed requests for salaries, travel, and supplies and
equipment are attached on Forms VTAD-2A, VTAD-2B, and VTAD-2C. When
the project forms are completed, they are returned to the county office
for the required signatures and then routed to the Director of the
Vocational, Technical and Adult Education Division of the State Department
of Education. The project is reviewed by the area home economics
supervisor, State home economics occupational consultant, program
administrator, and other divisional personnel before final approval is made.

When approved, the project is returned to the county office.
Equipment and supplies are usually purchased through the county purchasing
agent.


Salaries


Form VTAD-2A is an attachment request for salary reimbursement which
is to be used only when a vocational unit is not available. Do not include
a request for any salaries for any personnel who are not properly qualified
for the position for which they are employed. Salaries for non-professional
personnel such as secretaries, clerks, janitors, lunchroom workers, school
bus drivers, or mechanics will not be approved.


Travel


Attachment Form VTAD-2B is a request proposal for local travel
expenses. Again, the funds are available to only properly qualified
personnel. If travel for wage-earning home economics programs is approved
it may include trips to:

...Interview prospective employers;

...Supervise work experiences;

...Confer with consultants or resource persons;

...Interview advisory committee members;

...Interview prospective students and their parents;

...Attend conferences and workshops;

...Make field trips.


Supplies and Equipment


Requests for supplies and equipment are made on attachment Form VTAD-2C.
It is advisable to:

...Separate equipment and supplies;






...Keep all similar items together, preferably placed under a heading
such as "children's books;"

...Total each page separately;

...Show a grand total on last page;

...Check to know that items that cannot be purchased with project
funds have not been placed on the list;1

...Give complete educational specifications on each item requested,
particularly large items. (Careful stipulations of features
in the education specifications are often instrumental in
acquiring desired equipment because, generally, items costing over
$300 must be purchased on bid);

...Give justification of purchase if an item is a very new or
unfamiliar one or there is a possibility it may not be fundable;

...Give current unit and total cost.

Some items cannot be classified as supplies or equipment for
reimbursement. Do not include the following:


...Equipment or materials used for construction of facilities;

...Cost of site;

...Building repair or minor renovation;

...Cost of selling bonds or revenue certificates.

When completing the forms, it is essential that they be accurate.
Allow one year from the date a proposal is submitted in the County Plan
until the equipment and supplies are received and ready for use in the
classroom.

There are approximately 20 steps involved in the processing of a
project from the time it leaves the teacher until it returns to the county.
Therefore, to facilitate processing and avoid deletion of items, very
careful consideration should be given to the preparation of the projects
and expenditure of the allocated funds.

It is most important to include the following information about the
program:

...A statement of objectives;

...Identification of the group to be served such as age, grade level,
sex, special need, handicapped, or others;

...If it is a wage-earning program, or consumer and homemaking education;

...Identification of expected accomplishments of the program in relation
to equipment and supplies requested.








WAGE EARNING YOUTH CLUBS


An essential part of every vocational home economics program is the
chapter of Future Homemakers of America. On the Form C filed by the
teacher each October is the statement, "Each department of home economics
education shall have a chapter of Future Homemakers of America. Where
circumstances make it impossible to meet this requirement a request for a
waiver must be submitted by the District Superintendent of Schools to the
Division Director."

The wage-earning home economics teacher has the opportunity to choose
between two types of FHA chapters. She may affiliate her students with
the FHA State and national organizations through either a regular FHA
chapter or through a HERO-FHA chapter. The HERO (Home Economics Related
Occupations) FHA chapter is exclusively for wage-earning home economics
students. A regular FHA chapter is for both consumer and homemaking students
and wage-earning home economics students. Wage-earning students in a
regular FHA chapter still have the option of wearing the special HERO guard
with their FHA pin.

Correlating FHA and class experiences provides an opportunity for wage-
earning teachers to extend their students' learning time and provide
greater variety or depth to material.

As the operational details or HERO-FHA chapters are completed and
more information becomes available this information will be shared with
teachers throughout the State. Watch for articles in the Florida Future
Homemaker magazine, the current Florida FHA Chapter Handbook, "Happenings
in Florida Home Economics" and various information packets during the year.


PUBLICIZING WAGE-EARNING PROGRAMS


One of the most often heard criticisms of the statewide home economics
program is lack of publicity. The general public is unaware of the change
in program emphases. The image of home economics still remains one of
"stitching and stirring" in many parts of the State.

It is imperative that an aggressive public relations campaign be an
integral part of each wage-earning program. This adds prestige to the
program participants, informs the public and aids in recruiting students.
The advisory committee can be most helpful in this endeavor.


EVALUATION


Evaluation is a process used to measure the extent to which educational
goals have been accomplished. It entails more than just the measurement of
subject matter through the use of quizzes and examinations. The wage-earning
home economics teacher must also consider the student in relation to
aspects of skill development, work attitudes, personal development and
social relationships, all of which interact to determine job success.
Objective measurement is a problem and a challenge because student attain-
ment often cannot be adequately determined by paper-and-pencil tests.






Teachers will need to examine their own interpretations and processes
of evaluation to determine whether they are compatible with the role of
home economics wage-earning programs, student and employer needs and
expectations, democratic ideals, effects of ethnic cultures upon individuals
and groups, and the way individuals grow and learn. The alert teacher
knows that classroom learning experiences cannot be isolated from home,
job, and community experiences.

Living in today's world is too complex for teachers to be satisfied
with preparing students who can function only in the classroom. The nature
of 4age-earning education demands that students be prepared to function in
the confusion, frustration, and complexity of the work-world. The
student may need help in evaluating his own successes or failures on the job
in relation to his personal, family, and community experiences.

To be effective, evaluation must not be the sole responsibility of the
teacher but a cooperative effort with students and employers, and, ideally,
with other teachers, administrators, parents, and advisory committee
members. The methods and interpretations of specific evaluations must be
sufficiently flexible to allow for the many variables present from group
to group and within the same group.

Evaluation must be an integral, daily part of the teaching-learning
process rather than isolated as a final course exercise. This insures
planned, continuous, and on-going evaluation rather than spasmodic or
periodic exposure. It cannot be concerned with fixed answers, but rather
with the gaining of information which will prepare the student to adjust
to varied situations encountered on the job.

Care must be given to select evaluation methods which encourage
growth and give security rather than cause dissatisfaction, aggressiveness,
or fear. Evaluators must develop skill in conducting objective observation
techniques of classroom, laboratory, and on-the-job experiences because
value judgments are constantly made in these situations.

If evaluation is closely related to the objectives of the curriculum,
continuous modification of curriculum is simplified. Evaluation can give
the teacher a basis for developing learning experiences, modifying course
plans, and selecting appropriate references and teaching materials.

Some objectives for evaluation in a program designed to prepare
individuals for wage-earning are:

...To select students by assessing the basic abilities of persons
desiring to enroll in the program;

...To determine needs and backgrounds of the students as one basis
for setting specific goals for the course;

...To measure the extent to which the students achieve the goals of
the course.

If evaluative activities do not result in changes for student, teacher,
or program improvement, there is little reason to carry them out.






Some of the means of evaluating which might be effective are:


...Informal teacher-student interviews;

...Student appraisal by using rating scales, check lists, or self-
reports to indicate the level or quality of accomplishments;

...Written evaluation instruments administered to students from
the vocational counselor's office;

...Observation of skills in laboratory or on-the-job assignments;

...Job placement;

...Job follow-up.

The ultimate evaluation of any wage-earning program is determined
by the number of students who are placed in jobs for which they are
trained and the number who continue to function successfully within those
jobs.


JOB PLACEMENT


It is important that a student be placed in a job situation where
he can best use his abilities and his training as well as progress in the
job. Some schools assume the responsibility of placing students in suitable
positions upon completion of a wage-earning program. It is becoming
necessary for more schools to assume more responsibility in job placement.

Whenever possible, the person responsible for the wage-earning
program in the school, with the assistance of the regular staff members,
should take the primary responsibility for the placement of students.
These people are in the best position to evaluate the students' abilities.
Additional help might be provided by other teachers, guidance counselors,
businessmen in the area or community, employment services, or members of
the advisory committee.

The following are some suggestions for helping the student find a job:

...During the training period, the staff should learn about each
student's special job interests;

...Aptitude tests might be administered to help identify a student's
special abilities;

...The instructor should keep an evaluation file on each student for
ready reference in suggesting applicants for certain types of jobs;

...Television and radio programs and newspaper articles should be
planned to publicize the abilities of the students;

...Contacts with professional and business organizations and publicly
supported agencies should be maintained;






...Contacts with-the local office of the Florida State Employment
Service should be made for job opportunity suggestions within
the area and in more distant communities;

...The staff should obtain a list of prospective employers and ask
them to serve as guest lecturers or discussion leaders;

...Interviews should be arranged for students with employers, managers,
and personnel directors who might have jobs available;

...Organize and job placement service as a function of the school.
(Regular staff members of wage-earning programs should serve as
consultants.)


JOB FOLLOW-UP


Job follow-up is the most effective method of program evaluation,
hence it is imperative that it be included as an integral part of a home
economics wage-earning program. Follow-up of job successes and failures
provides the best possible information to the school on its strengths and
weaknesses.

If teachers and administrators are interested in program improvement,
they will not be content to end their obligations when a student completes
the last course. At lease one job follow-up is necessary about one year
after graduation. The number and frequency of additional surveys will be
dependent upon the availability of staff and secretarial time. Once
every five years is recommended.1

The following information about former students can be pertinent for
program evaluation:

...The number who are currently employed;

...The average length of time employed;

...The number employed in jobs for which they were trained;

...The number who consider their wage-earning courses beneficial for
job performance and/or job advancement;

...The parts of the wage-earning programs which proved the most and
the least beneficial;

...Recommendations for better wage-earning programs;

...The possible reasons for unemployment.

Legislation for vocational education has been passed with accountability
in terms of successful job placement as a recurring stipulation. Currently


ISee Appendix 7 for Sample of Follow-up Survey Questionnaire







the State Board of Education is required by law to adopt regulations
stating minimum requirements and to adopt procedures for determining the
extent to which such minimum requirements have been met. The Legislature
has specifically requested an examination of the following:

...Employment performance of program participants;

...Standards of educational output with emphasis upon job
placement and satisfactory performance in employment.1

The State Commissioner of Education, thirty days prior to each regular
legislative session, must submit a status report of the programs which
have been funded under the vocational improvement fund. As a part of
this report he must include output of the projects undertaken, and
where possible, in quantifiable terms.2

Local educators will be expected to furnish job follow-up data to
assist in the compilation of such reports. To date, the processes have
not been officially determined although suggested forms have been
developed by State level personnel and are being field-tested.


LEGAL RESPONSIBILITIES


Wage-earning home economics programs must be operated in conformity
with local, State, and Federal laws. It is the teacher's responsibility
to be informed and, in turn, to inform the students about laws and reg-
ulations which relate to employment. Local personnel of the State
Employment Service will prove helpful to teachers for familiarizing
themselves with the necessary information.

It is especially important that secondary program teachers be well
informed about child labor laws, procedures for obtaining work permits,
and policies regarding parental approval for field trips and on-the-job
training. Insurance regulations and procedures are important, especially
if students are transported. Sanitation requirements, such as a health
card or food handler's certificate, must be met for various occupations.

Information concerning State employment laws and regulations can be
obtained from the Field Services Bureau of Workman's Compensation of the
Florida Department of Commerce, Caldwell Building, Tallahassee, Florida 32304,
phone 904-599-8261.

The United State Department of Labor in Washington, D.C. provides
bulletins covering both State and Federal laws and regulations through
the following divisions:

...Bureau of Labor Standards;


IFlorida, State Department of Education. Florida School Laws
(Tallahassee, Florida: 1970), Sec. 233.0682, p. 89.

2Ibid., Sec. 233.069, p. 89.







...Manpower Administration;


...Wage and Labor Standards Administration;

...Women's Bureau;

...Wage and Hour and Public Contracts Division. (This
division has branch offices where personal appointments can
be scheduled in the following cities: Clearwater, Cocoa,
Ft. Lauderdale, Ft. Meyers, Jacksonville, Lakeland, Leesburg,
Miami, North Miami, Orlando, Ormond Beach, Panama City,
Pensacola, St. Petersburg, Tampa, and West Palm Beach.)















APPENDIX


PAGE

1. Definition of Terms 58

2. Sample Letter to Prospective Advisory Committee
Members 63

3. Check list for Organizing Advisory Committees 64

4. Sample Occupational Survey Questionnaire 67

5. Samples Student-Interest Survey Questionnaire 70

6. Sample Copy of Letter Sent to Parents 74

7. Student Application Form 75

8. List of Items Not Approved for Funding

9. Sample Follow-Up Survey Questionnaire

10. Order Blanks







Appendix 1


Definition of Terms



To avoid confusion which may be caused by differing

interpretations, the following definitions will be used for clarification of

the terms used throughout this publication:

ACCOUNTABILITY--evidence provided to substantiate that the money
spent on education has resulted in constructive learning.

ACCREDITATION--the approval granted by the State Department of
Education to a county school system for meeting predetermined standards.

ADULT EDUCATION PROGRAMS--those classes planned for students
sixteen years old or older who are not enrolled in a secondary program.

ADVISORY COMMITTEE--a group of qualified individuals acting as
consultants to school personnel to help them plan educational programs
based upon the needs of the students and community.

AFFECTIVE SKILLS--those behaviors used to express attitudes, interests,
and appreciations.

BEHAVIORAL OBJECTIVE--the description of an instructional intent
expressed in such a way that the post-instruction behavior of the learner
is defined.

CAREER BASE--the fundamental job competencies which will prepare a
person to enter a variety of jobs which require similar skills and
understandings.

CLUSTER--the grouping together of competencies common to several
related occupations.

COGNITIVE SKILLS--those intellectual behaviors indicating knowledge,
understanding and education.

CONTINUUM--a planned sequence of levels of learning for specific
subject matter content.

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION--a program for persons who are enrolled in
school and who, through a cooperative arrangement between the school
and employers, receive instruction in the school and on-the-job training
through part-time employment.








COUNTY PLAN--an agreement between a county board for vocational
education and the State Department of Education describing (1) the
vocational education program developed by the county to meet its own
needs and conditions and (2) the conditions under which the county will
use appropriated funds.

COURSE--an organized series of experiences to be conducted during a
specified period of time to meet stated objectives.

CURRICULUM--all the experiences designed to facilitate learning in a
designated field of study.

EDUCATIONAL SPECIFICATIONS--written detailed descriptions of the
equipment, supplies, or facilities which are necessary to fulfill selected
learning needs.

EMPLOYABILITY SKILLS--the personal competencies which are basic to
performance on any job.

EVALUATION--the process used to measure the extent to which educational
goals are being accomplished.

FLOW-CHART--a diagram providing information regarding the sequence and
intent of identified items.

GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT--the occupations in the competitive labor market,
the practice of a profession, self-employment, homemaking, farm or
family work (including work for which payment is in kind rather than
in cash), sheltered employment, and home industries or other gainful
homebound work.1

JOB--any work, either mental or manual, which has a specific set of
duties, responsibilities, and conditions which are different from other
work assignments.

JOB ANALYSIS--an identification of tasks based upon a careful study of
an occupation to determine its unique characteristics.

JOB COMPETENCIES--the skills, knowledge, and attitudes necessary to
accomplish a specified task or tasks.

JOB FOLLOW-UP--a survey made to determine what occupations the former
students of vocational education courses enter and how effective their
training was in relation to their performance on the job.


1U.S., Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Office of
Education. Federal Register, Vol. XXXI, No. 9 (January 14, 1966).








JOB TITLE--a distinctive term for defined tasks related to a particular
occupation.

MINIMUM FOUNDATION UNIT--a monetary base established by the State
Legislature for appropriating funds to county school systems.

OCCUPATIONAL SURVEY--a study conducted to determine employment
opportunities and needs in a specified community.

OUT-OF-SCHOOL xDUTH AND ADULTS--persons who are not enrolled in a
high school although they may or may not have a high school diploma.

PART-TIME TEACHERS--certified personnel hired by a school board to
teach a specific subject for a specified number of periods which may be
less than a full day in school.

POLICY--a definite course or method of action stated to guide and
determine present and future conditions and decisions.

PROGRAM--one or more courses designed to prepare students for
employment in an occupation.

PROJECT--a request for specific amounts of money needed for individual
salaries, travel, equipment, and instructional supplies necessary to
implement or continue a program. Written educational justification may
or may not be required.

PROPOSAL--a request for total amounts of money needed for salaries,
travel, equipment, and instructional supplies necessary to implement a
program. A proposal must be approved before a project can be submitted.

PSYCHOMOTOR SKILLS--those behaviors that primarily involve manipulation
or motor activity.

QUALIFICATION--any natural endowments or acquirements which fit a person
for employment.

REQUIREMENT--any necessity or demand to be fulfilled by a person desiring
employment.

SCHOOL PLANT SURVEY--a systematic study of the present school plant
facilities and the determination of future needs. The survey is restricted
to school plant facilities; no judgment of the instructional program is made
nor is such judgment to be inferred.

SECONDARY PROGRAMS--classes planned for grades six through twelve.

SEMI-SKILLED OCCUPATIONS--those manual occupations which require dexterity
limited to a well-defined work routine which does not require important
decisions or extensive training.







SEMI-PROFESSIONAL OCCUPATIONS--those occupations which require a
high degree of mental ability. Some college education is a necessary
qualification.

SKILLED OCCUPATIONS--those craft or manual occupations which require
a thorough knowledge of the processes involved in the work. The workers
exercise independent judgment, a high degree of manual dexterity and
responsibility for valuable products or equipment. Apprenticeship or
extensive training is usually necessary for qualification.

SERVICE OCCUPATIONS--those occupations which provide assistance to
others.

SPECIAL NEEDS STUDENTS--students who have been assessed according to
specific criteria as possessing characteristics that require special
attention in the school.

TASK ANALYSIS--the identification of skills essential to the performance
of a specified task.

TEACHER CERTIFICATION--the approval action, based upon minimum standards
adopted in the State, interpreted by legally authorized persons, on the
professional and technical qualifications of a teacher. A certificate
permits that individual to teach in a designated situation.

TRAINING STATION--a business or industry in the community in which a
student is working as a part of a cooperative education program.

VOCATIONAL EDUCATION--training or retraining which is given in schools
or classes (including field or laboratory work and remedial or related
academic and technical instruction) under public supervision and control
or under contract with a State board or local educational agency for gainful
employment as semi-skilled or skilled workers or technicians or sub-
professionals in recognized occupations and in new and emerging occupa-
tions.1 The instruction not leading to a baccalaureate degree either
graded or ungraded, listed as follows: (1) Instruction which is given
to persons for the purpose of developing occupational proficiency
necessary for gainful employment. (2) Instruction in exploratory courses
designed to familiarize persons with the world of work and motivating
them to pursue courses in vocational education. (3) Instruction in
industrial arts. (4) Instruction in vocationally oriented home economics.



1U. S. Congress, "Vocational Education Amendments of 1968,"
Public Law 576, 90th Cong. (1968), 6.

21970 House Bill 3897, Amendment to Section 228.041.







VOCATIONAL IMPROVEMENT FUND--monies established by the State
Legislature to be appropriated to county school systems for priority
projects for the development of (1) vocational education programs for
the disadvantaged, (2) introductory curricula for junior and middle
schools, (3) training and in-service projects for improving vocational
counseling, (4) the career associate program, (5) job placement services
for graduates of vocational education programs, (6) training, in-service,
and recruiting projects for vocational teachers, and (7) supportive
personnel and projects.1

VOCATIONAL UNIT--a monetary base established by the State Legislature
for appropriating funds to a county school system for approved voca-
tional courses or programs.

WAGE-EARNING HOME ECONOMICS PROGRAMS--a course or courses designed to
prepare students to earn money in jobs using home economics knowledge
and skills.

WORK EXPERIENCES--on-the-job training for a student, provided either
by the school or an employer in the community.


Florida, State Department of Education.
(Tallahassee, Florida: 1970), Sec. 233.096, pg. 89.


Florida School Laws






Appendix 2


Copy of sample letter to prospective advisory board member.





Name of Individual
Business Address

Dear

Occupational Home Economics programs work closely with
advisory committees. These committees are composed of representatives
of various trades, businesses, and professions. The purposes
of the advisory committees are to assist in keeping education
and training tuned to the needs of employers and students preparing
for employment and to foster community understanding of and support
for these programs.

It is our wish to have the benefit of your service for the
coming year as a member of the advisory
committee. You will be notified of the time and place of the first
meeting. (first meeting may be scheduled here.)

Please indicate your reply on the attached form and return
to me.


Superintendent or Principal


Teacher


Superintendent
School Address


or Principal


( ) I will accept the committee appointment.
( ) I will not be able to accept the committee appointment.


Signed


- -





Appendix 3


HELPFUL INFORMATION ABOUT ADVISORY COMMITTEES


What are the advantages of using advisory committees?

...Advice on local codes;
...Advice about new methods and materials;
...Assist with public relations;
...Help with evaluation of courses;
...Help to provide instructional materials;
...Assist with job placement of graduates and students;
...Help with course content -- keep up to date;
...Help sell school administrators on need for wage-earning programs;
...Encourage industry to begin to come to the school for help;
...Protect from pressure and criticism;
...Help in area of safety.


What challenges do wage-earning teachers have in using committees?

...Getting right people;
...Getting members to come to meetings;
...Working effectively with committees.


Organization of advisory committee:

...Number of members (five or six recommended plus school staff members;
...Representation of all interested (employers and employees)


Committee Meetings

...How often?
At least one each semester and more if necessary


Preparation of Agenda:

...Who should prepare it?
Chairman and instructor or supervisor
...Where to get ideas for Agenda?
Minutes of last meeting for old business and reports, if any
Examine program problems
Check trends in news publications and in actual local activity


Order of Business

...Call to order;
...Reading of minutes;
...Unfinished business;
...Reports;
...Progress report (any improvement made-instructor tells what has
happened in course);
...New business;
...Committee appointments or individual assignments;
...Announcement of next meeting; 64
...Adjourn;






Suggestions for First Meeting of the Year


...Make introductions;
...Familiarize with program objectives, policies and procedure;
...Present course outline;
...Tour of laboratory facilities;
...Invite director or principals to talk to group;
...Have retained members explain such things as purpose of committees;
Accomplishments
Plans for future
...Briefly explain wage-earning program as related to total school program.


Suggestions for Meeting to Consider a New Course

...Necessity of the program;
...Present survey or make plans for survey;
Opportunities for employment
Number of people interested
...Estimate costs physical facilities needed, etc.;
...Recommendations for implementation of course;
...Recommendations for prospective instructors;
...Suggestions for equipment needs;
...Suggestions for course outline.


Minutes of Committee Meetings

...Secretary is responsible
Wage-earning teacher should volunteer to keep minutes
Send copy of minutes to each member after each meeting


Call Advisory Committee Meetings

...Check for convenient time;
...Send notice as far in advance as possible with a copy of the agenda;
...Follow-up with reminder on day of meeting.


How to Keep Committees Active and Meetings Interesting

...Keep discussion on problem;
...Tactfully discontinue discussion when it becomes repetitive;
...Accept and use advice in program planning;
Show what has happened as a result of committee participation
Report success of students
...Keep informed about activities;
Progress report at meeting
Send out bulletins between meetings
...Meal meetings or refreshments if convenient;
...Invite committee to attend class or class sponsored social affairs;
...Recognition of committee;
Encourage members to set a time for adjournment and hold to it
Write letters of appreciation to retiring members
Include recognition of committee members in school publication where
appropriate
...Notify the newspaper about new committee appointments






...Meetings should be organized but conducted in an informal atmosphere;
...Lay person should be chairman;
...Do not ask for q vote this is an advisory committee decisions
are made according to school policy by school personnel involved
...Request resource persons or resource material suggestions;
...Request list of special services each member feels that he might render
to the program.





Appendix 4


GUIDELINES IN MAKING OCCUPATIONAL SURVEYS


Purpose of Survey

It is important that caution be used in the conducting of a survey.
Each person who participates in the survey should know the purpose of the
study and the use of the information gathered. Tactfulness in obtaining
information should be observed, and there should be a respect for the
ethics of interviewing.

The following information should be supplied to each person interviewed:

...Specific occupations to be studied;

...Specific data to be obtained on the particular occupation or
occupations to be surveyed

...Time schedule for all portions of the survey

...Plan for tabulating and analyzing the data


Listed below are suggestions of types of information that might be obtained
through surveys if this data is needed:

...General information on present and potential employment of workers
in specific occupational categories including replacement and growth
needs

How many persons are employed for the specific job being surveyed?

What is the anticipated increase in the number of employees?

SIs there any anticipated drop off in the number of employees?

What is the turn over annually?

In what occupations are workers in especially short supply?

What are the present sources of supply used by the employers to find
new workers?

How do employers get people to fill their vacancies?

Does the employer have many applications to fill this type of job?

What is the number and the type of employed workers who need training
to update and/or upgrade their skills and knowledge?

What would be the opportunity for advancement after further training
is received?




Specific Information

...Data concerning expectations of the employee in specific occupations

What are the responsibilities of the worker?

What are the requirements of the job? (What is the worker
expected to do on the job? What are the specific requirements
as to health?)

What are the skills, abilities, and personal qualities needed?

What information is the worker required to know?

What are some common problems with employees that training programs
can help to solve?


...Data on training for the job

What training programs are provided by the employer on the job and/or
pre-training?

Could some or most of the training be done in an occupational training
course?

Would the employer be more willing to employ a trained person?

Would the employer be willing to pay an increased salary to workers
if they were trained?

Would the employer be interested in having a person (student or
learner) as a trainee?


...Data on policies, practices, and conditions of employment

What is the rate of pay?

What are the working hours?

What are the fringe benefits?

uniforms sick leave vacations

insurance retirement overtime

What are the opportunities for promotion?

What are the age limitations?





Sample Only


COMMUNITY SURVEY


Kind of Business Date

Kind of Firm Address

Person Interviewed Phone

1. How many full-time employees do you have?

a. Management: Full-t

b. Supervisory: Full-t

c. Sales: Full-t

d. Food Service Worker: Full-t

e. Child Care Aides: Full-t

f. Sewing Service: Full-t

g. Home Furnishings Services: Full-t

h. Home and Institutional Service: Full-t

i. Others: Full-t

2. How many replacements do you estimate you will n


ime

ime

ime

ime

ime

ime

ime

ime

ime

eec


Part-time?

SPart-time

Part-time

Part-time

Part-time

Part-time

Part-time

Part-time

Part-time

Part-time

1 in the next year?


In which categories?

3. How many high school students do you presently employ?

4. If none, have you ever employed students? Yes- No

5. Would you be interested in learning more about a program designed to

train employees for your type of business? Yes No

6. Would you be interested in learning more about the availability of

training for your present employees? Yes No


COMMENTS


Of Person Interviewed:


By Coordinator:





Appendix 5A


School


DAte

SURVEY OF STUDENT INTEREST

IN

HOME ECONOMICS RELATED OCCUPATIONS

Child Guidance, Care and Services
Clothing Management, Production and Services
Food Management, Production and Services
Home Furnishings, Equipment and Services
Institutional and Home Management and Supportive Services


What are your plans after high school? Are you planning for college, marriage,
or getting a job? If it is employment you want, how well prepared are you to get and
hold a job? Are you trained in any skills which qualify you for entrance into the
world of work?

Would you be interested in enrolling in a wage earning program in a Home
Economics related occupation if one were made available to you? Brief descriptions
of possible course offerings are included here for your corrideration:


CHILD GUIDANCE, CARE AND SERVICES

This course will focus on the occupational preparation for a child care
aide. It will prepare students for employment as aides in Child Day
Care Centers, Head Start programs, kindergartens or for self-employment
in their own homes. The student will identify the basic needs of children in a
group and exhibit the ability to meet these needs. The student will
receive supervised work experience in a laboratory situation or in a
nursery school or kindergarten in the community.

CLOTHING MANAGEMENT, PRODUCTION AND SERVICES

The opportunity will be given to the student to develop skills necessary
in altering ready-to-wear garments. Manufacturer's construction techniques,
alterations and special sewing problems, pressing, working procedures
and employer-employee relationships will be studied to help the student
develop saleable skills.

FOOD MANAGEMENT, PRODUCTION AND SERVICES

Orientation into the food service industry is the theme of this course.
The student will explore the job opportunities, describe the personal
characteristics of a food service worker and plan, prepare and serve
food using commercial techniques.

HOME FURNISHING, EQUIPMENT AND SERVICES

This course is designed to provide information to students who
are preparing to work in home furnishings. Information relative to
textiles and products used in home furnishings, home furnishing and
equipment design, source of product information and the application of
this information to this field, construction of draperies, bedspreads,
pillows, slipcovers and re-upholstery along with maintenance techniques
are included.





INSTITUTIONAL AND HOME MANAGEMENT AND SUPPORTIVE SERVICES

This course is designed to supply a student with knowledge and skills
to become employable as an aide within a home or similar institution.
The student identifies and demonstrates skills in handling emergencies,
dealing with people abd providing adequate care for the elderly and
disabled, use and carte of equipment, child care, preparation and service
of food and basic laundry and housecleaning procedures.
From these course descriptions which wage earning program do you think would
interest you most? (check one)

A. Child Guidance, Care and Services

B. Clothing Management, Production and Services

C. Food Management, Production and Services

D. Home Furnishings, Equipment and Services

E. Institutional and Home Management and Supportive Services

To help with the planning for these courses, would you answer these
questions:

1. If a course were offered to prepare you for the job which you checked,
would you be interested in taking this course? (check one)

A. Yes, I am definitely interested

B. I am interested, but want more information

C. I am not sure

D. No, I am not interested

2. Would you like to go into this kind of work after you get out of school?
(check one)

A. Yes, I am definitely interested

B. I am interested, but want more information

C. I am not sure

D. No, I am not interested

3. Indicate

A. Grade level

B. Sex

C. Age


4. Check the Home Economics Courses you have had:

7th and/or 8th grade Home Economics
Home Economics.I._
Semester Courses ini




Appendix 5B


In preparing student interest survey forms, consideration should be
given to factors which may limit wage earning course offerings such as:

...The teacher's expertise in a special area;

...Availability of facility, space and equipment;

...Class schedule arrangement.

It may be advisable to limit the scope of the student interest survey to
a limited number of wage earning offerings.

The course descriptions included in this bulletin may be helpful in
developing such a form.


(sample)
School

Date

SURVEY OF STUDENT INTEREST

IN

CLOTHING MANAGEMENT, PRODUCTION AND SERVICES

What are your plans after high school? Are you planning for college, marriage,
or getting a job? If it is employment you want, how well prepared are you to get
and hold a job? Are you trained in any skills which qualify you for entrance into
the world of work?

Would you be interested in enrolling in a wage earning program in Clothing
Management, Production and Services if one were made available to you next year?
A brief description of possible course offerings is included here for your
consideration:

Clothing Management, Production and Services courses are designed to
provide the student with the basic knowledge, attitudes and skills
needed for employment in a variety of clothing services. Students have
the opportunity to: (1) identify the various types of employment avail-
able in clothing management, production and services; and (2) develop
skills in such specific areas as:

professional dressmaking
specialty sewing
alterations
fashion design
product knowledge for merchandizing

The operation and care of domestic and commercial sewing machines and other
sewing equipment; pressing techniques as they relate to a variety of fabrics;
routine care of clothing; special care problems in wardrobe maintenance; design
(line, shape, texture and color) as related to clothing selection, construction,
fitting and alterations; and management of human and material resource will be
included in each course in proportion to objectives set for that course.








From these course descriptions which wage earning program do you think would
interest you most? (check one)

A. Child Guidance, Care and Services

B. Clothing Management, Production and Services

C. Food Management, Production and Services

D. Home Furnishings, Equipment and Services

E. Institutional and Home Management and Supportive Services

To help with the planning for these courses, would you answer these
questions:

1. If a course were offered to prepare you for the job which you checked,
would you be interested in taking this course? (check one)

A. Yes, I am definitely interested

B. I am interested, but want more information

C. I am not sure

D. No, I am not interested

2. Would you like to go into this kind of work after you get out of school?
(check one)

A. Yes, I am definitely interested

B. I am interested, but want more information

C. I am not sure

D. No, I am not interested

3. Indicate

A. Grade level

B. Sex


C. Age

4. Check the Home Economics Courses you have had:

7th and/or 8th grade Home Economics
Home Economics I___
Semester Courses in:




Appendix 6


SAMPLE COPY OF A LETTER SENT TO PARENTS



Dear Parent:

The Home Economics Department of High School
has expanded its program to include a wage-earning home economics course
to prepare students to enter the food service industry.

This course is designed to:

...Identify those secondary students, boys and girls, who are qualified
for training and to acquaint them with the opportunities for a career
in food service work;

...Be incorporated into a regular secondary curriculum;

...Utilize an active Advisory Committee from industry to serve in a
consultative capacity on the development and progress of this program;

...Produce interested, alert young people who listen, follow instructions,
and take pride in a respected and growing profession. Their skills and
background should permit them to obtain entry level jobs and stimulate
them to continue training and learning through apprentice and on-the-
job programs;

...Encourage qualified graduates to continue their education at a vocational
center, a junior college or university specializing in food service
courses.

If your child is interested and has your approval to participate in this
program, please sign the enclosed permission slip and return to your vocational
guidance counselor by the last day of school. It is to be returned with a
completed application form.

Sincerely yours,



Home Economics Teacher

Cut here-----------------------------------------------------------------------

Student's name: has talked to me about
wishing to enroll in home economics wage-earning program. I approve and will
cooperate with the program if my child is selected to participate.

Date Parent's Signature

Student's Signature





Appendix 7


Personal Data and Student Application Form
for wage earning home economics course
CONFIDENTIAL

Directions: Print all information. Answer each question.


Date


Attach
Photo
Here


Last First Middle

Homeroom No. Counselor Yr. in School_

Address Phone

Social Security No. _Date of Birth / /

Name of father or guardian Occupation
(Cross out one)
Home
Home Address Business Address Phone

Mother's name Occupation
Home
Home Address Business Address Phone
(if outside the home)

Health Condition: Please check one: excellent good fair poor

Height Weight

Physical handicaps: sight hearing limb body heart specify
other

You have brothers and sisters.

Are you now employed? yes no. If yes, state firm and address:


When did you begin this job? Duties:

Hours per week: Hourly rate: Weekly pay:

Other work experience:

Employer Duties Length of Employment

Employer Duties Length of Employment






References: (one must be a Physical Education Instructor, only one
other may be a teacher).
Name Address Phone Occupation

1.

2.

3.

Request that they send letters of recommendation to:


List your outstanding abilities, talents and strong points:



List your weak points:

What do you like to do in your spare time?


What school subjects do you enjoy most? Why?


What school subjects do you enjoy least? Why?


List Home Economics courses you are taking or have taken:





List clubs and organizations of which you are a member (in and out of school):







Do you have transportation available for field trips? yes no

What do you plan to do after high school? (Please check)

job college marriage further training (specify)






Student's signature




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